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Speculation Still Lives On 

^Quincy's' Amelia Ear) 
Lost 50 Years Ago 






■y ROIERT BOSWORTH 

Fifty years ago today 
(Thursday), Quincy's and 
America's most Tamous 
female flyer was lost near 
Howland Island in the 
Pacific Ocean on an 
attempted around-the- 
world flight. , 

When Amelia Earhart 
and co-pilot Fred Noonan 
vanished mysteriously 
July 2, 1937, it sparked 
much speculation as to the 
circumstances surrounding 
the disappearance. 

A half century later, that 



speculation is still here. 

The twin-engine Lock- 
heed had reached the two- 
third mark of the around- 
the-world goal when it 
suddenly and mysteriously 
vanished that July 2. 

Some claim she and 
Noonan were on a spy 
mission for the U.S. 
checking out Japanese 
military bases in the 
Pacific. They note this was 
just four years before the 
Japanese sneak attacked 
Pearl Harbor. 

And, they say, the plane 



ran out of fuel and crashed 
in the ocean. Earhart and 
Noonan, according to the 
way they tell it, were 
picked up by the Japanese 
and executed. 

There were stories 
during World War 11 that a 
"white woman and man" 
were executed on an island 
that year. 

There has also been 
speculation down through 
the years that Amelia 
Earhart was actually alive. 

In fact, just a few years 
ago there were reports she 



had been seen in Chicago. 

She was 39 when she 
disappeared. She would 
have been 89 this month. 

But in 1981 while 
speaking to a standing- 
room-only audience at the 
Quincy Historical Society, 
Earhart's sister. Mrs. 
Muriel Morrissey spiked 
the speculation and 
rumors which she called 
"nonsense." 

She said that fatigue and 
bad weather probably 
teamed to bring the plane 
(C.oni'd on Page 5) 




AMELIA EARHART 




vol.. 19 No. 4« • 56 Pages. 2 Sections 




Thursda). Jul) 2, 1987 



McCauley, LaRaia 
Mix It Up 

Viettiam War Memorial ^ver Resignation 



Estimated Cost $500,000 

Work Underway 
On Clock Tower 



ina onnD 



DO 

oa 

DO 



O'Conncll Development 
Company of Quincy is 
creating a $500,000 85-foot 
brick and granite clock 
tower memorial at Marina 
Bay. in Squantum. to honor 
all the men and women of 
Quincy who are missing in 
action or who died while 
serving in the Vietnam War. 

O'Connell Development 
Company has compiled the 
names of those veterans who 
either listed their permanent 
address as Quincy or lived in 
Quincy for most of their lives. 
These Vietnam veterans, who 
died or are still missing in 
action will have their names 
incorporated into the design 
of the four-sided memorial at 
Marina Bay. 

In addition to listing these 
veterans' names, there will 
also be a side incorporating 
the history of Marina Bay and 
a side which will suggest an 
appropriate quote reflecting 
the memorial's intent. 

The tower, just off the 
boardwalk and across from 
Corporate Park at Marina 
Bay, will have a gold lead 
cupola and a working clock. 

At a height of 85 feet, it will 
become a Quincy landmark. 

The tower will have a 16 
foot by 16 foot base and is 
being built by O.B.C. Inc. of 
Quincy. G.E. Ross Associates 
is the architect. 

Work on the tower is 
already underway and 
dedication of the memorial is 
scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 
27. 

Families of South Shore 
Vietnam veterans, as well as 
various branches of the 
military local dignitaries and 



officials will participate in this 
very solemn tribute and 
commemoration to those w ho 
lost their lives in the Vietnam 
War. 

The names of the veterans 
will appear on the memorial 
under an olive branches 
symbol and after this 
inscription: 

"Dedicated in sorrow, 
gratitude and pride to the 
citizens of Quincy who died or 
are missing in action while 
serving their country in the 
Vietnam War." 

Brian P. Ahearn, Richard 

C. Archer. James M. Barry. 
Charles L. Bifolchi, Richard 

D. Black. Jr., Francois J. 
Builaeri. James E. Casale, 
Ralph W. Caspole. James H. 
Cavicchi. Jr., Basil L. Ciriello. 
Thomas J. Chiminello, James 
C. Daigle. Richard S. Davis, 
Jr., Warren C. Deyermond, 
Christopher C. Donahue. 

Robert J. Fay. George F. 
Fell. Jr., Peter J. Gerry, Leo 
F. Grady, John W. Granahan, 
Paul V. Grasso, Lawrence A. 
Grenham, William D. 
Henchy, James P. Hickey. 
James J. Jenks. Jr.. Martin R. 
Keefe, Peter J. Landry, 
George R. Levesque, Stanley 
W. McCausland, John H. 
Morgan. James F. Murray. 

George A. Nash, Gerald R. 
Peterson, Joseph J. Pignato, 
David A. Pitts, Robert W. 
Raymondi, Alfred V. 
Schofield, Lawrence E. 
Sirois, James H. Stark, David 
O. Sullivan, George W. 
Underwood. Richard J. 
Vasconcellos, James M. 
Walsh Richard D. Walsh. 
Gary J. Webb, Reymond J. 

(Conl'ti on Page 16) 



VIETNAM VETERANS 
Memorial At 
Marina Bay 



28 Page Historic Quincy 
Supplement Inside 



By NANCY McLALGHLIN 

The mayoral race 
heated up along with the 
temperatures this week 
as incumbent Francis 
McCauley and challen- 
ger Joseph LaRaia 
traded barbs regarding 
the resignation of 
Building Inspector 
Kenneth Johnson to 
take a more lucrativejob 
in the private sector. 

The loss of individuals such 
as Johnson "reflects the 
difficuhy the mayor has in 
keeping qualified competent 
individuals." said LaRaia. a 
city councillor. 

"It points up to the political 
interference of the mayor's 
office in managing the affairs 
of the city," said LaRaia, who 
is also a former Quincy 
mayor. 

McCauley rejected LaRaia's 
charges and said, "Many of 
the people ! have appointed 
have gone on to bigger and 
better things. Councillor 
LaRaia also had problems 
with department heads in his 
administration. 

"However, instead of going 
on to bigger and better things, 
some of them went on to jail, 
others were forced to resign 
because of indictments and 
charges pending against 
them." 

"My decision to leave the 



Quincy Bay 
High Tides 



July 2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

7 

8 



A.M. 

3:55 
4:42 
5:29 
6:2i 
•':I9 
8:15 
9:13 



P.M. 

4:29 
5:14 
6:00 
6:47 
■':3'' 
8:3! 
9:25 



department is due to the fact 
that these people actively 
recruited me for over a 
month," said Johnson. 

"When I took the position 
with the city, I thought I 
would stay for about three 
years, but I got several offers. 

"There was no political 
influence at all," said 
Johnson. 

"I just feh this was the best 
for me." 

Johnson added, "Everyone 
in the city that I've worked 
with has been tremendous. 
The city is very lucky to have 
the type of people it has." 

Johnson, a 27-year-old 
Squantum resident, told the 
mayor last week that he was 
leaving the $39,501 a year 
position he has held for about 
a year to join a Chicago-based 



company at a higher salary. 

"They came up with an 
offer that was just too good to 
pass by." said Johnson. 

"I feel very badly leaving 
the city." said Johnson, who 
noted that he will be working 
in the Bay State area but 
outside of the city of Quincy. 

"1 look forward to a good 
career with this company," 
said Johnson, who denied any 
interference by the mayor's 
office. 

LaRaia called Johnson a 
"young, talented and mature 
public servant who was a 
credit to the department as 
well as to the city of Quincy in 
a short period of time with the 
city. 

"Unfortunately, his office 

iCont 'd on Page 5) 



Brownell Nominated 

Foe Plymouth 

Judgeship 



Gov. Michael Dukakis is 
expected to nominate Rep. 
Thomas Brownell of Quincy 
as a judge in Plymouth 
District Court, The Quincy 
Sun learned at press-time 
Tuesday. 

Brownell, if approved by 
the Governor's Executive 
Council, would fill the post 
being vacated by Judge 
George White who is taking 
early retirement. 

Brownell's appointment 
would trigger a scramble for 
his House seat. 
Potential candidates include 
CouiKiikvs Patricia Toland, 
and Michael Cheney, former 
CounciUor Leo Kelly, School 
Committee man Steve Durkin 




THOMAS BROWNELL 

and Sheila Mclntyre. 

A special election will prob 
ably be called in the fall. 



Page 2 Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2. I»«7 



Police Report On 

Kelly's Pub Placed 

On File For Year 



By JANE ARENA 

The City License Board 
Tuesday placed on file for a 
period of one year a police 
report concerning Roscom- 
mon, Inc.. doing business as 
Kelly's Pub & Grub. 25-27 
Billings Rd.. North Quincy. 

Peter Kelly, president of the 
establishtnent, and his 
attorney, Robert Fleming, 
told the board that they would 
not challenge the police report 
and waived the reading of the 
report at the meeting. 

According to the report, 
filed by officer Kathleen 
Roche, there were three 
patrons found drinking in the 
bar after hours on the 
morning of April 18 at t a.m. 
All three individuals were 
found to be underage, 
according to the report. 

Fleming told the board that 
the usual procedure of the bar 



does not include checking 
identification at the front 
door, but that this is left to the 
discretion of the waitresses as 
they take drink ordei^. 

The police report also 
stated that a back door of the 
establishment, which is to be 
used solely as an emergency 
exit, was found to be open on 
several occasions during the 
night in question. Kelly said 
that this has been a problem in 
the past and that people often 
enter the bar by this door. 

Fleming told the board that 
Kelly has plans to install a 
crash bar on the back door 
along with an alarm so that it 
can be opened only from the 
inside as an emergency e.xit. 
Kelly has also hired two 
additional employees to check 
identification at the front 
door four nights a week. They 
feel confident that these 



measures will help to alleviate 
the problem. 

The establishment was 
subject to a fine of over $3,000 
earlier this year by the 
Alcoholic Beverages Control 
Commission for a similar 
incident, it was noted. 

The board placed the report 
on file for a period of one year 
with the understanding that it 
could be taken out and used 
against the establishment at 
any time during that period. 

The board said that Fire 
Chief Carl Valenti and his 
deputies would check the bar 
regularly to make sure that 
the capacity of the establish- 
ment was kept under the limit 
of 105 patrons. They also said 
that police officers on detail at 
the bar would report directly 
to Police Chief Francis Finn 
to ensure that the bar 
complies with the conditions 
set in the hearing. 



License Board Briefs 



The City License Board 
took the following action at 
Tuesday's meeting at City 
Hall: 

• Granted a request from 
the North Quincy High 
School Girls Volleyball Team 
to hold canning dates on 
Friday Sept. 25 from 6 p.m. to 
9 p.m. and on Saturday Sept. 
26 from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

• Granted a request from 
Joe's Pub. 133 East Howard 
St.. for a license to add one 
video game machine to the 
premises. The application was 
for two machines, but a city 



ordinance limits the number 
of machines to four, 

• Granted a request from 
James J. Sage of Pembroke 
and Harold Stewart of 
Brockton for the transfer of 
the repair shop license and the 
license to store 16.000 gallons 
of gasoline underground as 
held by Montoni Realty 
Trust. 333 Quarry St. The 
board stipulated that no junk 
cars or other debris be left at 
the site. 

• Granted a request from 
Lawrence Carr. doing 
business as Lawrence Carr 



I PROPANE GAS 

FOR INDUSTRIAL USE AND COOKOUTS 

PRES WELDING INC. 




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8:00 A.M. to 4 P.M. 



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DcrdiMttr, Mass. 



825-2444 



Carnival of Wilmington, to 
hold a carnival at the Elk's 
Club, 440 East Squantum St.. 
July 8, 9. and 10 from 6 p.m. 
to 10 p.m. and on July II from 
I p.m. to 10 p.m. The carnival 
will benefit A Child's Wish 
Come True. The board 
stipulated that all electrical 
systems and wiring must be up 
to code with state standards 
and be installed by a master 
electrician and inspected by 
the city. 

GiUis 

Praises 

Johnson 

license Board Chairman 
John Gillis made a point to 
praise the work of City 
Building Inspector Kenneth 
Johnson at Tuesday's meeting 
at City Hail, Johnson will be 
leaving his position at the end 
of this week for another job. 

Gillis said that Johnson has 
done "good work" for the 
people of the city and that the 
board and all who know and 
work with Johnson would 
mis«. him 



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THREE AI.ARIM FIRE at 487 South St.. Quinc) Point, Iffi three familirN homelm. Eire ( hief 
Ctrl Valenti estimated the damage at $50,000 and said the cause was probably faulty wirin|. 

(Outnv\ Sun iihnint /i> Tinii (inrmanl 

Vandals Still Problem 
At Ross Parking Garage 



A representative of Kinney 
Systems told the City 
Council's Downtown and 
Economic Development 
Committee Monday night 
that his company painted over 
the graffiti in the Ross Garage 
but vandals replaced it the 
next week. 

"It's back again," said 
Bruce Young, regional 
manager of Kinney Systems 
which has operated the city's 
two parking lots and one 
garage in Quincy Center since 
1984. 

He was asked to appear 
before the committee after 
city councillors and others 
complained about the 
operation and condition of 
the lots and garage. 

Councillor James Sheets 
suggested that the garage be 
blocked off after operating 
hours rather than left open as it 
is evenings and Sundays. 



Sheets also said he was 
considering submitting an 
ordinance prohibiting the sale 
of spray paint to customers 
under age IK. 

"You can't keep painting 
the walls of the garage every 
two weeks," said Sheets 

Young also said that the 
stairs are washed every 
morning with ammonia to 
remove odors, and one full 
time and one part time 
employee are on duty to pick 
up litter. 

Councillor Patricia 
Toland. committee chairman, 
suggested that signs 
prohibiting litter be erected, 
and any grassy areas be 
maintained. 



Photos ol graffiti taken 
earlier that evening at the 
Ross (iarage were shown to 
the council by Councillor 
Joseph l.aRaia. 

"If youngsters have done 
this much in that little time, 
there is an obvious lack of 
control," said I.aRaia. 

"I don't think we've arrived 
at any solution." 

Councillor Michael Cheney 
said spaces for handicapped 
drivers should be designated 
immediately. 

Cheney also suggested the 
committee meet again in 
September to see if any 
progress has been made with 
the problems over the 
summer. 



David Emswiler In West Germany 

Army Pvt. David P. duty with the Mh field 

Emswiler. son of Milton and Artillery. West Germany 

Ann Emswiler of 30 (iarfield Emswiler is a cannon 

St.. Quincy. has arrived for crewman 




Quincy Junior College 

SUMMER '87 

It will be the 

Happiest Summer 

of Your Life. 



Session II 

July 6 - Aug. 6 

5 Weeks — 10 classes 

Day Care Available Mornings 
Call 786-8741 for more information 

Or Walk-In and Register 

Mon.-Thurs. 9 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri., 9 a.m..3:30 p.m. 

Accredited by the New England 

Association of Schools and Colleges 

Q J C will \k' closed Friday, July 3 



Tkarriaj. Jul) 2. IMT QiilKT Sm Pa|C ) 



Wo More Challenge' 

Lydon Decides Not 
To Seek Re-election 



Ward 3 Councillor John J. 
I.ydon, Jr., a veteran of 14 
years on the City Council, 
surprised some onlookers at 
Monday night's special City 
Council meeting by announ- 
cing he would not seek re- 
election. 

In front of an audience 
which included a number of 
his family members. Lydon 
said, "To a great degree, I 
have achieved the goals I have 
established for myself at this 
point in my life. 

"Clearly, my family is my 
first and most important 
consideration ..My business 
(l.ydon-R ussell Kuneral 
Home) has grown beyond my 
expectations. 

"I find that as each year 
passes, vacation time becomes 
more important to my family 
and to nc - I like it that way. 

". In short, government is 
no longer a challenge - the 
source of achievement and 
enjoyment that it once was - 
therefore. I choose not to seek 
reelection to the Ward 3 
Council Seat." 

Though I.ydon will 
continue to serve until a new 
Ward 3 Councillor is sworn in 
in January, his colleagues 
took the opportunity to praise 
and rib him. 

Council president Stephen 
Mc<jrath said bespoke forthe 
other councillors in wishing 
I.ydon well. 

"I have enjoyed the 10 years 
we have served together." said 
Mc<irath who was elected 
after I.ydon. **You"ve done a 
great job 

"I regret your decision and 
will miss our relationship." 

Councillor Michael Cheney 
said to I vdon. "I've learned 




JOHN J. I.YDON, JR. 

from you that there is always a 
lighter side to things, and a 
people side to issues." 

Referring to the amount of 
time required of ward 
councillors, Cheney joked, 
"My wife is probably 
watching this at home and 
saying 'why aren't you doing 
the same thing?'" 

Councillor James Sheets 
noted that he and Lydon both 

Tex I Of Lydon V 
Slatement On 
Page 20 

came on to the council at the 
same time 14 jcars ago. 

Sheets drew laughs from his 
colleagues when he related an 
election night story about 
Lydon. 

"It was 3:30 in the morning 
when Jack Lydon called to 
ask me a question and a 
favor." said Sheets. 

"We had just been elected, 
but Jack was asking for my 
vote for him as council 
president." said Sheets. 



He told Lydon. "You added 
to the council and city 
government a touch of class." 

"It's been a pleasure to 
serve with you," said 
Councillor Theodore 

DeCristofaro, who joked that 
Lydon had asked his support 
for council president before 
he was even elected. 

Lydon finally served as 
council president in 1982- 
1983. 

Councillor Joseph LaRaia, 
who is running for mayor, 
said. "I'm sorry you won't be 
Joining us in the miseries of 
running for office, but you've 
made a courageous decision." 

"I've come to like and 
respect you." said Councillor 
Patricia Toland. 

Councillor Thomas Nutley 
said the council would miss 
Lydon's "strong opinions." 

"The city is losing a ver\. 
very valuable servant." said 
Nutley. 

"You've taught me a great 

. deal." said Councillor 

Richard J. Koch, Jr., 

"including to stand back and 

laugh at yourself." 

Koch, who moved to Cape 
Cod, will also be leaving the 
council at the end of this term. 

At the end of the 
councillor's comments, 
McGrath smiled and said that 
a retirement party would 
have to be held for Lydon. 

Lydon has become known 
for the St. Patrick's Day party 
he holds annually. 

But it was Fire Chief Carl 
Valenti who had the last word 
later in the meeting. 

"He was always a good 
friend of the firefighters," said 
Valenti. "and a gentleman." 



Fourth Of July Events 



following are event? 
scheduled in Quincy over 
the Fourth of July 
weekend reports Richard 
Koch. Sr.. executive 
secretarv to the Quincy 
Park-Rccreation Board: 

July 3: Welcome Young 
Playground. Sagamore 
St.. Atlantic - Field Day. 
10 a.m. - I p.m.. sponsored 
by Atlantic Neighborhood 
Association. 

Merrymount Beach. 
Miss Merrymount Beauty 
Pageant, evening, spon- 
sored by the Merrymount 
Association. 

July 4: Wendall Moses 
Playground, Park Ave., 
Squantum, parade - 8 a.m. 
- I p.m., sponsored by 
Squantum Fourth of July 
Committee. 



• lore River Field - 
Beechwood and Harrison 
Sts.. Quincy Point. Field 
Day - 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.. 
sponsored by Ward 2 Civic 
Association. 

• General Palmer 
Park. Bicknell St., 
Germantown. Field Day - 
9 a.m. - 8 p.m.. sponsored 
by Harborview Residents 
Committee. 

• Baker Beach. Palmer 



St.. Germantown - Field 

Day. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.. 

sponsored by Baker Beach 

Association. 

• Merrymount Parade, 
starting at 1 p.m. at the 
Merrymount School. 
Agawam Rd.. followed by 
awards at Merrymount 
Beach, sponsored by the 
Merrvmount Association. 




TAPS was played as fire fighters stood at attention at the Firemen's Memorial at Mt. Wollaston 
Cemetery during Fireman's Memorial Service. 

(Quino Sun photn h\ Charlet Flafifc) 

Squantum Donuts Shop 
Hearing Resumes Thursday 

The City License Board 
Tuesday continued until 
today (Thursday) at 9:30 a.m. 
a hearing concerning traffic 
conditions at Squantum 
Donuts. doing business as 
Dunkin' Donuts. at the corner 
of East Squantum St. and 
Quincy Shore Dr. 

Owner of the shop. Paul 
Govostcs and his attorney, 
Neil Kerstein, had not been 
notified of the hearing and the 
board called a special 
Thursday meeting as Tuesday 
was the last scheduled 
meeting before the summer 
recess. 

In a May 19 hearing, the 
board had recommended that 
the East Squantum St. 
entrance to the shop be 
blocked off by barriers to 
prevent cars from cutting into 
traffic to enter the shop. They 
had also suggested that the 



curb on Quincy Shore Dr. be 
extended in order to narrow 
the curb-cut and prevent cars 
from turning illegally off 
Quincy Shore Dr. to enter the 
shop. 

MDC Police have indicated 
however, that they do not 
want the Quincy Shore Dr. 
entrance to be the sole 
entrance and egress from the 



shop. In light of this the 
owners have failed to block 
off the East Squantum St. 
entrance and the traffic 
conditions have continued. 

The board said they would 
notify Govostes and Kerstein 
of the Thursday meeting and 
would also request that MDC 
police officers be present at 
the meeting. 



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USPS 453-O60 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Ouincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Qumcy, Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth, Jr . Publisher and Editor 

2W per copy, $11 00 per year by mail tn Ouincy 
$12 00 per year by mail outside Oumcy. $15 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston Mass 



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au30i 



Helping You 
Feel Healthier 



The staff at Quincy City 
Hospital offers 10 best ways 
to improve your health. 

Thev are: 

• O'lit smoking cigarettes. 

• Wear protective clothing 
when exposed to harmful 
substances. 

• Avoid meals that are 
high in calories. 

• Eat a balanced diet with 
plenty of seasonal fruits and 
green vegetables. 

• Use seat belts when 
driving. Persuade your 
passengers to buckle up too. 

• Know the ingredients of 
prescription drugs you take 
and how they affect you. 

• Avoid unnecessary X- 
rays. 

• Avoid saturated fats and 
foods which contain high 
levels of cholesterol. 

• If you dnnk alcohol, do 
so in moderation. 

• Quit pipe or cigar 
smoking. 

You can write your 
prescription for a healthy 
future by taking advantage of 
Quincy City Hospital's 



programs designed to help 
you feel better. 

"l.eanlines" Weight Loss 
program. "Stop Smoking," 
stress management and a free 
skin cancer detection 
screening clinic are a few of 
the programs offered to help 
you feel better. Free blood 
pressure clinics, and 
community blood sugar 
screenings are also available 

The hospital also offers 
support groups for Alcoholics 
Anon\mous. Narcotics 
Anon\mous, Al Anon. 
Emotions Enonymous and 
Overeaters Anonymous. 

Infant care seats are 
available on loan from the 
hospital for the protection of 
infants up to 20 lbs. In 
compliance with Massachu- 
setts laws, all children 
through age 5 must be 
protected in automobiles, and 
Quincy City Hospital in\ites 
you to lake advantage of this 
opportunity for your 
youngster or grandchild 
Information on all programs 
is available by calling 773- 
6100. ext. 4016. 




Following is a list of new adult and children's 
books now available al the Thomas Crane Public 
Library: 

Fiction: Fiasco, by Stanisiaw Lem and translated 
from the Polish by Michael Kandel. Harcourt, Brce, 
Jovanovich Publ., 198''. Mrs. Randall, by Christopher 
T. Lcland. Houghton Mifflin, 198"'. OUtlaw, by 
Georges Simenon and translated from the French by 
Howard Curtis. Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovich Publ., 
198''. Rough Cider, by Peter Lovesey. The Mysterious 
Press, 1987. S.P.H.I.N.X., by DM. Thomas. Viking 
Press, 1987. To The Sargasso Sea, by William 
McPherson. Simon and Schuster, 1987. 

Non-Fiction: Grace, the secret lives of a princess, by 
James Spada. Doubleday & Co.. 1987. •B K297S. No 
More Heroes: madness and psychiatry in war, by 
Richard A. Gariel. Hill and Wang. •616.85 GAB. Step- 
By-Step Successful Gardening, by Better Homes and 
Gardens. Meredith Corp., 198''. •635 B46s. You Don't 
Have To Live With Cystitis!, by Larrian Gillespie, 
M.D. and Sandra Blakeslee. Rawson Associates, 198''. 
•616.62 G4I. Victorian Exterior Decorations: How to 
paint your nineteenth-Century American house 
historically, by Roger W. Moss. Henry Holt & Co., 
1987. •698.12 MO 

1987. •698.12 MOS. Victory (iarden Cookbook, by 
Marian MOrash. Alfred A. Knopf, 198'', •641 .65 M''9 

Children's Books: Boats, by Byron Barton. Crowell, 
1986. •JE 623.8 B23. Glorious Eourth At Prairietown, 
by Joan Anderson. Morrow. 1986. •J394.2 An23. In 
Summer Light, by Zibby O'Neal Viking, 1985. J 
Fiction. Sailing With Fhe Wind, by I homas Locker. 
Dial, 1986. JE Fiction. Sea Songs, by Myra Livingston. 
Holiday, 1986. 'J 821 L7625. 

•Dewey Decimal (location) number 

Compiled by Catherine R. Duffck and Jane 
Granstrom. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Lydon Move No Big Surprise 




VDON 



John Lydon's announcement this week that he will 
not seek re-election as Ward 3 councillor took most 
people by surprise. 

But, not everyone. 

Lydon had announced in early 
April that he would seek an eighth 
term. 

But, there had been speculation 
the past year that he might not run 
again. 

When he announced in April that 
he would, that surprised some observers. 

They are the people who weren't exactly stunned 
Monday night when Lydon announced he was not 
going to run after all. 

Lvdon indicated he wants to spend more time with his 
family and give more time to his growing business as a 
funeral home director. 

These were the two reasons that had spawned 
speculation the past few months that he might not run. 

Monday night he tossed in another: he now finds "No 
challenge" in government. 

"Government for me." he said, "has become dour - it 
is overly concerned with regulation and has forced us 
into the role of regulators. I have never perceived myself 
in this type of role. 

"In short, government is no longer a challenge ~ the 
source of achievement and enjoyment it once was." 

He indicated he is also tired of the campaign trail. 

And, in Ward 3. it is a long, winding one. Ward 3 has 
got to be the cra/iest ward ever put together from a 
geographical and political standpoint. It seems to be all 
over the city 

Once upon a time it was South Quincy. 

Now k is all over the place, /ig-/agging through parts 
of Ward 2, Ward 4. Ward 5 and Ward 6. 

You could easily get tired campaigning there, if not 
lost. 

D 

LYDON'S DEPARTURE from the political arena 
brings the number of open seats in the City Council this 
year to four. 

Two are at-large seats: the one Joseph LaRaia is 
vacating to run for mayor and the one Richard Koch. 

Readers Forum 

A Tribute 
To Dr. Chryslal 



Editor, The Quincy Sun: 

Congratulations to the 
Swampscott School Commit- 
tee for unanimously voting 
with enthusiasm to bring Dr. 
Richard K. Chrystal to their 
community as their number 
one choice for Superintendent 
of Schools. His multi-faceted 
abilities will be appreciated 



there. 

Thank you, Dr Chrystal, 
for your 29 years of service to 
Quincy as a teacher, assistant 
principal, principal, and 
administrator, and, for 
quietly touching the lives of so 
many. 

Anne M. Vallicr 
66 Wesson Ave 





Quincy 

Pound >r. 

Adoptables '''fi^^^ 



Shepherd-mix, spayed female, black /tan/ white. 2 
years, very friendly. 

Husky-mix male, blacktan. 4 years. 

Young Beagle, black/ white brown female. 5 
months. 

Sheepdog-mix, small female. 6-9 months, tan. 
gorgeous. 

Golden Retriever-mix male. 15 months. 

female Shcpherd-mix. 1-2 years, black/tan. 

Male Schnau/cr, grey, 5 years, very friendly, great 
dog. 

( ollie Boxer-mix, black tan white male, I year. 



C onlact Officer PhyHb Bcrlucchi at 773-4297. 

OfTicr hours: (Uily 1:30 ■.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Exdudini Sundays 




( AHII I 




Jr. is stepping down from to live on the Cape. 

The third is the Ward 5 seat Council President Stephen 
McGrath is leaving to run lor councillor at-large. 

D 
SO, REGARDLESS of how the election goes, 
Quincy is sure to have at least three new faces in 
the City Council. 

D 
WITH LYDON OUT of the race, it leaves three 
contenders for the seat: Larry Chretien. Howard 
MacKay and William Reardon 
It might open the door for more. 

D 
A BOSTON HARBOR cruise fundraiser for Jim 
Cahill. City Council at-large 
candidate, is set for J hursday, July 9 
aboard the Nantascot. 

The vessel will leave Rowc's 
Wharf, Boston al 8 p.m. and return 
al 1 1 p.m. Tickets are $20 each and 
may be obtained by calling Jina 
Cahill at ''"'0-0066. 
D 

WELL, if you're wondering 
whether Christopher Kennedy is 
seeking re-election to the School 
Committee, he is. He's the latest 
candidate to take out nomination 
papers al City Hall. 

' D 

KKWKDY MENDING Both Marts 

Einnegan. Quincy public schools athletics director and 
Richard Sweeney. Jr , former president of the Quinc\ 
Kiwanis Club, are recuperating at their homes Ironi 
recent back surgery Sweeney incidentally, was recent l\ 
elected \ice president of the New (ingland Distrai 
Kiwanis Eoundation 

D 
TFD KENNEDY, Jr will be the speaker at the South 
Shore Chamber of Commerce breakfast Monday. Juh 
20 CAA am.) at Lombardo's. Randolph His topic 
"Civil Rights of People With Disabilities" 

D 
HERB EONI AINE was the man of the hour at last 
week's special Cit\ Council meeting when he was 
honored with a bron/e plaque But 
this week, he was just plain Herb 
again. When Eontaine began 
snapping his lingers for council 
president Stephen McCirath to turn 
on a microphone so he could record a 
comment for WJDA, McGrath 
replied that it was on. Mc(;RATH 

"Do you want me to take your plaque down'*" he 
asked with a smile. 

JIKI^ COUNCILLOR THOMAS 

r . ^^ NUT LEY got a laugh from those 

» ^ ^^jfTi attending a press conference on 
zoning orders in the mayor's office 
during which about 15 people stood 
behind Mayor Francis McCauley's 
desk for photos. 

"I got behind the desk a lot sooner 
than I anticipated." quipped Nutley. 
A future candidate? 




NDTLEY 



LAUGH TIME 





ZIP 






M-UKii 



11^ 

"I don't care if you are arainat air pollution — atay 
away from here with that bucket of water!" 



Itmn4ay, July 2. I*t7 QmkKj Sm Pag* S 



Earhart Disappeared 50 Years Ago QuincVS 

(Cfml\i from Page h , . . J 



down and there was no spy 
mission involved. 

Miss Earhart. who 
became the first woman to 
fly solo across the Atlantic 
Ocean in 1932, used North 
Qu incy's Dennison 
Airport as home base for 
many of her flights during 
the 1920s and early 30s. 

Last radio contact was 
near Rowland Island, well 
north of Australia, where 
Miss Earhart was headed. 

Earhart had planned the 
trip to gather statistics on 
the amount of punishment 
a plane's engine could 
withstand, Mrs. Morrissey 
said. The monsoons in the 
Pacific were stronger than 
anticipated, causing the 
plane to go down, she 
insisted. 

Mrs. Morrissey has 
written a book about her 
sister entitled Courage is 
the Price and is a flying 



enthusiast herself. She said 
Amelia became interested 
in flying during World 
War I when she entered the 
"Voluntary Aid Detach- 
ment" in one of the largest 
military hospitals in 
Toronto, Canada. 

Morrissey said the 
military had just started to 
use planes for reconnais- 
sance missions and 
Amelia's interest in flying 
was sparked by her contact 
with injured pilots, who 
despite their injuries were 
eager to fly again. 

After the war. Earhart 
went to California where 
she became friendly with a 
barnstormer. He took her 
on a plane ride, unheard of 
for a woman then. But she 
enjoyed it and became 
determined to fly. 

Mrs. Morrissey recalled 
that her sister was a 
determined, courageous 
woman who did "things 



not for honor or glory, but 
for inner satisfaction and 
the feeling that she had 
opened the door for 
somebody else." 

"Amelia's flights were 
not made as stunts," she 
said. "She wanted to show 
that women could do it." 

The two sisters grew up 
m Kansas where they had 
what Mrs. Morrissey 
described as an "exciting 
childhood." She said they 
were tomboys whose 
mother had their seamstress 
make them bloomers so 
they could "shimmy up 
trees and ride horses 
bareback." 

Mrs. Morrissey recalled 
an incident from their 
childhood in which they 
built a "roller coaster" 
after visiting an amusement 
park. The girls greased two 
planks with butter, leaned 
them up against a shed and 
slid down. 



"Midge, It's just like 
flying," Mrs. Morrissey 
remembered Amelia 
saying. 

Her statement was 
prophetic. 

Not only was Amelia 
Earhart the first woman to 
make a solo flight across 
the Atlantic, in 1935 she 
became the first person to 
fly from Hawaii to 
California. 

Earhart early saw the 
tremendous potential of 
commercial aviation and 
in 1930 joined the 
Luddington Line, one of 
the first passenger services 
which operated between 
New York and Washington, 
D.C. She became an officer 
in that company. 

No one for sure knows 

what did happen that July 
2 a half century ago. 

And, 50 years from now 
the speculation will 
probably still be there. 



McCauley, LaRaia Jab 
Over Johnson Resignation 



/( nnl'tl frnm /'n^r h 

has been deluged with a 
tremendous amount of 
pressure, some of which has 
recently emanated from the 
mayor's office, particularly 
the projects of the city 
hospital building program as 
well as others in progress. 

"A recent directive from the 
mayor in changing the 
a.ssignment of inspectors at 
the hospital reflected an 
increased work load on the 
building inspector directly 
and I am sure is a major 
reason for his decision to 
leave the employ of the city of 
Quincy. 



"I am sure Mr. Johnson has 
not indicated those reasons 
for his departure because of 
the type of individual that he 
is, and points up to the 
political interference of the 
mayor's office in managing 
the affairs of the city." 

LaRaia pointed out that 
Franklin Jay was not 
reappointed to his position as 
treasurer-collector, and that 
City Solicitor Dean Nicastro 
left the city's employ. 

McCauley responded that 
when Johnson took the job 
last year, he told him thai if he 
acted in a professional 



to the building regulations 
and codes "there would be no 
interference from me in the 
conduct of his job." 

"The reason he is leaving is 
because he can't refuse the 
offer." said McCauley. 

"1 asked him again Tuesday 
if there had been any political 
pressure and he said there had 
been no political interference 
on the job. 

"So, we do have our 
problems keeping people, but 
at least in my administration, 
the people who have left me 
have gone on to the private 
sector and have improved 
themselves." he said. 



manner and strictiv adhered 

Mark Burns Receives Air Force Medal 

He IS a 1978 graduate of Braintree High School. 

^^^^^■"^g^^^ >MtfEf' \Afl^ "SSltU- \S^I^ 

^f^KJ9Kt^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ '^^w% ^^^^ 



Staff Sgt. Mark W Burns, 
son of Elizabeth J. and 
Matthew H. Burns of Quincy, 
has been decorated with the 
Air Force Commendation 
Medal in South Korea. 

The Air Force Commenda- 
tion Medal is awarded to 
those individuals who 
demonstrate outstanding 
achievement or meritorious 
service in the performance of 
their duties on behalf of the 
Air Force. 

Burns is a crew chief with 
the 5lsl Aircraft Generation 
Squadron. 

Save Gas 
and Money ... 
Shop Locally 



^ 



HANDCRAFTED 

ITEMS 

FROM SCOTLAND 



"We're sorry to lose Ken 
Johnson, but I'm not 
surprised because he has quite 
a bit of background and he 
can do much better in the 
private sector. 

"Ken is a very talented 
young man." said McCauley. 
"He has a great academic 
background and he was 
offered a job he couldn't turn 
down." 

McCauley said he has 
already offered the position of 
building inspector to a Quincy 
man and expects a reply soon. 

"If things go well, we could 
have a new man on board in 
the building inspector's office 
by Monday, July 12," said 
McCauley. 

If the local resident does 
not accept the position, the 
city will advertise for a new 
building inspector, he said. 



• Toys 

• Unique Gifts 

• Edinburgh Crystal 

• Thistle Pottery 

Linen and Cotton 
Nautical Sweaters 

MARINA BAY 

304 VICTORY ROAD 

SQUANTUM, MA 02171 

TEL (617)770-4172 



. ^i^vnfrivV^i''MiVcv ^wt&f\ ya^Bfv ^^^■fv ^>^nrv ^j^nr^ 





Will? 



... City Hall was decorated 
for the Fourth of Jul> 
back when the favorite 
means of transportation 
was horse and bu{S>. 



. . . Vou were not just a 
Policy Number and retained 
your own identity, when 
personal service was always 
given ... It still is at 



BURGIN PLATNER INS 

1357 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 472-3000 



HEARING AID 
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WE MAKE HOME VISITS 
AND ACCEPT MEDKIAID 



Yesterdays 

How Early Quincy 
Celebrated The 4th 



July 1-7 

1876 

111 Years Ago 



Hancock and Washington Sts. were literally alive 
with people in the glare of the new calcium lights, 
tended with infinite care by ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
Supt. Nathan A. Brickett in the 
belfry of First Parish Church. 

Particularly the fine 
decorations uere noted at the 
homes of the leather merchant 
E.B. Pratt on Hancock near 
Adams St., where the trees ^^^_^^^^^^^^_ 
were hung with gaily colored 

lanterns and Deputy Sheriff Washington M. French on 
Washington near Temple St. 

As the clock struck midnight, cannons roared and the 
flag went up the pole at the Hose House on Washington 
St. amid the rockets red glare and the Fire Company 
sang the Star Spangled Banner under the direction of 
Galen Bowdiich. the expressman. 

It was July 3, IS^b, in Quincy, the eve of the 
Centennial of American Independence. 

Independence Day, 100 years after, began at sunrise 
with the ringing of church bells and a salute fired from 
50 guns. 

The parade formed at 5 a.m. on the new road that ran 
from the Poorhouse on Sea St. to Greenleaf St. and. 
shortly after 6 a.m., the marchers stepped off down 
Greenleaf led by Wash French and a platoon of 
mounted police. 

Chief Marshal Edward Whicher was at the head of 
the line in a chariot drawn by four horses and the First 
Division featured a float with a large axe marked. 
"Father. I cannot tell a lie. 1 did it with my little 
hatchet." 

The parade wound down Greenleaf to Hancock to 
South Quincy. turning at the corner of Water and 
Pleasant Sts.. thence to Quincy Ave. and Washington 
St.. and back to the Square to disband at the Stone 
Temples. 

The main event took place in a 1 15-foot by 85-foot 
tent pitched in a field off Granite St. across from the 
home of the late Capt. Lewis Bass. The audience was 
admitted at 1:30 p.m. and soon the 1,000 seats were 
filled. 

James H. Slade. a stenographer from Quincy Point, 
presided and the Declaration of Independence was read 
by six selected grammar school girls: Nettie Crocker, 
Alice Spear, Amanda Sylvester. Ida Paine. Nettie 
Penny and Nettie Randlett. 

By the time Charles Francis Adams Jr. began the 
opening address, a general review of the history of 
Quincy, it was sweltering hot and the audience was 
restless when School Dept. Col. Francis W. Parker rose 
to deliver a history of the city's public schools. 

The speech-making droned on into the early evening, 
for what would the Fourth of July be like without the 
oratory of the Rev. Reginald Howe of Christ Church, 
Prof. William R. Dimmock of Adams .Academy and 
Josiah Quincy. 

The biggest applause of the day. undoubtedly, went 
to the Re\. Edward Norton and Insurancemen Charles 
H. Porter, who announced that they would not speak 
but gave texts of their orations to be printed in the 
weekly paper, the Patriot. 

The oratory ended, mercifully, at 6:40 p.m. and 

everyone adjourned to the Fireworks Grounds at the 

rear of the railroad station in South Quincy for a band 

concert at sunset and a displav of fireworks after dark. 

QllNCY-iSMS 

Capt. S.F. Whitmarsh's Nettie captured the First 
Class c. he holiday sailing regatta sponsored by the 
Quincy Yachting Club, Quincy Point . . . The sloop 
Aurora capsized coming out of Quincy Point and was 
rescued by a boat from Bowen's on Weymouth Neck . . 
Quincy Selectmen John Q.A. Fiels. Edmund B. Taylor 
and Henry F. Barker posted a $1,000 reward for infor- 
mation leading to the arrest of the person who burned 
down the Almshouse harn on Sea St. . . Elijah R. Bates 
of Union St., a machine operator, was elected president 
of the Victoria Division No. 45 of the Sons of 
Temperance . . . Granite Engine Co. defeated Vulture 
Engine Co., 24-12. behind the "very effective" pitching 
of Cronin . . . George Ford and Tom Williams, who left 
Quincy May 9 for San Francisco, returned home with 
the news that jobs were simply not to be had for the 
asking in California . . . John O. Holden's jewelry store 
at 87 Hancock St. was selling $13 watches for 10.50 
H olden also repaired watches . . . William Greenleaf 
Appleton Pattee, son of Dr. W.S. Pattee of School St., 
the physician and druggist, was graduated from 
Harvard College. . . The holiday baseball game at 
Quincy Point ended in a 31-28 victory for the Actives 
over the Brown Stockings . 



Page * Quinry Sun Thundiy. July 2. I9S7 




Marie's Kitchen 



By MARIE J. DOMMPIO 



July 4th Cookout Specials 

And Pray For Good Weather 



Well, here it is the Fourth of July 
weekend again, can you believe it? 

And maybe this year weMI be lucky 
weatherwise. 

Here are a couple of recipes that I'll be 
using in our yearly cookout. First of all, I 
like to use individual skewers when I can 
(I pick up extras at yard sales and flea 
markets). It makes serving a lot easier. 

For the chicken lovers, I cut up 
boneless chicken (from any part of the 
chicken) into almost bite size pieces. 
Then some fresh mushrooms, green 
pepper and fresh tomatoes and some 
onion. Place a piece of the chicken, 
followed by the mushroom, and so forth 
until each one will have at least three to 
four pieces of chicken with the vegetables 
in between. 

With skewered steak you can use just 
pieces of sirloin steak which cook up 
quickly, goes a long way, and are tender 
along with mushrooms in between. 

If you want to make frankfurters this 
way, cut franks in one inch lengths, 
spread with mustard and string on 
skewers alternatch with pieces of pickle 



and onion wedges. 

If you use lamb, it is a good idea to 
marinate for about an hour in whatever 
sauce you like from soy sauce and lemon 
juice to oil and vinegar (which I 
sometimes use along with fresh garlic). 

And if you like Chinese shish kebab, 
and are using pork, it is a good idea to 
precook the pork first (boil if you like) 
dip it in soy sauce, cornstarch and peanut 
oil, skewer between slices of pepper and 
cook until really done. 

And if you think we get away without 
pasta. I usually serve this with some kind 
of pasta, either a fettucini, (white) or ziti 
and tomato sauce. Also white boiled rice 
goes well. 

Happy holiday! 

Marie D'Olimpio is the author of 
"Simply Italian-And Then .Some," a 
collection of her own recipes. ( opies of 
the book are available at That's Italian, 
Franklin St., South Quincy; Previte's 
Market, Sumner St., Quincy Point and 
Samosit Pharmacy, Samoset Ave., 
Merrymount.) 



Performing Arts Summer 
Day Camp Starts July 6 



The Academy of the 
Company Theatre will hold a 
two week summer day camp 
for the performing arts, 
beginning July 6. at Christ 
Church, 12 Quincy Ave., 
Quincy Center. 

Students ^^er-8--f8 -*i]i be 
taking courses in contempor- 
ary afid traditional drama, 
story theater, movement, jazz, 
dance survey of the 60's, 70's, 
and 80's, art, technical 



musicianship, 
show tunes, and 



t heater. 
Broadway 
more. 

Tuition is $225. The 
program places students 
under the guidance of a 
professional staff of eight, 
according to age and ability. 

Two students from 
Rockland and Hingham. and 
one student from Braintree 
may attend ACT. on full 
scholarship, sponsored by the 



Ihc 
the 



Mass. General Hospital 
Invites You To Share Your Home ... 

with an elderly person. You jict monthly income, 
lull support of M(iH medical, nursinj:. social work 
staff m return lor your tmic and caring. Ihc MdH 
family Care Program needs couples and singles, in 
homes or apartments, to offer lamily living lor the 
elderly and disabled who no longer can live alone. 
Please call soon! 

726-2640 

Famil> (are Program Mass. (ieneral H( 



lospital 



eV .'JoucA Of "€(0^ 




^Itvi^ie ^€)€i4e€lue ^ 



towns' Arts Councils, 
only requirement for 
student is to be motivated in 
the performing arts. Students 
from other towns are also 
eligible for partial scholarships. 

The program will culminate 
in a day long multi-arts 
festival which will be held 
Saturday. July 18. which is 
free and open to the public. 

Students may register in 
person at Christ Church on 
Wednesday, July I, from 
12:30 to 5:30. For further 
information, please call 773- 
0473 or 472-2619. 

Linda Foley On 
Dean's List 

Linda J. Foley of Exeter 
St., Wollaston. has been 
named to the dean's list at 
Simmons College m Boston 
for the spring semester. 

Miss Foley graduated from 
Simmons with a bachelor of 
science degree in biology and 
computer science. 

Shop Locally 
Save Gas & Money 




MARIE GII.I.AN. Maryann ( iulia and Leslie MacDonald, ail of North Quincy, pme on the 
Lido deck of the ( arnival (raise Line<i flacship, "( elebration " before sailint out of the port of 
Miami on a seven day cruise of (he Caribbean Islands. 

(Nru» /•.'i«'ri/« l'hi>lit Srri irv. hi I niiilrrilnlr. h'l ii 




EVELYN STORER of 
Wollaston received an 
Associate in Science degree in 
executive secretarial from 
Aquinas Junior ( ollege, 
Milton. 



( AROLVN KAVANAl (;H 
of Quincy received an 
associate in science degree in 
executive secretarial from 
Aquinas Junior College, 
Milton. 



JOANNE KEILEV of 
Quincy received an .Associate 
in Science dep'ee in business 
management from Aquinas 
Junior ( ollege, Milton. 



16 Residents Suffolk Graduates 



Sixteen Quincy residents 
were graduated from Suffolk 
University at commencement 
exercises held recently at the 
Wang Center. 

They are: 

Judith A. Belmont, 
daughter of Mrs. Belmont 
and the late Philip Belmont, 
received a Master o( 
Education degree m School 
Counseling. 

Susan K (aldarone. 
daughter of Mr and Mrs. 
Rcmo Caldaronc received a 
Bachelor of Science degree in 
Llemcntary Education 

Kathryn A Doherty. 
daughter o( Mr and Mrs 
Louis C. Doherty reccned a 
Bachelor of Science degree m 
Journalism. 

Denise A Downing, 
daughter ol Mr and Mrs. 
(jeorge Downing received a 
Bachelor of Science degree in 
Business Administration. 



Lori (i. vjriffin. daughter ol 
Mr and Mrs John (jriflin 
received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Business Admini- 
stration 

Matthew (i I aPointe. son 
of Mr and Mrs. Bcrtrand 
l.aPomte graduated cum 
laudc and received a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Business 
Administration. 

John R. McCarthy, son ol 
Mr and Mrs. John Mc( arthy 
received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Business Admini- 
stration 

Michael J Mc( aulev. son 
of Mayor and Mrs I rancisX 
Mc( aulcy, and husband to 
I lise A McCauley received a 
Masters degree in Business 
Administration 

Lisa M. McCormick, 
daughter ol Mr. and Mrs 
John McCormick received a 
Bachelor ol Science degree in 



Business Administration. 







3 
Senior (_ 
Citizens 
Discnuni 







?• ii^i-i^S 'i-i-Si: 



Closvd Mondays 

Op«n Tuttday thru Saturday 

10 A.M. — S 30P M 



28 GracnKwood A»e 



WotlMton 



-X Op«n Thuri »v«i til • 30 

\\ 773-5266 



VKA 




SOUTH SHORE 
EVENING MEDICAL CARE 

21 School Street, Quincy Center 

> Reasonable Fees • Walk In 

• No Appointment 
• Insurance Accepted Necessary 

• Adolescent and 
Adult Medicine 

Courtesy blood pressure screening, Friday evenings. 
► Heart disease risk screening and cholesterol $10" 

Hours: 
Monday-Friday, 6 pm - 9 pm, Saturday. 9 am - 4 pm 

Ttl: 773-2600 

A Medical Associates of Quincy inc. Affiliate 




Qualified Physicians 



I-ucinda F Morrill. 
received a Bachelor ol Science 
degree in Business Admini- 
stration 

Anne M Mulligan, 
daughter ol Mr and Mrs 
.Joseph A Mulligan received .1 
Bachelor ol Science degree :n 
Business .Administration 

Susan C" Orrock. daughlii 
of Mr and Mrs Andrew 
Orrock reccned a Bachelor ol 
Science degree in Business 
Administration 

Valerie A Princiotto. 
daughter ol Mr and Mrs 
I homas F'nnciollo receised a 
Bachelor ol Science degree in 
Business Administration. 

F rancis .1 Scanlan. son ol 
Mr and Mrs F rank Scanlan 
received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in Business Adminis- 
tration 

I ma Schepis. daughter ol 
Mr and Mrs Joseph Schepis 
received a Bachelt)r ol Science 
degree in Business Admini- 
stration. 

James P Seymour Jr , son 
ol Mr. and Mrs James 
Seymout received a Bachelor 
of Science degree in Business 
Administration. 

Michelle Cyr On 
Dean's List 

Michelle Cyr of Presidents 
i,ane. Quincy. has been 
named to the dean's list at 
Simmons College in Boston 
for the spring semester. 

Miss Cyr graduated from 
Simmons in May with a 
bachelor of arts degree in 
human services. 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
H«r*'a a chanc* to tarn 
•xira monty by building • 
Quincy Sun homa delivery 
roula. 

Talaphont: 471-3100 



Thunday, July 2. IM7 Quincy Sun P«|e 7 




DEMSE A. WAI.SH and DOl GLAS M. KING 

^Mclntire'i Sludiol 

Denise Walsh Engaged 



To Douglas M. King 



Mr and Mrs Eugene F. 
Walsh, of Quincy. announce 
the engagement ol their 
daughter. Denise A. to 
Douglas M King, son of Mr 
and Mrs. Paul K. King of 
Quincy 

Miss Walsh IS a graduate of 
Quincy \ocational technical 
School and Massasoit 



She is 
Street 
North 



Community College 
employed at State 
Bank and Trust in 
Quincy. 

Mr Xing is a graduate of 
North Quincy High School 
and is employed at Trans 
Atlantic C arpet in Quincy. 



A November 
planned. 



uedding is 



Historical Society 
Installs Officers 



Joyce I. Baker was recently 
installed as president of the 
Quincy Historical Society at 
its recent annual meeting. 

Also installed were; 

[)oris Oberg. first \ice 
president; Daniel J Johnson, 
second vice president; James 
R. Cameron, treasurer; 
Deborah A. Northall. 
secretary and H Hobard 
Holly, historian. 

Irustees: Rev. Sheldon W. 
Bennett. Mary J Clark. Luisa 
Dano. David R. Day. Laura 
C. DiTulho. Andrew J. 
Dooley. Robert W. Gardiner. 
Albert J (irenier. Helene D. 
Johnson 

Margaret M. Mahoney. 
Herbert F. Morris, Wilfred A. 
Nolan. Stephen C. Ricciardi. 
Robert W. Sillen. Kathleen 
Sullivan-Moran. Alfred M. 
loy. Lila M. Vorce. Ruth 
Wainwright. 

Mrs. Baker begins her 
second year as president of the 
Quincy Historical Society. 
She is active in community 
organizations including the 
Historic District Commission 
and DOVE. 

I he Quincy Historical 
Society oflers a permanent 

Teresa Duggan 
Honors Scholar 

Teresa Duggan. of 57 Viden 
Rd.. Quincy has recently been 
selected as an Honors Scholar 
at Stonehill College. 

This recognition is given to 
entering freshmen on the basis 
of high school academic 
accomplishment, class rank, 
and college board scores. 

She will begin her freshman 
year at Stonehill in 
September. 




JOYCE BAKER 

exhibit entitled "Quincy: 
From Settlement to City," a 
city -wide educational 
program for elementary 
school students, afternoon 
and evening lecture series, 
crafts workshops, and 
interesting trips to historic 
locations in and out of 
Massachusetts. 
New members are welcome. 



Social 




MR. and MRS. GLEN A. HOLLATZ 



iMclntire'i Studio) 

Mary Beth Ricciarelli 
Married To Glen Hollatz 



Mary Beth Ricciarelli. 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Ronald C Ricciarelli of 
Quincy. was married recently 
toGlenA. HoUat/, sonof Mr 
Glen C. Hollat? and Mrs. 
Virginia Hollat/ of West 
Yarmouth. 

The ceremony was 
performed by Deacon John 
Jennette and Father Kevin 
Sepe at St Joseph's Church. 
Quincy. A reception followed 
at the Wevmouth Sons of 
Italy Hall. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her father and 
was attended by Karen M. 
Sellon of Quincy as maid of 
honor. 

Bridesmaids were Deanna 
Crespi of Quincy, and the 
brides's sisters-in-law, 
Darlene Maggio of Norwood 
and Diana Hollat? of 
Randolph. The flower girl 



was Lisa M. Coull. a special 
friend of the bride. 

Best man was Andrew 
Anderson of Natick. 

Lshers included James 
Ricciarelli and Daniel 
Ricciarelli. brothers of the 
bride, both of Quincy. Jay 
Malaspino and Francis 
Sayers. both of Brewster. 
Michael Maggio, brother-in- 
law, of Norwood, and Jon 
Holmes Jr. of West 
Yarmouth. 

The bride is a graduate of 
Control Data Institute and is 
employed by Commercial 
Union Insurance. Hyannis. 

The groom is a graduate of 
Stonehill College and is 
currently employed by the 
Cape Cod Paper Co. of 
Dennis. 

After a wedding trip to the 
Poconos, the couple will be 
living in South Yarmouth. 



Parsons & Richardson 

INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. 
*Be Sure Now - Not Sorry Later* 

65 Winter Street 

p. 0. BOX 509 

So. Weymouth. MA 02190 

(1 Block NORTH of Rt 18 
Expressway Exit) 

Teis # 335-1656 & 1657 



1 



IF YOU CAN DRINK, 
THAT'S YOUR BUSINESS. 

IF YOU CANT WERE 
WILUNG TO MAKE IT OURS 

CALL 847-3841 ANYTIME 



* Nail Tipping 

& Overlay "OO 

^Sculptured 

Nails 'oS 

^Pedicures '19 




for her. ..Monday Special 
Wash. Cut ft Blow Dry $ 1 4, 
Long hair slightly higher •»• ^ 



for him...Tues. * Thurs. Special 
Blow Cut. includes $ 1 1 

shampoo A A 



•51 comp. 



VI ediiesday Perm Specials: 

Uniperm '35 comp. Gold well Foam Perm .. 

Complete Slightly higher for longer hair 
Facial Waxinfl Available Pedicures and Nail Sculpting 

All Specials Performed By One^ Russell's Staff 

'0/ Open ^-S Dailv. Wed , 

Cor. Hancock & Chestnut & 13 Maple Sts Ouin. v 472-1060^© 



/Ml apeticiis r*;iiu 




SHEILA L. BLAKE 



iPafnar Studio) 



Sheila Blake Engaged 
To Richard Palumbo 



Albert R. Blake Jr. of 
Quincy and Wilma Blake of 
West Quincy announce the 
engagement of their daughter. 
Sheila L. Blake to Richard P. 
Palumbo. son of Edith 
Palumbo and the late 
Americo Palumbo of Quincy. 

Miss Blake is a graduate of 
Quincy Vocational-Technical 
School. She is employed as a 
supervisor at Blue Cross Blue 
Shield in Quincy. 

Mr. Palumbo graduated 
from Quincy High School and 



Boston State University. He is 
employed by the Stop and 
Shop Companies in Braintree. 

Miss Blake is the 
granddaughter of Florence 
Casey of Quincy . 

A November v^edding is 
planned. 



Save Gas 
and Money ... 
Shop Locally 



LOVE IS ... a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 

/y^''7-\ ^^^^^^^ Speak to TcrrySlracco- She's oar rratal 

' '\l 1 ^^^^^^^ *'"" ' *P*''*^''t ■** «M"plHc *t44ktt 

i ' j ; N^ ^^^^^^1 P*'''*!* P*"** *"'' *' **""' octMiom. 

" ' ' The CoUrn Lion Suilr tctommtodmtt* 

up to JN. Tkc VMCtiM Nomm up to I4« 

tmnt^ Cht Ttny ■ caN for m 

•ppointMcnf for yomt mtnabon. New 

broclMrH arc availaMc. 

(Air conditioMrf) 

CALL 

Qainc; Sons of llal; Social CciMcr 

I2« Quarr; Sired. QviwT. MA t2lt» 

NEW NIMUR ii 472-S9M 





GEORGE'S EXPERT 
TAILORS AND CLEANERS 

136 WASHINGTON ST., QUINCY 
773-5999 

When you look sharp, you'll feel sharp, 
and you'll always look sharp when your 
clothes are tailored and kept clean by 
George's Expert Tailoring, 136 
Washington Street, Qumcy. George 
and Zaneta ha e been o" ering the best 
tailoring and the finest cleaning 
service on the South Shore for over 15 
years. 

Zaneta invites you to bring your 
mother's old wedding gown in, she'll 
bring back memories by altering the 
gown to fit you perfectly. 

See both George and Zaneta 

at 

George's Expert 
Tailoring and Cleaners 

136 Washington Street, Quincy 



PaitrR Quinr> Sun Ihursdat. .Iul> 2, I9S7 



Crime 
Watch 

B> RORKKT H ANNA 
(rime Prevention Officer 
Quinc> Police Department 




Assault Prevention 

>s For Self Protection 
While Driving 



Tip{ 



• Keep uindovKs rolled up and doors locked at all 
times. Check your gauge to see if you ha\e enough 
gasoline before lca\ing 

• Keep your purse and other \aluableN out ot sight 
either under the seat or in the glove compartment 

• At intersections and stop lights, keep sour car in 
gear. If \ou are threatened, blou the horn and dri\e 
away 

• Hitchikers should not be picked up. especialh b> a 
woman alone. Don't stop to help disabled dri\ers if 
you're alone; report them to police or a ser\ice station. 

• If you have car trouble, raise your hood and stay 
inside with your doors locked. If a stranger stops, ask 
him to report your predicament to the nearest Police 
Department. 

• It you are being followed, don't dri\e into \our 
dri\cway or attempt to lea\c your car. Dri\e to the 
nearest police station or fire station or open business lor 
help. 

• Don't allow yourself to be forced to the curb; 
speed up or slow down, but keep dri\ing. Write down 
the license number and description of the car and dri\er. 
and report the incident to police at once 

• Park in areas that will be well lighted when you 
return, lock sour doors. Put >our valuables in a locked 
trunk or lake them with you. Mwayscheck the rearseat 
and the floorboard betore getting inside your car. 

• Nc\er lea\e ke\s to your home with \our car keys 
when \our car is left in a parking lot or service station, 
(jet a pull-away key chain or separate your keys. 



1 1 Quiney Don Bosco Grads 
Going On To College 



Eleven Quiney residents of 
the class of 1 987 at Don Bosco 
Tech in Boston ha\e enrolled 
it colleges or unnersities lor 
;he fall semester, according to 
diredor of college placement. 
William Hddv 



Joseph 


P. Nelson. 121 


Oxenburg 


Rd.. William J 


McArdle. 


19 Dovle Terr., 


Jeremiah 


P Bowen. lOK 



Phillips St. and Kevin J 
Dempsey. 10! Pontiac Rd. 
will all attend r Mass Boston 
and are majoring m liberal 
arts. 

John F-. McMiilen. .171 
Vianet Ave.. Suffolk 



I ' n 1 \ e r s i t > . liberal arts; 
Stephen S Morad. 40 
Rawson Rd., Southeastern 
Massachusetts University, 
electrical engineering; Ekman 
Y Tsang. 12 Wollaston Ave., 
Rice University, aerospace 
engineering; Patrick Breen. 57 
Samoset Ave., Bndgewater 
State College, liberal arts; 
Mark W. Fahev. 196 
Governors Rd.. UMass- 
Amherst, civil engineering; 
Christian J. Boussey, 54 
Pawsey St.. University of 
Lowell, eledrical engineering; 
and Richard W. Brvan. 320 
Fayette St., North Adams 
State, liberal arts. 



Quiney Police Log Hot Spots 



June 19: 
Alarm of Hre, 1:10 am. 151 Sea St.. Town House Apis. 
Caller reports fire alarm sounding at above address. C-2 
Oft Sorgi and Cireillo.C-l Oil. Praetschand Potter. I- 
I Sergeant (ioyetle assigned. Report this a working lire. 
Second alarm sounded at 1.21 a.m. I bird alarm 
sounded at 2:20 a.m. Fourth alarm sounded at .V5.^ a.m. 
Red Cross notified to set up shelter tor displaced 
persons 

Larceny, 7:05 am. 808 Willard St. Caller reports that 
four tires were stolen from his 8'' Chev. during the night. 
Break/Arrest, 9 am. Casco St. Caller reports that a 
youth just climbed ina window at the above location. C- 
1 Oft. Burke & Blake, C-2 OtI. Queeney & Donovan 
detailed and report they have arrested an 18 year old 
Quiney youth for breaking and entering in the day time. 

June 20: 
M/V Vandalism, 4:.^ pm. 14 Faxon Ave. Caller reports 
that the windshield in an 8'' Ford truck has been 
broken 

Request Officer, 9:41 pm. Adams St. Caller rep oris 
two parties shooting guns at the rear ot the Hollov* 
Restaurant. A-l Off. Molloy and Breen. S-2 Off. Krmg 
and Courage dispatched. Responding officers report 
this is two vouths with squirt guns Parties advised. 

June 21: 
Large Gang, 12:25 am. Bishop Field, Hamilton Ave B- 
I Off Burrell & J. Sullivan, B-2 Off. Bradley assigned. 
Responding officers report this group is throwing rocks 
at them. I hree North Quiney youths were arrested for 
assault and battery and assault and battery with a 
dangerous weapcm. Off. Burrell was injured servicing 
this call. He was treated at Q.C H and relieved ofdutv 
Vandalism, 548 am. 19 \ictoria Rd. Caller reports a 
rock was thrown through a storm window and an inside 
window. 

Theft. y.M) pm, Robertson St. Caller reports that three 
men in a rust colored car with a black top iusi slok a 
"Street Mag" scooter trom the above address. 
Theft. 4 45 pm, Reardon Si Caller reports that ^ parties 
m a rust colored cai with a black top just stolea scoiMci 
trom the above address. 

June 22: 
Break, 2:45 am, Dayton St. A VCR. telephone 
answering machine and two box's of chips were taken. 
M/V Break, ■':26 am, 104 Centre St Caller reports that 
three vehicles were broken into overnight. 
M/V Accident, 11:32 am. Highland Ave & Brook St. 
Numerous 91 1 calls of an accident between a bus and a 
car. Report that the car has Hipped «)ver and a parlv is 
trapped inside. Four parties were taken to the hospital 
with iniuries. Quincv I ire Rescue notified to Iree t)ne 
individual. Accident under investigation bv Iratfic 



Officer Anthony Pollara. 

Break, 12:12 pm. West St., high numbers. Under 

investigation at this time. 

Break, 5 }4 pm. Faxon Rd. I nt ranee was gamed by 

forcing the rear door. A quantity of jewelry was taken. 

June 23: 
M/V Break, ■^:09 am. 14 Find St. Caller reports that a 
1982 Camaro was broken into. I he " I " tops, a wallet 
and tools were taken. 

Break, 12:25 pm. linson Rd. Fntrance was gained 
through the front door. I wo black males were seen 
leaving in a red Pontiac. Mass Reg. 125-T.''.'. 
Break, 12:4'' pm. F. Squantum St. low numbers. 
Fntrance was gained through a cellar window. A 
quantity of money was taken. 

Break, 5:14 pm, Russell St. Under investigttion at this 
time. 

Break, 11:07 p,n, Blake St Fntrance was gained 
through a rear window. A I Vand hummcis were taken. 

June 24: 
Larceny, 9:.U am, Ciridley St. Caller repaorts that a 
large amount of jewelry was taken from the home. 
Unknown how entrance was gained. Under 
investigation. 

Att. Break, .VOl pm. Flm St. Caller reports that 
someone tried to torce the front door. A good dead-bolt 
kept them out 

Break, 4:2.^ pm. Stedman St. Fntrance was gained 
through the cellar window. \ quantity ot jewelrv w.is 
taken. 

Break. 4:49 pm. South St low end Fntrance was gained 
through a kitchen window. A VCR and monev weie 
taken. 

June 25: 
Arrest, 4 5"^ am. Captains Walk ( -2 oil Boluuler 
reports he »)bserved an h2 C amaro strike a Dodge van 
and then llee towards Sea St C-l Oft Praetsch and M 
Kellv repaorts thev have this vehicle stopped at Sea A 
Palmer Sts A Dorchcsici luvenile was arrested lor 
larceny ol a nn>toi vehicle, operating a M \ not 
licensed, leaving the scene alter propertv damage 
Break, 5 51 pm. Willard St . K(H) block. Fntrance was 
gained bv torcing the Ironi dotir lewelrv and monev 
were among the items taken 

Break, ''pni, Indeperuleiue Ave Fntrance was gained 
through the tront dooi \ quantitv ol jewelrv and silver 
were taken 

Services lor week - 911 ( all-.^65; Wagon Kuns-4K. 
\ehicles I owed-45 

II you have anv inltirmatiim about anv ol the above 
crimes, or anv crime, please call the Quincv Police 
Detective Bureau ai 4''9-l2l2 e\i .^T \ ou will not be 
required to identify yourself. 



QJC Programs Approved By Board Of Regents 



Ihrec new academic 
programs offered by Quincv 
Junior College this year were 
recently approved bv the 
Massachusetts Board o( 
Regents. 

I he programs arc: 

• Optometric Icchnician. 

• Paralegal Studies and. 

• travel and Tourism. 
Each program was developed 
due to public interest, and 
under the regular academic 
guidelines of the college. 



wh«n it comes 
to insurance we 

keep good 
companies 

We represent many fine insurance 
companies. And we select the company 
we think can best suit your insurance 
needs — whether it's coverage for your 
car, your home or your business. 

For insurance with an independent 
point of vievy, give us a call. 



berry 



Waltham 

42 WESTON ST 



insurance ageiKy inc. 

685 hamccx:k street, quincy 

479-5500 



Franklin 

9 MAIN ST 



Walpol* 

940 MAIN ST 



894-1214 528-5200 668-2900 



I he Optometrie I echnician 
program is a eourse of studv 
designed to prepare students 
to assist optometrists in 
providing quality vision care 

Ibis course is offered 
currently in conjunction with 
the New England ( ollege of 
Optometry Students lake 
their liberal arts courses at 
Quincv Junior C ollege and 
their para-oplomctrit courses 
at the New t ngland C Ollege 
ol Optometrv 

Paralegal Studies enables 
the student tn uet ex pern nee 
and knowlcilf;. netcssar. o 



work in a legal oil ice A 
special feature ot the program 
IS the opportunitv to gain 
experience through an on-the- 
job internship in an actual law 
office 

the travel and tourism 
program at Quincv Junior 
(Ollege includes an overview 
of the travel indusirv. iv pes ol 
travel, travel geographv, 
airline reservation svstems. 



tour packaging, domestic aiul 
international travel and muih 
more ImplovmenI opporiu- 
nities in this field are rapidlv 
expanding and are available 
in a wide variety of settings 

lor more information on 
these programs contact tin 
Admissions office at "^K^- 
H7W or write to Quincv 
Junior college Admission".. 
.^4 (Oddington St . Quincv 
MA 02169 



2 Residents Graduate From New Prep 

Two Quincv residents ,,1 C ambridge 



recentiv were graduated from 
the New l»reparaIory School 



ARRESTED 

DRUNK DRIVING? 

Know your legal rights, possible legal defenses 

and potential legal consequences 

on* hour consultation *50.00 

TRIAL LAWYER ROBERT K. KELLY 

Call 479-8133 for appt. 



t hey are: 

(iregoryj Medlameot PI 
Itaivard St 

Anthonv M Scola ol 2\, 
llt)b»)neck Rd . was aw.tuleil 
the Political Science Aw.ml 

Vi illiam (^iia^liu 
PaHNeN Bar F^xam 

^Viiiiam .1 Qiiaglia " 
( urlew Rd . .Adanis Shore 
has passed the Massachiisells 
Har I xam given in I ebruaiv 



SOUTH SHORE TILE 



'# 



A'^ 



«fe 



:v 



DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 

338 Washington St. 



QUINCY 471-3210 



HOURS: 7 to 5 Mon., Tum., Fri. Wed. & Thurs. Ill 8 pm 



Thuniay, My 2, I9t7 Quimej Sm fft 9 



Regina Maris To Be 'Lighted' 

Amelia Earhart Celebration At Marina Bay 




KK(.IN \ M AKIS. historic Ihrer-masled till ship, has been 
outntted with somr 3.800 tin) whitr lights and permanently 
anchored at Marina Bay, Squantum. A li|>htin|> ceremony 

NQHS Calculus Team Strong 



In its fourth and final meet 
of the year the North Quincy 
High School calculus team 
placed second in Massachu- 
setts, third in New England 
and 20th in the United States. 

Ihe performance enabled 
the team to advance from its 
sixth place standing after 
three meets to second place in 
Massachusetts for the year, 
beatmg out Concord-Carlisle. 



Lexington. Sharon, and 
Weston and achieving a tie 
with Boston Latin. The nnal 
standing shows North Quincy 
High School in third place in 
New England and twenty- 
fourth place out of 250 teams 
m the United States. 

Lisa Ramsden was the 
team's leading scorer this 
year, backed up by high 
scorers Cynthia Lee, Jennifer 
Shores and Martin Steevcs. 



will take place tonight (Thursday) at 8:45 p.m. following an 
Amelia Earhart celebration that will start at 7:30 p.m. 

((Juinc\ Sun pholo by Tom Gorman) 



Coming Up 

Events coming up at Marina Bay this summer: 
Sunday, July 12 - Dinghy Day 

Sunday, July 26 - Island Barbecue 

Saturday, Aug. 8 - Treasure Hunt 

Sat. & Sun., Aug. 22-23 - Seaway Bluefishing 
Sunday, Sept. 6 -Marina Bay Festival 

For further information or entry blanksforany 
of the events, call 328-0600 or stop by the 
Administration Office. 



Famed aviatrix Amelia 
Earhart will be remembered 
at a commemorative 
celebration tonight (Thursday) 
at Marina Bay, Squantum, 
starting at 7:30 p.m. 

The celebration will kick 
off the July Fourth weekend 
activities at Marina Bay, 
Squantum which will include 
the lighting of the tall ship 
Regina Maris at 8:4S p.m. 

Amelia Earhart, one of 
aviation's most famed 
pioneers, flew out of the old 
Dennison Airport in North 
Quincy in the I920's. 

Dennison Airport was near 
the present Marina Bay and 
was a forerunner of the 
former Squantum Naval Air 
Station. 

Amelia's Restaurant at 
Marina Bay is named after 
her. 

Earhart and her co-pilot 
Fred Noonan were last heard 
from July 2. 1937 near 
Howland Island in the 
Pacific, not far from the 
Solomon Islands. 

She would have been 89 this 
July 24. 

Born in Atchison, Kans. 
July 24, 1898, her 39 years 
were marked by many 
accomplishments and 
associations. However, her 
love for aviation was what she 
pursued most actively. 

In 1918, as a nurses' aide 
with the Canadian Red Cross, 
she first became interested in 
flying through her associations 
with members of the Royal 
Canadian Air Force. Two 



years later, during 1920, she 
trained for aviation at Rogers 
Airport in Los Angeles and 
later that year bought a 
second-hand plane. 

In 1926, Earhart enrolled at 
Harvard Law School where 
she took up social work. Two 
years later she began teaching 
at Dcnison House, a Boston 
settlement and in the same 
year wrote the poem 
"Courage." 

She also became one of five 
incorporators of Dennison 

Aircraft and flew out of the 
Dennison Airport near 
Marina Bay. 

In June 1929. with Wilber 
Sxuhz as the pilot, she became 
the first woman to fly the 
Atlantic as a passenger. After 
this flight, she published the 
book. "20 Hours. 40 
.Minutes." 

During this same yea' she 
became the aviation editoi for 
Cosmopolitan Magazine. In 
1931 her writing career was 
furthered when her second 
book, "For The Fun Of It," 
was published. 

On May 20-21, 1932. 
Earhart became the first 
woman to fly solo across the 
Atlantic Ocean. She set a 
record time of 13'/^ hours. She 
received numerous awards for 
this feat, and continued to 
make history. 

On Jan. II. 1935 she 
became the first woman to fly 
from Hawaii to the U.S. 
During that same year she 
flew non-stop from Mexico to 
New York City. 



'Ome for a picture-perfect day at the 
Marina Bay Village Boardwalk! 

This quaint, seaside Boardwalk will take 
you back to an old-world charm and 
ambiance of yesteryear. 

Browse through the vast array of 
Nantucket-styled shops and restaurants 
or enjoy a tall drink as the sun sets over 
Boston's harbor and skyline. 

Come by land or by sea! It's just a 10 
minute drive from Boston, a short ride 
from the North Quincy MBTA station or 
a slip away from our full service marina. 

The Marina Bay Village Boardwalk will 
meet your every exp>ectation...and always 
bring you back for more! 



\-s.\ 



*'^''\ 



H':-:i\ 






IJS^^ 



:ssvii.v-?iriJ^"' 






Marina Bay. Victory Road, Marina Bay, Quincy, MA 02171 (617) 328-0600 




Marina Bay 



Pag« !• Quincy Sun Tkunday, July 2. 1917 



Mildred C. Dolan, 66 

Killed In Auto Accident 



A funeral Mass for Mildred 
C Dolan, 66, of West Quincy. 
formerly of Chestnut Hill, 
was celebrated Monday at St 
Ignatius Church, Chestnut 
Hill. 

Miss Dolan died Thursday, 
June 25, in a head-on collision 
in Ossipee, N.H. 

Miss Dolan was driving 
south on Route 16 in Ossipee 
when her auto was in a 
collision with a car driven by 
William Nilsen of Ossipee, 
who was also killed. 

Helen Kerr, of Lexington, a 
passenger in M iss Dolan's car, 
was taken to Wolfboro 
Hospital and transferred to 
Massachusetts Eye and Ear 
Hospital, Boston 



Born in Chelsea, she lived 
in Chestnut Hill for many 
years before moving to 
Quincy three years ago. 

Miss Dolan was a teacher in 
the Chelsea school systems 35 
years, retiring five vears ago. 

She was a member of the 
Neighborhood Club of 
Quincy and the club's bowling 
league. 

Miss Dolan was a volunteer 
at Milton Medical Center for 
three years. 

She is survi\ed by a 
brother. Austin E. and a 
sister. Maureen Dolan both of 
Adelphic, Md.; and four 
nephews. 

Burial was in Holy Cross 
Cemetery. Maiden. 



Josephine M. Damore 



A funeral Mass for 
Josephine M. (Boudrow) 
Damore, 96. of Quincy was 
celebrated Wednesday at St. 
John's Church. 

Mrs. Damore died Sunday 
at South Shore Nursing 
Eacility m Rockland after a 
brief illness. 

She was a lifelong resident 
of Quincy. 

Mrs. Damore was a 
housekeeper for many years 

She wasa memberof thcSt 



John's Ladies Sodality. 

Wife of the late Philip J 
Damore. she is survived by a 
brother. William Boudrow of 
Quincy; a sister. Maude 
K ravish of Quincy; four 
grandchildren, seven great- 
grandchildren and great- 
great-grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by Joseph Sweeney Funeral 
Home. 74 Elm St.. Quincy. 

Burial was in Mount 
Wollaston Cemeter\ 



\ o'^ e OVA J^f V.^P ''i-d: 'O • r^' / 

*A THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK ? 




-o C 



r- r .- oo ^ ^ -'..0/- ^ 



Scott Deware 



Possibly because of the Instant 
availability of news and opinions, 
many observers seem to be 
overwhelmed by the complexity 
and pace of today's living. 

The problems of today are 
much better publicized than the 
problems of yesterday. Just 
t>ecause we know about more Injustices and proMems 
does not mean that there ARE more than t>efore. 
Actually, issue lor Issue, today's troubles could be said 
to be "underwhelming " when compared with the long 
list of grievances against the King which are listed in 
the Declaration of Independence. 

Our forefathers were revolutionary with good 
reasons and they built a solid foundation of freedom 
and opportunity on which it is our privilege to carry on 
what they began. Our forefathers did not promise us 
freedom from troubles and worries. What they gave us 
was a superb doctrine for dealing with them. Surely the 
problems we have (and they are real and they v many) 
can be solved by men of good wNI within the 
governmental, business and social frameworlu which 
have served us so well for so long. 

Let us aN, as Americans, on this Fourth of July, pause 
and be thaniifui for that declaration that allows us to live 
in a free nation ... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St.. Quincy, MA 02170 

Tel: 472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



Obituaries 



Eleanor E. Taylor, 81 

Taught 42 Years At Central Junior 



A memorial service for 
Eleanor E. Taylor. 81. of 
FIcmington. N.J.. a retired 
teacher at Central Junior 
High School, was held 
Tuesday at Wollaston 
Congregational Church. 

Miss Taylor died June 24 in 
Flemington after a long 
illness 

Born in Salisbury. New 
Brunswick. Canada, she came 
to Quincy in 1927 after 
graduating from Mount 
Allison University. 

She taught mathematics at 
Central Junior High School 
for 42 years, retiring in 1969. 

She received her masters 
degree in education from 
Radcliffe University m 1949. 
In 1954. she was honored by 
the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences as an 
"Outstanding Teacher of 
Science." 

Miss Taylor was a member 
of the Wollaston Congrega- 
tional Church, the National 
Retired Teachers Association, 
the Massachusetts Retired 



Teachers Association, the 
Quincy Retired I eachers 
Association, the Quincy 
Women's Club and the 
William B. Rice Eventide 
Home Auxiliary. 

She is survived by five 
nephews, l.loyd J. Hennessey 
of Flemington. N.J.. Gordon 
Hennessey of Whitehouse 
Station. N.J , Richard C. 
Hennessey of Gillette. N.J.. E. 
William Wheeler of Centerv ille, 
Ohio. Frank 1. laylor of 
Ellicott City. Md . and 
Alexander Taylor; and many 
grand nieces and grand 
nephews. 

Burial was in Blue Hills 
Cemetery. Braintrec. 

In lieu of flowers, memorial 
contributions may be made to 
the Quincy Retired teachers 
Association Scholarship 
Fund, c o Miss Mable F. 
Pratt. 660 I'nion St.. Apt. 4A. 
Braintrec. MA 02184; or to 
the Wollaston Congregation- 
al Church Memorial Fund. 48 
Winthrop Ave.. Wollaston. 
MA 02170 



Marv Ellen Morion, 69 



\ funeral Mass for Mary 
Fllen (McKeen) Morton. 69. 
of Quincv. tormcrlv of 
Roslindalc. was celebrated 
June 26 in St. John's Church 

Mrs. Morton died June 2.^ 
at Quincv City Hospital 

Born and educated in 
Cambridge, she lived in 
Roslmdale manv years, 
moving to Quincy 10 years 
ago. 

Wife of the late Richard F 
Morton, she is survived bv 
four daughters. Joan I Black 
of Saugus. Janet M. 
Cappadona and Deborah A 



Kane, both of Quincv. and 
Donna I (ioulart of Hvile 
F'ark; a brother. John 
McKccn of Winchester; four 
sisters. Ann Hughes of 
Boston. Katherine Monahan 
of Walt ham. I heresa WOod 
of Somervillc and Helen 
Ferren of Burlington; eight 
grandchildren and four great- 
grandchildren. She was the 
sister of the late Dons 
Harrington Burial was in 
Pine Hill Cemetery 

Arrangements uere by the 
Keohane Funeral Home. 785 
Hancock St . Wollaston 



Bolea-Buonfiglio 

Funeral Home 



Michael A. Bolea 
Director 



116 Franklin St. 
Guincy, Ma. 




472-5319 



S>ujceneg 3Funeral ^crutcE 

DKNMS S. SWKKNEY, Director 
The"J()SKPH SWKKNKV Fl NKRAL HOMK.S" 

( OMPLKTK "HOMELIKE" 
ATMOSPHERE 






74 hLM ST. 
QUINCY 

775-2728 



326(OPhLANI) 
W OUINC Y 

773-272H 



OIR OM.V TWO I.fK ATIONS 

NOI M\ II lAI! I) WIIH ANY ()IH| R 
a \l KAI HOMI IN Ql IN( N 



Kathleen Chappell, 64 

Wa8 Secretary To 3 City Managers 



Kathleen Blanco (Gillman) 
Chappcll. 64. of Cayucos. 
Calif., an executive secretary 
to three Quincy city 
managers, died June 1 1 in 
Morro Bay. Calif 

Mrs Chappcll was born in 
Milton and was a graduate of 
Weymouth High School. She 
was a former resident of 
Braintrec. 

She lived in Rossmoor. 
Calif, for 21 years, moving to 
Cayucos four years ago 

She was employed by the 
city of Quincy as an executive 
secretary to City Managers 
William Dcegan. Donald 
Blatt and Fdward lewis and 
served as secretary to the 
latter when he became 
executive secretary to Mayor 
Amelio Delia Chicsa. 

She was a member of the 



Rossmoor Women's Club and 
was active in their bowling 
and bridge groups. 

Wife of the late Paul 
Chappcll. she is survived by a 
son. Paul P Chappell of Paso 
Robles, Calif.; a daughter, 
Cathy A. Ziegler of Cypress, 
Calif.; a brother, Stanlc\ 
(iillman of Colchester. COnn. 
two sisters, tstellc Flanagan 
and Anna Bibens. both ol 
(ilastonbury. Conn ; and loui 
grandchildren. Michelle A 
Ziegler. Jacquelynn M 
Chappell. Julianne M 
Chappell and Eric J /legicr 
She was the daughter ol 
(i e o r g e F . and Anna 
(Rouleau) (iillman 

Memorial donations can he 
made to the American Cancer 
Societv. 



Alice D. Murphy, 78 

Past President Quincv Women's Club 



A funeral Mass for Alice D 
(Cory) Murphy. 78. of 
Quincy. a retired payroll 
secretary for the Powell Flute 
Co.. Boston, was celebrated 
June 26 in St Francis Church. 
Braintrec 

Mrs Murphy died June 2.^ 
at Braintrec Manor after a 
long illness 

She was past president i>f 
the Quincv Women's Club, 
and a member ol theCieneral 
Federation of NNO men's 
( lubs. S quantum N acht 
( iub. the QuincN and 
Braintrec Historical Societies, 
the Fmhlem Club, and the 
QuiiK'N Aii\iliar\ of the 
William B Rice Isentide 



Home She was also .i Ri\\ 
Cross volunteer 

She was emplo\ed b\ ilu 
Powell I lute Co lor 2^ \e.us 
retiring m \^'!b 

Wife of the late I dw.int I 
Murph>. she is survived b\ ,i 
daughter. Harriettc A. Butki. 
of Braintrec. seven grandctnl 
d r e n and two >; i c .i ; 
grandchildren 

Buna! was in Blue II 
( emeterv, Braintrec 

Funeral arrangements «•' 
bv the Dev^are Furut.i 
Home. Vfi Hancock S* 
Wollaston 

Memorial donations can h. 
made to the Xmerican ( arui-: 
Societv. 4" W I Im Si 
Brockton. MA 02401 



Marfi;aret I. MoKillop, 85 



A funeral Mass for 
Margaret I (MacFachern) 
McKillop. K5. of Quincv. 
formerly of I ynn was 
celebrated I uesdav at St 
John's Church 

Mrs McKillop died 
Saturday at Quincy City 
Hospital after a brief illness 

She was a graduate of 
Tewksbury State Nurses 
School. 

Mrs McKillop was a 
retired nurse at the 
Massachusetts General 
Hospital Eye and Far 



her 
I 
1) 



Infirmary 

She IS survived bv 
husband. Alexander 
McKillop. a son. I eo 
McKillop of Wollaston. thrci- 
sisters. Alexina Ross ol 
Newton. Mary Block ot 
Manchester. N H and 
Kathleen Shute of [)edham. 
and four grandchildren anil 
three great-grandchildren 

Funeral arrangements v^ere 
by Joseph Sweeney Funeral 
Home. 74 Elm St . Quincy 

Burial was in Tcwksburv 
Cemeterv in Tewksburv. 



Robert A. Caswell, 74 



A funeral service for 
Robert A. Caswell. 74, a 
retired assistant treasurer for 
Eastern (ias and Fuel 
Association, was held 
Monday at Deware Funeral 
Home. 576 Hancock St.. 
Wollaston. 

Mr Caswell died June 26 at 
Quincy City Hospital. 

He was assistant treasurer 
lor 50 years 

Born in Somervillc. he 
moved to Quincy 50 years 
ago 

He is survived by his wife, 
Martha ((ireenwood) C aswell; 
* ***** * * 



two daughters. Judith Ryan 
of North Carolina and Finda 
Chaisson of Ipswich, a sister. 
Winifred M a w b e v of 
Attleboro; and four grand- 
children. Robbyn Chaisson ol 
Ipswich, and Chervl 
Machado. Joseph Machado 
and Robert Paul Machado. 
all of Quincv 

Burial was in Blue HiH 
Cemetery. Braintrec 

Memorial donations can be 
made to the Ronald 
McDonald House. 22*^ Kent 
St . Brookline. MA 02146 



^fs 



sMs 



Sweeney/ JBroikers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY 
RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 



1 




Tliunda;. Jolj 2, IW Q»to«J Sim Fife II 



Prize Winners Announced 



North Quincy Sidewalk 
Sale ^Tremendous Success*^ 



The fourth annual North 
Quinc\' Super Sidewalk Sale 
was another "tremendous 
success." 

In addition to bargains 
scooped up by thrifty 
shoppers, over $1,000 in 
pri/es were awarded to 44 
shoppers 

C'armella Corbin. owner of 
C'orbin's Fashions and 
president of the sponsoring 
North Quincy Business and 
Professional Association said 
the promotion was "very 
successful." 

"It went very, very well." 
she said Wc were very pleased 
with the turnout. It was a 
super day for everyone." 

Winners of the pri/es were 
drawn from coupons that 
appeared in the Quincy Sun 
and were deposited at 
participating stores by 
sht)ppers. 

Ihe winners and their 
pri/cs 

Accent I pholstery. four 
sofa pillows, kathy Kabillian. 
66 Buckingham Rd.. 
Wollaston. 

Anthony Palma Hair 
Stylist. $20 gilt certificate. 
Helen laft. 29 Athorp. North 
Quincy 

Bob's Speed and Auto 
Parts. Inc . $10 gift certificate. 
Helen Sullisan. 33 Albion 
Rd.. Wollaston. 

Balducci's Pi//a. four large 
piz/as of choice. Paul Ryan. 
61 Fdwin St . Quincy 

Bank of New tngland. two 
$25 savings accounts. Nita L 
Wallace. 160 Davis St.. 
Wollaston and Joseph Wrinn. 
23S West Squantum St.. 
North Quincy. 



Bargains (ialore. 14 kt. 
gold chain, J. Joyce. 29 Oval 
St.. North Quincy. 

Barmo's, $25 gift certificate, 
Joyce Ennis. 9 Kimball St . 
North Quincy. 

Burke's Seafood, two one 
and a quarter pound live 
lobsters. Mr. and Mrs. Paul 
Ryan. 61 Edwin St.. Quincy. 

Corbin's Fashions. $50 gift 
certificate. Mary Fit/gcrald. I 
Canton Rd.. Quincv 

Creative Hair Works. $25 
gift certificate. Ciloria Hurley. 
24 l.unt St.. North Quincy. 

Doran and Horrigan 
Insurance and Real Estate, 
surprise gift, Joyce Ennis. 9 
Kimball St.. Quincy. 

Dean's Video Express. 
Teddy Ruxpin Video Tape, 
l.ee Mel. can. 365 Palmer St.. 
Quincy. 

Emerald Isle Express. $15 
gift certificate. John Clark. 47 
Flynt St.. North Quincy. 

Encore Quality Consign- 
ment Shop, handcrafted item. 
Phyllis Mattera770. 79 
Billings Rd . North Quincv 

Fashion Quality C leaners. 
$20 dry cleaning. Ihomas 
McDonald, 29 Cheriton Rd.. 
Quincy. 

Granite Cooperative Bank. 
$25 savings account. Patty 
Murdock. 17 Freeman St.. 
Quincy. 

Hancock Flower Shop. $20 
arrangement. Kay Hoyt. 33 
Foster En.. Milton. 

Hancock International 
F ravel Service. I flight bag. 
Brian Condon. 77 Bromfield 
St.. Wollaston. 

Irish Pub. $20 gift 
certificate. Bill Heim. 
Di' ision St.. Quincy. 



Joyce Jewelers, butterfly 
charm. Margie Ready. II 
l.unt St.. North Quincy. 

Kid's Korner. $20 gift 
certificate, B. Breska, 46 
Euclid Ave.. Quincy. 

I.oretta's Doughnut 
Shoppe. three dozen 
doughnuts, Susan Dunham, 
43 Lincoln St., Wollaston. 

Mister Sub, Kodak disc 
camera and film, Gilda 
Knowles, 36 Sachem St., 
Quincy. 

Murphy's Beer and Wine. 
Harvey Strauss. 16 Billings 
Rd.. North Quincy. 

Naborhood Pharmacy, 
Timex watch, Marie 
Manupelli. 55 Adele Rd.. 
Quincy. 

Nando of Rome Coiffeurs, 
$10 gift certificate, Janet 
Salani, 35 Freeman St.. 
Quincy 

Susie's Haircutters, wash 
cut and blow dry. Harvey 
Strauss, 16 Billings Rd.. i 
North Quincy. 

Olympic Restaurant. $10 
gift certificate. Patty 
Murdock. 17 Freeman St.. 

Qiiinrv 

Pick of the Litter. $10 gift 
certificate. Donna Gilmartin. 
Quincy. 

Purdy's, ice cream pie. Kay 
Hoyt. 33 Foster Ln.. Milton. 

Quincy Cooperative Bank. 
$50 savings bond. Will Harris, 

William O'Brien 

William J. O'Brien, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. 
O'Brien Jr.. of Quincy was 
recently graduated from 
Norwich University and 
received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in communications. 



Quincy. 

Quincy Visiting Nurse 
Association Resale Shop. $20 
gift certificate. Donna Glynn. 
Quincy. 

Santo's Creative Men's 
Hair Styling, free hair cut. 
Jerry Marchetti. 391 Palmer 
St., Quincy. 

Shoe's by Lara, two pairs of 
shoes, Michelle Collen, 41 
Farrington St., Quincy. 

South Shore Bank. $50 
savings bond. .Mrs. Donald 
Mattson. 101 South Bayfield 
Rd.. Quincy. 

South Shore Check 
Cashing Service. $20 gift 
scratch tickets. Ciloria Hurley. 
24 Lunt St., North Quincy. 

Stan's Card and Gift Shop, 
$20 gift certificate, Terry 
Marchetti. 391 Palmer St., 
Quincy. 

Tedeschi Food Shops, $20 
gift certificate, John Kenney, 
60 Marshall St., North 
Quincy. 

Vaughan's Deli, baked 
ham, Martha Campbell. 46 
Lunt St.. North Quincy. 

Walsh's. $20 gift certificate, 
l.R. Doucet, 91 Clay St.. 
Quincy. 

Wheelhouse Diner, first 
prize four boiled dinners. Lee 
McLean. 365 Palmer St.; 
second prize four Italian 
breakfasts. Janet Salaris. 35 
Freeman St., North Quincy. 

Norn ich Graduate 

Upon graduation. O'Brien 
was commissioned as a 
Second Lieutenant in the U.S. 
Army Reserve. 

O'Brien was a 1983 
graduate of Xaverian 
Brothers High School. 




DONNA SI LI.IVAN (right) of Quincy, receives certiricatc 
from Shelley W idoff, director of the Certificate Program for 
Legal Assistants at Boston University's Metropolitan College, 
during recent graduation ceremony. She has worked as a legal 
secretary in the law firm of SutHvan and Cronin in Boston for 
the past 15 years. 



FAIELLA 

INSURANCE AGENCY 

L«t Ut H«lp You S«v«l 
148 Washington St., Quincy 

Call Today 471-1111 



AUTO • HOME • BUSINESS 

• Complete Policy Analysis 

• Private Home Appointments 

• 24 Hour Answering Service 

• All Registry Transactions 

• Full Claim Assistance 

• Notary Public 



I 



Abov* »*rvlcet free of charge • No oMIgatlont • Wt 
will tend to all of your Insurance needs and guarantee our 
most prompt and courteous service. 



The best way 
getting into 

Hot Water! 




''^'^^/'/'/V/-/V/////^V/iin\vVV\'v'v'v'^ 



Are you tired oj . . . 
7 Running out of Hot Water in the middle of a shower? 
? Only being able to use one hot water faucet at a time? 
? High gas or electric water heating bills? 

If the answer is YES, then do we have a system for you!!! 

We proudly present the super efficient Circle Hot Water Maker, offering you 
the luxury of unlimited hot water. 



Call us for more information Arthur Leseur 479-3000 



whgleco 

(formerly C.Y. WOODBURY OIL CO.) 

"Heat With The Best" 



(h CIRCLE COMBUSnON 

^^^ Tomorrow's Heating Systems Today 



Piff 12 Quinry Sun Thunda). Jul> 2. IW7 




SAVE THt TOWER Campaign at Bethany ( ongrrgatiunal ( hurch, Quincy Center got 
underway following a recent worship service with the presentation of SI, 000 and SI. 400 checks. 
From left, are Henr> Paterson. of the Bethany Churchmen: C'lifT Evers. Al Toy, Jean Smart, 
campaign treasurer; Harry Wetmore. Marion Sprague, of the church's Amity Team; and Louise 
Forsyth, moderator and lay leader of the church. Bethany hopes to raise SI25,0OO to repair and 
restore the church's landmark tower and gargoyles. 

$125,000 Bethany Drive 
Underway To Save Church Tower 



As part of the opening of 
the "Save the Tower" 
campaign at Bethany 
Congregational Church. 
Coddington and Spear Sts.. 
Quincv Center, gifts were 
presented following a recent 
worship service. 



Marion Sprague of the 
church's Amity Team and 
Henry Paterson of the 
Bethany Churchmen, presen- 
ted checks in the amount of 
$ 1 .000 and $ 1 .400 respectively 
to Louise Forsyth, moderator 



and lay leader of the church, 
and to Jean C. Smart, 
treasurer of the campaign. 

Bethany hopes to raise 
$125,000 to repair and to 
restore the church's landmark 
tower and gargoyles. 



Covenant Or Chaos' 
Sermon Title At Bethany 



This Sunday there will be 
one service of worship at 10 
a.m. in the sanctuary of 
Bethany Congregational 
Church. United Church of 
Christ, Coddington and 
Spear Sts., Quincv Center. 

The Rev. Joel F. Hunting- 
ton, associate minister, will 
preach' the sermon, entitled 
"Covenant Or Chaos." 

The sermon will focus on 
the need for a covenant of 
interdependence in life 
together as a nation. In 
addition Holv Communion 



will be celebrated. Rev. J. 
William Arnold, senior 
minister, will be the liturgist. 

Lay Scripture reader will be 
Dorothy L. Mitchell. The 
communion commentary—for 
radio only-will be given by 
Robert W. McLain. 

Robert E. Brown will be the 
guest organist for the 
morning. He will direct as his 
son. Philip Brown, baritone 
soloist, sings "The Lord Is My 
Shepherd" by Don Humph- 
rey, and "Lord. God of 
.Abraham" b\ F mendels- 



sohn. 

Nursery care will be 
provided by church members 
for babies and toddlers. 

The service of worship is 
broadcast live at 10 am over 
WJDA, i300kc. A cassette 
tape of the service is available 
for $2 by contacting the 
church office at 479-7300 

There will be a fellowship 
hour following the worship 
service Members of the 
community are welcome to 
share in both the worship and 
in the fellowship 



Wollaston Church 
of the ^Nazarene 




Vacation Bible School 
At First Presbyterian Church 



,>7 E Elm Ave.. Wollatton 
— Services — 

Sundt yllOOtm ttOOpm 
Wednesday - 7 00 p m 



"Serve the 1 ord" is the 
theme of this year's Vacation 
Bible School to be held al 
First Presbyterian C hurch, 
270 f-rankiin St.. South 
Qumcy Monday. July 6 
through LridayJuly I0from9 
am to 12 noon. 

Bible learning is brought to 
life through creative 
storytelling, aafts, music, and 
recreation, is planned for all 
children of any faith, ages 4 to 



r 






I 



Church of 

Saint John the 

Baptist 

44 School SI Omncy. Matt 

PASTOH 

Rtv WHIkamR McCarthy 

ASSOCIATES 

R«v Dsnt«l M Graham 

Rav Edward G Carroll 

«•» Theodora Fontar 

Outncy Hoopltal Chaplain 

In ratid»r>ca 

Ra* Mr Chartat SuHlvan 

Daacofl 

MASS SCHEDULE 

ALL MASSES IN THE UPPER CHURCH 

Saturday 4 00 & 7 00 pm 
Sunday 7 00 8 15 9 30 and n 00 am 12 30 and 5 30 pm 
Daily Masses Monday thru Friday - 8 00 am and 5 30 pm 



1 2. A child must hav e reached 
his or her fourth birthday to 
register. 

Children may prc-rcgister 
by calling the church office at 
773-5575 (Monday- F hursday 
9 to I p m.) or may register at 
8:30 the first day of Vacation 
Bible School. All are 
welcome There is no fee for 
this program. 

C ontact Karen Arnold 773- 
5575 for further information- 
details. 




THE QUINCY POINT 
C0N6IIE6ATI0NAL CHURCN 

Corner Southern Artery 
and Washington St Quincy 

SUNDAY SERVICES. 10 a.m. 

Rev free Atwood-Lyon 
Rev Carol E Ati*ood-Lyon 

1773 6424 (Child Care provided) 
Call The Daily Bible 472-4434 




A RKPI.IC A of » lop-sail schooner wis constructed by trena|>rrs of the First (hurch of 
Squantum as part of the decorations for the church's "Sailinx Sunday" held recently. Marci 
Hurd, left, and Mindi Hard were among those who worked on the 20-fool lonft project. 

H^Htni\ *^tin /</iii/<> In lunt (•nrmiiixi 

Summer Schedule 
At Squantum Church 



"Waiting For The lord" 
was the title of the sermon 
preached Sunday at the First 
Church of Squantum by the 
pastor. Rev Dr. Gene 
Langevin., 

Mary Ruth Scott was the 
organist. Tore Wallin and 
Stewart Scott were the ushers. 
Edna Swanson and May 
Lewis hosted the Fellowship 



Hour after the service. 

This was the day on which 
the congregation changed 
over to the summer schedule 
of worship. During the 
summer, the Sunday service 
will be at 9:30 am. 

On Sunday, July 5, the 
congregation will gather 
behind the church at 8:30a m 
for its annual Independence 



Day brealifast before the 
Sunday service at 9:30 am 
tickets are $2.50 per person 
and can be reserved by calling 
Ha/el Maync at 328-436^ 

Those who will he 
attending the breakfast arc 
encouraged to wear straw hats 
and other attire appropriate 
for a traditional celebration cit 
the Fourth of July. 



Outdoor Services 

To Start At Covenant 

Congregational Sunday 



Beginning this Sunday, the 
10 a.m. worship service of 
Covenant Congregational 
Church, Whitwell and 
(iranite Sts., will be held 
outside in the church park 
adjacent to the building, 
weather permitting. 

Communion will be served 
outside that Sunday I hose 
attending mav bringthcir own 
lawn chairs 

Rev Fred lawson's 
sermon topic will be "A drcat 
Memorial" Richard Smith, 



minister of music, will be 
playing the portable 
electronic organ for the 
summer and will accompany 
I uisa Dano. soprano soloist, 
ne.xt Sunday 

As usual, an attended 
nursery is available lor 
children age five and younger 
in the church. Following the 
service, a coffee hour will be 
shared in Person Hall 

At a special congregational 
meeting ii was voted to hire 
the recommended contractor 



to begin painting the outside 
trim on the church and to 
replace the oil burner Both 
jobs will be done this summer 

Vacation Biole Day C amp 
will be held Wednesdavs (rom 
9 tt» 11:30 am July 1^ 
through Aug 12 I here vmH 
be a $4 registration fee and the 
theme will be "A Journcv i.> 
Japan "- Adult volunteers are 
still needed for all sessions 

More information abmii 
any of the church's activ ities is 
available by calling the church 
office at 479-5''2K 



Vacalioii Biblr School Krifistralioii Jiilv 10 



Registration will be held 
Fridav.Julv 10 from 6. 30 pm 
to 8 p.m. lor Vacation Bible 
School to be held at the 



Salvation .Army. 6 Baxter St. 
Quincy v^eek nights ]u\\ 10 
through July 17 

(lasses are for children 4 



years old through sixth grailc 
for further information 
call 472-2345. 



Quincy Heart Assn. Branch 
Raises $7,600 In First Year 



I he Quincy branch of the 
American Heart Association, 
after its first year of 
organization, chaired by 
Carol Speran/o of Second 
Sight, raised a total of $7,600. 

The money was raised in 
events such as Hearts and 



Flowers, Home with Heart, 
and a system-wide. Jump 
Rope for Heart. 

Branch members also 
participated in the American 
Heart Food Festival last 
September by recruiting 
dieticians for four local 
supermarkets. 



Concentration will be 
placed on recruiting 
additional members over the 
summer. Anyone interested in 
volunteering time to join the 
fight against heart disease and 
stroke, may contact the 
Brockton Heart Association 
office at 584-0446. 



Robert Burrelli Bible School Graduate 



Robert J. Burrelli of 
Quincy, was graduated from 
the ( orrespondence School 
program of the Moody Bible 



institute of Chicago. 

Burrelli, who traveled to 
Chicago for the graduation 



ceremony, received an Adult 
Bible Studies Certificate at 
the commencement exercises. 



V 



Confessions m Chapel 
Sat 3-3 45 PM. 7 45 -« 15 P»4 
Rectory-21 Gay St 



773-1021 




65 Washington Street Quincy, IMA 02169 






-:^' 




l» 



479-6512 / 479-4932 

Sunday School 9 30 am 

Starting July 1 - Sept 1 
Morning Worship 1000 am 

Evening Service 6:00 pm 

Wed. Evenings 7:00 pm 

Bible Study & Prayer Service 

Nursery provided at all services 
Rev Sid A Veenstra, Pastor, Teacher 
A.M.: CELEBRATE 
P.Mj LET'S read 
AffUlafd with: BapU$t QtnanI Conltnnc* 
Hortharn Baptitt Conttnnca 



FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST. SCIENTIST 

20 Grearileat St . Qmncy 



Cordially myites you and 
your family to attend 
Sunday ServK.i-s at 10 4") 
a m Sunday School is held 
at the same lime 

Wednesday Evening 
Meetings t>egin al 7 30 p m 

Child Care is available t>olh 
Sunday and Wednesday 




Come and hear how Bible truths heal. 



Thursday, July 2, I9t7 Qmlmey Sun Pag* 13 




Michael E. Buchanan 
Top Physics Student At QHS 



Michael E. Buchanan was 
recently selected the 
outstanding physics student 
at Quincy High School and 
presented a certificate from 
the American Association of 
Physics Teachers by Charles 
E. Gliniewic?. a physics 
teacher at Quincy High 

He is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Edmund Buchanan. 78 
Doane St.. Quincy. 

The valedictorian for the 
Quincy Hi^h Class of 1987. 

Political Advertisement 



Michael will attend Rutgers 
University in the fall and 
major in meteorology. 

Michael is a member of the 
National Honor Society and 
the Mathematics Team. He 
has also received the 
Chemistry Honors Award, 
the Mathematics Honors 
Award, the Quincy Historical 
Society Award, the Brown 
University Book Award and 
the Presidential Fitness 
Award 

Political Advertisemeri 



The American Association 
of Physics Teachers was 
founded over 50 years ago to 
encourage excellence in 
physics teaching and has 
approximately 10.000 
members in the United States 

and abroad. To recognize 
outstanding work of physics 
students, the association 
provides a certificate each 
year to the best physics 
student in the school. 

Political Advertisement 



RAI PM PAl II. third left, was recently installed as commander of the Quincy Jewish \\»t 
Veterans Post during the 4Hlh annual installation of officers at Beth Israel S>nagoRue. From 
left, are Samuel Samuels. David Minkofsky, juni<»r vice commander: Paull; r>r. Bertrand 
Shaffer, senior vice commander; Kdward FIfman and MeUin (.oldstein. stale commander. 



It is with great pleasure that 

NEWTON J. COCHRAN, M.D. 

GUY A. SPINELLI, M.D. 

and 

ROBERT M. WEINBERG, M.D. 

announce 

THE RELOCATION OF THEIR OFFICES FOR 

THE PRACTICE OF INTERNAL MEDICINE 

to 

7 ELM AVENUE 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 021 70 

770-2211 328-8811 328-7673 




Julys 
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July 4 
July 4 
July 4 
July 4 
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HAVE A HAPPY 
AND SAFE SUMMER 

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AT THE 

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Welcome Young Playground/Atlantic Field Day 10 am-l pm 
Squantum Parade & Festivities 10 am 
Fore River Field/Quincy Point Field Day 9 am-S pm 
General Palmer Park/Germantown Field Day 9 am-8 pni 
Baker Beach/Germantown Field Day 8 am-S pm 
Merrymount School/Merrymount Parade & FesUvWet 12:30 



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Pat* 14 Quincy Sun ThurMiay. July 2. I9S7 



McCauley Launches 

Campaign To 

^Keep Our City Clean' 



Mayor Francis McCauley 
announces he has initiated a 
"Let's Take Pride in Quincy 
and Keep Our City Clean." 
campaign. 

With the summer months 
approaching and school in 
recess, residents should 
resolve to keep their 
properties tidy, he said. 

McCauley said that "if a 
partnership comprised of city 
departments, businesses, civic 
and neighborhood organiza- 
tions and most importantly, 
individual citizens like you 
and mc -- if wc all pitch in -- it 
will be easier to keep the city 
clean." 

McCauley suggests that 
neighborhoods, groups and 
organizations enlist the aid of 
city councillors to initiate 
clean-up days He further 
suggests that citi/ens organize 
problem areas to be targeted. 



and then tackle one area at a 

time. 

McCauley is also urging 
local businesses to keep their 
properties free of debris and 
trash. 

The mayor said. "We 
should instill the attitude that 
litter is everyone's business, 
not just the city government's. 
We should make it unfashion- 
able to litter." 

McCauley said that this 
should happen on all levels - 
no one is too old or too young 
to be aware that it is nicer to 
live in a city vou can be proud 
of. 

The Public Works. 
Cemetery and Park-Forestry 
Departments have been and 
will continue to work 
diligently to keep public ar^as 
clean, he said. 

In addition. McCauley 
noted that the Downtown and 



Beautification Committee has 
done extensive work in 
refurbishing parks and traffic 
islands throughout the city 
Many flowering shrubs have 
been planted, and trimming 
and mulching has taken place. 
Councillor Patricia I oland. 
chairwoman of the Downtown 
and Beautification Committee, 
announced the establishment 
of a small task force to survey 
areas and make precise 
recommendations for 
improvements. 

This task force consists of 
Peter M. Kenney. executive 
secretary to the mayor, Frank 
Mclaughlin of the Park 
Department and a reprcsenta- 
ti\e of the Planning 
Department. 

McCauley said all residents 
should take pride in Quincy 
and keep the city clean. 



Quincy Receives $43,630 
For ^Gateway Cities' Program 



State Secretar\ of 
Communities and Develop- 
ment Amy S. Anthony has 
awarded $43,630 to Quincy to 
suppcul local efforts to 
provide services to immigrants 
and newcomers. 

The award, part of an 
innovative state initiative 
called Gateway Cities, 
provides resources to 
communities which have 
experienced an influx of 
newcomers so that special 
services, such as help in 
finding jobs and housing, can 
be provided 

"The ncu (iateway Cities 
program will make it easier 
for immigrants and refugees 
to share the economic success 
uf have achieved in the 
commonwealth." Anthony 
said "By providing services 
which address the specific 
problems lacing newcomers, 
we are taking an important 
step towards eliminating the 
barriers to opportunity which 
often confront newcomers as 
they adapt to life in a new 



country.' 

The award to Quincy will 
pay for a broad range of 
services developed as part of a 
local plan to address 
newcomer needs. Among the 
services which will be 
provided as part of Quinc>''s 
Gateway Cities plan are: 

• A community liaison 
worker will be hired by the 
city to aa as an interpreter 
between city social services 
agencies and the Chinese and 
Vietnamese speaking commu- 
nities and to assist in 
developing a resource 
directory in Chinese and 
Vietnamese. 

• The city will also hire a 
consultant to identify and 
develop city programs and 
services to be targeted to 
newcomer groups; 

• English as a Second 
Language (ESI.) classes will 
be provided and ESI. 
textbooks will be purchased 
for the Quincy Public 
Library's new Reader Project 
Tutoring Program for 
newcomer groups. 



Anthony noted that 
Massachusetts is one of the 
only states in the country to 
target state resources to 
provide assistance to 
newcomer groups. "Governor 
Dukakis has often said that 
the economic health ol the 
commonwealth must be 
shared by all its residents," 
Anthony said. "The Gateway 
Cities program, created by the 
state legislature, will help us 
make good on our shared 
commitment to provide 
economic, housing and social 
opportunities for all." 

Ihe SI I million in Cialeway 
Cities program funds will be 
shared by 26 communities 
throughout the commonwealth 
which are experiencing an 
influx of newcomer groups 
The awards, determined by 
formula based on a 
community's immigrant and 
refugee population, support 
locally-developed plans to 
address the specific needs of 
newcomer groups living in the 
community. 



17 Receive $4,010 In 
HN Council Book Awards 



Seventeen students recently 
received book awards from 
the $4.0IOdistributed recently 
from the Houghs Neck 
Community Council Scholar- 
ship Fund 

This is the greatest number 
of students, selected from 28 
applicants on the basis of 
academic grades, and the 
largest annual amount 
awarded since 1964 when the 
fund was established 

Total presented to date is 
$35,810. 

Those receiving the awards: 

Hi{h School Graduates 

Kathleen Ryan. Woodward 
School. 93 Rock Island Rd . 
accepted at several colleges- 
$500 Houghs Neck Commu- 
nity Council Scholarship 
Award. 

Thomas !,ogan. Quincy. 85 
Edgewater Dr - $250 Chris 
Peter Memorial Award. $50 
Houghs Neck Community 
Council Award, entering 
Northeastern l.niversity 

Christian Boussy. Don 
Bosco. 54 I'dWNcy St . $250 
Kaye Gunning Memorial 
Award, entering U. Lowell. 

Darrcl Aiguier, Voc-lech. 
19 Chapel St., $155 Mary 
Clancy Memorial Award 



entering Northeastern U. 

Dorothy A. Cameron. 
Quincy. 7 Winthrop PL. $150 
Edward Radcliffe Memorial 
Award, entering U. Lowell. 

Stephen Picarski, Quincy, 
34 Hawthorne St., $100 
Dorothy Rae Memorial 
Award; entering Framingham 
State. 

Chad Hallett. Quincy, 125 
Sea Ave.. $100 Katherine 
Doherty Memorial Award; 
entering U Mass. Boston. 
Coliece StudenU 

Jennifer McCauley. 210 
Manet Ave., entering senior 
year at American University - 
$500 Houghs Neck Commu- 
nity Council Scholarship 
Award. 

Kelly Doherty, 106 
Rockland St., entering senior 
year at Holy Cross - $200 Our 
Lady's Sodality Award; $150 
Rock Island Cove Award. 

Cynthia M or re II, 64 
Parkhurst St , entering fourth 
year at Emmanuel - $250 
Joseph Paradise Memorial 
Award. $100 Frank Locke 
Memorial Award from 
Harvey's Salt Water Fishing 
Club. 

Sharon Steen, I Bird St., 
Aquinas Junior College - 



Kaye Gunning Memorial 
Award $250. 

Carol Blowers. 92 Sea Ave., 
entering full-time at Quincy 
Junior College - $125 Scott 
Whitney Memorial Award; 
$75 Houghs Neck Communi- 
ty Council Award. 

Michelle Richmond, 20 
Stoughton St., entering 
second year at Suffolk U. - 
$105 Joseph Valentino, Jr. 
Memorial Award. 

Peter McPartlin. 150 
Stoughton St., a junior at 
Boston College - $100 
Anonymous Award. 

Lee A. Mitchell, 74 Darrow 
St., entering third year at 
Lesley - $100 Anonymous 
Award. 

Nancy Mellyn, 26 Bay View 
Ave., entering third year at 
Framingham State - $100 
Buzz Orio and Jack Dennis 
Memorial Award. 

Arnold Bcresen is Scholar- 
ship Fund Chairman - 
committee members are: 
Helen Berescn. Mary C ollins, 
David DiBona, Dorothy 
Laing. Herbert F. Morgan. 
Atty. William Murphy, 
Margareta Radcliffe, 
treasurer, Ruth Wainwright. 
secretary. 







W OLLASTON LE(;i()N POST rfcenliy drdicaird a monumrni at Ihe corner of Hancock Si 
and Southern Artery in honor of "the men and women of Wollaslon who have of thrir li»es to 
this nation in times of armed conflict." Fr<»m left, are Mayor Francis Mc( auley with past 
commanders Joseph A. ( unniff and Frank koslowski. The sUmt replaces one which was 
damaged by vandals. 

(ijuint\ Sun phxiii tt\ i inn (•itmintu 

Wollaston Memorial 

Restored As Part 

Of Park System 



Ihc Wollaston Memorial 
located at the inlcrscciion ol 
Route 3.A and HanciKk St in 
Wollaston ha\ been restored 
and Will become a permanent 
memorial in ihc city's park 
system 

Originally designed and 
created by Paul Riccardi of 
Wollaston. il was Unated in 
Sallord Park on Bcale St in 
Wollaston to replace the 
World War 1 Howitzer placed 
in Ihc park afler WDrld War I 
Ihc Howitzer was removed 
during World War II and 
donalcd to the Scrap Drivi- 
conducted lo secure needed 
metal. 

I or many years the site was 
vacant except for a plaque 
idling ol ihc Hown/cr 
existence Alter its new Post 
home was built on Weston 
Ave.. Wollaston I cgion Posi 
conducted a Public subscrip- 
tion program wiihin the 



Wollaston c o ni m u n 1 1 v . 
secured Ihc services ol Paul 
Riccardi and the mcmt)rial 
was placed in Safft)rd Paik A 
capsule with a listing o( the 
subscribers was placed in ihc 
memorial 

Ihc memorial was ihen 
vandalized and pulled down 
at the Sallord Park siic 
Again Riccardi resitired the 
memorial and it was moved to 
Ihc corner ol Weston A\c on 
ihc Wollasion Post Home site 
and remained there until Ihe 
Post home was sold 

Ihrough Ihe elloris ot 
Mayor Francis Met aule\ ils 
present siie became available 
with ihe cooperalM>n and 
assistance o| Phillip Kieciuli 
ol Ihe Hancock Monunienl 
(Ompany and Richaid 
Koch, execuiive dircci«»r ol 
the Quincv park, lorestrv and 
cemeierv deparinienis Ihe 
memorial was moved lo iis 



present siic adjaeeiii io 
Vercrans Memorial Stadium 

Ihen came another 
setback It was broken as a 
result ol an dccideni Onee 
again il needed rcsU>raiion 

Joseph Cunnifl .ind Arthur 
Scnier. past commanders o\ 
Wollasion Post . w e i e 
appointed lo coordin.i!e 
dlorts wiih Mayor Mi-(auk\"s 
office represented by KikM 

Ihe memorial w a ^ 
leciealed b\ ihc lames ( 
C unnilt Moniiinenl Corp I'l 
Qumcy and creeled under 
KiKh's direction 

Ihe cartridge eonlamii.f; 
Ihe names ol the subsenbeis 
lot the original menuuial. 
earelully preserved lhrou{:h 
Ihe restoration ol ihe 
memori.il has been pi, iced 
wiihin ihe niemoiial and 
dedicated lo the men and 
women of Wolj.ision who 
served Ihis nation in limes ol 
war. 



Foster Parents And 
Social Workers Honored 



Over 140 people, including 
foster parents, social workers, 
politicians and community 
representatives attended the 
seventh annual Recognition 
Dinner held by Quincy 
[department of Social 
Services in honor of the South 
Shore area's foster parents 
and social workers. 

fhe group gathered at 
Montello's in Quincy for 
dinner, awards and dancing. 

Among those receiving 
awards were foster parents 
Nancy Carmody, Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank Langillcand Rita 
Owens-Mitchell and Patrick 
Mitchell all of Quincy; Mr. 
and Mrs. Roy Conrad and 
Mr and Mrs Richard Days 
of Randolph. 



Some foster families from 
other areas that have been 
very supportive in having 
Quincy area children placed 
in their homes are Mr. and 
Mrs Harry Azis of Abington. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Boutin 
of Fall River and Miss Janice 
Ridge of Bridgcwater. 

Each social work unit of the 
Quincy area office of the 
Department of Social 
Services also received awards 
for their unique contributions 
to children in foster care. In 
addition, representatives of 
the South Shore community 
received recognition awards 
for their support of foster care 
resources during the past 
year. Award recipients were 
Wayne Dunlop of Eastern 



Nazarcne C ollcge in Quincy. 
Mr. and Mrs Arnie (labrielle 
of the L'nited Church of 
Christ in Norwcll. Richard 
Koch of the Koch ( lub of 
Quincy. June Leahy ot 
Barker's Stationery also in 
Quincy. Rev. William 
McCarthy of St John the 
Baptist Church. Mrs. 
Dorothy Newell of the Patriot 
Ledger and Linda Whitlingof 
Eastern Nazarcne College. 

Among the guests were 
Mayor Francis McCauley, 
Judge Levin Whitman of 
Quincy District Court, 
members of the Quincy Cily 
Council. William Dolan. 
assistant commissioner of the 
Massachusetts Department of 
Social Services, and Quincy 
D.S.S. area board members. 



Summer Institute Opens July 6 At QJC 



I here are six openings left 
tor gifted academically 
talented siudcnis entering 
grades 8 through 12 in Quincy 
Junior College's sixth annual 
Summer Institute. 

courses for younger 
children are already filled 

Ihe institute which runs 
from July 6-1''. is a half-day 



enrichment program designed 
to meet and challenge the 
academic and artistic needs ol 
students. 

Students will select three 
courses from the lollowing: 
Chemistry I.aborat(»ry. Earth 
Science. Eye to I. Introduction 
lo PascaL Introduction lo 
Computers and Programming 



in BASK . SAT Mathematics 
Pres, SAI Verbal Prep and 
Mudworks. 

I wo evening programs on 
the college application 
process lor students and their 
parents will also be scheduled 

Eor lurther information or 
an application, call Dr. Carol 
Uc Griffin al "'K6-«742. 



Thunday. July 2. 1917 Quincy San Page IS 



Sterling School Presents 
$1600 Check To Fight Drugs 



Students and faculty of the 
Sterling Middle School 
recently concluded their 
participation in Quincy's 
"Drug Awareness" week by 
releasing 200 helium-filled 
balloons and presenting a 
$1,600 check to Project 
feelings. Inc. 

A Quincy-based drug 
research organization. 
Project Feelings ls led by 
executive director Jack 
Donahue. It is a non-profit 
organization. 

Ihe lunds. raised by 
students and faculty through 
the sale of candy bars, were 
presented lo Don.ihm' 



Sterlins assistant principal 
Richard Hutchison, coordi- 
nator of the drive, said. "The 
volunteer serve project was 
inspired by the students' 
gratitude for an April 3 
assembly program and 
workshops given at the school 
by Mr. Donahue and his 

brother Brian, a former NY 
Jets lineman " 

"We are very proud of our 
students' enthusiasm and 
great capacity for giving their 
time and ser\ ice for 
worthwhile causes " 

Both Hutchison and 
Donahue agreed that 
students' reception of Hm" 



awareness messages and their 
active involvement in 
promoting drug free lifestyles 
were "very promising signs of 
a healthy future for the city of 
Quincy." 

According to Donahue, the 
donation from Sterlingwill be 
used for a new part of the 
program. "For Parents Only." 

"Parents can call and we'll 
bring a panel to speak." said 
Donahue. 

For Parents Only will start 
in Quincy and expand to 
Hingham. according to 
Donahue. 

For more information, call 
Donahue at 472-1055. 



23 Graduate From 
St. Joseph's School 



Iwcnty-three Quincy 
residents have graduated 
fpom Saint Joseph School. 22 
Pray St . Quincy. 

I hey arc: 

Steven P Brodeur, Amy 
J Chenettc. Carolyn B. 
C asrncy. Regma C'hu. Sheila 
A Cronin. Denise C ("urran. 
Janet I.. Dilullio. Paul J 
(ientile. Janecn M. Hurlev. 
Michael O'Keefe Johnston. 
Krista C. Kerrigan. Melissa 
M Marronc. Norcen M. 
McBridc. Laurel A 
McCloskcy. Eileen M. 
McDonnell. Michelle L. 
McKenna. Michael S. 
Mazzini. Danielle Morin. 
Patricia A Quinn. Antoinetta 
I. Ruscio, Marc Schurman. 
Michael J. Staff and Jennifer 
A. V'erlicco. 

Scholarships were awarded 
to: Michael Staff, Holy Name 
Scholarship, f-ileen 
McDonnell. Sodality Schol- 
arship; Janeen Hurley. Srs. of 
St Joseph Scholarship; Amy 
Chenette. Alumni Scholarship; 
CaroUn Carney. Frances 
I errassi Scholarship; Jenniler 
Vcrlicco. Vinnie Barrett 
Scholarship; Norcen McBride. 
(icorgc Shahccn Memorial 

Scholarship, .Antoinetta 
Ruscio. Merit Awards; 
Melissa Marrone. St Joseph 



the Worker Award. 

Perfect Attendance 
.Awards: Steven Brodeur. 
Antoinetta Ruscio. Denise 
Curran, Danielle Morin and 
Norcen McBridc. 

Focal Art Fair prizes: 
l-ileen McDonnell, first; 
Janeen Hurley, second; 
Regina Chu, third; Antoinetta 
Ruscio, honorable mention. 

Science Fair prizes: Steven 
Brodeur. first; Jennifer 
Vcrlicco and Noreen 
McBride. second; Paul 
Gentile, third; Melissa 
Marrone. Denise Curran and 
Janet DiTullio, honorable 
mention. 

Patriot Ledger Spelling Bee 
Champion: Eileen McDonnell; 
runner-up. Laurel McCloskey. 

Certificates for Service on 
the Student Council: Noreen 
McBride, president; Melissa 
Marrone, vice president; 
Jennifer Verlicco and Carolyn 
Carney. 

Certificates of Honor all 
three terms: Amy Chenette. 
Janeen Hurley and Eileen 
McDonnell. 

Honorable Mention all 
three terms: Jennifer Verlicco. 
Carolvn Carney and Noreen 
McBride. 

F'hysical Fitness Awards: 

Michal Staff. Michal 



Morin. 

Eileen 

Cronin. 

Jennifer 



Amy 
Noreen 

Merit: 
Sheila 



Mazzinin. Danielle 
lanpen Hurlev. 
McDonnell. Sheila 
Denise Curran and 
Vcrlicco. 

Cheerleading Awards: 
Amy Chenette. Eileen 
McDonnell, Janeen Hurley, 
Antoinette Ruscio, Jennifer 
Verlicco, Carolyn Carney, 
Michelle McKenna. Janet 
Ditullio and Sheila Cronin. 

Reading Awards: Melissa 
Marrone. first 
Chenette. second. 
McBride, third. 

Certificate of 
Carolyn Carney, 
Cronin, Paul Gentile, Amy 
Chenette, Denise Curran, 
Michael Johnston, Michael 
Mazzini, Michelle McKenna, 
Antoinetta Ruscio, Jennifer 
Verlicco, Regina Chu, Janet 
DiTullio, Krista Kerrigan. 
Noreen McBride. Danielle 
Morin and Marc Schurman. 

Eileen McDonnell received 
the Notre Dame Scholar for 
the Class of 1991 Award. 

Certificates of Academic 
Achievement from President 
Reagan were awarded to 
Michael Staff. Eileen 
McDonnell. Jennifer Verlicco, 
Noreen McBride, Carolyn 
Carney. Amy Chenette and 
Janeen Hurlev 



QHS Malh Team Strong In Competition 



I he ninth grade math team 
at Quincy High School 
finished second in Massachu- 
setts after fi\e competitions of 
the Continental Mathematics 
League. 



Ihe team also ranked 
fourth in New England and 
tied for 15th place nationally 
with a total of 108 schools 
participating. 

Final student standings are: 



Christen Clarke: (3) Marsha 
Goodman. Joseph DiStasio. 
and Hok Chi Wan; (4) Steven 
Hill and Randi Gaura; (5) 
Jimmy lorio. Cindy Galman. 
and Lorraine Swanton. 



(I) Susan Crispo; (2) 

12 Residents On U-Mass Dean's List 



Twelve Quincy residents 
have made the Dean's List at 
University of Massachusetts 
at Amherst. 

They are: 

Barbara J. Fain. 99 Puritan 
Dr.. Kelly A. Fallon, 857 



Furnace Brook Pkwv., 
Robert F. Farrel. Jr.. 35 
Churchill Rd., Kimberly A. 
Gardener. 40 Euchd Ave.. 
Andrew Y. Wong. 19 
Glendale St.. Jeff A. 
Bovarnick, 122 Brock St.. 
Kathryn E. Gorczyca. 157 



Highland Ave., Anne J. 
Corczyca, 157 Highland Ave., 
Annette K. Higgins, 18 
Prospect Ave.. Jennifer M. 
Wilson. 164 Giandview Ave., 
Alina M. Laine, 12 Alvin 
Ave., and David M. Meleedy. 
238 Newbury Ave. 



"God so loved the world 

that He gave His only Son . . . 

Now . . . 
What can YOU do? 

Do you think you can meet God in the Catholic Church? 
Havc! you ever thought about becoming a Catholic? 

For a non-pressured informal look at the Catholic Church, try 

"Conversations in the Catholic Faith", sponsored by 

St. John the Baptist Parish community. 

For further information, call St. John's Adult Center, 

Tel. #770-1586 

Church of St. John the Baptist, 44 School St., Quincy 773-1021 




JACK DONAHl K, executive director of Project Feelings, holds a large replica of SI, 600 check 
presented by .Sterling Middle School faculty and students to the non-profit organization. 



Yim Lan Yee 
Honored At NU 

Yim Lan Yee of Lillian Rd.. 
Quincy. was honored recently 
by Northeastern University 
for outstanding academic 
achievement during an 
Evening of Recognition. 

The program honored 
students in the Boston 
Housing Authority Grant 
Program, which provides 
five-year tuition grants to 
residents of the Boston 
Housin g Authority. 

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Pagr I* QHincy Sun Thursday, July 2, I9S7 



Work Starts On 85-Foot Tower Sabina Kavanagh 
Vietnam Veterans Memorial 



Ward 5 Candidate 



iC.tmi'd from Paitr II 

West. Ralph J. Willard 

Anyone knowing the names 
of any other Quincy veterans 
who gave their lives in 
Vietnam are asked to call 328- 
()055. 

The following inscription 
will also appear on the tower: 

"Marina Ba\. a proud and 
\ibrant community, is richly 
steeped in history. 

"On this site stood the 
Victory Plant Shipyard at 
Fore River. Here, thirty-five 
naval destroyers were built 
between 19 1 8- 1 920. 

"In the I930's. Dennison 



Airport was founded and 
became an important 
landmark in this area It 
hosted national air shows and 
flights by famous a\iators. 
among them. Amelia Farhart 

"As World War II 
approached, and America's 
focus turned from the seas to 
the skies, the Victory Plant 
was transformed into the 
Squantum Naval Air Station. 
Many pilots who fought in the 
skies over Europe and the 
South Pacific were trained in 
the skies over Quincv 

"Their courage and the 
countless acts of dedication o\ 



those who labored at the 
Squantum Naval Air Station 
and the Victory Plant are 
remembered here 

"This memorial tower 
reflects Quincy's pride 
towards its past and its hope 
lor a future of peace " 

The Veterans Memorial 
Advisory Committee includes: 

Rep Ihomas \ Browncll. 
Rep Robert \ Ccrasoli. 
Senator Paul D Harold. 
David I awson. C"it\ Council 
President Steve McCirath. 
Sheila Mclntvre. Rep 
Michael W Morrissev. C it\ 
Councillor I homas.l Nutle\. 



Daniel Wilcher. Taylor 
Ahearn. Henry Bosworth. 
Raymond C I i n e . John 
Comer. Jo-Anne Condon. 
Forrest Cook. Jr.. Rev 
Arthur Curtis. Commander 
Francis (Javin. (ierrard 



Ciuadino, Paul Hurley, Rabbi 
Da\id Jacobs. William 
Kelley. Re\ William 
Mt<arthy. Mayor I rancfs 
McCaules. Charles Pearce. 
Phillip Perkins. I eoReardon. 
City Councillor James Sheets. 
Captain Richard Strallonand 
Ronald Zooleck 



Mayor Signs 30 
Zoning Change Orders 



Mayor Francis McCauley 
signed 30 orders dealing with 
zoning changes during a press 
conference Tuesdav afternoon 
at City Hall. 

"These are some of the most 
important documents I will 
sign." said McCauley. 

"No one here is against 
development per se. but it has 
to be harnessed and 
channeled." 

The zoning orders were 
proposed by the City 
Council's Zoning Task Force 
established last year by 
Councillor Stephen McGrath. 
Some were also suggested by 
Citizens Advocating Proper 
Planning (CAPP). 

Among the zoning orders 
arc decreases in the height of 
buildings in any given district, 
limiting density, and 
requiring a hearing before the 
Zoning Board of Appeals to 
cross ,ovcr from one zoning 
designation to another, 
explained Planning Director 
Richard Meade. 

"The orders protect the 



interest of the city." "said 
Meade, a task force member. 

McGrath noted that there 
had not been an overview of 
the city's zoning regulations 
since the early 1970s. 

"The city was in danger of 
an uncontrolled growth 
spurt," said McGrath. "We 
needed ordinances which 
would take us into the 1990s 
and vear 2000 " 



Councillor I ht)mas Nutlev. 
chairman ot ihc task torce. 
said. "I he key is that we arc 
not halting development, 
we're just reducing it a bit" 

Peter Kolson of (ierman- 
town said. "Young people can 
be justifiably proud of our 
elected officials and citizens 
group which looked after 
their interests." 



Nut ley noted that developers 
have not been "tremcndousK 
upset" with the zoning 
changes 

He also said that 34 of 57 
recommendations have been 
brought in. and more will be 
coming forward. 

N'utley said that some 
buildings alreadv underway 
will still be constructed under 
the old zoning regulations. 



Sabina M. Kavanagh 
announces her candidacy for 
Ward 5 City Councillor. 

As a business woman in 
Wollaston for the past 25 
years, she feels that she 
understands the needs of that 
section ot Quincy. including 
those of the elderly and 
voung. 

Among the issues she 
considers important are drug 
problems. Wollaston Beach, 
sewage problems in Wollaston. 
traffic and real estate 

It elected, she intends to 
"bring beautv to Wollaston as 
well as business and good 
living conditions." 

President of the Silver 
Haired I cgislaiure. she 
invites senior citi/ens to join 
her at a meeting Wcdnesdav. 
Julv 15. at I p m at 80 C lav 
St . Wollaston 

(iuest speaker will be 
•Angeio Musto Irom Joseph 
Kennedy's i»lfice. and Sen 
.Arthur Driscoll 

Issues will be discussed and 
cold punch will be served 

Kavanagh is alsi> president 
ot Cerebral Palsy ol the South 
Shore, and a member ol the 
Board ol Realtors on the 




SABINA KAVANAGH 

South Shore and Quincv 
C ouncil on Aging 

A former Health Board 
( ouncil Membei lor Region 
5. she IS also lormer vice 
president ol Sunival drug 
program in Quincy. 

Owner ol Sabina's Beauiv 
Schools in Quincv and 
Boston, she is a licensed real 
estate broker in Quincv. 
Boston and Dennisport 

She IS also a mother and 
grandmother 



Conservation Commission 



Kelly To Head 
McGrath Campaign 



To Meet July 8 



The Quincy Conservation 
Commission will meet 
Wednesday. July 8. at 7:30 
p.m. in the second floor 
conference room. City Hall 
Annex. 

Agenda items will include 
discussion of: 

• Intent of L.L.L. Realty 
Trust to construct a 
warehouse -office building at 
25-41 Columbia St. and 88-96 



Liberty St., Quincy. 

• Wollaston Yacht Club's 
intention to repair existing 
timber foundation piles under 
the clubhouse at 692 Quincy 
Shore Drive. 

• George Gardner and 
Robert Weatherbee's intention 
to file for the construction of a 
single-family, wood frame 
dwelling at 93 Sea Ave. 

• Public Works Depart- 



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mentt's intention to install 
interim leachate collection 
system in Phase 1. at the 
location of weir; cap, cover 
and revegetate Phase III. and 
create or improve gravel 
access roads for property at 
Ricciuti Dr. 

• Intent of Thomas Healy 
to construct a single family, 
raised ranch with garage 
underneath at 74 Post Island 
Road 

• Intent ol Avard and f-ay 
Davidson lor a 16-loot bv 24- 
foot room addition for 
propertv al 10 Faton Rd. 



City Council president. 
Stephen J McCirath 
announces that former 
council president. I.eo J 
Kelly has agreed to serve as 
campaign manager for 
McGrath's campaign for 
Councillor at Large 

"I am very pleased that Leo 
has agreed to lake on 
management of my campaign," 
said McGrath 

"Leo's knowledge of the 
city makes him an invaluable 
asset to my campaign and I 
look forward to his input and 
counsel." said McGrath. 

Kdlv said. "As a past 
council president. I kn(m 



what IS required for a 
successful leadership role on 
the City Council. 

"Having served with Steve 
for six years and having 
observed him as council 
president. I believe Steve has 
shown those qualities ol 
leadership and concern for 
Quincy." 

"I would like to assist him 
as much as possible in seeing 
him continue on the Council 
at an At Large capacity so the 
people of the citv can benefit 

Irom Steve's know led ge. 
experience and leadership." 
Kellv said. 



2 Residents Receive Degrees At Colby 

James l> Sullivan and 
Nicholas I Papapctros II. 
both ol Quincv. recent Iv 
received bachelor ol arts 
degrees al the 166lh 
commencement exercises ol 
Colbv ( ollege. Watervijle. 
Me 

Sullivan, who graduated 
with distinction in the ma)or 

3 ReKidents Receive Forsvth Dental Cerlificateh 



ol I nglish. IS the son ol Mrs 
James B Sullivan ol Putnam 
St and Mr James B. Sullivan 
ol (larlield St in Quincv A 
graduate ol Boston C ollege 
High school. Sullivan has 
been named to the second- 
semester dean's list ol the 
college 

Papapetros. a biology 



ma)or. is the son ol Mr and 
Mrs I heodorc Papapetros ol 
Andrews Road A graduate ol 
Boston college High School. 

Papapetros has achieved 
distinction and has been 
named to the sectmd-semester 
dean's list of the college 



I hree Quincy residents 
have received certificates in 
dental hygiene Irom the 
Lorsyth School lor Dental 
Hygienisis. 

■ 

FILL OUT THI 



I hev are Margaiet Dunn. 
105 I dgewater Dr. Christine 
Mulvev. 60 Willow St.. 
member ot Church Youth 



Organizations; and Krist'ne 
O'Keefe. 66 Cireenleaf St . 
member ol Church Youth 
Corp.. Board ol Deacons. 




SUBSCRIPTION FORM I 
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CITY. 



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CHECK ONE BOX IN EACH COLUMN 



[ ] 1 YEAR IN QUINCY $11.00 

1 1 1 YEAR OUTSIDE QUINCY $12.00 
I ) 1 YEAR OUT OF STATE $15.00 



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Thunday, July 2, I9t7 Quincy Sun Page 17 



Legion Baseball 

Morrisette Takes First 
With 4 Wins In Row 



The Morrisette I cgion 
haschall team completed the 
first hall ol the season in 
grand fashion, winning four 
straight to finish in first place 
in Zone 6 with a 7-2 record. 

Morrisette won all three 
games last week. 

Morrisette defeated 
Canton 6-1 paced by the 
outstanding pitching of 
Wayne Chambers. Chambers 
allowed just one Canton hit 
and one unearned run. He 
struck out nine and walked 
four. 

In his three starts, 
Chambers has given up five 
hits and one earned run. He 
has helped Morrisette 
tremendously, as number two 
pitcher Dan Overby has not 
fully recovered from 
tendonitis. 

Chambers also helped his 
own cause, driving in the go- 
ahead run in the second with 
the game knotted at l-l. He 
drove in Chris Ricciuti who 
was aboard on an error and 
moved to second on Ron 
Fletcher's single. 

Morrisette's first run came 
in the bottom of the first when 
Steve Minichiello walked, 
moved to second on a wild 
pitch and scored on a Dan 



Biagini single. 

Canton got their lone run in 
the second on two walks and a 
throwing error on a sacrifice 
bunt. 

Morrisette scored two in 
the fifth and two more in the 
sixth. In the fifth. Billy 
McDougal singled and scored 
on Mike Mullaney's double 
and Rob McDonald singled 
home Mullaney. 

In the sixth, McDougal 
drove in Fletcher who had 
walked and stole second. 
McDougal scored on a 
throwing error after stealing 
second. 

Steve Minichiello made the 
defensive play of the game, 
making a diving shoe-string 
catch on a fly ball to right 
field. 

Morrisette also downed 
Quincy by a 6-1 score. Larry 
Taglieri pitched his fourth 
complete game to bring his 
record to 4- 1 . Taglieri allowed 
one unearned run, walked one 
and scattered six hits while 
striking out six. 

Quincy got on the board 
first when Jim Dennis singled, 
moved to second on a wild 
pitch and came home on Kyle 
Robertson's single. 



Morrisette answered with 
one in the second on a Rob 
McDonald single. Ron 
Fletcher's walk, a fielder's 
choice and a single by Billy 
McDougal. They went ahead 
for good in the third when 
Dan Biagini doubled home 
Taglieri who had singled and 
stole second. 

Quincy had a two-out 
threat in the bottom of the 
fourth when Peter Tufts and 
Joe Gately singled but were 
left stranded. 

Morrisette scored four runs 
in the sixth to put it away. A 
single by McDonald, a 
sacrifice by Fletcher and 
infield throwing error 
brought in McDonald. Chris 
Ricciuti drove in a run and he 
was brought in by McDougaPs 
triple. Mullaney knocked in 
McDougal. 

Billy McDougal went three 
lor three for two RBI. Rob 
McDonald had three hits and 
Dan Biagini had two hits and 
an RBI. 

Rob Higgins started for 
Quincy and took the loss. 
Steve Happas came in for 
relief 

Happas and Tim Baker had 
Quincy's other hits. 

Morrisette completed its 



Junior League 



Quincy Cable Wins 
Two On Pitching 



Quincy Cable, led by 
excellent pitching performan- 
ces by Jay Snabel and Aidan 
O'Donahue. posted two 
victories in the Quincy Junior 
baseball league recently. 

Cable, behind the tour-hit. 
12-slrikeout performance of 
Snabel. blanked Vl-W, 7-0. 

O'Donaghue tanned seven 
C olonial federal hitters in six 
innings in a 10-5 Cable 
V ictory. 

Against VFW, lerry 
Sheehan. Mike Kavanaugh 
and Jamie Schat/el all had 
two hits apiece Chris Sullivan 
knocked in three runs on a 
bases-loaded double. 
O'Donaghue. Snabel and 
Dan Donahue also had hits. 

Snabel. who went the 
distance, struck out the side 



twice, both times with the 
bases full. Snabel helped 
himself with two good 
defensive plays. Sheehan 
made two key plays at first 
base. 

David Cooper and Sean 
Donovan had hits for VFW. 

In the Colonial Federal 
game. Snabel hit a three-run 
homer. Sheehan had three 
hits, including a double and 
O'Donaghue and Schatzel 
had two hits. Other Cable 
hitters included Donahue. 
Kav anaugh and Justin 
.Ackerman. 

For Colonial Federal. Billy 
Dunn singled twice and Steve 
Miller had a hit. 

In a third game. State 
Street outlasted Cable. 8-6. 
Cable banged out 10 hits, 
including a two-run homerun 



and two 



by 

and 
two 



Smollett Scores Hole-In One 



Bob Smollett of Quincy 
recently joined the 
exclusive hole in one circle 
at the Plymouth Country 
Club golf course. 

Smollett scored the ace 



on the 140-yard eighth 
hole with a seven iron. 
Playing with him were Jim 
Herbert. Dick Evans and 
Ron Evans, all formerly of 
Quinc^. 



doubles 

Kavanaugh. a double 
triple by Snabel and 

singles from Brian Wood. 
O'Donaghue also tripled and 
Schatzel and Ackerman 
singled. 

State Street scored seven 
runs in the first two innings on 
seven hits, including a double 
and homerun by Liam 
Higgins. He later added a 
single. 

After the second. Cable 
pitcher Wood held State 
Street to two hits and one run. 
He had seven strikeouts. 

.After a shaky start. Cable 
settled down defensively, 
especially Schat/el who made 
two difficult catches in left 
field. Sullivan and Ryan 
Ackerman also made 
outstanding putouts. 



Save Gas 
and Money ... 
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drive for first place with a 20-3 
smoking of Holbrook. 

Morrisette and pitcher 
Wayne Chambers (3-0) had 
little trouble with Holbrook, 
breaking the game wide open 
with a 13-run second inning. 

Chambers went six innings, 
giving up four hits, four walks 
and fanning 10. None of 
Holbrook's runs were earned. 

Morrisette put together 20 
hits for their 20 runs, led by 
Billy McDougal's four hits 
and two RBIs. Dan Biagini 
had three hits, including a 
homerun and triple for 3 
RBIs. Steven Minichiello had 
three hits and two RBIs. Mike 
Mullaney had three hits, Rob 
McDonald two hits and two 
RBIs. Larry Taglieri two hits 
and one RBI and Chambers 
two hits and an RBI. Chris 
Ricciuti also knocked in a run 
with a single. 

Dan Overby pitched the 
seventh and gave up just one 
hit. 

Morrisette plays Wollaston 
at Adams Field Friday at 
8:30, Milton at Adams on 
Monday and travels to 
Braintree in a very important 
game next Wednesday at 8 
p.m. 





TIM COLLINS of Quincy has completed hh sophomore 
season as a goalie on the Norwich I niversity varsity hockey 
team. He had an 8-6 record with a .903 saves percentage and a 
2.90 goals against average, both among the top ten in the 
ECAC East. 



■ !'■ 

Sun Sports 



Boston Gear Humbles 
H N. State Street 



Boston Gear defeated 
Houghs Neck and State Street 
Visa in recent Junior League 
Action. 

Gear stunned Houghs Neck 
11-4 behind another strong 
pitching performance by 
Mike Patch. 

Patch gave up eight hits to a 
powerful Houghs Neck team. 
He struck out 1 1 and walked 
no one. He also connected for 
a grand slam, triple and 
double tor six RBIs. 

Also contributing to Gear's 
I l-hit attack were Danny 
Duncan and Mike Desroache 
who had three hits each. Matt 
Riley had two hits while Billy 
Skutul and Kenny Ledwak 
had one apiece. 

Having strong defensive 



games tor Gear were George 
Wirtz, Mark Connelly. Mike 
Duffy and Timmy Byrne. 

Robbie Kane. Mike 
Conner, Constas Rosenatis 
and George Burke all had hits 
for Houghs Neck. 

Gear also defeated State 
Street Visa 9-5 paced by the 
excellent pitching of Eric 
Kruez. Kruez had terrific 
control all evening, allowing 
eight hits, striking out two 
and walking none. 

Gear's offense was timely 
rather than plentiful, taking 
advantage of 12 walks. Gear's 
five hit performance came 
from George Wirtz. Matt 
Riley, Mike Desroache. 
Kenny Ledwak and Kruez. 

Spectacular defense for 



Gear was supplied by Mike 
Duffy. Danny Duncan, Mike 
Patch, Timmy Byrne. Billy 
Skutul. Mark Connelly and 
Pat Layden. 

Shaun Herron hurled well 
in defeat for State Street. Bill 
Morrissey, Herron, Liam 
Higgins. Paul King. David 
Manning. Danny Melzard 
and Derek Mooter had hits 
for State. 



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Pa^f IK Quincv Sun Thunday, Jul> 2. S9(I7 



Basketball Camp, 

TV Workshop 

Registration Underway 



Quincy Tennis Club 
Marks Centennial 



Recreation Director Barry 
J. Welch announces the 
Quincv Recreation Depart- 
ment is accepting registration 
for its basketball camp which 
will be held July 6-10. and its 
T c 1 e \ i s i o n Production 
Workshop which will be held 
Tuesdays July 7. 14. 21. 2H 
and Aug. 4. 

Registration will he taken 
on a first come first serve basis 
at the Quincy Recreation 
Department, 100 Southern 
Artery. Monday-Friday. 8:30 
am - 4:30 p.m as long as 
openings still exist 

The basketball camp is an 
instructional program geared 
to young people with a 
genuine interest in the sport. 
A complete series of drills will 
emphasize fundamentals of 
passing, shooting, rebound- 
ing, and individual defense as 
well as some team concepts 
such as the fast break. 
Scrimmage games will be 
conducted with instructors 
pointing out proper techniques 

Camp directors are Brian 
Buckley, head coach of 
basketball at Curry College. 
Paul Bregoli. head coach o( 
girls basketball at North 
Quincy High. 

Location: North Quincy 
High School Gym. Age: 9-15 
years, co-recreational. Time: 



8:30 am - 12:30 p.m. Cost: 
$19 

I he Television Production 
Workshop is a five week 
program on how to produce 
telcMsion programming I he 
participants will be taught the 
basic techniques of portable 
television production. 
Instruction will include parts 
and operation of the camera, 
editing, and scripting. Some 
studio instruction will also be 
covered. 

Participants will also 
produce VHS programs to be 
cablecast over Quincy 
Community Television 
Channel 3. Directors: Jamie 
Kelley. independent producer; 
Nancy Santry. outreach 
coordinator for Quincy 
Community Television. 

Location: Quincy Cablcsy- 
stems. 81 School St. Ages: 
Boys and girls, entering 
grades 6, 7. 8. and 9. Time: 
8:30 a.m. - noon. Cost: $18. 

The Quincy Recreation 
Department also offers other 
camps: Competitive Swim- 
ming Camp. Football Camp. 
Ceramics Camp, Dance 
Camp, Cheerleading Camp. 
Baseball Camp, Soccer 
Camp, Volleyball Camp. For 
further information concern- 
ing these camps please call the 
recreation office at 773-1380 
ext. 204. 



Kevin Warren B.C. Honor Graduate 



Kevin Y. Warren of North 
Quincy was reccntis 
graduated summa cum laude 
from Boston College. 

A member of the Phi Beta 



Kappa Society, nc received a 
Bachelor of Arts and Science 
degree 

He IS the son of Mr. and 
Mrs William Warren. 



I he Quincy I cnnis Club is 
cckhrating its centennial this 
summer with main act i\ it ion 

I lie acliviiics iiuliulc an 
t>nMic clambake and sinji- 
altMij:. a ccnlcnni.il toiirna- 
nu-iii .uul a t.ill dinncr-dancc 

Ihc club, perhaps the 
oiliest tennis club in the 
eoimliA and the most hisloiie. 
lias a rich, disiinguisheil 
hisioiA Mam players in the 
New I ngland area aiul 
bcsond ha\e competed on its 
red clay courts I he niemhcis 
own and operate the eliib 
w huh IS open trom earl\ Ma\ 
until mid-Nd\ ember. 

The club was established in 
IKS^ when a group met m 
Quincy to form a "lawn tennis 
club" Fleeted at that first 
meeting were president Pcrrv 
1 aw ton. \iee president Rc\. 
HI Cotton and secretars- 
treasiirer \\ . W Osborne 
Named to the exccutiv e board 
were Henr\ M. Faxon. 
\\ .liter B HoUlen. Waher N 
Packard and Paul R 
Black mur 

\ eoniinitlee consistini; ol 
the olticers and 1 llis la\on 
diew up a constitution. Dues 
lor nie were S.V tor women SI 
and a S5 initiation lee A tract 
ot land was made a\ailabieon 
Higelow St tor three dirt 
courts 

In the lust tournament on 
Sept. P. IHX7 Herbert M 
I ederhen deleated .lames } 
Harlow. 7-5. 6-1. H-fi. 

I>ie social hitrh point was 
the annual dance held on 1 eh. 
\^. 1X84, at the old opera 
house. 

In the first decade of this 
ccntiirv the club's annual 



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Match ineetini: w .is held in 
the p.ii lot ol the old dieenleal 
Motel I luie the membeis 
voted to lelocate the club to 
land owned b\ |)i N S 
Hiintini; neai the Woodaul 
School loi (mis and build .1 
clubhouse desijined in the 
New I iiiiland shinj:le st\le. In 
1405 the members \oteil to 
build two .idditional couits 
lor SlOd 

In the sunimei ol I'HO the 
club hosted the \i>;enline 
Nav.tl ( oninusMoii on detail 
.11 I 01 e Ki\ei 

In NI4 the club dratted a 
constitution I he l.iiij:iiaye. 
written li\e \e.iis betoie 
passages ol the I 4t h 
amendment, appe.irs quaint 
and humorous ioda\ Women 
were gnen 'Ihc lull rijihts ot 
the club except the rijiht to 
vote a nd sii e h ot hei 
rest net KUis as the Hoard ol 
(iov er no rs ma> liom time to 
time impose ■■ 

Since the club did not own 
Its land, the inembeiship 
determined m 1*^)1^ to lind a 
new location. \ committee 
heailed bv Quincv bankei .1 
Brooks keves reconimeniled 
pill chase ol l.iiiil ne.ii the 
CO t II e I o I (i o t t e St 
( Pi esideni "s I a nc 1 .mil 
Cilendale Rd 

llie site-on laiul ow ned .iiui 
cultivated bv John ami 
\bij;ail Ndanis a centurv 
earliei--was desenbeil as "a 
delijihtlui seltiriL' on ,1 knoll 
co\cred with 0.1k s and 
cedars." Ihc clubhouse was 
also relocated to this new 
setting: where the club has 
remained to this tiav 

I eajiue tennis became 
popular at this time and 
QuiiKv's arch rival was the 
Wollaston lennis ( lub (lonj; 
Since disbanded) In an 
exchanjie recorded in the 
club's minutes. Quincv 
demanded that WOllasion 
relinquish its ""w inneis shield" 
for (allure to lollow the 
Wrijiht and Ditson tennis 
rules hv impoiting non- 
member ""riniieis" Irom 
Boston. 



Ihe e\chanj:e was niinoi 
compaied to the club's battle 
m 1^1 < with the Kev 
Bcniamm ( Wilinolt, pastoi 
ot Bethanv ( iiiij;iegation.il 
( hiirch I he issue - pl.ivin^; 
tennis on the Sabbath 

In his seimon the Rev 
WilmotI ilcnounced Siiiulav 
tennis plavinj; hv well-to-do 
people ol Ihe citv It w.is 
unlaii. he said, to prevent 
haul workinj; men of the I oie 
Rivei vaiils and jiianite 
qiiai lies tioni pl.iv inj: Sinul.iv 
baseball and allow the well- 
to-do class to plav tennis on 
Sundav 

W ilmott s.iid tie was not m 
lav or ol Sundav baseball but 
that he believed in a squaie 
deal tor all 

Ihe follow inn Sundav 
( hiet Huirell and Inspectoi 
(loodhue made a "sudden 
visit" to the cluh wheie thev 
tound eij:ht doubles m aciiiui 
with a laijie j:alleiv ot manv 
well-known soeietv women ol 
the citv I he duet thieatened 
ai lesi ot plaveis and w itnesses 
ciealinj; no end ot tuioi 

Ihe club hi led a lawvei and 
some membeis suj:j;ested that 
a test case K- made Ihe 
executive committee decided 
otheiwise .iiul opted to end 
Sund.iv plav I he Paliiot 
I cd j;ei head li neil "the 
suiieiulei ot the tennis elub" 
calling; it "a sij;nal vietoiv loi 
Rev Wilmott. a icleniles\ toe 
ot Sundav v lol.iiioriN " 

I wo prominent Quincv 
men. (ieorj-'c S Platlm.m and 
.1 Brooks keves. L'uided the 
pioj;iess ot the elub the veais 
be'tween the wars Pt.ittinan. 
Quine\"s V\ P A ailministiatoi 
during the depression, died in 
MVVi in his 241 h veai as club 
president 

In 1^56 the deorce I 
Plaltman memoiial tiophv 
was placed in ciuiipetition and 
IS awarded to the men's singles 
champion lor the seat 

Ihe continuance (d the club 
during the war \eais is 
credited to the late lames P 
Pennvpackei I ast v ear's elub 
vearbook eulogi/es him with 



the tollowing: "Not |ust aclub 
mem be I, but a ttuls 
conlribuling membei ol the 
club tor ovei ^(l veais 

Ihe NSiK and I^WK saw 
sieadv piogiess at the cluh but 
in lecenl \ears the cluh h.is 
taced and survived problems, 
m.iinlv vaiulahsm and aged 
plumbing \andals torched 
the clubhouse in Novembe'i. 
I4''4. lesulting in its total loss 
In l9S2thc ancient sewer line 
which connected the cluh to 
( 1 1 e n il a I c R d gave in. 
lequiring immediate replace- 
ment Both problems 
necessitated considerable 
tiind raising However, the 
challenge was met and lodav a 
new clubhouse stands built b\ 
membe'r siibseription 

In Its |(H)lh season the elub 
has a laige. active membciship 
and piovides reasonablv 
pi iced tennis tiom Mav until 
Novembei 

I lophies aie aw ai ded 
ve.ulv to membeis who 
distinguish themselves in 
vaiious areas Besides the 
Ptattm.in tiophv the I dna 
Miller I ollelt award is given 
to the temale champion. Ihe 
H Hob.iit Hollv award 
honois the most piomising 
liinioi .indtlie H.iiiv Piolinari 
seivice awaid lew.irds the 
niemlxi vsho has made the 
greatest eontiibutioii to the 
club 

lodav's membership lists 
cimlrast with those ot MMt 
ve.irs .tgo Ihe aristocratic 
surnames have la r gels 
vanished and todavs names 
lellect the ethnic diveisiiv ot 
the IMMK Not aie (lie 
members the sociallv elite ot 
Rev Wilmotl's da\, but 
rather represent various 
piolessions and trades And 
thev plav ilailv. including 
Sundav 

\mong the notable 
members is |)r Philip 
Malonev who, since I95H, has 
garnered At) titles at the club in 
three adult events .loseph 
Horak ot Milton. SOvearsold 
and nat lona IK ranked, 
competes daily. 



Florida Style Tourney At Ponkapoaji; 



Dorea McConaghv of 

HELP KNOCK OUT 
BIRTH DEFECTS 




Jfiifi Ihc 



dj) Ma/ch of Dimes 



QuincN, Mary Michaels and 
Rita Rogers finished first with 
a gross 44 in a recent Florida 
style tournament at the 
Ponkapoag 1 adics' golf inner 
club. 

Florence Koffman. (irace 
( ohen. Bert Sigilman and 

Save 

Gas and Money 

Shop Locally 



Marion Dale Imished second 
with a gross 46 

A nine-hole medal play 
tournament - was also held 
with Pat Fit/gerald taking top 

honors with a net }fi 

In a three-way tie for 
second were F:lcanor Verdin. 
Bonnie Thompson and Joan 
Fleck with a net 37 

Mary Carchedi and Bert 
Sigilman scored .38 to tie (or 
third. 



BORED? 

Start A Quincy Sun 
Delivery Route. 

You'll Be Part Of 
The Business World. 

Call 471 -31 00 
or Apply in Person 



V 



p/^ 



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1372 NMCOck Strttt Miicy Squore 471-3100 



Tlmnday, July 2, 1917 Quincy Svn Piflt 19 



Babe Ruth 



Granite City Electric 
Wins Pair, Loses One 



Granite City Electric had a 
2-1 record in recent Babe 
Ruth action. 

In the first game. Granite 
edged a very competitive 
Bryan Post VFW team, 6-5 
Mike Picaricllo was the 
winning pitcher, settling 
down after giving up four first 
mning runs. 

Bryan Post jumped out to a 
quick 4-0 lead on hits by 
Jamie Greene, Mark Kelliher 
and Donnie Anderson, a walk 
to Brian O'Malley and errors 
by Granite. 

Picariello did not give 
another hit m his six and two 
thirds innings of pitching. He 
was relieved by hard- 
throwing Tony Anderlionis 
who fanned three of the last 
four VhW hitters. 

Brian O'Malley, one of the 
league's most improved 
players, allowed onlv si.\ hits 
to Granite. I nlortunalely, 
five of those hits came during 
a fi\e-run second inning lor 
Ciranite. 

Erik DeBoer. Angelo 
Kyranis and Steve Wysocki 
all had consccuti\c singles 
Dave Gamsbv hit a thrc<r-run 
single and ccnterlieldcr Jim 
Munroe dro\c in (iamsby 
vMth a single 

(iranitc C ity's last run was 
scored m the third when 
Wayne Sit's line drive single 
to right licid knocked in 
DcBocr who had walked 



Rightficlder Steve Wysocki 
made the pla> of the game, 
throwing out a VFW hitter at 
first base on what seemed to 
be a clean single. 

Picaricllo helped his own 
cause, throwing out five 
Bryan Post hitters. 

Bryan Post second 
baseman Chris Slenmon was 
solid defensively. 

Granite City continued its 
winning ways with a victory 
over the Elks. Granite rallied 
to score eight runs in the last 
two innings to beat the Elks, 
16-7. 

Steve Wysocki held the 
Elks to one run in the first 
inning. In the second, the Elks 
scored five runs on Greg 
Clifford's double, singles to 
Jim McCarthy and Pat 
Clifford and walks to Dana 
Gurwitch and Mike Cahill. 

Dave Gamsby relieved 
Wysocki and gave up one run 
on seven hits. He hung on to 
improve his record to 6-0. 

For the Flks, pitcher Mike 
Beatrice had a triple and two 
singles. Gurwitch, Mike 
Cahill and McManus all had 
singles. 

Granite City collected 10 
hits Picariello and (iamsby 
had triples, Steve Wysocki a 
double and .Xndv Collearv, 
lonv Anderlionis (2). Angelo 
Kvranis (2) and Eddie 
C ostello (2) all had singles. 

Andv \ cnc/iano and Dave 



Jolley played very well at 
second for Granite. 

Granite City's bid for a 
perfect week fell short as the 
Fireman upset Granite, 5-4. 
Fireman's Jason Doyle 
pitched a strong two hitter to 
knock off a 13-3 Granite City 
Electric club. Doyle struck 
out six and walked only three. 

Granite's Gamsby led off 
the game with a single and 
scored when Anderlionis' 
ground ball was misplayed. 
Erik DeBoer's single was the 
only other Granite hit. 

Angelo Kyranis pitched a 
fine game for Granite, giving 
up five hits. 

Going into the six. Granite 
held a 3-2 lead by Jim 
Maloney and Billy Eddy 
singled and four Granite 
errors gave the Fireman three 
runs to win the game 

Fireman's outstanding 
catcher Brian Taylor had two 
singles and three stolen bases. 
Steve Neiters contributed a 
double. 

Mike Bay lis played 
exceptionally well in 
centerfield and chipped in 
w ith a double. Shortstop Billy 
Monteith had incredible 
range, making many fine 
plays. 

Also contributing to the 
fireman's win were Brian 
Comeau. Mark Portesi and 
1 om Courtnev . 



Mulkern Fires 3-Hitter 
For Bryan Post 



Bryan Po.si 
successful week, 
games, defeated 
behind Sean 



enjoyed a 

winning two 

Police. 4-2 

Mulkern's 



outstanding three-hit pitching 
performance 

Mulkern dominated the 
game, going three for three, 
stealing two bases and scoring 
two runs. 

Police's Sean Cafferty 
hurled a fine game, working 
out of several serious jams, he 
continuously denied Bryan's 
bids to break the game open. 

In the first inning, Bryan 
scored two unearned runs. 
Police countered with a run 
on singles by Brian Kelly and 
Mike Geddes. 

Bryan increased its lead to 
3-1 in the third as Mulkern led 
with a single, stole second and 
scored on two infield outs. 

Police pulled within one in 
the fourth as Tom Kiveavy 
scored to make it 3-2 but 
could not score the equalizer. 

Bryan closed out the 
scoring with a pad run in the 
fifth on Steven Waas' sacrifice 
and Pat McDonough's single. 

During the last three 
innings. Mulkern received 
spectacular defensive support 
from Brian O'Malley. Kevin 
Mullay. Donnie Anderson. 
Mark Kelleher and Waas who 
all turned in terrific plays to 
seal the victory. 

McDonough had two hits 
and Jamie (ireene. Chris 
Stennon. Michael Malvesti. 
Joe Marnikovic and Paul 
Murphy also contributed to 
the Bryan win. 

Shortstop Mike lacobacci 
and second baseman Mike 
Dohcrty anchored the Police 
defense. 

In other action, Bryan Post 



deleated Morrisette 11-6 with 
pitchers Waas and Mc- 
Donough combining for nine 
strikeouts. They allowed two 
walks and one earned run. 

Morrisette led 5-1 going 

into the last of th fifth but 

Bryan ral lied with ten runs on 

ten hits in the fifth and sixth to 

notch the victory. 

O'Malley had three hits 
while Waas, Mulkern. 
Mullary and Malvesti each 



had two. Aaron Sullivan and 
McDonough had the other 
hits. 

Steven Loud, Kelleher. 
Stenmon. Murphv and 
Marnikovic also performed 
well for Bryan. 

Morrisette's offence was led 
by Rich Keddy and Cunio 
who had two hits each. David 
Hutchins. David McManus 
and Stephen Keddy also 
singled. 



LOW LOW PRICES 
AT 




MKRRYMOl NT School fifth grader Joe lacobucci displays his tennis skilK to schoolmates 
during demonstration conducted b) the I .S. Tennis Association. Following the demonstration 
principal (ierald Mc(ioHan. his wife Adrienne and Art Gillis held a clinic for the students. 

l(^iiini\ >iin phitiit b\ Tom dorman) 

Local 1139 Wins Pair 
In Quest Of Berth 



Local 1139 maintained 
their second place position in 
their quest for a playoff berth 
with a pair of victories last 
week. 

Against Barry's Deli. Local 
won 13-6 led by Christine 
Barrett's four hits and three 
RBls. including the game 
w inner. Christine, the first girl 
ever to play in Quincy Babe 
Ruth, had one double and 
three singles. 

Along with Barrett, other 
offensive stars were Scott 
Dunn (two singles, one RBI), 
Gary Rawdon (two singles. 
RBI). Steve Kohler (double, 
single, two RBI) and Fred 
Regan (single, two RBI). 
Steve Sumpter. John Shea 



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Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



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472-6776 65 School St., Quincy 479-1155 



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and Tony Stafford all had 
singles. 

Rawdon also pitched a fine 
game, scattering seven hits 
and allowing three walks. 

Barry's Deli was paced b> 
Jimmy Glynn, who had a 
double, and two RBIs. Glynn 
also played sound defense. 

In the second game. Local 
1139 downed the Elks. 11-3. 
behind the five-hit. eight- 



strikeout pitching of John 
Shea. 

Local offensive stars were 
Greg Hohmann (double, two 
singles, two RBIs). Regan 
(three singles. RBI). Kohler 
(double, single, four RBIs) 
and Sumpter ( two singles, tw o 
RBIs) Rawdon. Shea and 
Gallagher all had singles. 

Chris Beatrice played well 
for the Elks. 



COLMANT 



Sports 
Stumpers 



1 . Name the team Dwight Gooden faced during his first 
professional baseball game in 1984. 

2. When Tom Seaver was traded from the Mets to the 
Reds in 1977, whom did the Mets receive in return for 
their ace pitcher? 

3. Name the starting pitchers in the famous Red 
Sox- Yankees playoff game in 1978. 

4. Name the pitcher who set the record at nine 
consecutive seasons with 200 or more strikeouts. 

5. Name the first-ever manager of the San Diego Padres. 

6. Name all six teams for which Jerry Ruess has pitched 
during his career. 

7. Name the first-ever batter for the Seattle Pilots in 
1969, their expansion season. 

8. Name the two television comedy shows Leo 
Durocher speared on as a guest during the 1960s. 




Leo "The Lip" Durocher 



Answers: 1. Houston Astros; 2. Don Norman, Steve 
Henderson, Pat Zachry and Doug Flynn; 3. Mike Torrez vs. 
Ron Guidry; 4. Tom Seaver; 5. Preston Gomez; 6. Cards, 
Astros, Pirates, Dodgers, Reds and Angels; 7. Tommy 
Harper; 8. The Munsters" and -Tlie Beverly HiUbillies" 

© 1987 by King Features Synd. 

COLMAN'S 
SPORTING GOODS 

The Right Answer For 
AH Your Sporting Needs. 




Page 20 QuiiK) Sun Thunday. July 2. 1917 



William Reardon 
Ward 3 Council Candidate 



William J. Reardon of 66 
Arddl St., North Quincy 
announces his candidacy for 
Ward 3 City Council Seat. 

Reardon has lived in 
Quincy nearly all his life and 
has been a resident and 
taxpayer of Ward 3 for over 
50 years, he said. 

Husband of the late Mary 
E, (Nogueira) Reardon. he 
was graduated from North 
Quincy High School, as were 
his four children. He has 16 
grandchildren and five great- 
grandchildren, some of whom 
reside in Quincy. 

Reardon also attended the 
Franklin Institute and a labor 
school in Boston. 

Retired from the Mass. Bay 
Transit Authority, he was the 
elected union representative 
of all hourly employees in the 
Boilermakers Local 651 at the 
O.G. Kellv Co.. Dorchester. 
He held the position for 12 
years until the company 
closed the plant 

As such, Reardon negotiated 

union contracts and settled 

grievances between the 




WILLIAM T. REARDON 

company and employees. He 
was also an officer in the 
Boilermakers 1 ocal 651 

Reardon was a member of 
the Industrial Inion of 
Marine and Shipbuilders 
Workers of America .AH - 
( lO Local »25. Boston 

.-\ member of the Quincy 
Citi/ens Association for o\cr 
five years, he is a member of 
the John P McKcon Post No 
146. 

He has been a \oluntccr at 
the Sidnev Farber Cancer 



Institute for over eight years, 
logging in over 1.300 hours. 
He is also a volunteer at the 
Children's Hospital and the 
Wednesday Night Supper 
Club at the Long Island 
Shelter for the Homeless. 

Reardon said he is 
concerned about the future of 
the quality of life in Quincy. 

He has been speaking out 
about the sewage, traffic, 
rubbish and water problems 
of Qumc>. and the overdevelop- 
ment ol neighborhoods, 

Reardon also said he is 
against the new Zone D being 
extended in business areas in 
Wollaston and North Quincy 
and wants to put a two-year 
moratorium on all new 
construction 

He supports the Quincy 
Citi/en's Association petition 
on limiting the height, density 
and parking for new buildings 
in Quincy. 

"I will work for the citi/ens 
of Ward 3 to insure that ihcir 
neighborhoods remain 
residential and that thcii 
needs and concerns arc met." 
said Reardon. 



Text Of Lydon's 

Statement Not 

To Seek Re-election 



Anderson Appointed To 
MBTA Advi 



Mayor Francis McCaulcy 
announces that Mayor 
Eugene C. Brune. chairman of 
the MBTA Advisory Board 
has appointed Quincy Public 
Works Commissioner Paul N. 
Anderson to the MBTA 
Advisory Board Finance 
Committee, 

This committee makes 
recommendations to the 
Advisory Board on all items 
relating to the MBTA budget. 

The appointment was made 
by Mayor Brune in a letter 
which reads in part: 

"The Advisory Board relics 
heavily upon the expertise 
and sound judgement of the 
members of the Finance 



sory 

Committee. . to make 
recommendations on,,, both 
authorization of a fiscal year 
budget and requests for 
transfer of funds within an 
approved budget," "The 
current members and I look 
forward to working with you 
(Commissioner Anderson)," 

McCauley added that two 
years ago he was appointed as 
chairman of the MBTA 
Advisory Executive Commit- 



Board 



tee. The Finance Committee 
reports all financial matters, 
reviews and recommends 
courses of action to the 
Executive Committee which 
in turn reports to the 
Advisory Committee. 

The Advisory Committee 
has 70 representatives from 
78 communities within 
MBTA Districts, McCauley 
said. 



(FoUouinn in the lexl 
oj VI ard 3 C.imnciHor 
John l.yfion's iHalrmvnl 
thai hv uiU not xt't'k re- 
t'l vfl ion this yrar.) 

"Recently I was preparing 

my campaign lor re-election 

and considering strategics. 

Iinances. functions, door 

knocking, bumper stickers. 

signs and all the components 

that go into campaigning and 

I thought to m>sell that I 

really did not want to spend 

my summer campaigning - I 

did not want lo go out 

knocking on doors lor \otes - 

I didn't want to ask my friends 

to go out and get nomination 

papers signed - put on bumper 

stickers - or put signs on ihcir 

lawn>, I have served on the 

Quinc> City Council for 14 

years- campaigning c\er\ two 

- that is SIX long summer 

campaigns I have concluded 

that I do not feel like doing it 

again. 

I he week before last, as my 
(amjly and I discussed the 
upcoming campaign. I 
realized something that I had 
not seen before. ! was running 
for re-election to my council 
seat not because I wanted to 
be part of the city council any 
longer - not because i had any 
major objectives or goals to 
achieve in city government, 
but because I was being 
challenged. I was about to 
spend the summer doing what 
I really did not want to do. I 
have always been one to 



accept a challenge. However, 
at some point we have the 
good sense to ask ourself- to 
what end! Are the sacrifices 
entailed really worth it'.' Is it 
really what you want'' 

I o a great degree. I have 
achieved the goals I have 
established lor myself at this 
point in m> lile Clearly. m> 
lamily is my first and most 
important consideration My 
children are adults and I am a 
grandfather They have, each 
in their own right, achieved 
success. M\ marriage has 
been blessed with good 
fortune and my wile and I 
cnioy good health My 
business has grown beyond 
my expectations. I find that as 
each year passes, vacation 
time becomes more important 
to my family and to me - I like 
It that way 

"(ii>vcrnmcnt in Quincv 
has changed and I reali/ethai 
change is inevitable, and with 
time. It does seem as though 
the proverbial pendulum does 
exist (iovernment seems to 
be missing the qualities that I 
once admired and enjoyed 
The great sense of camaraderie 
that once existed is no longer 
there and the philosophy of 
one for all and all for one that 
I so much espouse is missing 

I have always enjoyed 
government - it was a means 
of providing for people - 
helping people - friends - 
neighbors - and the 
community, (jovernment for 



It IS 

with 



me has become dour 
overly concerned 
regulation and has forced us 
into the role of regulators - I 
have never perceived myself in 
this type of role. 

in short, government is no 
longer a challenge - the source 
ol achievement and enjoyment 
that it once was - therefore. I 
choose not to seek re-election 
to the Ward 3 C ily Council 
seat 

(iovernment has been good 
for me and it has added a 
dimension and a richness to 
my life that I would not have 
otherwise experienced I feel 
my tenure in office was during 
a meaningful period in 
Quincy 's growth and I believe 
that to thai end. my 
contribution to our community 
has had some significance 
(iovernment has allowed me 
to meet many people that I 
would not otherwise have had 
the opportunity and pleasure 
to become acquainted with 
(iovernment had allowed me 
to accomplish goals, that 
given a life devoid of 
government service. I would 
not have had the ability to 
achieve My 14 years are an 
experience rich in reward and 
deep in satisfaction. 

To each of you. my fellow 
councillors, my wishes are for 
your best in whatever future 
endeavors you choose to 
undertake. To the people of 
the city. I have given you my 
best. 



Thomas Tagen 
Stationed At Fort Bragg 



Beach Schedule 



Army Pvt, Thomas L. 
Tagcn, son of Thomas S, and 
Barbara A. Tagcn of 10 
Gilmorc St., Quincy, has 



arrived for duty with the 
505th Infantry, Fort Bragg. 
N,C, 
Tagen is an infantryman. 



Thursday, July 2: High 
Tidc-4:29; Beach Hours - I 
p,m, - 6 p.m,; Beginner I A- 1; 
Beginner I B - 1:30; Beginner 
II A - 2; Beginner II B-2:30; 
Advanced Beginner - 3; 
Intermediate - 5:30; Swimmer 




- 5; Basic Rescue and Water 
Safety - 3:30 - 5. 

Friday, July 3: Holiday -no 
beach lessons, 

Monday, July 6: High Tide 
7:37; Beach Hours 3 p,m, - 8 
p.m.; Beginner I A - 3; 
Beginner I B - 3:30; Beginner 
II A -4; Beginner II B - 4:30; 
Advanced Beginner - 5; 
Intermediate - 5:30; Swimmer 

- 6; Advanced Lifesaving - 
6:30 - 8, 

Tuesday, July 7: High Tide 
8:31; Beach Hours 8 am, - 12 



p.m ; Beginner ! A - 1 1:30; 

Beginner II A - II; Advanced 
Beginner- 10: .30; Intermediate 
10; Swimmer - 9:30; Basic 
Rescue and Water Safety - 8- 
9:30 

Wednesday, July 8: High 
Tide 9: 13; Beach Hours 8 am 
to 12:30 p.m.; Beginner I A - 
12; Beginner II A - II; 
Beginner II B - 11:30; 
Advanced Beginner - 10:30; 
Intermediate - 10; Swimmer - 
9:30; Advanced Lifesaving- 8- 
9.30. 



Thomas Tagen 
Completes Station ^^^nit Training 



Army Private Thomas C. 
lagen. son of Thomas S 
lagen of 10 (iilmore St.. 
Quincy. has completed one 
station unit training (OSUT) 
at the U.S. Army Infantry 
School. Fort Benning. (ia. 



OSIJ I is a 12-week period 
which combines basic combat 
training and advanced 
individual training. 

Soldiers were taught to 
perform any of the duties in a 
rifle or mortar squad. 



The Disabled 
American Veterans 
asks you to reserve 
handicapped parking 
places for 
handicapped people. 



d^>^^^»^^ '// 



J 



LOIS QIJINTILIANI QAMON 
PLEDGE FUND 



I pledge $. 



10 ihc reward fund for the arrest and or 



lonviclion of ihe person or persons responsible (or the murder on 
December 14, 1986, of I ois Quiniiliani Damon, a .^1 year old *ile 
and mother of two children, and owner ol the Braintree t)airy Mart 
I understand that pledge money for ihe reward will not be collected 
until Ihe arrest and or conviction of the person or persons 
responsible for this crime. 



Name 
Street . 
Town . 
Phone 



I'Irttr pfmi 



Zip Code . 



Signature 



Return Pledge lo 

LOIS Ql INT II.IANI DAMON PIKD(;K H ND 

P() Box 71Hft 

(./uincy, MA 02169 

All Informaiitin is ( imfidcniml 



Thur«da). July 2. 1987 Quincy Sun Pige 21 



One-Man Patrol 
Cars Start July 15 



Fhe first phase ol the Pohcc 
Study Implementation 
Project, estahlished by the 
city last year, has been 
successfully launched, 
according to Mayor Francis 
McC'auley. 

"When the Police r)cpart- 
mcnt initiates its new one- 
man patrols on July 15. the 
city will then be able to point 
to a number ol important 
initial steps taken to improve 
police department cKiciency," 
said Mc<'aulcy. 

Ihc Police Study Imple- 
mentation C (»mmittcc was 
created to oversee implemen- 
tation of recommendations 
made in a controversial report 
on the Q u I n c y Police 
Department that was 
submitted by the I ield 
Services Division ol the 
Massachusetts Municipal 
Associatmn inOctob<.-r, I9S6. 
McC auley said 

The committee is comprised 
of representatives u! the 
Mayor's OHice. the Police 
Department and the t itv 
( Duncil (C ouncillors James 
Sheets and Michael C hene\l. 

It has cncourajicil facilita- 
tion of MM A rctonimenda- 
tions aimed jI piolcs^ionali/ing 
and nuulch/iiig iIk Police 
Department 

I he MM A consiiitants 
recommended stronger 
overall management and 
internal controls, better 
utilization ol personnel. 
enhanced training a! \arious 
levels, improved management 



and planning practices 
through more effective use of 
computer technology and 
their systems, and restructur- 
ing of the department, he said. 

"I am pleased with the 
progress we have made 
toward building a stronger, 
more responsive Police 
Department," Mayor 
ML<'auley stated. "Of course, 
there is still much work to be 
done. Ibis is only a start. But 
It IS a very promising start, 
and It demonstrates the city's 
commitment to public safety 
and management efficiency." 

Police Chief Francis Finn 
did not comment. 

Mayor McCauley cited 
specific improvements to the 
Police Department operations 
including the following: 

• New patrol cars with 
modern features. 

• ( reation of a new shift, 
the so-called impact shift, 
which reassigns officers to 
peak activity periods. 

• Increased supervision of 
patrol cars. 

• A new internal affairs 
capability within the 
department to improve 
community relations. 

• Strengthening the 
department's training 
program 

• A research and planning 
capability 

• Fnhanced internal 
communication with the 
department 

• ( Umputeri/ation of 
department operation. 



According to Brent Wilkes, 
director of the Massachusetts 
Municipal Association's Field 
Services Division, "Quincy 
has made impressive progress 
toward improving manage- 
ment and operations of the 
Police Department." 

In MMA's report to 
McCauley, the report states, 
"While the consultants and 
the Police Department do not 
agree on all the recommenda- 
tions and issues, there has 
been enough common ground 
to achieve measurable results. 

Ihe Field Services Division 
of MM A IS the leading 
organization providing 
consulting services and 
technical assistance to 
Massachusetts cities and 
towns, he said. 

Mayor McCauley stressed 
that "progress is due in large 
part to the team spirit and 
cooperative attitudes of those 
who have participated in the 
project I very much 
appreciate the constructive 
role of the Police Department 
and th^ useful advice and 
assistance from the consultants 
at the M assachuset t s 
Municipal Association." 

McCauley also noted that 
he has approved Chief 
I rancis .\. Finn's request to 
begin the process of 
accreditation tor the Police 
Department 

I he C iiy ( ouncil voted 
Mondav night to appropriate 
$5.6()0 toward that process. 



North Quincy Meeting 
On Drinking, Vandalism 



Ward 6 Councillor Thomas 
J Nutley, in conjunction with 
the Atlantic Neighborhood 
Asso(;)ation, has scheduled a 
community meeting with the 
Quincy Police Department 
and representatives to address 
the problems ol drinking and 
vandalism in various areas of 
North Quincy. 

1 he meeting will be tonight 
(Thursday) at 7 p.m , at the 
Atlantic Neighborhood 
Center. 12 Hunt St. 



"We have a law prohibiting 
drinking in our streets and 
parks It should be 
enforced." said Nutley. 

The drinking and boister- 
ousness in the North St. area 
and Welcome Young 
Playground area coupled with 
the shooting out of car 
windows on North and South 
Bayfield Rds. and nearby 
streets recently has caused 
residents to be very 
apprehensive and angry, 



Nutley said. 

"The example set for 
children by beer drinking 
adults at Welcome Young is a 
disgrace," said Nutley. "Let's 
nip-it-m-the-bud and enforce 
the open container law now," 
he said. 

All North Quincy residents 
are welcome to attend the 
meeting which will begin at 7 
p.m., Thursday, July 2, at the 
Atlantic Neighborhood 
Center, 12 Hunt St. 



WoUaston Doughnut Shop 
License Transfer Approved 



The City License Hoard 
Tuesday granted a request 
from Antonio Andrade of 

\&A Donuts. Inc , doing 
business as Dunkin' Donuts. 
6«7 Hancock St . Wollasttm. 
lor a transfer of the common 
victualer license as held by 
Dandi Donuts of the same 

oi^ation 

Andradc and his attorney, 
Robert Fleming, told the 
board that thev have plans to 
remodel the bu'lding >o that 
the side w hich is used as a deli 



in the existing establishment 
would become ofdce space for 
.Andrade. who currently 
owns Dunkin" Donut shops in 
other locations including 
Holbrook. Braintree and 
Hm^harn. 

lleming told the board that 
two neighborhood meetings 
have been held and that none 
of the residents on Chapman 
St.. which is behind the shop, 
are in opposition to the 
proposal. 

Ihev also told the board 



that they are willing to install 
an outdoor trash compactor 
which will be run once a day 
to cut down on trash build-up 
and that th.v would have the 
lonipactor enclosed. 

i hi- board granted the 
iraiisfcr with the stipulation 
that the remodeling plans be 
submitted to the board for 
inspection before any 
reconstruction begins and 
that no free-standing sign be 
erected at the site. 



Happy Acres Day Camp 
Seeking Volunteers 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department is seeking 
teenage volunteers to assist its 
regular staff at the Happy 
Acres Day Camp for children 
with special needs, according 
to Director of Recreation 
Barry J Welch. 

The camp is located at 100 
Southern Artery and offers a 
variety of recreational 
programs for handicapped 
Quincy residents. 

Persons who are accepted 
may volunteer one day or 
more each week and gain 



valuable experience while 
providing an opportunity for 
handicapped children to 
fulfill their potential in a 
variety of recreational 
activities. 

Boys and girls interested in 
volunteering should be 
entering the seventh grade or 
above, and report to an 
organizational meeting at the 
camp on Thursday, July 2 at 
10 a.m. 

Additional information can 
be obtained by calling the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment at 773-1380, ext. 204. 




Hew many othar 

pcopit have keys 

to your homo? 

Drop Into 

Our Showroom 

ALL TYPES OF 

LOCKS ON DISPLAY 

ANY QUESTIONS? 

Aik Our 

Expcritnctd Sloff 

SALES 

SERVICE • INSTAUATION 



755 SouttMrn Arttry, Quixy 
FIEE MRKINC 472-2177 



Houghs Neck 

Bonfire Cancelled 

Because Of Danger 



Ihe annual bonfire on 
Edgcwatcr Drive, a long-time 
tradition for residents of the 
Rock Island Road area, has 
been cancelled, according to 
Councillor Michael T. 
Cheney. 

Cheney said that the 
Quincy Fire Department 
cannot issue a permit to hold a 
bonfire because of the danger 
that the bonfire would pose to 
abutting residents. 

Several residents at a 
meeting of the July 3 
Edgewater Drive Celebration 
Committee expressed concern 
that the dump has been closed 

and contraaors are already 
showing up with wood to be 
dumped on the beach for the 
bonfire. 



Residents have requested 
that the city enforce the 
maximum fine for illegal 
dumping and S200 for the 
transportation of illegal fill - 
bringing a total fine of S400, 
said Cheney. 

**I understand the concerns 
of my neighbors, therefore, at 
their request this year's 
bonfire will be cancelled, and 
anyone dumping wood on 
Edgewater Drive beach will 
be fined a maximum of $400," 
Cheney said. 

"I have requested, through 
Captain William Murphy, 
that patrols be beefed up in 
the Edgewater Drive area for 
the purpose of preventing any 
wood or debris from being 
dumped on Edgewater 



Drive." 

Many residents filed 
complaints that substantial 
damage was caused to their 
property by unruly crowds of 
drinkers who did not live in 
Quincy and have requested 
that the Quincy Police 
maintain the same level of 
police service on the night of 
July 3 at Edgewater Drive 
that was allocated last year, 
according to Cheney. 

Cheney praised the police 
for doing an outstanding job 
at last vear's celebration. 



The residents in the vicinity 
of Edgewater Drive look 
forward to a peaceful July 4 
weekend, he said. 



Granite Co-Operalive Bank 
Declares Dividend 



Granite Co-operative Bank cents per share, 
ol Quincy announced today Ihe dividend is payable on 

that the Board of Directors JuK 15. 1987 to stockholders 

declared a cash diMdent ol 10 of record as ol June 30. 198" 



This dividend is the fifth paid 
b\ Granite since its 
conversion trom mutual to 
stock in April. 1986. 



Sun 
Videos 



I : — 



^ 



Preserve those precious personaf 
moments or important business 
events forever on video tape to be 
seen again . . . and again. 

We have a complete video cassette recording 
service specializing in: 



• Weddings 

• Anniversaries 

• Testimonials 

• Birthday Parties 

• Lectures 

• Seminars 

• Corporate IVIeetings 

• Court Depositions 

And other special events 



We do it right and at the right price. 



For further information write or call: 



Attention: Debbie McCarthy 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy 
471-3100 



Puft 22 Quino Sun Thursda>. Juh 2. I4S7 



Arts/Entertainment 



Dinosaur Day At Merrymount 





BRONTOSAl Rl S Bl RGKRS and other treats were ser>ed to students at the 
Merrymount School during Dinosaur Da> recently. Students, from left, are Lauren 
McLellan. Felicia Tarn. Johnny Miller. Jared Downey.andJanine Miller, second graders in 
Mrs. Kay Kil^patrick's class. Standing, from left, are Mary I.ou Kishman, l.ori Seegraber, 
children's librarian of the Adams Shore Library; Terri Miller and Lihel Sherman. 
Merrymount PTO president. 



MKRR\M()( NT SCHOOL principal (lerard (.oHen presents diplomas for work in 
creative writing, language, social studies and science to second graders in Mrs. Kay 
Kit/patrick's class. From left, are .lared Dow nr>. Mar> Kay Kit/gerald. Jill l-ishman. Kath\ 
Linsky. Jen Stipkovitch. Justin Sherman. Jeff \ erlicc«>, \ndrew Rislano and Andrew 
Byrne. 

lijiilili \ S(,(| jiliiiiits l,\ I ,,ni (mrniniil 



Paula Quigg Winner 
In Puerto Riean Contest 



Summer Programs At Crane Libraries 



Paula Quigg. a junior at 
North Quincy High School, 
was recently a semi-finalist in 







llsiand 



Our Own Homemade 
SEAFOOD 
CHOWDER 

Seizing 
FRESH FISH 



a contest sponsored by the 
American Association of 
Teachers of Spanish and 
Portuguese. 

She received a grade of 90 
per cent on a test composed of 
questions based on more than 
200 facts about Puerto Rican 
cultural and history The test 
was given in Spanish 



The summer programs at 
all Thomas Crane Public 
libraries will begin this 
month. 

Toddlers, ages two and 
three, accompanied b\ a 
parent can attend a weekly, 
half-hour program at the 
Adams Shore Branch 
Library This program 



Scrod 
Scallops 
Smelti 
Shrimp 



Sot* 

Cl«m> 

Swordflth 

Haddock 



njisferSUB 



Seafood Planer 
Your choice of 
Broiled or Fried 

Everyday Special 

Open Breakfast 
Everyday Except Sunday 

HOURS 
Mon - Sat 6am -9pm 

TAKEOUT ORDERS 
FAST SERVICE 

308 Ouincy Ave 
CALL 773-9854 



Homemade Italian Cuisine 

Chicken Parmesan 

Chicken Campagna 

Lasagna 

Beef Stroganoff 

Salad & rolls with butter 
included with dinner 
Salad & rolls with butter included with dinners. 
64 Billings Rd., N. Ouincy 328-9764 

Mon.-Sat. 10-10 



tcalurcs stones, lingerplays. 
and activities, it begins 
luesday. Jul> 21 and 
continues through August 2.^ 
F'rogram time is |{):3() am 

Pre-schoolers, ages three, 
four and five, will enjo\ films 
and stories shared at the 
North Quincy Branch 
I ibrary I his program is held 
Wednesday mornings at 9:30 
or at 1 1 and runs lor six weeks 
beginning July 8. 

Ihc story hour at the 
Wollaston Branch I. ibrary 
begins on Friday, July 10, at 



WOLLA&TON 
THEATER 



10 am I ach I rida> tor m\ 
weeks children ages m\. se\cn 
and eight will meet new and 
exciting book characters 
through reading aloud, book 
talks, and other book related 
activities. 

"I ales through lime," a 
SIX week series of programs 
for youngsters age eight and 
older, consists of stories, book 
talks, games and demonstra- 
tions. This series is offered at 
the Quincy Square librarv on 
Ihursday at 10 30 am. 
beginning July 9. 



Savt Gat and Money 
Shop Locally 



Ihc evening programs for 
families will jlternale film 
programs with storytelling 
concerts during July and 
August [ hese programs arc 
held at " p m at the Quincv 
Square library lor children 
age live and older, and adults 
F he film programs arc 
scheduled for .luly 7 and 21, 
August 4 and IK 

I he storytelling concerts 
will begin July 14 af 7 p.m 
and (oilow onJulv 2K. August 
II and 25 I he West of the 
Moon storytellers begin the 
series, and they'll be followed 
by Sumner McClain, I ec Mm 
Mo, and I ony C'apaccio. F his 
program scries is funded by 
the Quincy Arts C ouncil. 



773-4«qp 



Grill 2 



Restaurant 

For Business Luncheons 

and 

Elegant Dining 

Best Food on the South Shore 

Tablecloth and Candlelight Dining 

Now En|oy LUNCH on Weekdays And BBC on Weekends and Holidays 
at the South Shore's only OPEN AIR POOLSIDE RESTAURANT 

Background MutIc - Tatty Tropical Drinks 
Also: Don't Miss Our BOILED LOBSTER Specials 

FRI & SAT.: PRIME RIB X-LARGE »9" 

ALL DINNER ENTREES From »8" to M3** saiiJ'i?^ 

LUNCH From »3" - Plus Daily Blackboard Specials 




At Th« Quincy toy Inn 

20 Hancock St. . Ouincy 
Can for rMervatlona 328-1900 

Available For Funcbons Located Naxt to The ^leponset Rh^er Brtdge 

Free Partdng - Noo-Smokmg Section Availabte g^ sSSJT^nSI 



Wed & Thurs July 1 & 2 

Winner 4 Academy Awards 

"PLATOON" (R, 

Best Picture 

Eve s 7 00 Only 

Starts Fri July 3 

Mic^iael J Fox 

-SECBET OF 

MY SUCCESS" (PG 13) 

Good Family Fun 

Fri 4 Sat 7 00 & 9 15 

Sun-Thurs 7 00 Only 

Mon A Tues Dollar Night 



ADM. >2.S0 20 A OVER '2 00 



AT PINF Z^ 



A Good 
Place To Eat 

Hlnd.'ppnd'-riL.' A»r Ouincy 4 79 S 1 1 1 REASONAB IE PRICES 



RESTA1 



4 Different Dinners Will Be 
Posted on Blackboard Daily. 

Call us for the specials 



DINNER SERVED SUN. TO THURS. Til 9:45 P.M. 

FRI. & SAT Til 10:45 P.M. 

LUNCHEON SPECIALS SERVED DAILY 




CtL/iedo A 



i.t 



I.uncheon Specials 

11:30- 3:00 p.m. 

( hicken Parmigiana 
spaghetti 

Seatood Newburg 

Baby Broiled Haddock 

London Broil Au Jus 

Broiled Beet I iver 
onions & bacon 

(lift Certificates 
Available 




MOO 
M.OO 

M.75 
M.25 

M.75 



Dinner Specials 
3:00- 11:00 p.m. 

• Queen Prime Rib «8.95 

• Chicken Parmigiana *5.95 

• Broiled Boston Schrod »6.95 

• Beel Burgundy 

rice pilaf *5.95 

• F ggplant Parmigiana *5.95 

• Veal C'acciatore *6.95 

• C hicken Marsella *6.95 

Served w fresh garden salad or 
soup, potato, veg f)r pasta 



l.ivp pnfprtainmpnl in our lounge 
Thurs - Sat Bob Benoit, Sun - Frank Dunn 

75 Franklin St., Quincy 
472-1115 



Thursday, July 2. IM7 Quincy Sim Page 23 



Quincy Cable TV 



The local program ichtdule for 
Quincy Cablavitctm Ch. 3 and 
Ch. 9 from WedncMlay. July I to 
Friday, July 10. 

Ch. 3 

Wednesday, July I: 

7 pm Summerfcst - Live Douai 
Boyi Choir from France al the 
Ruth Gordon Amphitheatre. 
Thursday, July 2: 

6:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 

7 pm Joe Mucci's Body works 
7:30 pm Mad about the Movies 
- The Untouchables 

8 pm Cabletalk 

8:30 pm Making the Most of It 

9 pm QJC Maga/me 

Kriday, July 3: 

No Programmmg 

Happy Kourth of July 

Sunday, July S: 
4 pm The Carpenter's Union (R) 
4:30 pm You Arc I he light of the 
World 
5:30 pm C ablctalk 

Monday, July 6: 
6:57 pm Rhymes of the Fimes 
7 pm Reading Discovery 
7:30 pm Bramtrcc Flower & 
(iardcn Show 
H pm Senior Smarts (R) 
K 30 pm Joe Mucci's Bod\ Works 

Tuesda), July 7: 
6:57 pm Rhsmcs ol the limes 
7 pm I ibrar> Hook Nook 
7 30 pm I ocal locus 
« pm lalk ahoui ihc Mind 
Wednesday. Jul> 8: 
■" pm Summcrk-st-l 1\ I -Baron 
Hugo's Orchestra Irom ihe Ruth 
(lordon Amphiiheairc 

Thursdat. JuU 9: 

6 57 pm Rhsmes o! the I lmc^ 

7 pm Joe Mucci's Body works 
7:30 pm quinc> Maga/me 

8 pm (ablctalk 

8 30 pm Dart F ever 

9 pm Job Search - Jerrs I'llis 

Friday, July 10: 
2:27 pm Rhymes of the limes 



3 pm Senior Smarts (R) 

3:30 pm Library Book Nook (R) 

4 pm Davey A Goliath 

Ch. 9 

WcdncMiay, July I: 

7 pm Summerfesi - Live Douai 
Boys Choir from France at the 
Ruth Gordon Amphitheatre. 
Thivaday, July 2: 

7 pm Joe Mucci's Body Works 
7:30 pm Mad about the Movies 

8 pm Cabletalk 

8:30 pm Making the Most of It 

9 pm QJC Maga/me 

Friday. July 3: 
7-9:30 pm Fourth of July parade 
from Randolph live on American 
Channel 9 



Quincy Sun 
Ch.8 



Quincy, regional, national 
and world news around the 
clock seven days a week. 
Plus 
Special Video News Reports 
and Features. 

Mondays. 5 30 1' M . ^ V) l» M 
Tuesdays. 10 \ M , 5 30 P M . 
7 30 F' VI 

Wednesdays. Ml AM. 5 M) 
I' M . " 30 P M 
Thursdays. 10 \ M . 5 30 P M . 
" M) V M 

Fridays. 10 A M . 5 Mt V M . 
" M) P M 
.Salurdavs. 10 A M 

No Ch. 3, 9 
P^o^^anls Friday 

There will be no program- 
ming on Ch. 3 and Ch. 9 
Friday. July 3 because ol the 
holiday weekend. 



Alice Burke Child 
Center Holds Graduation 



The Alice Burke Child 
Center held its annual 
graduation and dance revievv 
rccenlly at Sacred Heart 
School Hall, North Quincy. 

Graduating from the 

Quincy School Kindergarten 

Program were Panhia Kou. 

Gary MacKen/ie. Jamie 

Parisi, and Fdward Sallaway. 

The theme of the music and 
High School. Sullivan has 
World ■' Ihe nursery, pre- 
kindergarten. and kindergarten 
children performed songs and 
dances from different 



countries. 

Quincy School performers 
were: 

Tracey Adams. Sheila 
Bohan. Tarn Cao. Christopher 
Crocker, Corinne Curtain. 
Kelsey Doherty, Eric Eng. 
Manou Edovard, Katlyne 
Finn. Erica Keeley. Bridgette 
Kelly, Panhia Kou. Ha Le. 
Gary MacKen/ie. Mark 
Maher. Ariane Mathis, Jon 
Palma, Jamie Parisi. Many 
Pho. Steven Quirk. Edward 
Sallaway. Joey Sudak. 
Khuong Tran. Tri Tran. 



Swim Lessons 



Ihc Quincy Recreation 
Department scheduled 
registration for instructional 
swimming lessons at beaches 
Wednesday. July I, from 12 
noon until 6 p.m. 

Instruction is in accordance 
with American Red Cross 
Standards and classes from 
Beginner I through Advanced 
l.ife Saving are offered by 
Red Cross trained Water 
Safety Instructors lessons 
are open to Quincy residents, 
arc free, and will be conducted 
at the following locations: 



Avalon-Avalon Ave.. 
Quincy Point; Baker-Palmer 
St.. Snug Harbor; Rock 
Island-Rockland St.. Hough's 
Neck; Perry-Parkhurst St.. 
Hough's Neck; Adams 
Shore-Heron Rd.. Adams 
Shore; Elm-Sachem St.. 
Wollaston Beach; Bayfield- 
opposite Bayfield St.. 
Wollaston Beach; Nickerson- 
Dorchester St., Squantum. 

Qualifying swim tests for 
the Boating and Sailing 
Program will also be available 
at these locations. 



I' 
* 



n.n^<^^^^TTtT^t^^^»t^^^^^ti^^^^'t^^--^^^^t^Y 



"It's Simply Italian - 
And Then Some" 

And They're All Simply Delicious 
A book featuring the recipes of 

Marie J. D'Olimpio 

On Sale In Quincy At 



That's Italian, Franklin St. 
Previte's Market, Sumner St. 

And At 

Samoset Pharmacy 
Samoset Ave., Merrymount 
Price: $5.95 

I] r 



Sunday, July S: 

4 pm The Carpenter's Union 
4:30 pm You Are the Light of the 
World 

Monday, July 4: 

7 pm Reading Discovery 

7:30 pm Braintree Flower & 
Garden Show 

8 pm Senior Smarts (R) 

8:30 pm Joe Mucci's Body Works 
Tuesday, J«ly 7: 

7 pm Time-Out with Butch 
Stearns 

7:30 pm Local Focus 

8 pm Talk about the Mind - LIVE 

Wednesday, July I: 
7 pm Summerfcst - LIVE - Baron 
Hugo's Orchestra from the Ruth 
Gordon Amphitheatre. 

Thursday, July 9: 

7 pm Joe Mucci's Body Works 
7:30 pm Quincy Maga/ine 

8 pm Cabletalk 
8:30 pm Dart Fever 

9 pm Job Search - Jerry Ellis 

Friday, July 10: 
10:30 am Talk about the Mind 
(R) 

11:30 am Evan Korey's Variety 
Plus(R) 
2:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 

3 pm Senior Smarts (R) 

3:30 pm library Book Nook (R) 

4 pm Davey & Goliath 



Top Ten 

Video 

Rentals 



1 "Hannah And Her 
Sisters" starring Woody 
Allen, Mia Farrow and 
Michael Caine (HBO 
Cannon) l^ast Week: No. 1 

2 "Little Shop Of Hor 
rors' starring Rick Mora- 
nis, Steve Martin and 
John Candy (Warner) No. 
(i 

;J. "Junipin" Jack F^lash" 
starring Whoopi Goldt>erg 
(CaS/Fox) No. 4 

4 The Color Of Money" 
starring Paul Newman and 
Tom Cruise (Paramount) 
No 2 

5. "Peggy Sue (iot Mar 
ried" starring Kathleen 
Turner (CBSTox) No. 3 

ti. "F'erris Bueller's Day 
Ofr starring Matthew 
Broderick (Paramount) 
No. 5 

7. "Crimes Of The Heart" 
starring Diane Keaton, 
Jessica Lange and Sissy 
Spacek (Lurimar) New 
Kntr> 

S. "Children Of A l^.sser 
(Jod" starring William 
Hurt and Marlee Matlin 
(Piiramount) No. (i 

f> "Hearthreak Ridge" 
st<irring Clint Eastwood 
(Warner) No. 10 

10. "Wanted Dead Or 




Alive" starring Rutger 
Hauer (New World) New 
Kntrv 



NEW RKI.CASLS 

Crimes of the Heart 

I very I ime We Syy Goodbye 

lightship 

(iolden Child 



Sponsurrd b> 

"yuur Hulltwuitd Connecliitn" 

'^DEOEXPRESSSS 



VID€OVOV'fS 

1 "l' ■( 




471-1959 

419 HANCOCK ST NO OUINCV MA Ml" 



Job Recruitment Now 
On ^Around Town' 



The Around Town cable 
network, which is shown on 
Sun Ch. 8 in Quincy, will offer 
metro Boston's first video job 
recruitment services beginning 
Monday, July 13. 

The half hour oroerams, 
called "At! Work." will 
include segments on career 
services as well as employment 
opportunities in the 
professional, business and 
health care fields. 

Initial firms participating in 



the programming include 
Fidelity Systems, Compugra- 
phic, Mass. Financial 
Services, TASC (The 
Analytical Sciences Corpora- 
tion) and Codex. 

-At! Work" will be seen 
Mondays through Fridays at 
6 a.m., 10 a.m., 2 p.m., 10 
p.m., I a.m., and 3 a.m., and 
Saturdays and Sundays at 7 
a.m., 9 a.m., I p.m., 4 p.m., 8 
p.nt and 2 a.m. 

"This is a revolutionary 



recruitment concept which 
has been made possible by the 
tight labor market in the 
Boston area." said Jane 
Morton, president of Around 
Town! 

"The nice part is that once 
viewers start tuning in, it will 
begin to change the way that 
they choose their careen for 
the future. 

"The visual dimension 
offers viewers the ability to 
prescrcen." 



Quincy's July 4th Parades On Sun Ch. 8 



Quincy's Fourth of July 
Parades in Squantum and 
Merrymount can be seen 



Monday on Sun Ch. 8 at S 
p.m. and 7 p.m. 



Both parades will be shown 
at these times. 



Summerfcst Concerts Live On Ch. 3 



Rene and Marie Rancourt, 
the Yankee Jack Country and 
Western Group, and the 
Heritage Ja/z Band are just a 
few Summerfcst concerts 
which QCTV volunteers and 



staff will broadcast live on Ch. 
3 Wednesday at 7 p.m. 
weather permitting. 

Baron Hugo and his 
orchestra will perform a 
Summerfcst concert July 8 



which can be seen live on Ch. 
3. 

Summerfcst performances 
will be repeated on Ch. 3, 
Sundays at 7 p.m. 



^The Untouchables' Topic On Ch. 3 



Movie reviewers Dallas 
Slade and guest Paul 
O'Donnell will speak about 



the movie, "The Untouchables" 
tonight (Thursday) at 7.30 
p.m. on Ch. 3. 



A "sneak peek" of the Brian 
Depalma movie. "Mad about 
the Movies" can also be seen. 



Residents Science Museum Interpreters 



Patricia Lovell, L.J. 
Balasundaram. and Shirley 
Brooks of Quincy are among 
the 200 volunteers who will 
work as interpreters and 
translators this summer at the 
Boston Museum of Science. 



They will be involved with the 
touring international exhibit 
India: A Festival of Science 
on display through Sept. 7. 

The display explores 5.000 
years of Indian innovation in 
art. science, and technology 
ranging from production of 



fine textiles and exotic 
perfumes to advancements in 
the fields of holistic medicine 
and physics. More than 500 
rare artifacts are displayed 
many that have never been 
seen in the West. 



AMERICAN CABLESYSTEMS 
CHANNEL 23 

ooooooo. 

AMERICA'S #1 RENT-AMOviE Channel: 

HAWVHAND 
HER SIS 





Call To Order 
328-9090 

or 
471-9143 

Each Request TV Movie 

is only '3.95 added 

to your Cable bill 



Pngt 24 Quincy Sun ThurMlay, July 2, 19*7 




Special Features 



GRUBBY 



By War I en NjiIIici 




Clare AnnswcUs 



Rural Delivery 



By Al Smith 



BUT, JULIE, yoUR WIFE 
JUST PUTMEOLTTOF 
THE HOUSE.' I HAVE 
NO PLACE TO LIVE.' 



THERE5 ONLy 

ROOM FOR 

ONE IN HERE 

AND I'M THE 




Swamp Brab 






GOT It/ DAT room CUONT 
BOTVBR Vt>U NO fAO'.' 



By Warrcii Salt 

SMOty UIMEN r SA1ILE ? 



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7-2g7 



NAPOLEON 



By Foster Moore 




WELL .' IF THAT'S TH' Zxk, 
WAV WE WANTS TO 
PLAY- -I'LL JUST p^ 
CALL TH' VET/ r^'^^, 





TWITCH 




By How Rands 



NO. I'M NOT TAKING YOU 
BACK TO N^ APARTMENT/ 



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IT JUST SO HAFI'EM::!) 




"nfe MOST PoPoi>»R 




By D J. Co»iei 

Unmix the letters in the boxes to form a 
word. Then circle A. B or C for the cor- 
rect meaning (or definition). '■* * 
Score yourself as follows: 

4 Correct-Excellent 2 Correct-Fair 

3 Correct-Good 1-0 Correct-Poor 




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WEEK OF: July 2 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

You establish quick rapport with people from every walk of life 
and you have a gift for making everyone feel wekome It can 
be difficult for you to see a project through to completion. 
Renewing old friendships is a theme of the current year Far- 
off travel is a distinct possibility 

AQUARIUS - January 21 • February 19 

Your determination helps you achieve a key goal ahead of 
schedule. New challenges are in the offing; be careful not to 
overextend yourself. Partner is in a philosophical mood 

PISCES - February 20 - March 20 

Behind-the-scenes events are occurring that may positively af- 
fect your community standing by the end of the summer Shaky 
relationship stabilizes once you lake a more objective approach 

ARIES - March 21 • April 20 

Week is generally favorable lor moves, promotions, and renew- 
ing personal and professional contacts Overdue news on family 
matter may arrive after the weekend Self image brightens 

TAURUS - April 21 • May 22 

Be wary of those who make an all-out effort to impress you 
with their knowledge The quiet types are the ones you can 
count on Innovation and experimentation are your keywords 
this week 

GEMINI - May 23 • June 21 

Home life is a hub of activity, while career environment becomes 
somewhat quieter Arranging priorities is itself a high priority 
Self-confident Gemini should pursue major goals 

CANCER - June 22 • July 22 

You find yourself basking in the glory of loved ones' ac 
compiishmenis Cultural activities enliven your weekend 
Romantic streak may surface, don't hesitate to write senti- 
mental verse 

LEO - July 23 • August 22 

You have a knack for making requests and generally getting 
your way Put this ability to wise use Platonic friendship is 
highlighted all week Intriguing loiter may arrive by Tuesday 

VIRGO - August 23 • September 22 

Thursday- Friday favor travel and travel planning The weekend 
offers opportunities for acquiring small treasures Monday- 
Wednesday highlight financial reviews and possible 
reconciliations 

LIBRA - September 23 - October 22 

Reunions of various sorts are accented through this period 
Friend may f)verwhelm you with his or her generosity Avoid 
extremes if dieting, traveling, or exercising 

SCORPIO - October 23 - November 21 

Good week for intellectual pursuits, including those combined 
with romance or friendship Weekend accents detours and 
discoveries Monday- Wednesday focus on health related 
activities and fitness schemes 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 December 22 

Thursday-Friday favor competitions based on skill Career de- 
cisions are highliqhted after the weekend The period generally 
accccnts a trencftoward simplifiying your surroundings. 

CAPRICORN - December 23 - Janur.y 20 

Modern technology seems less intimidating and the week 
generally sees you upgrading your skills Weekend offers op- 
portunities for renewing friendships. Possible communications 
snags may slow you down. 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July 2nd. actress Cheryl Ladd: 3rd. director Ken Russell. 4th. 
band leader Milch Miller; 5th, showman P T Barnum, 6th. 
singer Delia Reese, 7th, singer Ringo Starr, 8th, singer Steve 
Lawrence. 



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19 My^clf 

20 A cliollrngc 
21. tmploycd 

23 SoncJ hill 

24 Girls' nornc 
7'f Mole turkey 

29 Dccrcosc 

30 Cord gome 
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knowledge 

36 Pfiusc 

37 OI>eie 

38 Cost 

40. Heir 

41. Golf ntound 
44. Suri God 



Thuriday. July 2. 1987 Quincy Sun Pagr 25 



^ 
*= 



In The Service 



John Lope8 Completer 
Advanced Army Training 



Army National Guard 
private John F lopes, son ol 
Susan I. opes of 1 1 Sixth Ave., 
Quincy, has completed 
advanced mdividual training 
at the U.S. Army Infantry 
School, Fort Bcnnmg, (ia 

Durmg the course, students 
received training which 
qualified them as light- 
weapons mfantrymen and as 
indircct-firc crewmen m a rifle 
or mortar squad 

Instruction included 
weapons qualifications, 
tactics, patrolling, land mine 
warfare, field communications 
and combat operations. 



-k 
^ 




JOHN LOPES 



John Peak Receives 
AF Achievement Award 



Major John C. Peak, son of 
retired Navy Ensign John C. 
and Beatrice M Peak of 15 
Standish Ave., Wollaston, 
has been decorated with the 
Air Force Achievement 
Medal at March Air Force 
Base. Calif 

The Achievement Medal is 
awarded to airmen for 



meritorious service, acts of 
courage, or other accomplish- 
ments. 

Peak isachief of operations 
with the 22nd Civil 
Engineering Squadron. 

He is a 1980 graduate of 
South Illinois University. 
Edwardsville. 



Joseph Lomi>ardo Promoted 
To Chief Petty Officer 



( hiel Petty Officer Joseph 
P I ombardo of Quinc>, was 
promoted to his current rank 
while serving as assistant 
officer in charge of Coast 
(iuard Recruiling Office 
Providence. Rl 

C hicI I ombardo is the son 
o( Cieorge I ombardo ol 
Quincy and Mrs Virginia 



Larson of Hingham. 

The 1971 graduate of 
Quincv High School will leave 
his current post this summer 
and assume command of the 
Coast (iuard's Recruiting 
Office m Portsmouth. N.H 

i. ombardo originally began 
his career with the Coast 
(iuard in 1974. 



Frank Carlos Completes 
A.F. Basic Training 



Airman Frank J Carlos, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank J. 
Carlos of 77 Flymouth St.. 
Quincy. has graduated from 
Air Force basic training at 
Lackland Air Force Base, 
lexas 

During the six weeks of 
training the airman studied 
the Air Force mission, 
organization and customs and 
received special training in 
human relations. 

He IS a 1986 graduate of 
Quincy Vocational Technical 
High School. 




FRANK CARLOS 



Matthew Ryan 
Completes Basic Training 



Pvt. Matthew A. Ryan, son 
of William P. and Thresa K. 
Ryan of 83 Lawn Ave., 
Quincy, has completed basic 
training at Fort Leonard 
Wood. Mo. 

During the training, 
students received instruction 
in drill and ceremonies, 
weapons, map reading, 
tactics, military courtesy, 
military justice, first aid. and 
Army history and traditions. 

He is a 1984 graduate of 

Sgt. William Dever 

A.F. Course 

Graduate 

Staff Sgt. William F. Dever 
Jr., son of William F. and 
Mary L. [)ever of 545 
Newport Ave., Quincy, has 
graduated from the U.S. Air 
Force air traffic control 
operator course at Keesler Air 
Force Base, Miss. 
(iraduates of the 16-week 
He is a 1981 graduate of 
Quincy Vocational technical 
High School. 



Quincy Vocational Technical 
High School. 

David Dimeo 

Participates In 

U.S.-Korea 

Exercise 

Army 2nd Lt. David F. 
Dimeo has participated in 
"Team Spirit '87." a Republic 
of Korea/ United States 
Combined Forces Command 
sponsored exercise held in 
South Korea. 

I he exercise involved 
forces stationed in South 
Korea, as well as U.S. forces 
from other locations within 
the Pacific Command and the 
continental United States. 

Dimeo is the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Fred B. Dimeo of 85 
Arnold St.. Quincy. 

The lieutenant is a tactical 
intelligence officer with the 
25th Infantry Division at 
Schoficld Barracks. Hawaii. 

He is a 1986 graduate of the 
U.S. Military Academy. West 
Point. N.Y. 



Now Is Time To Apply 
For College Financial Aid 



Rep. Robert A. Cerasoli 
reminds constituents that now 
is the time for people thinking 
about going to college next 
fall to apply for financial aid. 

Students and parents who 
have questions about filing 
out financial aid applications 
can call the Higher Education 
Information Center's toll-free 
information hotline at 1-800- 
442-1171 for assistance. 

Trained counselors will 
answer questions about 
completing applications and 
about financial aid programs. 

The center is open 9 a.m. to 
9 p.m. Monday through 
Ihursday; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Friday and Saturday; and 2 
p.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday 
(Octover through May). 

Rep. Cerasoli pointed out 
that despite stories about 
budget cuts and lack of funds, 
numerous financial aid 
programs exist to help 
families afford increasing 
college costs. 

Aid is available through the 
Massachusetts State Scholar- 
ship Office, the federal 

LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87PI522CI 

NOTICE OF 
CONSERVATORSHIP 
To PEARL GAGNON of 
QUINCY in said County and all 
persons interested in the estate 
of PEARL GAGNON and to 
the Massachusetts Department 
of Mental Health, a petition has 
been presented in the above- 
captioned matter praying that 
LESTER J STODDARD of 
NEEDHAM in the county of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
conservator vkith surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney must file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
July 22, 1987. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham this tenth day 
of J une, m the year of our Lord 
one thousand nine hundred and 
eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRICK HI GHES 
R agister of Probate 
7.2 87 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87PI549E! 

Estate of EDWARD F. 

HAYES late of QUINCY in the 

County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that PAUL F. HAYES of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor named in the will with 
out surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on July 
29. 1987. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham. the fifteenth 
day of June, one thousand nine 
hundred and eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRIC. HI GHES 
Recistci jf Probate 
7/2/87 



government, and colleges, as 
well as private sources such as 
foundations and community 
groups, he said. 

Massachusetts residents 
applying for aid should 
complete the Massachusetts 
Financial Aid Form(MFAF), 
according to Cerasoli The 
form is available from high 
school guidance and college 
financial aid offices as well as 
the Higher Education 
Information Center's office at 
the Boston Public Library. 
666 Boylston St., Boston, he 



A brochure describing 
various financial aid sources 
for Massachusetts residents is 
available free of charge from 
the Higher Education 
Information Center upon 
request. Cerasoli said. 

"I hope that anyone who 
needs financial assistance to 
attend college will make use of 
the services of the Higher 
Education Information 
Center," said Cerasoli. "The 
opportunity to go to college 
should be taken advantage of 
by everyone." 



said. 

3 On Simmons Dean^s List 

Three Quincy residents E. Griffin, senior English 
have been named to the 
Dean's List at Simmons 
College for the spring 
semester. 

Penelope Bullis. senior 
physical therapy major; Polly 



major; and Kathleen M. 
Francis, senior communica- 
tions major. 

LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICE 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87PI587EI 
Estate ofMARY E.SWEENEY 
late of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that GERALD D. 
SWEENEY of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executor named m 
the will without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
IO:(X) in the forenoon on July 
29. 1987. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the 
seventeenth day of June, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/2/87 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87PI620EI 
Estate of TERESA M. QUINN 
late of QUINCY in the Coumy 
of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that ANNA M. QUINN of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named in the will with 
out surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on August 
5, 1987. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Witness. Robert M Ford. 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the twenty- 
third day of June, one thousand 
nine hundred and eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRICK HI GHES 
Rcfkter of Probate 
7/2/87 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87PI606E1 
Estate of JAMES F HOAR 
late of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that JAMES P HOAR of 
YARMOUTHPORT in the 
County of BARNSTABLE be 
appointed executor named in 
the will without surety on the 
bond 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
IO:(X} in the forenoon on August 
5. 1987. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the twenty- 
second day of June, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRICK HI GHES 
Register of Probate 
7 2 87 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

DocketNo. 87PI596EI 
Estate of HANNAH 
McDONALD AKA: HANNAH 
MacDONALD late of QUINCY 
in the County of NORFOLK 
NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that FRANK J. LEAHY of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at C>edham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on August 
5. 1987. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Witness. Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the twenty- 
second day of June, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRICK HI GHES 
Register of Probate 
7/2/87 



LEGAL NOTICES 



NOTICE 
OF PUBLIC HEARING 

The Norfolk County 
Commissioners will, pursuant 
to M G 1. Chapter .34, Section 
14. conduct a public hearing on 
July 23. l98-'ai ''OO P M The 
public hearing will be held in the 
Second Floor Conference 
Room of City Hall Annex 
located at 1.305 Hancock Street, 
Quincy. MA. 

The purpose of said public 
hearing is to obtain comments 
from the public with respect to 
the sale of land owned by 
Norfolk County located at 20 
Coddingion Street. Quincy, 
containing approximately 
50.2'' 1 square feet of land 
improved with a building 
known as the "Old Quincy 
Courthouse." 

Norfolk County Commissioners 

James J Collins. Chairman 

George B McDonald 

David C .Ahcarn 

■'2,9 8-' 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87P1652EI 

Estate of BERNARD G. 

SAWYER late of QUINCY in 

the County of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that SUZANNE ST. 
JOHN, named in the will as 
SUZANNE JOAN ST 
JOHN of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix named m 
the will without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on 
September 16, 1987. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) m accordance with 
Probate Rule 16. 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the twenty- 
fourth day of June, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRICK HI GHES 
Register of Probate 
7,2/87 

COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87PI551EI 
Estate of GERALD S. SHEA 
late of QUINCY in the County 
of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that GERALD R. SHEA of 
QUINCY in the County of 
NORFOLK be appointed 
executor named in the will with 
out surety on the bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
IO:(X) in the forenoon on July 
29. 1987. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16. 

AVitness. Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the fifteenth 
day of June, one thousand nine 
hundred and eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRICK HUGHES 
Register of Probate 
7/2/87 



Pa(e 2t Quincy Sun Thunday. July 2, 19X7 




EVERYBODY'S MARKEmACE 



HELP WANTED 



EXPERIENCED 

PASTE UP ARTIST 

Full or Part Time 
Call 471-3100 for appt. 




1372 Hancock St., Quincy 
471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICE 



IWII MION K)K HIDS 

CIIY Of yi INCY MASSAC HI Stl IS 

ri RC HASINd DFF'AR I MFM 
\M)^ HANCOCK SI . yi INCA. MA 02169 

Invites scaled bids proposals (or furnishing and dclivcrinj! lo ific C"ii\ 
of Ou"»cy 

I'olicc [)epl - 

KIcci Service - Oil 

Changes and I ubncalions Julv IS. \9H'' (a 10 (H» AM 

C emcterv I)epl - 

1.000 Yards of I cam luK 15, I^H"" (a 10:30 AM 

Detailed specifications arc on lilc at the office of the Purchasing 
Agent. Ouincy Cii> Hall. 1305 Hancock Street, Qumcv. MA 02169 

Bids must state exceptions, if anv. the delivery dale and an> allowable 
discounts 

Firm bid prices vmH be given first consideration and vmII be received at 
the office of the Purchasing Agent until the time and dale stated 
above, at vthich lime and dale thev will be publicly opened and read 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope I he outside of the sealed envelope is 
10 be clearlv marked, "BID ENC I OSl D" vviih lime date of bid call 

I he right is reserved to reject anv or all bids or to accept any p.irt ol a 
bid or the one deemed best for the ( itv 

Francis \ McCaulev. Mavor 
Robert I Denvir. Jr. Purchasing Agent 

^ 2 S"" 



HELP WANTED 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWf Al TH 

OF MASSAC HI SLITS 

fHE IRIAI COl Rl 

fHF PROBATE AND 

FAMII Y COLRI 

DEPARF.MENT 

NORFOLK DIVISION 

Docket No «6Plf>0IF I 

NOTK E OF 

HDl CIARV'S AC COl NT 

lo ail persons interested in 
the estate of PARINA CiAl F () 
a k a PARFNA A GAF I.O 
late of QUINCY. in said 
County, deceased 

You arc hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass R Civ P 
Rule 72 that the first and final 
account(s) of EIAINE P 
CiAl LO as Executrix (the 
fiduciary) of said estate has - 
have been presented to said 
Court for allowance 

Ff you desire lo preserve your 
right to file an objection to said 
account(s). you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance m said Court al 
Dedham on or before the fifth 
day of August, 1987, the return 
day of this citation You may 
upon written request by 
registered or certified mail lo 
the fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain without 
cost a copy of said accounUs) Ff 
you desire lo object to any item 
of said account(s). you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such other 
time its the C ourt upon motion 
may order a written statement 
of each such item together v^iih 
the grounds for each objection 
Ificreto. a copy lo be served 
upon the fiduciary pursuant to 
Mass R Civ P Rule 5 

Witnets, Robert M. Ford. 
Etquire, First Justice of said 
Court, this twenty-fourth day of 
June. 1987 
THOMAS PATRK K HLCHES 
Register 
7/2/87 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEAFTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRFAl COIR F 

FHE PROBAFE ANF) 

FAMFI Y COIIRF 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No 87PI543EI 

Estate of HARRY H 

KFONTKE late of QUINCY in 

the Counlv of NOR EOF K 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-caplioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and alFowed 
and that JAMES L KIMMEI.F 
of QUFNCY in the County of 
NORFOLK and JOHN E 
JOHNSON of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK be 
appointed executors named in 
the will without surety on the 
bond. 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court al Dedham on or before 
FOOD in the forenoon on JuFy 
29. 1987 

In addition you should fiFe a 
written statenfient of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Witness, Roben M Ford, 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham. the sixteenth 
day of June, one thousand nine 
hundred and eighty seven 
THOMAS PATRK K HIGHES 
Refister of Probate 
7 2 87 



AMERICAN 
ifCMKER 
fSOOETY* 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 



ID our team of professionals providing quality r 
dential services to adults with severe to mild MR We 
are currently expanding our innovative residential sys 
tern CXir programs are tiehavtorally structured and in 
corporate state-of the art treatment approaches We 
provide in service training. protessionaF development 
and an excellent benefit package The following posi 
tions are available 

• PROGRAM MANAGERS 

• ASST. MANAGERS 

• CASE MANAGERS 

• PART-TIME 

• AND RELIEF 

All programs are located on the So Shore Send 
resume to 

Sue Powers 

St. Colletta' s Residential Program 

50 Messina Dr.. Braintree. MA 02184 

. iQual Opportinity fmploY^' . j 



LOVE 



Now that we have your 
attention, we know you will 
love this excellent clerical 
position in our long 
established Braintree real 
estate development manage- 
ment firm Strong secret- 
arial skills, shorthand, word 
processing, typing Must 
be flexible and have highly 
developed organizational 
skills $18,000 annual 
salary Call Eileen at The 
Real Estate Connection 
849-3200 for interview / ? 



PARENTS AND 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Data-Entry Operators 

Schedule to your Needs 

8:30 cm to 8:30 pm 

Coil 288-3400 

for interview oppt. 
col! 28S-3400 



;/♦ 



WORK AT HOME 

Respite families are needed 
to provide care & training to 
developmentally disabled 
adults & troubled adoles- 
cents on a short term or 
hourly basis Stipend, 
supervision & training 
provided 
If interested please call 
Betsy Schmidt at 
767-1008 
An Equal Opportunity 
Employer 

7/2 



INDUSTRIAL 
HEAT TREATING 

IS expanding We are 
currently accepting 
applications for 

• General Help, all shifts 

• Class II Truck Drivers 

• Quality Control Personnel 

• Shippers & Receivers 
We offer a good starting 
wage and t)enefits package 

Please call 328-1010 
for an interview ? ? 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a ctiance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun honte delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



EVENINGS/ 
WEEKENDS 

Growthwayt Inc.. an agency 
providing residential 
services for M-R adults 
has full & part time 
positions available in their 
W Bridgewater & Brockton 
programs Experience 
preferred but not necessary, 
will tram It interested call 

767-1008 
An Equal Opportunity 

Employer 7 2 



HELP WANTED 



HELP US, 

HELP KIDS ! 



COMPASS. a private non 

profit agency serving 
adoiesce'^;s s p'eseniy 
seek ng foster parents We 
provide comprehensive 
services to clients and foster 
parents incijdmg ?4 hr 
Support and weekly reim 

t)ursemenls 

For more information please 
call 

524-2333 

WE NEED YOUR 

HELP!!! 8^ 



COUNSELOR 



Mature females needed for 
full time 4 to 12 shift and 
part time 12 to 3 shift as 
counselors at woman s 
shelter No experience 
needed Paid training 
provided Competitive 
salary & benefits Call 770- 
3314 Ask for James McGill 

7 ? 



WANTED 

Local Real Estate 
office, Beacti St., 
Wollaston, needs 
student to do lawn 
work with mower. 

Call Judy al: 

Delafiey Realtors 
472-1111 



ROUTE 
DRIVER 

Full-Tim* PMition 

Eacellenl ttailing salary plus 
commission Company benefits 
PleaM Call 

828-«31S 

ARA/CORY 

R*fr*thm«nl S«rvlc*« 

960 Turnpike St. 

Canton, MA 02021 

7 2 



$ QUALITY JOBS $ 

FOR 

$ QUALITY TEMPS $ 

Earn $5-$15 Per Hour 
Flexible Hours. Local Assignments 

S*cr*tarial/W.P.. Citricai, Accounting. 
Light Industrial, Data Entry 

"•-0500 SV^'V^^.*^ o^' "^^; 328-6400 

Brockton' D'*"»°" °' Q"«*"y P«'»0""«' Quincy 

Full A P. TImt Permanent Alto Available 

1 /» SH 



Telemarketers 

Turn Your Phone Skills 
Into Cash! 

Us« your excetiem phone mannc 10 promote conserva- 
tion services on behail ot local utilities DMC Energy 
has imrr>ediaie openings for part-time telemarketers m 
Its t>usy Braintree oHice No product sales involved 

We offer eiceOent starting rates tienbie hours and are 
localed convenient 10 put>lic Iransponaiion Students 
encouraged to apply Don't wait— contact Karen 
McCod at (SIT) •4S-9750. EEO M/f 




RETAIL ADVERTISING 
SALES PERSON 

Part Time 



Loar 



1372 Hancock St., Ouincy 
471-3100 



Wanted 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

BOOKKEEPER 

Call 471-3100 - 335-1747 

For Appointment 



RN or LPN 

Charge Nurse for 3 lo 1 1 shift each 
'riday and alternate weekends 
EicellenI salary Cill47l-404e Fnel 
Nursing Home Wollaston *^A 

7,16 



MATURE PERSON 

Needed as receptionist m 

Optometrist s office Typi, g 

not necessary Flexible Hours 

328-6050 

7 2 



FOR SALE 



EX. HOUSEKEEPER 

For weeli-endi Hour* • lo 2. 
Eicellent aalary. Friol Nuriing 
Home, sa Beach SI , WoHaslon. MA, 
CaN tn AM. 479-7722 

7'16 



■ws 



INSTRUCTION 



TRAIN FOR TRAVEL CAREERS 



Rcst-rvalions 
Agents 
Ticket Agent 
Ground Service 
Representative 



Start locally full time/part time 
Tram on live airline computers 
Home study and resident 
training. Financial aid 
available Job placement 
assistance National Hdqtrs 

Lighthouse F»t FL 
ACT. TRAVEL SCHOOL 



1 800 327-7728 



I fll#fflO#f N.H.B.C- 



TF 



I 



USED 
WINDOW SASH 

Various Sizes 

$2.00 - $5.00 each 

Call 472-1754 from 4-8 pm 

7 2 

FOR SALE 

Magnavox-Stereo-three speed 
walnut floor model Beautiful 
piece of furniture, with old 
records Complete Best offer 

7 ? 

GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U Repair) Delinquent 
tax property Repossessions 

Call 805-687-6000 Ext GH-30t9 

9'17 



Save Gas 
and Money ... 
Shop Locally 



Thursday, July 2, 1*17 Quincy Sm Pag* 27 




EVERYBODY'S MARKETPIAGE 



SERVICES 



CLYDE POOL SERVICE Inc. 

Vinyl Liner Replacement 

General Masonry 

Coping, Declts, Wailcways, Patios 

Opening/Closing 

Sales Service & Repair 

337-4949 328-7290 



SERVICES 



/ 30 



SEALCOATING 

R & R McKINNON 

DRIVEWAYS 
PARKING LOTS 

■SPECIALIZING IN 
SAVING YOU MONEY' 

FREE ESTIMATES 

337-7362 



7 ? 



J.T.'S 
CARPENTRY 

DECKS 

STAIRS 

DOORS 

WINDOWS 

CALL: JAMES 

479-8162 

NO JOB TOO SMALL 



NANCY'S NOOK 

N*w baby bouttqu*. chr1stw>lng 
and baby aqutpmanl. ale. Naw 
and B«nHy uaad cMMran's and 
woman's apparal. Quality 
contlgnmanis accaplad. 2SA 
Baala St.. WoNaslon, 773-9293 



GARAGE DOOR 

INSTAUATION ft REPAIRS 

ELECTRIC OPENERS 

f rM Eitima«H 

698-2304 9 3 



AT YOUR SERVICE 

to tix. finish, repair, redo, 
restore, rake, paint, create, 
construct, clean, organize drive, 
straighten up and build So You 
Don t Have To' 

Ask for Martin at 894-6948 

7 2 



MISCELLANEOUS 



PATENT SUIT 

Patent 4.481.674 suit against 
govt Make upto3million dollars 
That s $6000 to each dollar paid 
996-1637 $500 cost Wayne 
Silva. 97 Park SI . New Bedford. 
MA 02740 7 16 



PERSONALS 



PPAVER TO THE HOLY SPIRIT O 
Holy Spirit You wfio enlightens me 
who illuminates all things so I may 
attain my goal You who gives me the 
divine gitt ol forgiving and lorgetlmg 
the evil done to me and who is ever with 
me al all moments ot my lite I wish 
during this short dialogue with You to 
thank You tof everything and to 
confirm once aaain my wish to never 
he separated from you even and m 
spite of ail matpfial distractions I 
desire to be with you in eternal glory 
Thank You for Your mercy towards me 
anil all who are dear to me Musi l>e 
sa-l three days in succession after thi' 
three days favor or grace will be 
attained even if it appears to be ol 
diHicult nature Then published with 
instructions as soon as possible with 
/uur initials M V J 

72 



Thank You 
St. Jude 



College Pro 
Painters 

of Quincy 

Residential 
Exterior Painting 

Two Year Written Guarantee 
FREE ESTIMATES 

Call 
923 - 4545 



7 9 



LABELS 


n 


Custom printed labels - Bigor 
small orders - Any size shape 

or colors 48-hour |ifty 

Stickers Call FDK Mktg N 
Quincy 472-4306. 



BAY STATE 
Home Services 

• Interior and Exterior Painting 

• Wallpapering 
Insured Free Estimates 

878-4567 

7 ? 

PRIVATE CHARTERS 

Cruise Sightsee Whalewatch 

U S C G Lie 

Capt R F McDermott 

Reasonable rates day night 

S43-8601 Eva. 

10 15 

JOE'S FLOORS^ 

Sanded & Refinished 
Best Quality and Prices 
"^REE ESTIMATES 
254-7539 9 ,r 

IROBERT L. ELLIS 

Decks, Porches, Winctows 

and Remodeling 

Free Estimates 

Licensed 331-9977 

9 17 



FOR RENT 



Cottages 
For Rent 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore, House- 
keeping cottages. 
Studio and 3 room 
available. Weekly 
rentals M85 - »250. 
Private beach. Tennis 
a\;ailable Call 328- 
1300. 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

TF 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

328-5967 

TF 



1^ V J 
12 



HALL FO^ RfNT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380. 

Amencan Legion. 1 1 16 Sea St 

479-6149 

TF 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings Showers. 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home. 440 E Squantum St 

Oumcy 

472-2223 

TF 



^ 471-5323 

Specializing in 
Custom Vinyl Exteriors 

• Vinyl & Aluminum Replacement Windows 

• Aluminum Storm Doors & Windows 

• Siding • Rooflng • Seamless Alum. Gutters 

LICENSED AND INSURED i 9 



ANCIENT MARINER 

Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning 

471 0026 • 282-5060 

Home Commercial Mannc Auto 

"CARPETS' 

$18 00 Per Room S25.00 Per Room With Scotch Guard 

•UPHOLSTERY 

All Prices Below lr>clude 3M Scotch Guard 

Sofa $35 

Chair S20 

Loveseal $30 

Sofa & Loveseat $55 

Sofa & Chair $45 

Loveseat & Chair $45 

Ottoman $10 

Sofa. Loveseat & Chair $75 



D.R. Smalley 
Carpentry 

Quality work in all fazes of: 

Building 

Remodeling 

Roofing & 

Siding 

Custom Decks 

Free Est. Anything 

Don with 

479-7436 Wood 

7 16 



DAVE'S LANDSCAPING 

Lawn Care. Yard Clean Up. Bush 
Tnmmings all at reasonable rales 
Call 773-1122 Leave message 
please 

7 2 



STEVE'S 
CLEANING CO. 

GENERAL CLEANING 

COMMERCIAL 

FLOOR CARE 

FREE ESTIMATES 

770-9799 

24 Hour 

Answering Machine 

7 9 



GLASS & SCREEN REPAIR 

Wood & Porch Screens 

WOLLASTON GLASS CO. 

9 Woltaston Ave., Wollaston 

Reasonable Rates 

Overnight Repair 

472-6207 9 



ELECTRICAL & APPLIANCES 



A &T VACUUM 

• $14 95 Overhaul Special 

on any vacuum 

• ORECK XL VACUUM 

(as advertised by WBZ s Dave 
Maynard on sale Now »249«) 

Almost New Electroiux s 
Starting at '299'" 



We now have a Large Selection 

of Video Movies 

99« Membership Fee 

$2 per Movie 



27 Beale St., Wollaston 
479-5066 



TF 



SERVICES 



BATHROOMS 

REMODELED 

also 

MINOR REPAIRS 

Ceramic Tile 

or 

Formica Enclosures 

One Price 

Reasonable Rates 

CALL 472-1310 

L,c »1247 Since 1960 

Free Estimates 

T F 



BOWES CUSTOM 
DECK & FENCE 

Free Estimates 
Call 698-2304 



9 3 



WASH & WAX 



Floors also stripped Reason- 
able rates Small businesses 
our speciality Call Jim at 
335-8870. 7 2 

TREE WORK 

Pruning, removal, brush 
chipping. Free estimates Mike 
Sullivan, 472-3595. 

9 24 



Your South Shorn 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franldin St , So. Quincy 

472-1710 

TF 





EXPERT 

LAMP REPAIR 
t REWIRING 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



SERVICES 



Larry's 
Home Repair 

• Carpenters 
e Painters 
• Decorators 

General Contractor 

20 Years Experience 

Licensed • Insured 

Interior-Exterior Painting 

Scroll Ceiling 

All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 



328-8735 



659-7471 

TF 



B& W 
RENOVATIONS 

Painting Interior. Exterior 

Remodeling 

335-2452 472-7276 

9 3 



Special Classified Ad Bonus 



^■^i^. 



Cban/ie/ 



and Sun Cable Classified Ads 

MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock SL, Quincy, MA02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 




RATES 



INDEX 



D Services 

D For Sale 

D Autos 

a Boats 

D For Rent 

D Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

D Pets, Livestock 

D Lost and Found 

D Real Estate For Sale 

a Real Estate Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

D Work Wanted 

D Antiques 

O Coins & Stamps 

O Rest Homes 

D Instruction 

a Day Care 

D Personal 

D Electrical & Appliances 

Cable Ads will be 
abbreviated if neccesary. 



QUINCY SUN 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 

QUINCY SUN 
3 WEEKS 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 
8 WEEKS 

QUINCY SUN 

13 WEEKS or more 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $4.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, IOC each additional word. 
D With your Sun ad you can also run 20 tinnes per day for 3 days on 
Channel 8-Sun Cable T.V. for only $1 per day 



D $4.20 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions, of the same 

ad, IOC each additional word. 
D With your Sun ad. you can also run 20 times per day for 4 days on 

Channel 8-Sun Cable TV. for only $1 per day 

D $4.00 per insertion, up to 20 words for 8-1 2 insertions of same ad 

10C each additional word. Channel 8 Cable for 5 days at $1 .00 per 

dayr 

D $3.85 per insertion, up to 20 words for 13 or mo-e insertions of the 

same ad, IOC each additional word. 
D With your Sun ad, you can also run 20 times a day for 7 days on 

Channel 8-Sun Cable T.V. for only $1 per da) 



SUN CABLE 
T.V. ONLY 



D Run your ad on Channel 8-Sun Cable TV. alone 20 times per day 
for 3 days at $2 per day. 



D Enclosed Is $ 

In The Quincy Sun and 



-for the following ad to run — ^weeks 



jdays on Channel 3. 



COPY:. 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADLINE: TUESDAY. 10:00 AIM. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



Pa|f 21 Quincy Smr Tkuradiy, July Z, 1917 



Massnsoit Merger Opposed 

Rally Supports QJC As Community College 



Business and professional 
leaders, political figures and 



students attended a community 
breakfast rally Wednesday to 



LIGHTING 
SUPPLY CO. 




$29 

Peg $00^ 



CQ Solid Brass Banker's Light 
with green or amber 
case glass. 




Hour*: Mon.-Fri. 8-8 • Sat. 8-5 • Sun. 12-5 

476 South Franklin St., Rt. 37, Holbrook 
767-5000 



show strong support for 
keeping Quincy Junior 
College as it is. 

At the same time, those 
attending firmly opposed a 
proposal to merge Quincy 
QJC under Massasoit 
Community College with no 
Quincy area representation 
on the governing hoard. 

They also called for the 
state to provide fmanciai help 
to students attending QJC. 

The Community College 
Association of Quincy and the 
South Shore and the Board of 
I rustecs of the Quincy Junior 
College Foundation jointly 
hosted the rally at the college. 

The meeting was led by 
Paul Hunt, chairman of the 
Community College Associ- 
ates, and Peter Eleey. 
chairman of the Board of 
Trustees. 



II 
II 

II 
I 
I 
I 
I 

I 

II 
II 
I 

I; 



Hunt spoke of the history 
of service the city of Quincy 
had provided to the 
Commonwealth through 
Quincy Junior College, and 
argued that the state should 
provide help to the studcnt.s 
attending the college. 

Elcey expressed his group's 
strong support for QJC to 
continue its service to the city 
of Quincy. and that there be 
some form of local control of 
the college. 

Other community leaders 
continue to support the need 
for community college 
services to e.xisl. 

Students also spoke out on 
their need for college 
programs to continue in 
Quincy. Some noted they 
were single parents without 
resources to attend college in 
another part of the 



FREE Big Mac® Sandwich 



when you buy 
one ol the same 

VALID ONLY AT 

• QUINCY 

473 South^fn Arltry 
By Roues 

• N. QUINCY 



275 Hancock St 
By N Ouincy T 



/», 




FREE Quarter Pounder'^ 
With Cheese 

when you buy 
one of the same 



VALID ONLY AT 

• QUINCY 

473 S»Outhern Artery 
By flo«pe > 

• N. QUINCY 

275 Hancock Si 
By N Ouincy T 




GOOD THRU JULY, 1M7 



GOOD THRU JULY. 1987 
PrMcnl Coupon Btlort Ordcrtng 

Limit one coupon p»f cuttomet per vmt 
Not valid with othar otfari couponi or 
ca'di 



a:i 



N«»T \ M II) (I SIMIO Ut 

Pn—nt Coupon Before Ordering 

Limit one coupon per cu»tomer per vitit 
Not valid witn other offers coupons or 
cards 



II 
11 
I 
I 
I 

I 

11 
11 

II 

II 

II 
J 




Commonwealth. They also 
spoke of the high quahty o<" 
education they receive at 
Quincy Junior College. 

The groups were firm in 
their rejection of a proposal 
submitted by the Board of 
Regents which as submitted 
would merge Quincy Junior 
College under Massasoit 
Community College with no 
Quincy area representation 
on the go\erning board 

It was noted that although 
it sppears that the proposal 
would benefit QJC students 
through lower tuition it offers 
no guarantees of program 
continuation in Quincy It 
indicates the planning board, 
made up t>f Massasoit 
officials and the Chancellor of 
Higher Fducation's office will 
decide which programs ought 
to be moved from Quincy. 
according to the groups I he 
plan further offers no 
guarantees of continued 



employment to current 
faculty and staff of the 
college, they said. 

If programs are moved 
from Quincy to the Massasoit 
campuses in Brockton or Blue 
Hills without careful review. It 
was pointed out students 
attending QJC could be cut 
off from their programs 
without ability to finish them 
as thcte are no easy ways to 
get to either ol these schools 
unless they have access to a 
car w hich many QJC students 
do not. 

Both grQ|tf>s considered the 
rally to be a success and 
expressed the hope that the 
legislative bodies would lake 
note and work to resolve the 
Quincy issue fairly and 
impartially. 

Quincy Junior College has 
I00() full time students. 250 
part time day students and 
200 evening students. 



McCauley 

To Name 2 
To Zoning Board 



Mayor Francis McCauley 
said he hopes to appoint 
fourth and fifth members to 
the Zoning Board of Appeals 
before that body holds its next 
meeting July 14. 

McCauley's action follows 
the City Council's passage 
Monday night of his order to 
increase the three member 
board to five members. 

The mayor had made the 
proposal in 1986. but the 
council turned it down last 
year. 

This week, it was passed 
unanimously A public 
hearing had been held earlier 
this month at which zoning 
board chairman Peter 
MacDonald had been among 
those to speak in favor of 
increasing the board 



members. 

Tm very pleased that it was 
passed." said McCauley, "and 
I want to thank the City 
Council. 

"This brings us in line with 
most cities of oursi/e. and will 
provide more input to a very 
important board." he said 

The current members of the 
unpaid board will be 
reappointed, according to 
McC^auley. 

In addition to MacDonald. 
they are Anthony Sandonalo 
and Michael Faherty. 

Iheir three year terms will 
be realigned to five year 
terms, he said. 

McCauley also said that 
qualified women would be 
considered for the new 
positions on the board 



Pomposelli Honored For 
Hospital Volunteer Service 

Jim Pomposelli of Quincy hospital's annual volunteer 
was recently honored by the luncheon. 

New England Deaconess Pomposelli has volunteered 

Hospital lor his many hours 112 hours in the hospital's 
of volunteer service at the nutritional metabolism lab 



''I wish 

Id known that 

before" 

We hear people we serve say this often. 

That's why we extend an open invitation to 
anyone to consult with us in advance. 



Keohane 

FUNERAL HOME. INC. 

785 and 333 HANCOCK STREET 
QUMCY 
773-355 1 
'PEOPLE HELPIMO PEOPLE" 




Historic Quincy 



A Tourist Guide 





\ .S/x'ciV// Sui)f)li'niciit 



Thursday. July 2, 1987 



Page 2A The Quincs Sun Thursdav, Julv 2. 1987 



City of Quincy, Massachusetts 




Office of the Mayor 




'Welcome to QrUloric Ouincv 



^^^^^^^/ 



Ab the M.iyor (>t till' C ity of Quiiu y, it ih wit (i ,i;i'(Mt [m kK' .nul picisui c t hat I w cU oiiu' \iui to t he C it \ ot 
Prt'sidents 

Quint y's Histt>ru T r<iil is not .1 road hv whu h on» follows histor\-, hut r ,it her >i \\ ,i\' In v\ hu h i.^\)c ni,u 
cxpcncnt (■ cont.u t with .1 ru h And (.lixtTsc histor\'. 

Quint y, M.1SS.U hux'tts (. i>n|urcs up .1 v\('.dt h ot mia^^cs m ni.uu' people I he r u h histtu w t he ,1 inn ui.iiu e 
t)f impor^cint historit <il sites, the sourt e ot y;ranite tor famous st t ui t ure-^, the huilJin>; pLu e of main ^hips, 
the ht)me town of f.imous people; all of these are Jisf mi t umis that lielnnr, to Cjuiiu \ alone. 

We tontinue to at kn<)wled>;e our liistorv .md our herit.i>',e Quiru\' reientK lelehiated the .^fn^th 
anniversary of ['resident lohn Adams' hirth In the words of T resident Adams. I m.ule a ( oiistit uf ion tor 
Massachusetts whith finally made the C onstitution n\ the I'nited St.ites " I hus, ,is the nation af^proai he-- 
the 200th anniversary ot the United States ( onst it ut ion, if will he uif h spec lal pr ide that Qu:iu v will watt h 
the t elebration of the C onstitution, wliosc (>n>;ins are t r ,u ed to Aii.uii'- law of f u e r ir,ht hrr e in Cjuiin \- 

It has been over ^^0 years siru e the first [ ur opeans settled in what is iuu\ tjuiiu \- and we h,i\r been a 
City for very ne.irly 100 of those years [ rom lie in r, .1 small trading, po-t ti> a v it\ of over S 8,000, Quim \ has 
kept pate with the t h<ui^;iny; world around It, hut ha-, ret, nned .1 tiistiiu five idciit It \ that IS based in it-^ [Moud 
past 

In the p.iKc- ahead, vou will read about pi, u es ,ind men and women t ha t ha\f pi, i\'ed ^ir.n if u an t i ole-. ip, 
:l-ie hibtory of our t itv .uui our n,ition I f hink Vim \\\\\ ,ii-,ree with me th,it Cjuiru \- is indeed 1 u h m histoi u 
heritage I ur^'' y(»u to \isit the ' ( hurt h of the {'residents" (| irst i'.insh C hurt h ^ ,ind oui ( itv I hill, ,uul 
while vou .ire in Q)uin(\' C enter, t.ihe tim- td x'l^it the .■\ti,ims .•\t,idem\- site of tlu' iMithpl.ue of |ohn 
H.incot k' and ,1 U S. Landmark, the } hnu ot k ( emeterv .-Ml t)f these hist tiru sites are within .1 shor f walking; 
distaru* of one .iruither ,uid <ire extellent ex.miple-, t)f Quiruy's herit,i>;e pres<'rved ftu her xisittus ,ind 
t iti/en-> t)f tod.iv 

I hope your visit to Qumtv will be a rew.irdmr, ,ind memor.ible le.irnm)', expierieiue .md th.if vou will 
return a>^din. 

Sint er"'v >'t)urs. 



Francis X. MtC .uilev 
M.wor 




After Six-Year Renewal Project 



Thundtit. July 2. 1987 The Quincy S«m -^m 



JA 



John Adams Birthplace Now Like It Was 



After six years of reconstruction, 
the birthplace of John Adanis, the 
second president of the United 
States, looks like it did when he and 
his parents, Deacon John and 
Susanna, lived there. 

Visitors to the John Adams 
Birthplace, which peers over the 
shoulder of the John Quincy Adams 
Birthplace on Franklin St., South 
Quincy, can now see more 
completely how the house looked. 

It is open to the public this year for 
the third time since restoration 
began. 

The only furnishings in the house 
when it opened to the public two 
years ago were a table, bench and 
two chairs in the kitchen and a chest 
of drawers on another room 

"The house is nicely furnished 
now and looks like it did when they 
lived in it. We have had made every 
piece of furniture that was in the 
house It was a giant task," said 
Wilhelmina Harris, superintendent 
of the Adams National Historic Site. 

The final renovation touches were 
to the room where Deacon John 
Adams made shoes. 

The rooms are furnished from the 
period of Deacon John and his wife 
and probably reflect her taste, said 
Mrs Harris. "They are furnished not 
elaborately, but sufficiently to have a 
lived in look," she said. 

The birthplace was probably built 
in the late 17th or early 18th Century 
for less than $1,000 in the pounds of 
the day and the clapboards were 
hand hewn from trees that grew in its 
fields. 

The pine clapboards of the John 
Adams Birthplace are unpaintedand 
the U.S. National Park Service, 
which restored the house, insists 
that based on research the house will 
remain that way, despite the fact that 
John Adams was known to have 
preferred it white. 

For more than 80 years they were 
the little red farmhouses at the foot 
of Penn's Hill. But research turned 
up the fact that Abigail Adams, the 
wife of the second president, wanted 
them "stone" and white in color. 

Since what Abigail wanted, Abigail 
usually got, in the summer of 1980, 
the John Quincy Adams Birthplace 
was repainted to Abigail's taste, the 
"stone" color determined to be a sort 
of off white mixed especially for the 
occasion from a late 18th Century 
formula. 

The John Adams Birthplace was 
painted white so that both houses 
would look as .they did in 1807, the 
year the last Adams lived in them, 
but later research indicated it was 
unpainted. Mrs. Harris, an authority 
on the Adams family, hopes the 
USNPS will change its mind again. 

The birthplaces, parts of which 
date back to the 17th Century, were 
taken over by the National Park 
Service on May 1. 1979. after years of 
semi neglect due to lack of 
restoration and maintenance funds. 

The John Quincy Adams 




Birthplace reopened in 1982 for the 
first time in three years after 
undergoing a $175,000 rehabilita- 
tion faithful to the lives of the 
prominent family that lived there. 

If you close your eyes and give 
your imagination full rein you can see 
them now as they were more than 
200 years ago 

There is Abigail Adams in the new 
pink gingham dress. There is the 
curly-haired infant, Thomas 
Boylston Adams, bouncing on his 
father's knee. And there is John 
Adams, home from the Continental 
Congress in Philadelphia for the first 
time in a year, sitting at the table 
drinking a cup of tea. 

The setting, right down to the 
pewter plates and candlesticks, is 
reproduced faithfully in the corner 
room of the John Quincy Adams 
Birthplace. 

The furnishings of the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace are 
precise reproductions of those that 
were in the house when the second 
president lived there. The originals 
are at the Old House, the Adams 
National Historic Site, from which 
they cannot be removed under the 
ownership agreement with the 
Adams family. 

The most interesting room in the 
John Quincy Adams Birthplace is 
John Adams' old law office, in which 
the elder Adams, James Bowdoin 
and Samuel Adams drafted the 
Massachusetts State Constitution, 
the model on which the U.S. 
C'^nstitution was based. 

"The law office is furnished pretty 
much as John Adams had it," says 
Mrs. Harris, once secretary to 
Brooks Adams, the last member of 
the family to live in the Old House. 
Adams, ttie last member of the family 
to live in the Old House. 

There is the hutch table on which 
he wrote the State Constitution; the 



JOHN ADAMS BIRTHPLACE 

bookcase filled with books that 
probably were there in John Adams' 
day, judging by an inventory of his 
law library; his old writing desk and 
two chairs that were copies from 
those in his second law office in 
Boston. 

Pastels of Abigail and John, 
originally done in Salem, were 
photographically reproduced by 
photographer George Dow and now 
hang in Abigail's sitting room. The 
originals are in the possession of the 



Massachusetts Historical Society. 

Abigail's old kitchen cabinet was 
discovered serving as a bookcase in 
the Old House. 

"Brooks Adams always thought 
that books could go anywhere," 
explains Mrs. Harris. 

The cabinet was reproduced and 
installed in the kitchen of the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace along with 
copies of the blue china that John 
purchased when he was emissary to 
Holland 



r 



The Cover 




QUINCY HISTORIC SITES shown on the cover arc, top row, 
Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams Birthplaces; First 
Parish Church with Hancock Cemetery in foreground, and the 
Adams Mansion. Middle row, Dorothy Quincy Home, the Abigail 
Adams Cairn, the Josiah Quincy Homestead, and the site of the First 
Productive Iron Works. Bottom row, old City Hall, site of the First 
Commercial Railway and Adams Academy, on the site of the John 
Hancock Birthplace. 



Page 4A Th« Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 1987 



The Adams Cottages 

Our Only Father - Son Presidents Born Here 



It was the North Precinct of 
Braintree then, a sprawling tract of 
woods and farmlands on the gently 
rolling hills some 10 miles south of 
the Boston Stone along the winding 
Coast Road to Plymouth. 

Something less than 1.500 people 
lived in the North, Middle and South 
Precincts of Braintree in the year 
1735 and two of them were Deacon 
John Adams, 44, farmer and 
cordwainer, and his wife, Susanna, 
26. 

Their home was a weathered gray 
farmhouse with a high peaked roof 
and attached lean to kitchen set on 
seven acres of farmland at roughly 
Milepost 11 of the Coast Road, just 
where it turned up the wooded 
slopes of Penn's Hill toward the 
Monatiquot River ford. 

He was a pillar of his rural 
community. Mr. Adams was, a 
deacon in the First Parish Church, a 
lieutenant in the Braintree militia and 
a town constable with a forceful 
personality and tact that enabled him 
to collect taxes from his neighbors. 
He was a hard working farmer 
whose cider was acknowledged best 
in town, he worked in leather during 
the winter months, and he had an 
eye on an adjoining piece of 
farmland, 9'-2 acres owned by the 
Billings brothers, complete with a 
farmhouse similar to his own. 
Susanna Adams was a Boylston of 




JOHN QUINCY ADAMS Birthplace (left) and the John Adams Birthplace. 



Brookline. socially a cut above her 
husband, and perhaps there were 
moments in the simple house at the 
foot of Penn's Hill when she thought 
of the home of her uncle, the noted 
Dr Zabdiel Boylston of Brookline, 
whose furniture came all the way 
from London. 



Quincy Historical Society 
Library and Museum 




Wh^her ,U Route* 3^3A, 128, the Southeast Expressway o, theMBTA, they allieadtotheQu.ncy H.s.or.cal 

Society Library and Museum at the historic Adams Academy Building n.sioricai 

Here we have historic records and nr«>morab.l« o( the first commercu.1 railway, the granite maritime and 

^** '^"^' '""**" ""'f •*• *^''^ '"'""-^ •*'<"'«■ *^"IP--. Photographs and prints 

Our 5000 volume research and reference library contains land records, genealogK al archeoloQK paw-rs 
maps and other materials for students, scholars, educators and the historVbuK '"""'^''^'' ^"^"^ 

^.l^i^^t'eTery^^"'"' '''*'"^^' "^'^'^ * "'^ '" -"^'^ '^ ^^-V H.storcal Society has 
Join us and become a part of Ihit great history 



Their first child, a son who was 
named John for his father, was born 
in the southeast Ix'droom of the 
farmhouse on Oct 19, 1735 (Old 
Style). He would become the second 
president of the United States 

Deacon John purchased the 
house next door for 500 pounds m 
1744 and it was ready 20 years later 
when young John moved in with his 
brand new bride, the former Abigail 
Smith, the preacher's sparkling 
daughter from the next town of 
Weymou»h 

Their second child, a son who was 
named John Quincy Adams after his 
great grandfather. Col John 
Quincy, was born there on July 1 1, 
1767 He w<;uld become the sixth 
president of the United States 

The junction of Franklin St, 
Independence Ave . and President 
Ave. in South Quincy is the only 
place in the country where the 
birthplaces of two presidents who 
are father and son stand side by side 
in the same city. 

The precise age of the two 
cottages at the foot of Penn's Hill is 
not known. 

When the John Adams Birthplace 
was retcjred by the Daughters of 
Revolution in 1897, a brick bearing 
the date 1681 was discovered iinHpr 
the southeast corner, and the house 
was known to have been occupied 



by one Joseph Penniman m th.it 
year. 

And a man named Samuel Bell her 
was living in the John Quincy Ad. ims 
Birthplace as early as IbbA. whrti :; 
was little more than a one room 
shack with fireplac e It was built to its 
present size in 1716. asevidein eciin 
a date brick found in the ntav 
fireplace 

According to Henry Ad.iins, ^ 
grandson of President John Quiiu v 
Adams, no member of the taniily 
lived in the cottages after 181H. 
althf)ugh ownership remained in the 
Adams family until 1940. 

Both houses were restored by the 
Adams Realty Trust, the John 
Quincy Adams Birthplace in 18% at 
a cost of $1 ,650 and the John Adams 
Birthplace a year later at <m expense 
of $515 49 

They were presented to the city of 
Quincy in 1940 and supervised by 
the Quincy Historical Society until 
they were turned over to the US 
National Park Service in 1979. 

The Adams Birthplaces are al 
133 and 141 f ranklinSt.Thev are 
open daily, including Sundays 
and holidays, from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. through Oct. 15, with guided 
tours. Admission is $2 for adults 
and for children over age 12, 
which also includes admission to 
the Adams Mansion within seven 
days. 



The Quincy Presidential Trail 



Write 



The Quincy Historical Society 

8 Adams Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 
'Caii(617) 773-1144 



The Adams Birthplaces are an 
important stop on the newly 
designated Quincy Presidential 
Trail, a 10.5 mile route that takes 
the visitor through the 17th and 18th 
Century locales associated with the 
lives of the Adams family. 

Historic sites along the trail 
include the Adams Mansion, 
Dorothy Quincy Homestead,' 
Adams Academy, F-irst Parish 
Church. Adams Crypt, City Hall 



Hancock Cemetary, the Birthplaces, 
Abigail Adams Cairn, First 
Commercial Railroad, First 
Ironworks, Col. Josiah Quincy 
House and Moswetusct Hummock, 
most of which are described in this 
magazine. 

The Quincy Presidential Trail is a 
National Recreation Trail, the 
seventh in the state of Massachu 
setts and the 625th in the nation 



ThurMJav. July 2. 1987 The Quhtcv Sun Pag^ 5A 



The Quincy City Council 
Proudly Serving Historic Quincy 

Today and Tomorrow 




MICHAEL T. CHENEY 

Ward 1 Councillor 




TED P. DcCRISTOFARO 

Ward 2 Councillor 




JOHN J. LYDON 

Ward 3 Councillor 




JAMES A. SHEETS 

Ward 4 Councillor 





THOMAS J. NUTLEY 

Ward 6 Councillor 




JOHN GILLIS 

Cifv Clerk 






THOMAS BURKE 

Assistant Cit\^ Clerk 



QUINCY'S PEOPLE 

The City of Quincy is the most 
dynamic and exciting community 
on the South Shore. 

Its historical background, along 
with the existence of two colleges, 
has given it a cultural uniqueness all 
its own. 

Its people possess a solid sense 
of pride and look forward to the 
future with confidence. 

City Council President 




bTEPHEN J. McGRATH 

Council President 
Ward 5 Councillor 



1987 







RICHARD KOCH. JR. 

Councillor AtLarge 




JOSEPH J. LaRAlA 

Councillor At Large 




PATRICIA TOLAND 

Councillor At-Large 








LOUISE BRABAZON 

Administrative Assistant 
to City Council 



JEANNE REARDON 
Clerk of Committees 



RICHARD MEADE 

Planning Director 



ROBERT E. FOY. Ill 

City Auditor 






Page 6A The Quincv Sun Thursday. July 2, 1987 




ADAMS MANSION NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 



The Adams Mansion 



Summer White House And Home Of 2 Presidents 



Josiah Quincy. the one who built 
railroads around New England and 
founded the cooperative bank 
movement in Massachusetts, was in 
his boyhood a frequent visitor to the 
mansion where John Adams, the 
second president of the United 
States, lived in retirement. 

Later, he wrote with wry amuse- 
ment about Sunday dinner with the 
aging patriarch of the Adams clan 
and his wife. Abigail, a dinner that 
inevitably began with a thick 
pudding made from boiled corn 
meal 

"it being thought desirable to 
take the edge off one's hunger 
before reaching the joint." wrote 
Quincy 

"Indeed, it was considered wise 
to stimulate the young to fill 
themselves with pudding, by the 
assurance that the boy who 
managed to eat the most of it should 
be helped most abundantly to the 
meat, which was to follow 

"It need not be said that neither 
the winner nor his competitors 
found much room for meat at the 
close of their contest; and so the 
domestic economy of the arrange 
ment was very apparent " 

Quincy, as a young Harvard law 
student, stopped by several times a 
week in summer to talk and read to 
the former President He found the 
visits delightful Indeed, the Adams 
of the cold and austere public mien 
was never more relaxed and warm 
than he was at his country home in 
Quincy 

The original house, a small part 
of the present building, was built 
probably in 1731 by Major Leonard 
Vassall. a wealthy West Indian 
sugar planter who lived in Cam 
bridge and apparently used it for a 
summer place 

His daughter. Mrs Anna 
Borland, who was a Loyalist during 



the Revolution, abandoned the 
house to leave with the British 
forces when they evacuated Boston 
in 1776 For a while it was used as a 
haven for rebel refugees fleeing the 
war zones 

Mrs Borland returned to reclaim 
the house after the Revolution and 
John Adams, then in Europe as the 
first American ambassador to 
London, purchased it for 600 
pounds through the good offices of 
the Cotton Tufts of Weymouth, his 
wife Abigail's cousin 

The Adamses were about to 
return to the United States after 
seven years abroad and Abigail was 
concerned that John's books and 
papers and the furnishings they had 
acquired in Europe would not fit 
into their old farmhouse at the foot 
of Penn's Hill where they lived 
before 

The deal was closed on Sept 26, 
1787. and the deed is still on file in 
the Suffolk County Registry of 
Deeds in which the Adams purchase 
is specified as a house, barn and 
other buildings on seven acres of 
land with some 76 acres more scat- 
tered around the North Precinct of 
Braintree 

There are indications that Abigail 
was at first disappointed with her 
purchase It was a lot smaller than 
she remembered it. 

"In height and breadth it feels 
like a wren's house," she wrote to 
her daughter, Abigail, the wife of 
Col William S Smith. "Let Col 
Smith come without heels to his 
shoes or he will not be able to walk 
upright " 

Abigail and John Adams moved 

into tfie house, which they named 

"Peacefield." after his retirement 

from the presidency in 1801 and 

lived there until they died 

It was from the Old House," as 
the family called it. that John 



Adams carried on his long and 
increasingly warm correspondence 
with his old rival. Thomas Jefferson 
of Virginia, who had succeeded him 
in the presidency In retirement, 
they became firm friends as they 
outlasted their contemporaries 

Thomas Jefferson live'^." 
whispered John Adams as he lay 
dying in the Old House He was 
wrong Jefferson, in far away 
Monticello. Va . had preceded him 
in death by a few hours on the same 
day 

It was July 4, 1H26, the .Wth 
anniversary of the Declaration of 
Independence 



The Old House whuh served ,i- 
summer White House for tu" 
presidents, was home to tour 
generations of tlie Adams f<jiiii!\. 
the last. Br(K)ks Adams, dyni'i :i 
Fehruarv. 1927 It was takei 
by the U S National Park S.r. . 
in 1946 to become the Aci.i!:i- 
Mansion National Historic Sitr 

The site at 135 Adams St , is 
open to the public from April 19 
to Nov. 10 daily from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m. Admission is $2 for adults 
and for children over 12, and 
includes admission to the Adams 
Birthplaces within seven days. 



r 



The Adams Family 



^ 



V. 



HENRY ADAMS (l.SH.'i 1646) 
emigrated from England in 1638 
and was granted 40 acres m 
Mount Wollaston (later Quincy) 

2 JOSEPH ADAMS (1626 
1694). son of Henry, farmer and 
maltster of Old Braintree 

3 JOSEPH ADAMS (1654 
1737). son of Joseph, who 
married Hannah Bass. a 
granddaughter of John Alden 
and Priscilla Mullins 

4. JOHN ADAMS (1691 
1761). son of Joseph, farmer and 
selectman of Old Braintree, 
known as Deacon John 

5 JOHN ADAMS (1735 
1826). son of Deacon John and 
second President of the United 
States 

5a SAMUEL ADAMS (1722 
180.3). revolutionary firebrand; 
great, great grandson of Henry 
and cousin of President John 

6 JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 
(1767 1848). son of John, sixth 
President of the United States 

7 CHARLES F-RANCIS 
ADAMS (1807 18W)|, son of John 



Quincy, minister to Great Britain 
during the Civil War 

8 JOHN QUINCY ADAMS II 
(1833 1894). son of Charles 
Francis, state legislator and 
thrice candidate for governor of 
Massachusetts 

8a CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS II (1835-1915), son of 
Charles Francis, historian and 
founder of the Quincy school 
system 

8b HENRY ADAMS (1838 
1918), son of Charles Francis, 
author of "The Education of 
Henry Adams ' 

8c BROOKS ADAMS (1848 
1927), son of Charles Francis, the 
last Adams to live in the Old 
House in Quincy. 

9 CHARLES FRANCIS 
ADAMS III (1866 1954). son of 
John Quincy 11. mayor of Quincy 
and Secretary of the Navv under 
President Hoover 

10 CHARIFS FRANCIS 
ADAMS IV (1910 ), chairman of 
theho.irdof R.ivtheon Co 



Thuraday, July 2, 1987 The Quincy Sun Page 7A 



QUINCY SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



A Proud Heritage 

The proud heritage of the Quincy Public Schools, established 
under the leadership of its first Superintendent, Colonel Francis W. 
Parker, continues to the present day. 

And, we are proud and pleased to honor John Adams, John 
Quincy Adams, John Hancock and the other patriots whose values 
and determination helped shape our great nation. 

We are committed to maintaining and providing an educational 
system that is responsive to all of its people by developing skills to 
become contributing citizens, self-fulfilling individuals and competent 
workers. 






JOHN A. OSTERMAN 

Superintendent of Schools 
Secretaiy to School Committee 



FRANCIS X. McCAULEY 

Ma\^or 

and 

School Committee Chairman 



STEPHEN DURKIN 

Vice Chairman 





FRANK ANSELMO 



MARY COLLINS 






CHRISTOPHER KENNEDY 



MARGARET NIGRO 



FRANK SANTORO 



Pag* 8A Th» Quincy Sun Thursday. July 2. 1987 




P MM IN(. b> \lber1 Herter sh..Hs John Adams. Samuel Adams and James Bo*%d..in at nork on the Massachusetts ( ..nslilution in 



laM office of John Quinc> Adams Birthplace. 



(Phuto coL/rfs«% of The Qut'H \ HisforK cj/ Six letv) 



John Adams ^Father' 



U.S., State Constitution Both Born Here 



This year is the bicentennial of the 
U.S. Constitution and while most 
p)eople think of the convention in 
Philadelphia 200 years ago, the fact is 
that precious document was born in 
Quincy. At least the seed was 
planted here. 

The U.S Constitution was 
modeled after the Massachusetts 
Constitution which was written by 
John Adams, Samuel Adams and 
James Bowdoin in the law office of 
the John Quincy Adams birthplace 
in Quincy. 

There is every reason to believe 
that John Adams did not want to go 
to the Massachusetts Constitution 
Convention in Cambridge in 1779. 

He had arrived home only seven 
days before on the French frigate La 
Sensible after nearly 18 months in 
Paris helping to negotiate a 
commercial and military alliance 
with France He was in such a rush 
to get home that he apparently 
landed the day before La Sensible 
reached Boston by rowing ashore 
from Nantasket Roads 

He missed his wife, Abigail, 
terribly, and she him 

"One was angry, another was full 
of Greif, and the third with Mel 
ancholy, so that I burnt them all," 
he wrote to her from Passy on Dec 
18, 1778, listing his complaints with 
her most recent letters if you 
write me in t{ s style 1 shall leave of 
writing intirely, it kills me 



"Am 1 not wretched Enough, in 
this Banishment, without this^ 
What Course shall I take to convince 
you that my Heart is warm? 1 beg 
you would never more write to me in 
such a strain for it really makes me 
unhappy " 

"How lonely are my days''" she 
wrote on a Sunday evening, Dec 
27, "How solitary are my Nights'^ 
How insupportable the Idea that 
3000 leigues, and the vast ocean 
now dcvide us ■ but devide only our 
persons for the Heart of my Friend 
is in the Bosom of his partner " 

Somewhere on the vast ocean the 
two letters passed each other 

Paris and the dissolute court of 
Louis XVI held small appeal to the 
Puritan in John Adams, even when 
his closest everyday companions 
were Dr. Benjamin Franklin, still 
with an eye for the ladies at age 73, 
and the swashbuckling Capt John 
Paul Jones, half patriot, half pirate, 
who had just taken command of the 
leaky old East Indiaman he had 
renamed Bon Honr)nr}e Richard. 

The American colonies, newly 
reborn as the United States of 
America, were going through the 
most dismal period of the War for 
independence. Inflation was 
rampant butcher's meat, a dollar to 
eight shillings a pound; flour, fifty 
dollars a hundredweight The news 
from the fighting front was of 
defeat, privation and horror. 

Like many Braintrce wives whose 



husbands were away at war, Abigail 
Adams was forced into the unac 
-ustomed role of head of the 
household, a function she filled with 
determination 

"I cannot avoid sometimes 
repining that the gifts of fortune 
were not best(;wed upon us, that I 
might have enjoyed the happiness 
of spending my days with my 
partner," she wrote, "but as it is. I 
think It my duty to attend with 
frugality and economy to our own 
private affairs, and if I cannot add to 
our little substance, yet see to it that 
it is not diminished " 

She abstained from drinking 
black market tea, allowing herself 
one tiny complaint: "I should like a 
little green (tea), but they say there 
is none to be had here I only wish it 
for a medicine, as a relief to a 
nervous pain in my head to which I 
am sometimes subject " 

John Adams attended the 
opening session of the Constitu 
tional Convention in Cambridge on 
Wednesday. Sept 1. 1779 On 
Saturday, he was named to a 
committee of 30 to prepare the 
declaration of rights and the 
constitution On Monday, the 
committee delegated the task to a 
subcommittee of three. John and 
Samuel Adams, and James Bow 
doin 

Thus it was that John Adams 
wound up in the law office of his 
home at the foot of Penn's Hill. 



paired with his firebrand cousin. 
Sam. and his ailing friend, Janif-- 
Bowdoin. to write a Constitution for 
the state of Mass<ichusetts. which in 
turn became the mcxlel for th»' 
Constitution of the United States 

The patient, hard working John 
Adams, of course, did most of tlu' 
work 

"I was by the Convention put 
upon the Committee by tht.' 

Committee upon tht? subcommittee 
and by the subcommittei' 
appointed a sub subcommittee 
so that I had the honor to be 
principal Engineer." he wrote to his 
friend. Edmund Jennings Payroll 
records indicate that he was paid 90 
pounds for his work 

The so-called "Adams draft" of 
the Massachusetts Constitution was 
accepted by the Convention with a 
few alterations but by that time 
John Adams was long gone back to 
Europe, this time to help negotiate 
a treaty of peace with Britain and 
serve as America's first minister 
to London. He did not see the farm 
at the foot of Penn's Hill again for 
another eight years. 

But he was immensely heartened 
by these words from the pen of his 
ever loving Abigail, written on Oct. 
15, 1780 

"Our Massachusetts Constitution 
is read with admiration in New York 
and pronounced by the Royal 
Governor as the best republican 
form he ever saw," 



Thuraday, July 2, 1987 The Quincy Sun Page 9A 



Dorothy Quincy Homestead 



John Hancock's Declaration Of Love 



An aura of romance surrounds 
the stately old house that is set back 
in the trees from the corner of 
Hancock St and Butler Rd . on the 
banks of Furnace Brook. 

There is the wallpaper with its 
blue cupids and pink flowers that 
was imported from France for the 
wedding of Dorothy Quincy, the 
vivacious daughter of the house, to 
Qumcy born John Hancock, a 
patriot on the run with a price on his 
head 

There are the words "You i Love 
and You alone," addressed by 
Hancock to his beloved Dorothy and 
scratched on a window pane with 
his diamond ring just before he fled 
to Lexington on the eve of the 
Revolution 

And there are the secret 
chambers and passageways, used, 
it was said, to hide fugitive patriots 
during the Revolution and, at an 
earlier date, even certain English- 
men fleeing a charge of regicide in 
the death of King Charles I 

Parts of the house were built in 
1685 by Col Edmund Quincy. the 
second of the name, on land that 
was granted to an earlier Edmund 
in 1638 The major part was built in 
1706 by Edmund the third (There 
were six Edmunds in all, four in a 
direct line, two nephews ) 

The house was the social center of 
old Braintret' during the regime of 



the fourth Edmund, largely because 
he sired five beautiful daughters 
around whom swirled a whole 
future generation of judges, gen- 
erals and merchant kings 

The undisputed belle of the 
household was Dorothy, the 
coquettish youngest of the eight 
Quincy children, whose troth was 
soon plighted to John Hancock, the 
wealthy young businessman from 
Boston who was already becoming 
known as a leader of the rebels. 

Tradition has it that they were to 
have been married in the north 
parlor of the Quincy homestead 
with its French cupid wallpaper 
when Revolution intervened and 
John had to flee with the British on 
his heels. 

Eventually, they were wed Aug. 
28, 1775. at the home of Thaddeus 
Burr, uncle of Aaron Burr (later vice 
president of the United States) in 
Fairfield. Conn. 

After the Revolution and the 
death of Edmund the fourth in 1788 
the old house passed from the 
Quincy family. The Hancocks 
wanted nothing to do with it. Their 
only son. John George Washington 
Hancock, was killed in a skating 
accident at age 9 while on a visit in 
1787 

The house was acquired in 1904 
by the Massachusetts Society of 
Colonial Dames, who restored it 




DOROTHY QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



with vintage furniture, utensils and 
clothing, and gave it to the state 
with the proviso that the Dames 
continue to run it. 

The Dorothy Quincy Home- 
stead is open to the public May 
through October, Wednesday 



through Sunday, from 12 noon to 
5 p.m. (last tour at 4 p.m.). It is 
also open by appointment only 
Wednesday through Sunday 
from 10 a.m. to noon for groups. 
There is a $1.50 admission 
charge for adults, 50 cents for 
children. 




DOWNTOWN 



The Quincy Center Business And Professional 
Association Representing 140 Merchants, Banks And 

Professional Services In Downtown Quincy Center 
Appreciate Historic Quincy And Are Proud To Be A 
Part Of It. We Invite You To Shop Downtown Quincy 

Center And Take Advantage Of Validated Parking 



Alphagraphics 
Anodyne Medical Services 
Artery Cleaners 
Ayers Bros, Inc. 
Bank of Boston 
Bank of New England 
Barry, Richard P. 
Baskins-Robbins Ice Cream 
Bay Bank/ Norfolk Trust 
Bearde's Exxon Station 
Bed & Batfi of Quincy 
Bernie's Formal Shop 
Bowe, Thomas F. 
Burger King Corp. 
Burgin. Plainer & Co. 
Campanelli Quincy Trust 
Casual Concepts 
Cathay Pacific Restaurant 
Century 21 Tullish & Clancy 
Chase, Richard D., Insurance 
Child World 

Clifford's Flower Shops 
Colman Sporting Goods 
Colonial 1600 Restaurant 
Corner, Dandrow and Co. 
Cummings 
Curley, M J Company 



Dacey, Jeremiah J. 
Dependable Cleaners 
Dunkin Oonuts 
Eileen's Special Sizes 
The Faxon Trust 
Finian's Restaurant & Pub 
Flavin, Corcoran & Farrington 
Flavin & Flavin Realtors 
Floral Design by Fabiano 
Framers" Workshop 
Frantic Framers 
Fred Villari's Studio 

of Self Defense 
Friendly Family Center 
Gina's sandwich Shop 
Goodhue, A.E. Co. 
Goodhue, O'Brien & Co. 
Granite City Electric 
Granite Co-operative Bank 
Granite Lock Company 
Granite Rail Tavern 
Grossman Companies, Inc. 
H & R Block 
Hancock Tobacco 
Handshakes Cafe 
Hanlon's Men's Shoes 
Harold. Paul D. 
Harts Jewelers, Inc. 



Heavenly Rounds 

The High Rise 

Hurley Insurance Agency 

Indek Chiropractic. P.C. 

Indian Store 

Interior Design Center 

J.B. Optical & Hearing Aid 

Jackson & Sutherland PC. 

Jason's Music & T-Shirt Shop 

Johnson Motor Parts 

Key Realty 

Kinney System. Inc. 

LaBilancia 

Lucille's Little House 

Luke's Lounge 

McCormack, Samuel F. Co. 

McDonald's Restaurant 

Marvel Shops Inc. 

Maxx, T.J. Co. 

Medical Associates of Quincy 

Miller Shoes 

Miller Studio 

Montilio's Pastry Shop 

Murphy Kligman & Co. 

Napoli Pizzeria 

Norman's Army & Navy Store 

O'Connell Development Co. 

O'Llndy's Quincy Ave. Lanes 



Parade of Shoes 

Parkingway Associates 

Patriot Ledger 

Phase II Jewelry 

Photo Quick/Quincy 

Pilgrim Restaurant 

Posh Hair Stylists 

Postal Instant Press 

Premier Furniture Co. 

Presidents City Motel, inc. 

Prone. Joseph G. 

Quincy Cablesystems Corp. 

Quincy Co-operative Bank 

Quincy Furniture Co. 

Quincy Savings Bank 

Quincy Sun 

Quincy Typewriter Service 

QuinWell Travel Service 

Quirk. D.J. Ford Inc. 

Remick's of Quincy 

Rent-a-Center 

Ricciardi Company 

Riley & Rielly Ins. Agcy. 

Rogers Jewelry 

Ryder's of Quincy 

Shawmut Quincy Bank & Trust 

Sleep-a-Rama 

South Shore Bank 



South Shore Barber Shop 

South Shore Buick 

South Shore Television 

Stooges 

Sullivan's Corner Antique 

Sweets n Things 

Taso's Pizza & Subs 

Taj Coin & Stamp Co. 

Thom McAn. Inc. 

Toodie's Fine Jewelry 

Tullio and Sons Inc. 

WJDA So Shore Broadcasting 

Winfield House Restaurant 

Wickens & Troupe Funeral Home 

Woodward School 

Woolworth. F.W. Co. 

HONORARY MEMBERS: 
McCauley, Francis X. 
DeCristofaro. Theodore P. 



OFFICERS 1987-1988 
Robert J. Quinn, President 
Robert Colman S>r., Vice President 
Beth Ann Strenge. Secretary 
Roger E. Perletti. Treasurer 



I 



Pag* lOA Th« Quincy Sun Thursdav. July 2, 1987 





THE FIRST PARISH CHURCH 



First Parish Church 



TOMBS OF PRESIDENTS John and John Quincy Adams and their wives 
in First Parish Church. 



Where 2 Presidents, Their Wives Are Entombed 



In 1949. when the present First 
Parish Church building, the Old 
Stone Temple, was 121 years old. it 
was ruled officially that the church 
IS older than the city itself and the 
town before it 

It was then that the late historian 
William Churchill Edwards was 
called upon to resolve a minor 
dispute that involved the rounding 
of the corners of the church lot in 
downtown Quincy 

"Almost the first subject to which 
the m\nds oi the ear\vj settlers of our 
country were turned after they 



landed here was the formation ot a 
church." said Edwards 

The first church in these parts 
was established as a branch of the 
Church of Boston in 1636 It became 
a church in its own right in 1639 
The Mount Wollaston section of 
Boston was incorporated as the 
town of Braintree on May 23, 1640 
Ergo, the church came first! 

Quincy's first house of worship, 
the brainch of the Church of Boston, 
was called the "Chappel of Ease," 
and if it was neglected by early 
historians it was because its first 




Welcome to 
HISTORIC QUINCY 



Quincy Tourist 
Information Center 

Quincy City Hall 
Hancock St., Quincy Square 

Across jrom the 'Church of The Presidents' 
Open Mondays through Fridays 

Free literature available 



Sponsored by 
The Quinty Tourism Assn., 853 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA 02169 



~ 



- 




pastor, the Rev. John Wheelwright, 
his sister in law, Anne Hutchinson, 
and others were banished from the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony for 
heresy. 

The new church, the one that 
lasted, was gathered by convenant 
on Sept 26. 1639. and it was hold 
ing services in its third meeting 
house in 1732 when its pastor was 
the Rev John Hancock, father of 
the bold first signer of the Declara- 
tion of Independence Son John also 
was a member 

The affairs of the church and the 
town of Quincy were one and the 
same until 1824 when church and 
state were separated in Massachu 
setts and the Congregational Socie 
ty was established to handle 
parcKhial matters 

The old Hancock meeting house 
was still standing, although a little 
run down, on the south lawn of the 
present church lot in 1822 when 
former President John Adams 
deeded the interest from certain of 
his lands and granite from his 
pastures to build a stone temple 

it was completed in Greek revival 
style at a cost of $30,488 56 whicn 
was some $3,000 less than architect 
Alexander Parrishs estimate and 



dedicated Nov 12. 1828. with John 
Quincy Adams, the sixth president 
of the United States holding Pt-v*. 
No 1 

Even before the church wa-^ 
dedicated, the mortal remains of its 
benefactors. John and Abigail 
Adams, were transferred to tombs 
in the crypt of the church and. in 
1852. the bodies of John QuituA 
Adams and his wife. Louisa, joined 
them 

It is the only church in the United 
States m which two Presidents ar» 
buried The only other church m 
which a President is buried is thi' 
Episcopal Cathedral in Washington 
D C . where President Wcx)drow 
Wilson is entombed 

Still an active Unitarian 
church, it is open to the public for 
tours from May 15 through Labor 
Day, Monday through Saturday, 
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Donations 
are accepted. There is a charge 
of 50 cents per adult for 
organized tour groups, which 
should make an appointment at 
least one week in advance. Tours 
of the church at other times 
during the year may also be made 
by appointment. 



Why We Pronounce 
It 'Quin-zee' 



Why do we pronounce Quincy 
"Quin zee" when just about 
everyone else in the country refers to 
It as "Quin see?" 

There arc 19 other Quincys in the 
U.S., but they pronounce it "Quin 
see." 

Can they be right and we be 
wrong? 

Not according to Quincy's late city 
historian, William C. Edwards who 
never budged an inch whenever the 
argument ever came up And it still 
comes up. 

The reason we pronounce it 
"Quin zee" is very simple 

"That's the way the Quincy family 
pronounced it," he used to explain 



"1 he original Quincy family which 
settled here at Mount Wollaston 
pronounced it 'Quin zee,' including 
Col. John Quincy after whom 
Quincy, Mass. the first Quincy was 
named in 1792." 

Colonel Quincy was the great 
grandfather of sixth president John 
Quincy Adams. 

Apparently all ]9otherQuincys in 
the U.S. were named after John 
Quincy Adams 

And, apparently the early settlers 
of those communities thought John 
Quincy pronounced it John "Quin 
see." 

Anyway, that is how Edwards 
explained it Seems like a sound 
argument 



Thurtdav. July 2, 1987 Th« Quincy Sun Page llA 



Abigail Adams Cairn 

The Smoke Could Be 
Seen Over Bunker Hill 



Abigail Adams was awakened at 
dawn in the farmhouse at the foot of 
Penn's Hill by the sound of far off 
guns. All through the sweltering 
morning of June 17, 1775, as she 
hustled about with the chores, the 
dull boom of cannon intruded on her 
consciousness. 

Riders on the Coast Road to 
Plymouth, stopping at the farm- 
house for a drink of water, told her of 
a great battle underway on Breed's 
Hill in Charlestown. 

One of them brought word that 
Dr. Joseph Warren had been killed 
in the fighting and little Abby, age 10, 
burst into tears , and John Quincy, 
nearly 8, felt bewildered and sad, for 
Dr Warren was the Adams family 
doctor in Boston 

in the afternoon, Abigail could 
stand it no longer. Taking Abby and 
John Quincy by the hand, she 
walked up the Coast Road to the top 
of Penn's Hill and climbed up on the 
rocks for a better view. 

The panorama of the Bay, a 
shimmering blue in the sunshine, 
spread out before them, the tiny 
houses on the three hills of Boston 
and, beyond, the black smoke rising 
in billows. 

"Good God, " exclaimed Abigail, 
"they are burning Charlestown!" 

The scene etched itself forever in 
John Quincy's memory. 



The early days of the Revolution 
were times of turmoil in Old 
Braintrcc and its North Precinct, 
which was later called Quincy. 

Abigail's husband, John, was away 
most of the time at the Continental 
Congress in Philadelphia, leaving 31- 
year old Abigail to manage the farm 
and look to the needs of four small 
children, Abigail, John Quincy, 
Charles, 5, and Thomas Boylston, 3. 

There were days of alarm as the 
British, penned up in Boston by the 
brand new Continental Army, 
foraged up and down the coast for 
supplies Refugees from occupied 
Boston and the inner towns of 
Dorchester and Roxbury sometimes 
slept in the kitchen and in the fields. 

As the wife of a member of 
Congress, Abigail was a center of 
attention. The house on the Coast 
Road was a favorite stopping place 
for travelers to Plymouth. Politicians 
up from Philadelphia made it a point 
to stop by for a visit with John 
Adams' wife. 

Abigail was invited to visit Gen. 
George Washington's headquarters 
at Winter Hill. The aristocratic 
Washington was suspect among 
New Englanders. He was a Virginian; 
he was an Anglican; and, it was said, 
he held slaves. But John Adams liked 
him and Abigail was soon charmed. 




ABIGAIL ADAMS CAIRN 



One day, young John Quincy 
came home to find his Uncle Elihu 
melting down Abigail's pewter 
spoons in the kitchen to make bullet 
molds. He looked at his mother and 
she looked back at him and 
something indefinable passed 
between them. 

"Do you wonder," wrote the sixth 
president of the United States some 
68 years later, "that a boy of 7 who 



witnessed this scene should be a 
patriot." 

In 1896, where the old Coast 
Road (now Franklin St.) meets 
Viden Rd. atop Penn's Hill a 
stone cairn was built to mark the 
spot where Abigail and young 
John Quincy watched the Battle 
of Bunker Hill. It is open to the 
public free of charge. 






■!•!•!•!•%:• V.V.'.V.V.'.v 



•.•.•••.•.•••-•.•.•.• 



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A fitting memorial . . . 



John Quincy Adams occupied the White House in 1828 when United 
First Parish Church, the Stone Temple, was built of Quincy granite, a 
fitting memorial to the enduring work of the men who founded the state 
and the nation. 

Two presidents of the United States, John Adams and John Quincy 
Adams, and their wives, are buried side by side in vaults in the grotto of 
the Church. 

The cornerstone of the Stone Temple was laid on June 11, 1827, and 
in it was placed a silver plate with the inscription: 'A temple for the 
worship of God, and for public instruction in the doctrines and duties of 
the Christian religion. 

Historic Hancock Cemetery in the foreground is the final resting 
place of early Quincy settlers and patriots among them Col. John 
Quincy for whom Quincy was named and Rev. John Hancock, a 
minister of First Parish Church and father of the first signer of the 
Declaration of Independence. 

Burgin Platner Insurance is located beside and across from these two 
historic sites. 




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12A The Quincv Sun Thur«iay. July 2, 1987 



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Enjoy History uith us... 

"Two Fort«...To Destiny'' 
the History of yuincy, Weymouth, 
Braintree, Plymouth Colony and^ 
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Abisail Adams Wife, 
Mother Of Presidents 



Mrs. John Adams, the former 
Abigail Smith of Weymouth, is the 
only woman to be wife of one 
president and mother of another ■ 
and she could have been 
grandmother of a vice president 

Husband John was chief 
executive from 1797 to 1801: son of 
John Quincy occupied the White 
House from 1825 to 1829: and 
grandson Charles Francis Adams 
ran for vice president on the Free 
Soil ticket in 1848 

An early advocate of women's 
rights. Abigail Adams once wrote to 
her husband, John 

■jn the new code of laws which I 
suppose it will be necessary for you 
to make. I desire you would 
remember the ladies and be more 
generous and favorable to them 
than your ancestors 

"Do not put such unlimited 
power into the hands of the 
husbands Remember, all men 
would be tyrants if they could 




ABIGAIL ADAMS 



r 



'Historic Quincy' Staff 



"Historic Quincy," this special 
supplement to The Quincy Sun 
was produced by the following 
members of The Quincy Sun 
staff: 

Henry Bosworth, Cheryl 
Burns, Tom Henshaw, Nancy 
McLaughlin. Brian O'Neill. 



Robert Bosworth and June 
Powers 

Photos are by the Massa 
chusetts Department of 
Commerce. Quincy Photo Lab 
and Sun photographers Tom Lee 
and Steve Grochowski 



Quincy has. . . 

Two Well Known 
Independents 

Doran & Horrigan 



19 Billings Road 
N. Quincy 328-0100 



youRJ independent 
Insurance g /AGENT 

SERVES VOU FIRST 

We Work for You 



Thursday, July 2, 1987 The Quinci, Sun Page 13A 



Chart Your Course 
T) Marina Bay 




he Rcgina Maris clipper ship has 
K)unJ a permanent home at Marina 
Bav in North Quincv...and vou 
can tool 

Enjov this 400'acre, selt-contained 
seaside community located just 10 
minutes from downtown Boston. 

Relax alone the X'illaee Boardwalk 
which will take vou back to an old- 
world charn^ and an^biance of vcster- 
vear. Stroll the X'illage Bc^irdwalk 
and hrc^wse through a \'ast arra\- oi 
Xantucket'Stvled she^ps and eateries. 

Di^ccAvr the pleasure of docking vour 
ho'cU at one of the 0^0 slips in our 
breakwater protected vacht basin. 

Live in the elegant <urrounding> 
o\ the Harbourside townhouse^^ t^r 
the Marina R^int condominiun^s. 

Work in Marina Ba\''< Corponite Rirk 
with its manv superior amenities. 

It's all here! Come eniov, relax and 
discover Marina Bav. 



MaHnaBay 

333 \ Kton rli)ad, Marina Bay, No. Qiiincy, Ma. 02171. 



Pam' 14A IhpQuimv .Sun 1 hur-vddv, Juls 2. 1987 



Let Us Show You 



s. 



10. 



11 



12. 



15. 



HIGHLIGHTS 



Town Hdll Cily Hall o( Quintv Ar,. hilut iind 
builder. Solomtin Wiliard Compii'tt'd NovembtT 
1. 1S44 Biiilt of Quini V i^raniff 

Adams Academy Site of the birthplace of John 
Haruot k, the F\itiu)t F.reeted in 1871 Now the 
hii'Tit ()! T fit' QLiiruA Historical Societv World 
War 1 statue and memorial Bust of HaneocK 
Histonral exhibit 

Adams National Hislorii Site Built in 1731 by 
Major Leonard Vassal Purchased by President 
John Adams in 1787. and occupied f^y four 
generations h" the Adams Family 

Dorothy Quincy Homestead [Jatmg from 
lb8S. i: was the home o; to;,r generations of the 

Edmund Quincy family Home of Dorothy Quincv 

who married John Hancock 

Woodward School Founded by Dr Ebenezer 

l*.iK)dAdrd in 1864 tfi cdui ate Quini V b(jrn girls 

Milesitone Marker The Neponset Turnpike 
•loy. Hancock Street) gave people a shorter 
route to Bostcjn This milestone (almost illegal) 
marks 7 . miles from B<jslon An older milslone 
atrosb the way, on Adams Academy grounds, 
marks the miles C)n the old route via Milton 

OVd Court Hou6« D\sU\ct Court of East 

Norfolk xas established m 1872 This courthouse 
Duilt m 19 12, has been replaced by a modern 
building on Chestnut Street 

Quincy Junior College Formeny the 
Coddmgton School built in 19(J9, then a 'modern" 
elementary schcxji 

Bethany Church Buiit in 1928 in Gothic style 
Its gar'^oyles ffjur feet long, are the longest in 
New F.'igland 

Thomas Crane Public I ibrary Lesi'jnefi -y 
Her.r, Joosor, Hicr,ards(jri. toremos' architef t of 
his era Cfjmmissioned in 18H<J by AR>ert Crane in 
memor, of his father 

United First Parish Church A fineexampk of 
iric Cjri'fK Ke-.i.al period designed by Alexander 
P^rrist. and constructed in 1828 John Adams and 
his wife, Abigail, and John Quincy Adams and his 
wife Louisa Catheririe are buried in the churi h 

Hancock Cemetery Dated arcjund IMO and 
r.a-,cd lor trie Hc^fri'r\ri Jotin Hanf ock father of 
"•• P^.'oo' The oldest hi'adstof,t' is dated lhi-)f) 

Post Office 

Christ Church Oidcs- [ pis' opdi jjansfi in the 
stalls 

St John the Baptist ( hurch Roman Catholic 
( hrisi f hur< h ( emefpry 

Birlhpldc es of John Adams and John Quincy 
Adams Im- -.-jtior, s onl, 'drticr ^nd son 
presidents T ',e two sailtio/ '^rrnhfMjses. 
undergcjing resloratifjn by the National Park 
Service are a brief walk down FrariKlir, Street 



The Quincy Cent 



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Cooperative Bank' 
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Quincy 



85 Quincy Avenue, Quincy (Main Office 

1259 Hancock Street, Quinc 
Tedeschi's Plaza, 280 Grove Street, Braintre 



Our newest branch office — in 



Way . . . 



Thursddv. JuK J l'^'^' Fh^Qumcv Sun Page 15A 



Walking Tour 



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LEGEND 
X public parking 
W statues & markers 
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Tedeschi's Plaza, Route 3A, Cohasset 

1000 Southern Artery, Quincy (Limited Service) 

Junction Routes 53 and 139, Hanover 



^ijuincy on Newport Ave. at the corner of Holbrook Rd. 



Paqe 16A The QuiniA Sun Thursdav luK 2, 1987 



You Can Bank 
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Quincy is getting 
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And So Are We! 



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THE GKANITK HAILWAY 

The Granite Railway 

First Commercial 
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f'Uir 'Al;.'fN h ,i!i,i (,!!»■ fi.iif t,Tt in 



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t('Pl)t''i \'K ir(i?i [i!,iti' v'.tiiih if'-tfii 



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pi.ui-ii I'lijlit t./»'f dp, lit .in^i tiriiik 
supportf'i on < ru'-ii-'d qrciinte to <» 
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On '-^titurd.r,. Oc ! 7 IS^h tdr 
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tfif fiiu's: (Jm ' ■ ■_ iKrinitf -md \\\i' 
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s(]nii' MM'^ni.Iiid. 

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off foi ,1 [):, r, m. .,; ) ;n (^uiru '. «'n 
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h.«s hcj'n rrsJo- -d ,wi(i is Ijk .jjpH 
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piiblu v«'cir KHirid. 2\ hourv a 
d.iv. I h<T«* IS rn) .Kimission 



Thundav, Juiy 2, 1987 The Quincy Sun Page 17 A 



WfeareptDud 

tobe apart of 

Qiiinc)5 a city 

with a rich and 

historical past 

and a great future. 



'ALWAYS THE LEADER 



Page 18A Th« Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 1987 



The Thomas Crane Library 



A Romanesque 
Architectural Beauty 



He came to Quincy as a boy of 7, 
grew to young manhood on a farm in 
Quincy Point, learned the granite 
cutters' trade, and left at the age of 
26 to win fame and fortune in stone in 
New York City. 

That was the last Quincy saw of 
Thomas Crane for half a century 
until one February day in 1880, five 
years after his death, when his son, 
Albert, appeared with $20,000 with 
which to build a memorial ■• 
preferably a library to his father. 

"My father always retained a 
strong feeling for the town of 
Quincy, " was his only explanation. 

Albert Crane himself chose the 
man to design the building, Henry 
Hobson Richardson, grandson of the 
English scientist Dr. Joseph Priestly 
and the foremost architect of the 
day. 

His reputation was so formidable 
that he was able to tell Crane, "I can 
not guarantee that the building, 
when completed, shall conform to 
(your) ideas of beauty and taste," 
and still get the job. 

Richardson's Romanesque 
building, which now houses the 
refcrerKe section of the library, was 
dedicated on May 30, 1882. with the 
principal oration delivered by 
Charles Francis Adams, Jr., 
chairman of the Board of Trustees. 

It was Adams who gave the library 



its name. Albert Crane wanted it to 
be "The Quincy Free Public 
Library." Adams insisted on "The 
Thomas Crane Public Library." 

"Who's giving the building?" asked 
Albert Crane. 

"You are, but you wouldn't have if 
it hadn't been for me." said Adams, 
who was used to having his way 
around Quincy, and that was that. 

President John Adams' modest 
collection of books was housed in 
the library until 1893, when it was 
discovered that in 11 years only two 
persons, one of them Charles 
Francis Adams, Jr., had asked to see 
them. They were then transferred to 
the Boston Public Library. 

At the start, Richardson's 
magnificent building was all but 
hidden behind a grain store, a hotel, 
an office building and four homes 
that lined Washington St. 

Albert Crane, however, was a 
persistent man and, by the time he 
died in 1917, he had purchased and 
torn down all the buildings, leaving a 
broad expanse of open space to 
enhance the library. 

But before the lawn could be 
seeded. World War I intervened and, 
in a burst of patriotism "Food will 
win the war," they said the area 
was planted with potatoes, tended 
by an expert brought in from Maine. 
The experiment failed 



Building Your 
Protection 



At Riley & Rifil)' Insurdna' Agcncv wv think ol 
your insurdnct' ni't-ds as d tiiu'lv crafted Utill of 
protection, just ds eiich stone is caretuilv chosen 
n\' a mason to fit the wall, our insurance agents 
choose exactly the kinds of policies \'ou need and 
fit them together to form a solid wafl of protection. 
V\/c fi)iii solutio}!^. 





THOMAS CRANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 



"There wasn't a potato in the lot 
that was anywhere near as large as a 
golf ball," said Mayor Joseph L. 
Whiton. The harvest was donated to 
the poor farm 

Albert Crane also put up $64,000 
to build the Spear St. wing of the 
library in 1907 08 and the Crane 
family gave yet another $164,000 for 
the free standing addition, built in 



1936, that now houses the stacks 
and the children's section. 

The Thomas Crane Public 
Library, 40 Washington St., is 
open to the public, free of charge, 
Monday to Thursday, 9 a.m. to 9 
p.m., Friday and Saturday, 9 a.m. 
to 5 p.m. It is closed on Saturdays 
during July and August. 



YOU GET MORE 

ENERGY OUT 

OF ROSTON GAS 




Thunday, July 2, 1^7 The Quincy Sun Page 19A 



Stormx; Debate 

Quincy Was 
Almost Hancock 



If some of the early settlers had 
their way, you would be living in the 
city of Hancock today instead of the 
city of Quincy 

Quincy, like George Washington, 
was born on Feb. 22. 

On Feb. 22, 1792, the General 
Court of Massachusetts passed an 
act incorporating the North Precinct 
of Old Braintree as the separate 
town of Quincy. 

But, just before that, quite a few of 
the residents wanted the new town 
named after native son John 
Hancock instead of Boston born 
Col John Quincy. 

Colonel Quincy, who had 
represented Old Braintree in the 
General Court, was the great 
grandfather of President John 
Quincy Adams 

Many people today think Quincy 
was named after the sixth President 
but the honor actually goes to his 
great grandfather 

John Hancock who was born in 
the North Precinct, was governor of 
Massachusetts when the General 
Court passed the act incorporating 
the new town as Quincy He signed 
the act the following day. 

But at the first town meeting of the 
new town m May. a petition was 
presented to change the name from 
Quincy to Hancock in honor of the 
patriot and first signer of the 
Declaration of Independence. The 
move was finally defeated after a 
stormy verbal battle. 

Opponents argued that Hancock 
was still alive and that the honor 
should go to a distinguished but 
deceased person. 




JOHN HANCOCK 

Colonel Quincy met those 
requirements He was both 
distinguished and deceased. 

He had represented Old Braintree 
in the General Court from 1717 to 
1741 12 of those years as Speaker 
of the House. He died in 1767 at age 
77 ■■ two days after John Quincy 
Adams was born. 

Quincy became a city June 11, 
1888. 

Thus, on Feb. 22, 1986 Quincy will 
mark its 194th birthday as the 
community of Quincy. 

But a lot of people • residents and 
tourists alike - will go right on 
thinking that Quincy was named 
after John Quincy Adams. 



Quincy Quiz 



What was the role in Quincy's 
history of "Thomas Morton of 
Clifford's Inn. Gent?" 

Answer: 

suo Bui/SjJPD 

qDns oj pua ue }nd uojsog 
p sueiijnj am pue mnoui/Si^j 
p suju5|i<j aqj |ijun sueipu] 
aqj q}i/v\ pajjOAP.T pup a|od/Seuj 
e papdjd 'junoj^ i^iiay^ oj aaieu 
aqj paBueq.i Y29I "! luauiajuas 
uo}SP||o/y\ i^ aqj ;o |OijuoD >ioo} 
..'ainisiy^ jo pjox. aqi ipsium 
Buiqqnp 'uojjoj^ seaioqj^ 

What was the role in Quincy's 
history of Claude Grahame 



Abigail Adams: 
A Woman Of 



White? 

Answer: 
sajejs pajiuf) aqj ui 
juauieujno} Buj/Sy paziueBjo jsji; 
aqj 'jaaj^ ojay uojsog pjPAjej^ 
aqj Buunp '0I6l Y Jdas uo ^ovq 
pue jqBi-] uojsog oj ujnjuenb9 
uioaj Bui/Sy /Sq aziJd 000'0I$ 
e uo/vN oqm jojpiap jaauoid aqj 
se^ ai!q/y\-aujeqejr) apnpQ 

What was the role in Quincy's 
history of Francis L. Souther? 

Ansix^er 

•je/Y\ ||A!3 aqj ui lequioD ui 
aip OJ ja|p|os uofuf) jsjij aqi 'I98i 
'01 aunp uo |aqjag Big p a|ueg 
aqj )e pa||!>l se/Y^ oqm 'juaaiiBay 
sjiasnqDPSse^^ qjjnoj 'spjenQ 
jqBi-] >|303UP|-j aqj p jrquuauj 
e sem jaqjnog ~i spuPij 



Special Honors ^ Was Richard 



Abigail (Smith) Adams was the 
only woman to be the wife of one 
President and mother of another. 

She was the wife of John Adams, 
our second President. 

She died in 1818, however, and did 
not see her son John Quincy Adams 
elected our sixth President. 

John Adams did live to sec his son 
become President in 1825. 



For years, the first name of Capt. 
Wollaston, the leader of the original 
settlers of Quincy in 1625, was lost to 
history. 

Only recently did the researches 
of H. Hobart Holly, historian of the 
Quincy Historical Society, turn up 
the information that it probably was 
Richard. 




Business 
is soaring 
in The Sea Belt 

The South Shore 
of Massachusetts 



The South Shore Chamber of Commerce, representing 39 
communities, firmly believes that our area offers great 
advantages to business and industry. Hence, we have created 
the term we call "The Sea Belt"(S The "Sea Belt" of New 
England, the South Shore of Massachusetts running from 
Boston to Plymouth, offers a rather unique geographic, 
social, and recreational opportunity for businesses to expand 
and relocate. 

Through our affiliate. The South Shore Economic 
Development Corporation, we are helping individual 
business grow through small business loans. 

The tourism industry in the coastal South Shore 
Communities needs not only individual but also collective 
action with creative regional approaches. Quincy has 
recognized this need. 

QUINCY YESTERDAY - with America's historical roots 
of democracy and industry, makes it potentially one of the 
most exciting historical cities in the United States. 

QUINCY TODAY - where pride in our city has led to 
planned economic development where tourism plays a part 
and the past and present blend through a sense of dedication 
and tradition. 

QUINCY TOMORROW - a city that is broadening its 
scope for the future. Tourism is a viable economic industry 
and defines the Chamber's objectives of creating jobs and 
promoting business. The "Sea Bell" of New England, the 
South Shore of Massachusetts, will not be a short-lived 
phenomenon. We can say, to all concerned, that we are 
justifiably proud of our past and very confident of our future. 
Call on us: 

The South Shore Chamber of Commerce 

36 Miller Stile Kd. Quincy MA 02169 
617-479-mi 



Page 20A Th« Quincy Sun Thursday, July 2, 1987 




Proud to be serving 
Quincy for over 30 years. 



(jul^edo i 






Luncheon Specials 






Dinner Specials 






11:30- 3:00 p.m. 






3:00- 11:00 p.m 


1 


• 


( hicken Parmigiana 






Queen Prime Rib 


»8.95 




spaghetti 


M.OO 




Chicken Parmigiana 


«5.95 


• 


Seafood Ne\^burg 


M.OO 




Broiled Boston Schrod 


»6.95 


• 


Babv Broiled Haddock 


M.75 




Beef Burgundy 




• 


[ ondon Broil Au Jus 


»4.25 




rice pilaf 


»5.95 


• 


Broiled Beef Liver 






Eggplant Parmigiana 


»5.95 




onions & bacon 


«3.75 




Veal Cacciatore 


»6.95 










Chicken Marsella 


»6.95 




Gift Certificates 












A\ailable 






Served w fresh garden salad 










or soup, potato, vcg or 


pasta 



lA 



Live entertainment in our lounge 
Wed.-Sat. Bob Benoit, Sun. • Frank Dunn 

75 Franklin St., Quincy 

Just minutes away from 
the Adams Birthplaces 
472-1115 




Eciataurant 

The South Shore'''' 



- Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials 

Luncheons Served from 1 1 to 4 
Dinner 4 to 10 P.M. 
Salad Bar Cocktails 



X 



H 



EMERALD ROOM 
QUINCY ROOM 




For Banquets, 
Luncheons & 
Cocktail Parties 



For HeserifiliotiH 
a n d In fit r mat ion 
CallMarffie :i2H-5455 

Open 7 Days A Week j 



9 Billings Road, North Quincy 




aw Hall 

Seat Of Government 
For 143 Years 



Daniel and Hannah French 
deeded the land to the town of 
Quincy for $1,000 with the 
stipulation that it "shall not be used 
for any other purpose than as a place 
for a Town House for the said 
Inhabitants." 

And. with a few minor 
transgressions of that vow, the solid 
structure of Quincy granite in 
Quincy Square has been just that for 
the past 143 years, the nerve center 
of government for first the town and 
then the city. 

It was the great hall on the second 
floor that the popular John Quincy 
Adams II, grandson of a president of 
the United States, held forth as town 
moderator for many years and, with 
his brother, Charles Francis Adanrns 
Jr., gave informal direction to town 
affairs 

One of the earliest ordinances 
passed by the first City Council on 
March 8, 1889 was the adoption of 
the City Seal emblazoned with the 
four most significant dates in 
Quincy's history: 

1625, for the first settlement on 
Mount Wollaston; 1640. for its 
separation from Boston as the town 
of Braintree; 1792, for its separation 
from Braintree as the town of 
Quincy; and 1888, for its 
incorporation as a city 




, CITY HALL 

Designed by the architect 
Solomon Willard who received $280 
for drawing up the plans and super 
intending construction for five 
months the City Hall was 
completed and occupied for the first 
time on Nov 1, 1844. 

It cost exactly $19,1 15.93 to build, 
including 88 cents to John Briesler 
for lead to seal the chimney 

In 1979, when a 3 and one half 
story reflective glass addition was 
built behind the old City Hall, the 
cost was $19 million 




* * * * 



ir'k * * * 



• Charity 
•Jiutioe 

• Brotheriy 
Love 

• Fiddity 




QUINCY 
LODGE 

OF 

ELKS 

No. 943 

440 East Squantum St. 
North Quincy 

(Former Myles Standish School) 



BINGO EVERY SUNDAY 



FIRST GAME 6 P.M. 



Thursdav. July 2. 1987 The Quincy Sun Pa9e2IA 



Josiah Quincy Homestead 



Lookout For Spying 
On British Ships 



Abigail Adams stood with her 
great uncle, Col Josiah Quincy, in a 
window of his mansion overlooking 
Wollaston Beach and watched the 
tall masts of 170 ships stand slowly 
out to sea. It was March 17, 1776. 
The British were evacuating Boston. 

But even in triumph there was 
tragedy 

Aboard the departing ships were 
more than 1,000 Loyalists, 
Americans who had chosen King 
above country, and one of them was 
Abigail's cousin, Samuel Quincy, the 
Colonel's only remaining son, an 
avowed Tory. 

"I take a long farewell," his sister, 
Hannah, wrote to him for one last 
time "Let it not be published that a 
brother of such brothers fled from 
his country Can you expect to walk 
uprightly now'^ Can you take fire in 
your bosom and not be burnecP" 

Two of Col. Josiah Quincy's sons 
had died young. Now he had no 
more 

But there was no time for regrets. 
The work of revolution had begun. 
The second floor of the house at 
what IS now 20 Muirhead St.. 
Wollaston, was a lookout from which 
the 66 year old Colonel spied on 
British ship movements for his 



friend. Gen. George Washington. 

A few months before. Col. Quincy 
watched the Royal Governor, Gen. 
Thomas Gage depart and he 
scratched on a pane of window glass 
the reminder: "Oct. 10, 1775, 
General Gage sailed for England 
with a fair wind." 

This time he remained in the 
window for three days as the British 
tall ships moved restlessly about the 
Harbor as if reluctant to leave. 
FinaDy, on March 20, the last of them 
passed through the roadstead and 
out to sea. 

The mansion in Wollaston 
reached full social flower under the 
aegis of the Colonel's grandson, the 
third Josiah, the "Great Mayor" of 
Boston, president of Harvard and 
Congressman, who called it 
"Tranquillia" and used it as his 
summer home. 

It was there that the Marquis de 
Lafayette visited one Sunday after- 
ncxjn after dinner with his friend, 
exPresident John Adams at the 
Adams Mansion. He carried flowers 
from the Adams garden for Mrs. 
Eliza Susan Quincy and her five 
attractive daughters. 

The house was built in 1770 by the 
old Colonel himself, the first in a line 
of six Josiahs. It was said that, while 
most families passed their line from 




JOSIAH QUINCY HOMESTEAD 



sire to son, the Quincys went from 
'Siah to 'Siah. 

But, while there were six Josiahs 
and innumerable Edmunds, the city 
was named for yet another member 
of the prolific family - Col. John 
Quincy, the great grandfather of 
John Quincy Adams sixth president 
of the United States. 



The Josiah Quincy Homestead 
is open to the public from June 1 
to Oct. 15, Tuesday, Thursday, 
Saturday and Sunday from noon 
to 5 p.m. Visits may be made at 
other times by appointment. 
Admission is $2 for adults and 75 
cents for children. Residents of 
Quincy are admitted free. 



How Many Miles From Boston? 



Stone mile markers across 
Hancock Street from each other 
indicate that the traveler is both 7'4 
and 10 miles from Boston. And both 
are correct. 

The 10-miles marker was placed 
on the Old Coast Road, one of the 
oldest highways in the United States 
still in existence, which went from 



Boston to Plymouth in 1639 by way 
of inland Milton. 

The 7' 4-mile marker was raised 
after the first bridge over the 
Neponset River was built in 1803, 
creating the Neponset Turnpike, 
which is today Hancock St. in North 
Quincy and Wollaston. 





Bernard C. Cohen 

Chilrmtn 
Pr«t Qranit* Induttr^tl Corp 



Robert E. Foy IV 

Pr«tid«nt 
Grtnit* Coop«tttive Bank 



Visit Granite's New 

Drive Through Facility 

100 Granite Street 

Quincy Center 

Open 

8:30 AM to 6:00 PM 

Monday through Friday 

9:00 AM to 2:00 PM 

Saturday 



The new, STRONGER 

— GiSnite^ — 




^ 



co-qper^ive^ 







Henry G. Berry. Jr. 

Trtaiurtf. Barry Inturanca 



William f. Shea 

PrMMant. 
Shaa Fonntca Canttr 



Samuel M. TuWe 

Ownar. Tuttta Haal Eatata 



Robert J. Colman 

Praaktant. 
Cotman'a Sporting Qooda 



Kenneth P. Fallon, Jr. 

Exac. Mr. Quincy Ccntar 
But. and Prof. A*«n. 




Allan F. MacDonald 

format BuNding 
Inapactor. Quincy 







Thomas Grossman 

Raal Eitata Invattor 



Martin E. Margolis 

CPA. Manin Bravar • Co 



Stephen T. Keete, Jr. 

Attomay At Law 



Richard J. Koch 

Exacuttva Dtractor 

Parfc. Fofwstry & Camalary 

Dapt., City of Outncy 



Richard B. Cohen 

Raal Ealala Invaator 



E&Mard F. P^rcy 

PrMldani MWar Studio 



As Directors of the bank we will continue to maintain 
our high standards of excellence in serving each 
depositor, shareholder and stockholder. 

MtiiilMr I l)K Sir 



Gianite_^ 




Niss/'e Grossman 

Advisory DIractar 



440 HANCOCK ST. 
NO. QUINCY 

100 GRANITE ST. 
' QUINCY CNTR. 



773-8100 



Pagp 22A The Quincv Sun Thursdav, Julv 2. 1987 

John Winthrop, Jr. Blast Furnace 

First Productive 
Iron Works In U.S. 



It failed after nine years of effort 
and. since failure was anathema in a 
growing America, perhaps that is 
why the site and even the memory 
of the first commercial iron blast 
furnace in the United States was 
lost for so long 

It flourished, if that is the word, 
from 1644 to 1653 on the banks of 
the Mount Wollaston River (now 
Furnace Brook) in a section of Old 
Braintree called "the Woods "" 

Iron was an important commodity 
in Colonial Massachusetts, 

particularly for nails and pots and 
pans Iron utensils had to be 
imported from England, a costly 
process for the penny-wise colon- 
ists 

With this in mind, John Winthrop 
<lr son of the governor of the 
Massachusetts Bay Colony, went to 
London and formed the "Company 
of Undertakers for the Ironworks in 
New England " 

The first iron was turned out in 
1644 but young Winthrop was fired 
from his 100 pounds a year job the 
next year, to be succeeded by 
Richard Leader The Ironworks it- 
self didn't last much longer 

The ore from which the iron was 
blasted on the banks of Furnace 



Brook was not a high quality 
product. It was bog -iron from the 
nearby swamps Making it proved 
to be more expensive than the 
imported kind. 

The Company of Undertakers 
appealed for fresh money in 1646 
and apparently there were enough 
investors ready to send good money 
after bad because the furnace was 
still in operation in 1650 when the 
Scotch Prisoners arrived 

The Scots were rugged 
Highlanders, soldiers in the army of 
the future King Charles II who were 
captured by Oliver Cromwell at the 
Battle of Dunbar Cromwell shipped 
272 of them to New England as 
cheap labor in an effort to make the 
Quincy ironworks a paying 
proposition It didn't work 

The Company of Undertakers 
went bankrupt in 1653 and "the 
Woods " went back to the bear and 
the deer. 

Meanwhile, with the same 
Richard Leader as agent, construe 
tion began on a second iron works 
north of Boston in Saugus in 1646 
When it was completed in 1650, it 
was recognized as the first inte- 
G'^ated iron industry in America. 



100 YEARS OF SERVICE 



Founded in 1887 when Quincy was still a town, 
Richard D. Chase Insurance Agency, Inc has 
grown through the years by meeting the changing 
insurance needs of the community it serves. 



Its founder, Richard D. Chase, was respected for his 
integrity and concern for his fellow citizens. Chase 
Insurance is proud of its heritage and looks to the 
future, maintaining these principles in providing 
dependable insurance services. 



Richard D. Chase Insurance Agency, Inc. is a 

full-service agency ready 
to meet your insurance 
needs today and 
tomorrow. 



y *^^'' 




We would like to make 
your acquaintance. 



CHESTNUT & FOSTER STREETS • QUINCY 
(617) 472-2100 



THE FIRST INSURANCE AGENCY IN QUINCY 



% ,1 



I 



t^i flEMAIWS o7 



JOHN WINTHROP JR 

BLASI F.URNACE 

AHER'CAS FIRS! 
PROOUCnVf IRONWORKS 

^Rected'in 1644 





JOHN WINTHROP. JR BLAST FURNACE 



Major Historical Sites 



TluTt' art' 12 tn<i)()r historical 
Mtfs in Quincy. as many if not 
morf than any other city of 
similar si/e in tht' Unitt'd States 

They ranye from the birth 
places of two Presidents to the 
nation's first commercial railroad 
to the place from which Massa 
chusetts got its name 

All of them are open to sum 
mer visitors at a various times, 
most of them without admission 
charge 

The sites and their locations 
are; 

•Adams Mansion National 
Historic Site. 135 Adams St , 
Quincy Center 

•Dorothy Quincy Homestead. 
^i4 Butler Rd . Quincy Center 

•Adams Acadernv H Adams 



St . Quincy Center 

•First Parish Church. i:«)6 
H<HU(Kk St . Quincy Center 

•Hancock Cemetery. 1319 49 
Hancock St . Quincy Center 

•John Adams Birthplace. 133 
1-ranklinSt . South Quincy 

•John Quincy Adams Birth 
place. 141 Franklin St . South 
Quincy 

•Abigail Adams Cairn, off 342 
44 Franklin St . South Quincy 

•Granite Railway, end of Mul 
Im Ave . West Quincy 

•John Winthrop Ironworks. 
61 63 Crescent St . West Quincy 

•Col Josiah Quincy House, 20 
Muirhead St . Wollaston 

•Moswetuset Hummock. 445 
Fast Squantum St . North 
Quincv 



Ciiniplinwnts of 

SWEENEY BROTHERS 




RICHARD T. SWEENEY 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 

JEFFREY F. SWEENEY 



1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE 
QUINCY, MASSACHUSETTS 02169 

472-6344 



Thursday, July 2, 1987 The Quincy Sun Page 23A 



Adams Academ\^ 

On Site Of 

John Hancock's 

Birthplace 



By modern standards. the 
boarding housf at the corner of 
Hancock and Depot Sts had all the 
aspects of a qenteel prison 

Residents were forbidden to leave 
between 7pm and 7 am They 
could not enter or leave at any time 
except by the hall door They were 
banned from pool halls and bars 
Smoking materials also were 
forbidden to them 

in exchange for good behavior, 
plus tuition ranging from $75 to 
$1S0 a year, they were given the 
best prep school education of the 
day for they were students at 
Adams Academy, which flourished 
from 1H72 to 1907 in Quincy 

The academy was a gift of John 
Adams, the second President of the 
United States, who always had his 
checkbook ready to fill the spiritual 
and educational needs of the 
citizens of his beloved Quincy 

The trust fund, nourished by 
"rents, profits and emoluments'" 
from certain Adams owned 

properties, was set up in the Adams 
will of 1822. but it was not until 1869 
that the fund was deemed large 
eiiouqh to ^\(^T\ construction 



The location was specified by 
Adams himself as the corner of 
Adams and Hancock Sts., site of the 
birthplace of his childhood friend, 
John Hancock, the first signer of the 
Delcaration of Independence, 

The doors opened to the first 
students. 24 of them, on Sept 4. 
1872 Five years later, the academy 
reached a peak enrollment of 154 
with an international student body 
• 25 from Quincy. four from 
Washington. DC, 125 and 14 
states, two from England and one 
from Chile 

It had one of the earliest prep 
schcK)l football teams, too. record- 
ing a tie with the Resolutes of 
Boston on Oct. 21, 1876, a scant 
seven years after Princeton and 
Rutgers played the first college 
game It whipped Andover three 
times from 1877-79 

The admissions catalogue 
specified that applicants be "well 
prepared in the usual studies of 
good grammar schools'" and 
warned that "no pupils are desired 
to give them a collegiate educa- 
tion" 

The best known headmaster was 
Dr William Everett, once ac- 
claimed as one of the seven smart- 




Quincy City Hospital has begun an impressive $57 million 
renovation. Almost two-thirds of the buildings and other 
facilities will be replaced— all part of a dramatic plan to 
better serve the growing and changing health care needs 
of the South Shore, 

The focal point of the new hospital complex will be a brand 
new six story building that will contain 234 patient beds as 
well as all of the necessary patient care support services. 

Since its founding in 1890, Quincy City Hospital has been 
in the forefront of health care on the South Shore. With our 
new facilities we'll continue to deliver the highest quality 
health care services with warm, personal attention. 

At QCH— we're building for the future on a proud past. 




ADAMS ACADEMY, now home of the Quincy Historical Society. 



est men in the world He ran the 
academy with a firm hand from 1878 
to 1893 and again from 1897 to 1907, 
From 1893 to 1897, he was a US, 
congressman from Lynn. 

Dr, Leverett, an aimiable if some- 
times waspish eccentric, was widely 
known as the man who hated 
Abraham Lincoln He had reason. 
His father was Edward Everett, 
whose masterful oration at Gettys- 
burg was over-shadowed by Lin- 
coln's notes scribbled on the back of 
an envelope. 

It was Dr. Everett who signaled 
the passing of Adams Academy --- 
and many other 19th Century 
classical prep schools --- at gradu- 
ation exercises in 1907 when he said 
that "unless someone comes for- 



ward and planks down $50,000, 
the academy will be closed." 

Nobody did and on June 22, 1907, 
the Adams Academy officially 
closed it doors. 

The building today is occupied 
by the Quincy Historical Society, 
which maintains a museum and 
research library in the old 
classrooms. The museum is open 
all year, Monday through Friday 
from 9:30 a.m, to 3:30 p.m., and 
Saturday from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 
p.m., or by appointment. The 
library is open Monday & 
Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 
p.m., and Saturday from 12:30 
p.m. to 3:30 p.m., or by 
appointment. There is no 
admission charge. It is closed 
Sundays and holidays. 



, What's up 1^ , 

« and coming in /^kf 
health care? 



The New QCH! 





The New 



Quincy City Hospital 

1 11 VVhitwell Street, Quincy, IVIA 02169 (617) 773-6100 



Managed by 

HCA 



Th«H«a»thcar« 
OofnpMvy 



Page 24A Th« Quincy Sun Thursdav. July 2, 1987 




CONSTITUTION COMMON links old City Hall built of famed Quincy 
granite in 1844 and the new glass wing dedicated in 1979. At left is the 
"Church of The Presidents" where Presidents John Adams and John Quincy 



Adams and their wives are entombed. Old City Hall was designed by Solomon 
Willard who was also the architect for the Bunker Hill Monument in 
Charlestown. 




Chureh of 

Saint John the 

Baptist 



4 School St. 
Quincy. Mass. 

PASTOR; 

Rev. William R. McCarthy 

ASSOCIATES: 

Rev. Edward G. Carroll 

Rev. Daniel M. Graham 

Rev. James C. Tuxbury 

Rev. Theodore L. Fortier 

(Qumcy City Hospital Chaplain) 

Rev. Mr. Charles Sullivan, Deacon 



Mass Schedule 

Saturday: 4:00 & 7:00 P.M. 

Sunday: 7:00 A.M. 
8:15 A.M. 
9:30 A.M. 
11:00 A.M. 
12:30 P.M. 
5:30 P.M. 

Weekdays: 8:00 A.M. and 5:30 P.M. 

Confessions in Chapel 

Sat. 3 - 3:45 P.M. & 7:45 - 8:15 P.M. 

(Rectory - 21 Gay St., 773-1021) 



To Be Part Of 
Quincy's Proud History 

Is A Proud Honor 




Quincy Lodge No. 1295 
Order Sons Of Italy In America 




120 (Quarry St., (Quincy 



Thursday, July 2, 1987 The Quincy Sun Page 25A 





mttmt^ JFuncral S^cnitcc 



Established 19 1 7 



Seventy Years Dedicated Service 
In Historic Quincy And The South Shore 




'.■'.•'.•'.•'y/rr.'.y^'*f- 




74 ELM ST. 
QUINCY 

773-2728 



326 COPELAND 
W. QUINCY 

773-2728 



Three Generations of the Sweeney Family 



Dennis S. Sweeney, Director 



Page 26A The Quincy Sun Thureday, July 2, 1987 




(File Heui 



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Where else but in America ean 
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On y uin« y\ HiKtorir Trail Jusi A Mitiiii('% 

Walk from the birthplaccK of l*r<*hicl<'nl\ 

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Hancock Cemetery 

Patriots, Early 

Settlers, Intrigue 

Buried Here 



Henry, the first Adams in Quincy. 
is buried there. So is the Rev. John 
Hancock, father of the first signer of 
the Declaration of Independence. 
And Col. John Quincy, for whom the 
city is named. 

But of all the 800 graves in the 
Hancock Cemetery, the Old Burying 
Ground of Colonial Quincy, most 
intriguing is one marked by a 
tombstone bearing this cryptic 
epitaph: 

"Erected to the memory of John 
R Grieve: Died Nov 12, 1850, age 22 
years, and Hannah Banks, his wife, 
died Nov 12. 1850, age 15 years. 
Both of Zanesville, Ohio. Deluded by 
the writings of A.J Davis." 

The mystery of John and Hannah 
has never been fully solved 

They came to Quincy in 1850, not 
as man and wile, but as male cousins, 
John Green and George Sands. 
They obtained work in a shoe factory 
but rarely left their lodgings on Elm 
St , spending long hours reading 
books on spintualism 

Coworkers thought that George 
Sands looked frail, almost 
effeminate It was widely suspected 
that "he" was a girl A scheme was 
devised to test the theory 

One day at lunch one of the shoe 
w(jrkers tossed George an apple A 
man would catch it |->y closing his 
legs; a woman by spreading her skirt. 
Guess what "George" did! 

Humiliated, John and Hannah 
never went back to the factory. Nor 
did they ever return to the house on 
Elm St. Their froxen bodies were 
found next spring by rabbit hunters 
on Penn's Hill, locked in a loving 
embrace. 

Several months later, the father of 
John Grieve arrived from Ohio to 
bury the young couple. It was he who 
directed the words to be chiselled on 
the headstone. He explained no 
further. 

A.J. D^vis was never identified for 
sure. But Andrew Jackson Davis, a 
spiritualist, hypnotist and faith 
healer, was then practicing in 
Boston. 

Among the belongings found in 
the Elm St lodging house were t hese 
words, written by 15 year old 
Hannah Banks: 

"To the oppressed and down 
trodden, to the suffering and 
afflicted, I would cry out ..Death is 
only an event, only a circumstance in 
the eternal life experience of the 
human soul. Death is simply a birth 
into a new and perfect state of 
existence." 

Not far from the grave of John and 
Hannah is a tomb bearing words that 
cry out of an earlier injustice: 

"Three precious friends under this 
tombstone lie 

"Patterns to aged, youth and 
infancy. 




HANCOCK CEMETERY 



"A great mother, her learned son, 
with child. 

"The first and least went free He 
was exiled 

"In love to Christ, this country, 
and dear friends 

"He left his own, cross'd seas and 
for amends 

"Was here extoll'd. and envy'd all 
in a breath. 

"His noble consort leaves, is 
drawn to death, 

"Stranger changes may befall us 
ere we die. 

"Blest they who will arrive 
eternity. 

"God grant some names. O thou 
New England's friend 

"Don't sooner fade than thine, if 
times don't mend." 

The tomb with its hidden message 
contains the family of the Rev. 
Leonard Hoar, third president of 
Harvard College, a man too liberal 
for his times. 

He was forced by the General 
Court of the Massachusetts Bay 
Colony to resign at the instigation of 
religious opponents and jealous 
colleagues for permitting Harvard to 
"languish and decay " Eight months 
later in November 1675, he was dead 
at 45. 

In 1975, the same General Court, 
now of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, righted the 300 year 
old wrong done to the Rev. Mr Hoar 
by "proclaiming and confirming his 
innocence of any misdeeds while 
president of Harvard College." 



The cemeterv, on Hancock St., 
Quincy Sq., next to City Hall, is 
open to the public. There is no 
admission charge. 



Thursday. July 2. I9%7 The Quincy Sun Page 27A 



Moswetuset Hummock 

'Birthplace Of 
Massachusetts' 



■ .--.■• I ^tl^liJ« 



tK,, 



■.IMi'A tlt'.lvl 



tK'L.inif llli' •■•.'■ . ■' '■ . ' ; ;• : 
thrii \\i,' -'.r. 

/ • ■ • ■ ■• ; ;■•"-. .,1iltlJ!Il M <!!Ki 

. :' ' " • ii ln'iii Chickiitdbut . 

(it Uu;i!' ' ■ -•' '; . .:- .! r.iltit'i' 
[I, it!.. 'I:! t. KiTt' 

} \r \<,)^ ttu' ctiU't ot tht' Md^Ai't 
.-!■• l".(ii<in'-. <i n;ui' ijrt'd! Tribt' tluit 

M, , :;.,,■. i til,' 1(1, ivt Mcirth "t }\\. 

■\ '. • . ;■ ■ ■ ' • • :';(i».'!' t[u' 
.;!.■ i: -.,1 ;i.;;, N;; . ■ : -^ '.■ :n.': . t(u' 
Mo~-.'.i'tii'-.'' hd'i b. . ;■ . t(i fuvi 
SI -:;.,■ '-'i I H >( i v, ,11 ! .1 )> - ti >r i! A,)i v. :!;, 




I ■ 



■ •.. ^ -.,' Nm 






. ;;, Ui 



rh,' 



U.Il 



V. 



.'\ni(>r'ni 



MOSWETUSET HUMMOCK 

partv of Plymouth Pilgrims that 
iiiducit'd the hid;an guide Squanto 
(or I'-uuainum). whose name was 
given to the peninsula that stuck out 
in the bav 

The tragic Ch;ckatabot died iiot 
long after the P;!gr:m>' visit and he 
'Ad'- ^ucci'eded as sachem bv hi'- 
-' '. l"-;dfi VVanipat'Jck. a boy who 
k'.e'A d good deal uhen he saw one 

V^'dmpatuck sold what was left of 
h> ^ iriudilv deserted tribal lands to 
<) ':n-iiup of 'Ahite> for 12 pound>. 10 
shilling,-- The lands included most 
of wliat > todav the city of Quincy 
and the toup.s of Braintree. 
Randolph and Holbrook 

Moswetuset Hummock, 
identified bv a marker stone and 
maintained in its natural state, is 
open to the public. There is no 
admission charge. 



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RESTAURANT 



E^t. 1937 



Open L ntil Aug. 1 

Special 30th Anniversary W eek 
July 28 to Aug. 1 

• CI? 

Reopening Oct. 1 
as 

The \\ infield Gift Emporium 

Souvenirs and Gifts From 
Quincy and around the IT orld 

/.■•;/\%; I Horrti (in fi\ Irmn hmtir 

Presidents' 

C. 
itx 

MOTEL 

M: Kst. 1957 



C"on\cniciiti> iocaiod to lUst 

about c\cr>t.hinL;, W ithin 

ualkiriLi distance to Quincv 

lii^ttif!^- Mtcs, C'omtort and 

coincniciu'c in each 

tavtc!ull\ dccvMatcd unit. 

indi\ iduai room air- 

CiMiditioncd. Pn\ate 

tcicpiion.'N and tcicMMon. 

AnicriCviPi I \prcss. \1a^ter 

ChaiLic A; \ 1> \ vicdit cardN 

honored 



)CT RtMie 3A 
am* Haanick St 

QUINCY 

Owned and operated 
by Mrs. Winfield Sirout 



47Q-6500 
for reser>ations 



The Egg & I Restaurant 

83.*i-B Hancock Street 
Qui lie V 

Brcnkfnst, Luncheons 



Paqp 28A Thp Quiniv Sun Thursdav. luK 2. I'^HT 







^x^x^x%:ox^:ix^xvw^?(^ 



Having A Fine 







ARM IN ARM, from If ft. I.rah Robfrtson, 10. with her 
face painted, and Susan I)e<ikins, 1 0, participate in a three- 
legged race, part of July 4 activities at the Fore River Field 
sponsored by the Ward 2 Civil Association. 





BALLOON RACES had youngsters scurrying during July 
4th Tield day events held at General Palmer Park by the 
Harborview Residents Committee. Kelly Spaur, front, 
won the race. 

li^uincy Sun photos by Charlei FtafK) 



HIGH JIMPER Mary Kobon, 9, was second place 
winner in a sack race held July 4 at Baker Beach by the 
Baker Beach Association. 




Siciliano Upset 

City Stonewalled On Auxiliary Police 




By NAN( V McLAl GHLIN 

The status of the 
auxiliary police, a 
volunteer group which 
hasn't been allowed to 
perform its duties since 
late last year because of 
possible legal liability to 
the officer or city, can't 
be addressed on a city 
level, said City Councillor 
Michael Cheney after a 
City Hall meeting 
Tuesday. 

"There is no action that the 
City Council or mayor can 
take to change the current 
status ol the auxiliary police." 
said Cheney, chairman of the 
council's public safety 
committee. 

But that news didn't sit uell 
with Tonv Siciliano. chief of 



the auxiliary police, who was 
among those who attended 
the meeting. 

"It's very, very upsetting." 
said Siciliano. "It seems like 
other communities have been 
able to solve the problem, but 
Quincy has not. 

"The people in the city are 
the ones who are going to be 
hurt." he said. 

The meeting, which lasted 
an hour and 40 minutes, was 
also attended by Police Chief 
Francis Finn. Police Capt. 
Paul Nestor. Joseph Pearson. 
Auxiliary Police; Atty. Paul 
Barbadoro. from the city 
solicitor's office; Stanley 
Aldelman, Executive Office 
of Public Safety. General 
Counsel; Thomas Rodger. 
Civil Defense .Agency. Office 
of Emergency Preparedness. 

"All of the representatives 
at the meeting praised the 



auxiliary police tor their past 
help." said Cheney. 

Auxiliary police officers- 
had previously performed 
duties ranging from crowd 
control to patrolling city 
buildings. 

"It has become very clear to 
me that the issue of utilizing 
auxiliary police beyond what 
the statute calls for would 
have to be addressed at a 
federal and state level." 
continued Cheney. 

"They do not have the 
powers of the regular police 
department unless there is an 
emergency declared. 

"It has to be clarified 
whether the governor or the 
mayor declares a disaster or 
emergency." Cheney said 
"Then it's up to the chief of 
police to call up the 
auxiliary." 

M oniW i»»i fan*' »> 



Lydon, Nicastro 

Back McCauley 

On LaRaia Issue 



Two former city officials 
came to the defense of Mayor 
Francis McCauIcy after his 
challenger. City Councillor 
Joseph LaRaia, charged last 

Quincy Bay 
High Tides 



AIMIN(; to keep Quincy Junior College independent is college president Dr. O. Clayton 
Johnson. .Story Page 3. 

((Juinty Sun photo hy (.harli-it h'ta/ifil 



July 9 

July 10 

July II 

July 12 

July 13 

July 14 

July 15 



A.M. 

10:10 
11:07 

12:11 
1:07 
2:03 
2:59 



P.M. 

10:21 
11:16 
12:02 
12:57 
1:50 
2:45 
3:38 



week that the city has lost 
qualified individuals because 
of political interference. 

Former City Solicitor Dean 
Nicastro and former Planning 
Director James Lydon both 
called The Quincy Sun ''to set 
the record straight." 

LaRaia made the charges 
after Building Inspector 
Kenneth Johnson submitted 
his resignation to take a more 
lucrative job in the private 
sector. 

Nicastro, who was 
mentioned by name by 
LaRaia, told The Quincy Sun, 
"I want to clarify for the 
record why 1 stepped down 



from my position as city 
solicitor. 

"It was to accept an 
attractive career opportunity 
which presented itself to me. 

"I did not leave because of 
any particular problems or 
disagreements with Mayor 
McCauley." 

Nicastro served for two and 
a half years as city solicitor, 
and one year as assistant city 
solicitor. He left in August, 
1985. to become associate 
counsel with the Mass. 
Medical Society. 

"I appreciate Councillor 

(('oni'd on I'aKv 2i 



Page 2 Qttincy Sun Thunday, July f. I«t7 





FOl'RTH OF Jl LY "octopi" is led down the street b> members of the OiMattia family in 
Merrymount's July 4 parade. 

(Quinry Sun pholn hy (harlen hlafm) 

Joseph Lvdon Receives AFL-CIO Award 

Joseph M l\don o\ work in the labor men cmcnt. 

Quinc\. e\ccuii\c \ ice started out as a member ol Center. lydon ser\ed 

Iron Workers I ocal in New f'>niierl> as president ol 
>ork and mi bscqueni h 

joined Local 7 m Boston He Al SC Ml I ocal 370 at I ong 

Viassachusells AFL CIC) i"^ ^ former member ot the Island Hospital. Boston, and 
Certificate ot Merit Award at "A 

the Sea Crest Hotel in C'urrentlx superintendent president of AIS( Ml 

Falmouth. of the state's Hurie\ Building Council 45. representing; Cit\ 

lydon. honored tor his >n Boston's dovernmcnt ot Boston cnipimceN 



president Massachusetts 
AFI CIO .State labor 
Council, recenth received the 



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ATI.ANTI(NKI(;MB()RH()()I)ASS()(IATI0N'S fourth ofJul> events included ■ sack ma 
It Welcome Voung Field. 

(Qutnts Nun fihoiit l>\ Imu (,,,rm,iii 

MacDonald, Mazrimas 

Named To Zoning 

Appeals Board 



A retired Quinc\ building 
inspector and a past president 
of a local environmental 
group have been appointed b\ 
Ma\or I rancis VlL<aule> to 
the Zoning Board ot Appeals 
which was recentN expanded 
from three to fi\e members 

Allan F MacDonald ol 92 
Video Rd . who retired last 
year as building inspector, 
was appointed to a term 
expiring Februar>. \^X9 

Mrs Maureen Vla/rinias. 
49 Bayberr\ Rd . .Squantum. 
past president of Save Our 
Shore, was appointed to .1 
term expiring Februarv. 1991 

She is believed to be the 
first W(tmaii ever tn ^erve on 
the Zoning Hoard ot Appeals, 
according to Md auiev 

I he appointments lollowed 
the C itv C DuMcil's passage o! 
McC'au lev's order to increase 
the board trom three to live 
members 

" I he Zoning Board ot 





Appeals IS one ol the most 
important boards m the cits," 
said Mc( aulev "I initiated 
the expansion ot the board to 
increase citi/en input on the 
board 

"Fnder state laws, ii takes 
lour attirmalive votes ot the 
live members to approve a 
variance ■■ 

Mc<'aulev also reappointed 
three members, \nthonv 
Sandonato, 1 1 Hitchcock 
lerrace, to a term expiring in 
Februarv. 19hS. Peter 
MacDonald. 102 Presidents 
I n . the present chairman, to 
a term expiring in I ebruar>. 
199(1. .ind Michael I ahertv. 



2K Furnace Brt)ok Pku, • 
term expiring in I chr;.,r 
1992 

Reappointed assiu :,.• 
members were Idrn.' 
O'l ear>. I6.S Whitwell S' ■ 
a term expiring in I ebni.r 
199((. and Daniel Sacciu^. 
Ocean St . North (Juiruv • 
term expiring in feh:i;,i' 
I9HK 

Mc( aulev also appoit,' 
Martin dordon, M'' Rn, 
Island Rd . to a lerni .is ,1 
associate member His \vr. 
will expire in I ebruarv. h'*' 

I he zoning boanjs n. < 
meeting will be hiesdav. In 
14. at 7 4*^ p m in the( oin . 
Chambers at ( ilv Hall 



Were Glad You Asked! 




^^M_YOyR MONEYJ^IATTERS IN ORDER' 

Financial planning is part of your fulurt- security program but if 
you were to die tomorrow, would your family know what to do' 
You may already have taken care of most ol the important 
elements, but here is a general checklist for your reference 

J '/ti^r^DA^75,FJ^ beneficiary up to date' Are premiums paid^ 

2 ARE BANKBOOK, S<K:ial Security. V A and other important 
documents all together' Does your family know where they 
are'' 

3 IS YOUR WILL current and available' 

4 DO YOU HAVE A LIST of names, address, phone numbers ol 
your brokers, insurance agencies, accountants and lawyers' 

There are many details you may require Call us for a printed 
form on pre planning or drop by for a free copy 



Your questions and comments on this and other subjects are 
welcome m private or publicly through this column 

WICKENS & TROUPE FUNERAL HOME 

26 Adams Street. Quincy 472 ,S888 



Lvdon. Nicastro Back 
!Vlc*(]aiil<*v On I^iKaia Issue 

'' oill'il lr,,ni I'lm, I, 

aRaia's compi imeiii a r v remarks about mc 

Nicastro "But I do w.m: : 
make it clear tor the ■■ 
the reason I led ii;. . 
solicitor's oltice 

"Mavor NKi'aulcv .I'i^ I 
remain good Iriends. anif 1 .1" 
supporting his reek\!. ■ 
mayor ol Quincv 

lvdon. who kit i.ii- .: ' 
year lojom the Ricci.irJt 
said. "I think it is unlair o: .1 
ciindidate to mention piup!^ 
without first spcakiiiL' 
them, and it infuriates v.v-: 
when he attributes reasons loi 
their departure which .hc 
untrue 

"Frank Mci'aiilev. qiiilf i" 
the contrarv ol causing \w '" 
leave. IS probablv the reason I 
stayed so long." said I vdon. 
who was Planning Director 
from April. 19^9. 10 
December. I9K6 

"Not only is he a g""'! 
administrator, but he is aK" 
one of the finest individuals I 
have met in my hie " 



Hospital Needs 

Junior 

Volunteers 

Junior volunteers an 
needed for the summer ai 
Quincy City Hospital 

Volunteers must be 1 4 year •« 

old. Hours and days arc 
flexible. 
For more information, call 

773-6100. cxt. 3149 

Save Gas 
and Money ■•• 
Shop Locally- 



Thiin^y. J«ly f. Iff? Qmtmty Sm Puft J 



I 

i 



Rally Theme: 



QJC Would Be 

""Submerged' In 

Massasoit Merger 



"Mcrjiing with Massasoit 
( ommunity College uould 
mean being "submerged" said 
Paul Hunt, chairman o( the 
("()mr7iunit\ ( ollege Associates 
at a communitN breaklast 
rally m support ol keeping 
Quinc\ junior College 
independent 

I he ralK last week was 
attended b> about 100 
business and piolessional 
leaders, political ligures and 
students who gathered in the 
college parking lot 

F hose attending opposed 
the proposal to merge QJC 
under Massasoit Community 
College with no Quincy area 
representation on the 
go\erning board 

I hey also called for the 
state to provide financial help 
to students attending QJC 

"I here are particular kinds 
of people who come here to 
QJC." continued Hunt. 

"Ihey'rc not looking lor 
large campuses; they're not 
looking tor a big. full campus. 

"...I hey 're looking for a 
place where they can come 
and learn and go back to their 
duties and their work and so 
lorth 

" Ihis college fulHlls a very. 



very basic need. 

"We won't have it taken 
over by another college, and 
the blood sucked out ol it 
therealter," Hunt said. 

Patriot I edger editor 
William K e 1 1 e r . who 
introduced the speakers, 
spoke ot the importance of 
preserving an "important 
educational institution." 

Dressed as a colonial 
patriot. Jack Cahill, president 
ol Jack C Onwav Co.. said that 
Quincy's John Adams and 
.lohn Quincy Adams "would 
not sit by and see an 
institution such as Quincy 
Junior College lose its 
independence without a 
battle." 

Mayor Francis McCauIcy 
noted that the School 
Committee, ol which he is 
chairman, voted to reject the 
merger. 

"We don't want a merger, 
we want to continue our 
identity." said McCauley. 

Councillor Joseph LaRaia. 
a candidate for mayor, said, 
"It's important that we rally 
behind the school, it's 
important that we rally 
behind the city of Quincy. and 




REP. MICHAEL MORRISSEY signed ■ declaration of 
continuation to keep Quincy Junior Collegt indep.ndent. It 
was signed by over 100 people. 

iQiiiiuy Sun fihniox h\ (harlm Flaunt 



O?^ 



\^ 



FAIELLA 

INSURANCE AGENCY 

L«t Ut H*tp You Savel 
148 Wathlnglon St.. Oulncy 

Call Today 471-1111 



AUTO • HOME # BUSINESS 

• Complete Policy Analysis 

• Private Home Appointments 

• 24 Hour Answering Service 

• All Registry Transactions 

• Full Claim Assistance 

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wM tend to all of your Inauranc* n««da and guarantaa our 

moat prompt and courtaoua aarvlca. 



that we get behind our 
legislators." 

Councillor Patricia Toland 
said that QIC ser\es "people 
who are not ready to venture 
into a different atmosphere." 

"Independence is the issue." 
said Peter hleey of the 
Governor's Counsel. 

State Sen. Paul Harold 
said. "QJC will not be part ol 
a marriage in which we will 
not plan an equal role." 

Councillor James Sheets, 
also a professor of government 
at QJC. said that the college 
serves many young people 
who were not motivated to do 
well in high school. 

"We help them fulfill their 
dream in life." said Sheets. 

"We don't ha\e numbers 
coming here, we ha\e people 
coming here. 

"If we lose that mission, it's 
going to be the young people 
who suffer." 




I'Al I. Ml NT. chairman of the C ommunity ( ollege Associates, was among the speakers at a 
community breakfast rally to show support for keeping Quincy Junior C ollege independent. 

(i^uincy >un ftholo by (Marten Hafifd 

New ESL Course Series Begins 



The Asian American 
Committee of Quincy 
announces the beginning of a 
new series of ESL (English as 
a Second Language) classes 
for the summer. 

The classes will be offered 
to newcomers to the area 
without cost. Subsidy for the 
class offerings is made 
possible through the Gateway 



Cities grant to the city of 
Quincy. 

The classes will be offered 
at two levels: Upper Level 
ESL and Beginning ESL. 

The Upper Level Class 
began July 6. and meets 
Monday, Wednesday. Friday 
from 10:30-12:30 in the class 
room at Wollaston Lutheran 
Church, 550 Hancock St.. 



Quincv. 

The Beginning ESL Class 
wil! start sessions - July 20, 
Mondays. Wednesdays. 
Fridays. 'from 8:30 to 10:30 
a.m. - just prior to the Upper 
Level Class. The classes will 
be taught under a program of 
instruction developed by the 
Urbanistics Human Services 
Foundation. Inc. 



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ATM Department. Attention: M Condon 
455 West Broadway 
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NAME. 



ADDRESS . 
CITY 



. STATE . 



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Main Offiu: South Boston. 268-2500 
NMMWt Circit OfNct: Dorcltester, 825-9090 
Qiiwy(Nnct:Ouincy. 479-9660 



TELEPHONE 



l_ 



_l 



P«r 4 Quinfy Sun Thursday, Jul) '. IW 



o3r 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Oumcy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St Quincy. Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth, Jr , Publisher and Editor 

25C per copy $11 00 per year by mail m Quincy 
$12 00 per year by mail outside Quincy $15 00 out o( slate 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston Mass 



Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun, 1372 Hancock St Ouincy. Mass 02169 



Trie Quincy Sun •siumet no Imancial responsibthly tor 
typograpr>ic«l error* in sdvertitemenw but wiM reprint that 
p«n of »n advertisement in mrhicri tf>e typographical error 
occurs 



'ausK.' 



Reagan Wreath 
To Be Placed On 
J.Q. Adams Tomb 



President Ronald Reagan 
is sending a wreath in 
recognition of John Quincy 
Adam's 220th birthday to be 
presented Saturday at 10 a.m. 
at United First Parish 
Church, "The Church of the 
Presidents," in Quincy 
Center. 

The pubhc is invited. 

The wreath will be 
delivered by Capt. Michael 
Holty. commanding officer. 
Naval Reserve Center, 
Quincy. with a color guard 
from Weymouth Naval Air 
Station. 

Mayor Franas X. McCauley 
will receive the wreath on 
behalf of the city. Richard 
Post, chairman of the Board 
of Governors, Walter 
Wriglcy, clerk, and Dorothy 
Wrigley, registrar, will receive 
the wreath on behalf of the 
church. 

An escort will then take the 
wreath to the crypt below the 
church and place it on the 
tomb of President Adams. 

The presenting of presiden- 
tial wreaths at the tombs of 
former presidents is an annual 
event started in 1966 under 
President I.vndon John'>nn 



Since that time ceremonies 
are arranged by the church 
and the city on the birthdays 
of the two presidents: Oct. 30 
for John Adams and July 1 1 
for John Quincy Adams. 

John Quincy Adams, the 
sixth president of the United 
States, was born in the then 
north precinct of Braintree, 
now Quincy, July II, 1767, 
the oldest son of John Adams, 
the second president. 

Like his father, John 
Quincy Adams devoted his 
life to public service. He 
served as senator, as minister 
to Russia, then England, and 
as secretary of state under 
President Monroe. After his 
term as president. 1825-29, he 
served for 16 years in the 
House of Representatives, 
where he died in 1848. 

His tomb is in a crypt 
within United First Parish 
Church, along with that of his 
father, his mother, Abigail, 
and his wife, Louisa 
Catherine. 

The city of Quincy is named 
after Col. John Quincy, John 
Quincy Adam's great 
grandfather. 




The joUowing is a list of new adult and children 's 
books and recordings now available at the Thomas 
Crane Public Library: 

Fiction: Being invisible; a novel by Thomas Berger. 
Little Brown and Co., 1987. Fine Red Rain: an 
Inspector Porfiry Rostnikov mystery, by Stuart M. 
Kaminsky. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1987. The Girls; a 
story of village life, by John Bowen. Atlantic Monthly 
Press, 1987. Gun Play: an Elton Dancey mystery, by 
R.B. Phillips. Countryman Press. 1987. Khrushchev 
Objective, by Christopher Creighton and Noel Hynd. 
Doubleday & Co., 1987. Simple Gifts, by Joanne 
Greenberg. Henry Holt and Co.. 1987. Snow On The 
Wind, by Hugh Miller. St. Martin's Press, 1987. 
Women Of A Certain Age. by Colleen Klein, Century 
Hutchinson Ltd., 1987. 

Non-Fiction: Making Of Fhe Atomic Bomb, by 
Richard Rhodes. Simon & Schuster, 1986. •62.^.451 
"34. Oil And Honor: the lexaco-Pcn/oil Wars, by 
Ihomas Pet/inger, Jr. G P. Putnam's Sons, 1987. 
•338.8 PF:T. A lalcnt To Annoy: Fssays, articles & 
reviews 1929-1968, by Nancy Mitford. and. Edited bv 
Charlotte Mosley. Bcaulort Books, 1987. ♦823.914 
Mil. Winning Back I he Sky: a tactical analysis of 
terrorism, by David (i Hubbard. M.D. Saybrook 
Pub.. 1987. *364.1552 H86. 

Children's Books: For Rent, by (harks Martin. 
Grcenwillow. 1986. JF Fiction. Luck Ol I he Mass L., 
by Lee Kingman. Houghton, 1986 J Fiction. Puffin, by 
Naomi Lewis. Lothrop, 1984. 'JF 598 3 1.58. 
Venturing: an introduction to sailing, by Peter 
Burchard. Little, Brown, 1986. 'J 797.124 BLR Where 
The Waves Break; Life at the edge of the sea, by A. 
Malnig. Carolrhoda, 1985. 'J 574.5 M29. 

♦Dewey Decimal (location) number. 

Compiled by Catherine R. Duffek and Jane 
Granstrom. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Lineup Card, Anyone? 




BROWNKl.L 





You may need a lineup card with numbers to keep 
track of the players in this year's pP^^ 
political arena. 

Looks like three elections: 
preliminary and final municipal 
elections in September and 
November and a special state 
election probably in December. 
(Maybe January). 

The latter would be to fill the state representative scat 
that Thomas Biownell will vacate to 
accept appointment as a judge at 
Plymouth District Court. 

Brownell has been nominated by 

Gov. Michael Dukakis for a black 

robe and he is expected to win 

Governor's Council confirmation 

without trouble. 

KELLY 

Former Ward I Councillor Leo Kelly is a definite 

contender for Brownell's seat and 

there are a number of potential 

candidates. 

The timing might present a bit of a 
dilemma for two of them: Councillor 
at-large Patricia Toland and Ward 1 
Councillor Michael Cheney. 

The dilemma is that they might 
have to make a big decision: can they TOLANI) 
run for two different offices virtually simultaneously' 
Or will they have to decide on one or the other' 

If the special election is put over until January, thc> 
may not have to wrestle with that decision. 

If both Toland and Cheney decide to make a bid for 
state representative and not seek re- 
election to the City Council it would 
bring to six the number of open scats 
in the City Council in this year's 
election. That's two thirds of the 
nine-member body 

All three at-large scats would be up 
for grabs. I wo already are: the one 
Joseph La Raia IS giving up to run for mayt)rand the one 
that Richard Koch, Jr. is leaving to live on the (ape 

The Ward 3 seat is open with 
incumbent John I ydon's decision 
not to seek re-election. 

And, the Ward 5 seat is being 
vacated by Stephen McGrath to run 
for council at-large. 

If Cheney gives up his Ward I seat, 
that would make the sixth vacancv 1)1 RKIN 



South Shore Bank To 
Host Buttonhole Session 




(HKNEY 




Forrest Cook, president of 
South Shore Bank, will host a 
Chamber of Commerce 
Buttonhole session Thursday. 
July 23 from 5 to 6:30 p.m. at 
the South Shore Bank. 1400 
Hancock St.. Quincy. 

A buttonhole is an informal 
gathering of chamber 
members and local and state 



officials. Mayor Lrancis X 
McCauley and other Quinc> 
politicians will attend this 
scssio n to meet and discuss 
issues of mutual concerns 



Reservations can be made 
by contacting Penny (iillcn at 
the South Shore Chamber of 
Commerce at 479-1 III. 



LAUGH TIMt 




/^o^^eA*,fS^ 



^.V*^/ trouble— when It come« to matching me 
up with dat«a the computer ia TOO perfect' The 
girls alwaya look like me.'' 





School Committee Vice Chairman Steve Duikm Ikis 
been mentioned as a possible candidate Itx BrovMiclls 
seat but last report has him still planning to run lor tr 
election and not interested in the House seal. 

Another possibilit\ for si.nc 
representative is Sheila Melius ic 
wile of the late Mayor-Scnatoi 
James Mclntyre who is active in 
community affairs and who carlui 
•his year was thinking of getting into 
the mayor's race herself 
SMKII.A 

Meanwhile, Deputy Civil Defense 
Director Tony Siciliano who has 
been mentioned as a potential City 
Councillor at-large candidate says he 
is now "leaning toward" running for 
Brownell's House seat 

At this writing some observers ■ KHlANo 

are tagging Kelly with the "man to beat" label 

The Second Norfolk District where Brownell's seat is. 
includes all of Ward Lallof Ward 5. Precincts l.2dnd.'^ 
ol Ward 3 and Precinct "^ of Ward 4 

Ward 1 tends to stick together for the local bo\ -- 
especially in the Houghs Neck area. 

If Kdh IS the onl\ Houghs Neck candidate he would 
cjme out of Ward I with a strong vote 

II ( hencN gets in. he would split some of that \oic In 
this case, toland would benefit with a good \Hard 5 
vote. 

,And if Chencv does get into the race ii would set the 
stage for an inteicsting sidelight the strength of the 
former councillor from Ward I vs the sircnj:ih ol tlie 
present Ward I councillor 

D 

COLN( II LOR James Sheets appears to fune some 
opposition in Ward 4 Philip Baldassmi. toriiKi eits 
employee, has taken out noiiiiiuitioii 
i " papers for that seat 

m^_ AND. if you're wondeiinj; il I laiik 

_^^~_^^ Anselmo is going to seek rc-ek\tioii 

^^R|^]^^ to the School Committee. 

^B^^^B apparently He has taken 

ANSH .MO nomination papers 



Readers Forum 

Recalls Boston Light 

Flight From 

Marina Bay Area 



Fditor, I he Quincy Sun: 

Reading the article on the 
Vietnam Veterans Memorial 
on Ihursday July 2. I noted 
that m addition to the 
veteran's names there will be 
also a ride incorporating the 
history of Marina Bay 

Being a Quincy resident lor 
K4 years, I still have a good 
memory ol a historical event 
held on the site of Marina 
Bay. I he Harvard Aeronauti- 
cal Society held a historical 



international air meet I'li 
Sept 3 to Sept 10. I'^K' 
Drew airmen and aircratis 
from Fngland and I ranee 

I he fiighl to Boston I ij:!" 
was a record It v^as a ^irc.ii 
sight to sec those aireralts t1\ 
It took a great eouragc tcr 
airmen to fly trail alrcMlI^ 
which were the pioneer i>t to- 
day's air travels. 

Alfred Hcneclctii 
73 Rodman St 

QUIIKV 





Quinc y 

Pound 
Adoptables '% 



Husky Shepherd-mix, female, black white. .' 
years 

Icrrier-mix, female, large adult. 
Lhasa Apso. male. 4 years. Adults only; non 
allergenic. ideaMor owner allergic to dog fur. 

C onlaci Ofricer PhyRb Bcrlucchi at 773-62')7. 

Omce houn: daily 1:30 ■.m.-4:30 p.m. 

Excluding Sundays 



I 



TlMrMtay. Jaly ♦. IW7 Qii<nc3f Sun Pag* 5 



(C.onl'il (nun I'niif ll 

Related cases are heing 
tried in the area of civil rights 
in the federal courts, 
according to Cheney. 

"ll is up to Congress to 
change the federal civil rights 
laws to address the liahility 
question, and up to the state 
to further define the duties of 
the auxiliary police in a state 
statute." he said. 

"I don't see that happening 
any time soon." 

Cheney noted that the 
auxiliary may perform 
ceremonial functions such as 
participating in flag-raising 
ceremonies 

"If I said that to my men. 



City Stonewalled On 
Auxiliary Police Issue 



they would laugh me out of 
the building." said Siciliano. 

"We don't intend to do 
ceremonial things." 

Siciliano said that auxiliary 
police officers recently 
completed a training program 
conducted by the Mass. 
Criminal Justice Training 
Counsel. 

"That was a waste of the 
taxpayer's money." said 
Siciliano. "We have a well- 
trained auxiliary police force 
doing nothing, waiting for an 
emergency or disaster to take 
place, at which time they may 
not be available." 

Siciliano said he has 27 out 
of 60 officers who have not 
left 



"They're upset now." he 
said. "They're saying, 'they 
had us go to school, we took 
the training, spent the 
taxpayer's money, for whatT 

"They don't want to give us 
any authority at all." 

Siciliano said that 10 
auxiliary police officers 
assisted at last year's Miss 
Quincy Bay Pageant, an 
annual event which will take 
place again next week. 

"We won't be able to do 
that this year." he said. "We're 
at a standstill." 

Siciliano said he is 
disappointed with what he 
feels has been lack of support. 

"The administration has 
not done anything. The City 



Council, other than Councillor 
Michael Cheney, has not done 
anything except appropriate 
money to train us 

"I would have thought we 
would have gotten more 
support from the people in 
Quincy. the veteran's 
organizations, the civic 
organizations. 

"We're very, very disap- 
pointed. All these years we've 
been giving service to the 
community and now we can't 
do it anymore. 

"We're only allowed to go 
out if there is an emergency or 
disaster.if wecan find people 
to go out... 

"We may not have anyone 
left." 



142 On Atlantic Honor Roll 



The Atlantic Middle 
School lists 142 students on 
the fourth quarter honor roll. 
Grade 6: 

Hifh Honors: (irace Chan. 
Jenny Y I. Chan, liana R 
Cobban. Joanne Curreri 
Sean W Donovan, Marianne 
t. Foley, l.oren M Gates. 
John J (jladu. Cau Ha. Hang 
B Hoang. Jeffrey Jones, 
Kathleen .A. McDonald. 
Kosta D. Ro/anitis. Mark 
Sinclair. Rebecca M Squires, 
( hriNtophcr M Sulli\an, 
John J Svagdis, Scan M 
Warren. 

Honors: ( hrisiophcr P 
Alibrandi. Brian Anderson. 
Jennifer Barbuto. Julie J 
Barbuto. Kc\in Barrett, 
Donclla R. Belangcr, COIlccn 
M Bulman, James P 
C ampbell. Sean Chen. Mei N 
(hen. (jina M Climo. Nadinc 
C Olello, James Mahcrtv. 
C hristopher .M (ierman. 
1 lam I) Higgins, Christine 
M Howard, Andrew W 
Konncy. .Ann I edwak. Wing 
H Lee. Nicholas A 
M a s t r o g i a c o m o , F 1 1 e e n 
McDonagh, Miyon Park, 
Michael Patch. Jefl A 
Pillard, Janet A Pollard. 
IhomasJ. Robertson, Dennis 
M Smith, Robert Smith. 
Richard J. Starsiak. Christina 
M Strauss, Jennifer L 
Ihompson, I urn B. Yung 



Grade 7: 

High Honors: John J. 
Aliberti. Robert B. Bassett. 
Stephanie A. Christopher, 
Julie A. Comeau, Christopher 
P. Connor. Heather A. 
Curley, William Degan. 
Christopher F Hill. Kathryn 
Kabilian. Pamela A. Koch. 
Raymond M. Lee. Winifred J. 
Lee. Peter Liang. Noreen E. 
McDonagh. J. Lindsey 
McCiovern. Joseph G. 
Murphy. Mai M. Ng. Lula 
Pepdjonovic. Michael A. 
Santosuosso. Dawn T. Tape. 
Cindy M. L. Tse, Florence 
Tse ' 

Honors: John D. Barber. 
Susan M. Callow. Mark J. 
Cocu/zo. Kathryn E. Cohane. 
Matthew J Collins. Tammy 
J. Coull, Patricia A. Curran, 
Andrea Donnelly. Angela 
Favaloro, I ee J. Giordano, 
Karla J. Hagerty, Sean D 
Hannon, Laura C. Hayden, 
Brian (i Klicr, Scott (i. 
Kohler. (ieorge Kou\lis. 
Nhut H ly, Michael M. 
Ma/rimas, Karen E. McCabe, 
Rebecca L. McCosh. Susan 
McGonagle, Cynthia 1. 
Mitton, Hang T. Nguyen, 
Christine G. O'Sullivan. 
Brian M. Perry, Marko 
Repovich. Kellie A. Sartre, 
Michelle lasney, Brian E. 
I oland. I rinh B. Lu. Mark A. 
Walsh, Cindy Wan. Wayne 
C. Weikel, Cvnthia A. White 



Grade 8: 

High Honors: Christopher 
D. Ballum. Keri M. Curreri. 
Si L. Kou. Kenneth M. Lee, 
.Maryann McDonagh. Tara 
A. Miles, Ayako Odashima, 
Pamela L. Wicks. 

Honors: Janice L. Blaney, 
BIythe G. Bumpus. Mong H. 
Chiu, Judi A. Cochrane, 
Brian P. Comeau, M ichelle N . 
Donovan, Patrick K. 
Faherty, Connie Fong, Maria 



B.S. Gavros, Karine Kabilian, 
Kwun^ Y. Koo. Richard 
H. Lavery, Raymond W. Liu. 
Julie Marinilli, Tristen N. 
Mastrogiacomo. Carol M. 
Moulton, Erin K. O'Neill, 
Mark F. O'Neill, SoyonPark, 
Meredith Rossi, George D. 
Rozanitis, David Sia, Dawn 
E. Sloane, Matthew A. 
Swierk, Suzanne L. Wilson, 
Amanda J. Young, Chi C. 
Yung, Jia H. J. Zhao. 



'Senior Spotlighr 
Features Tour Of Alps 



Host Maida Moakles and 
guest George Roberts will 
take you on an airplane tour 
of the Alps on the next 



episode ol "Senior Spotlight" 
Monday. July 13 at 7:.10 p.m. 

on Channel 3. 




James Sullivan A.F. 2nd Ll. 

Air Force Base. 



James E. Sumner, son of 
Ellen M. Sumner. 999 
Southern Artery, Quincy, and 
grandson of Muriel Fallon of 
42 Wood St., Milton, has 
been commissioned a second 
lieutenant in the U.S. Air 
Force upon graduation from 
^Officer Training School at 

Shop Locally 
Save Gat & Money 



Lackland 
Texas. 



"KOCKINC AROl ND THE CLOCK" in the Merrymount 
Ji'^^ 4 parade were Mr. and Mrs. John Swanton. 

(Quincy Sun pholo by Charles HafCf) 



NOW OPEN SAT. 
UNTIL «- NOON 




MORSE'S 

AUTO RADIATOR INC. 



ror«l«n/Dein*stle 
Car* A Trucks 

MW IMOUTOlia « MuraM 
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1 7» W 80UANTUM 8T. ^^^ 
N. QUINCY ffC 

NEAR NO T \^^ 



lEMEMBEl WHEI? 




. . . Kdna B. Austin wa« thr 
first and onl> noman 
councillor in thr ( il> 
C uuncil back in 1958-59. 



. . . You were not jusi a 
Policy Number and rrtaintd 
your own identity, when 
personal service was always 
fiven ... it still is at 



BURGIN PLAINER INS, 

1357 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 472-3000 



Quincy 's 
Yesterdays 

Topless Swimsuits 
(For Men) Banned 
At WoUaston Beach 

Health Commissioner Dr. Richard M. Ash warned 

that samples of water taken from Quincy beaches 

showed "a very serious ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
condition of pollution from 
sewage exists at all times off the July 8-14, 
shores and frequently on the IQ^Q 

shores themselves." iVoV 

"Due to the time required for 48 YcarS AffO 

analysis of the water it is ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
impossible to take samples and 



have the results early enough to warn bathers that day," 
he added, "consequently, I advise extreme caution in 
checking the situation before bathing." 

Relief from the pollution appeared to be on the way 
as the State House Committee on Metropolitan Affairs 
reported favorably on a bill that would earmark some 
$24 million to clean up Boston Harbor and Quincy Bay. 

But pollution wasn't the only problem faced by 
Quincy bathers. 

MDC officials refused to lift their ban on topless 
bathing suits (for men) on Wollaston Beach despite the 
fact that Chelsea District Court Judge Frank D. 
Crowley ruled that it was no crime (for men) to go 
topless at Revere Beach. 

RAILROAD IN DANGER 

A commission set up by Gov. Leverett Saltonstall 
reported that a New Haven Railroad proposal to 
abandon its South Shore lines on Sept. 24 would 
endanger the financial structure of the area. 

The commission also cited the proposal as a danger to 
National Defense since the lines serve the Fore River 
Shipyard, the Hingham Ammunition Depot, the 
National Guard Camp in Bourne and the Cape Cod 
Canal. 

Members of t!ie commission included Lt. Gov. 
Horace T. Cahill of Braintree and Quincy banker Irving 
L. Shaw. 

QIINCY-ISMS 

Barbara Benzaquin, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A.J. 
Benzaquin of Chickatabot Rd.. Merrymount, left for 
Ontego, N.Y., for the summer to study contemporary 
dance with Melvine Itar . . . Mrs. R. Edward Martell 
was re-elected president of the Wollaston Hospital Aid . 
. . Stop & Shop on Southern .Artery opposite the Police 
Station was selling bleach for 10 cents a gallon, steaks 
for 29 cents a pound and cucumbers at three for 10 cents 
. . . Harold P. Newell of 38 Ellington Rd., Wollaston, 
winding up his 1 0th year as city treasurer, noted that he 
had signed nearly $25 million worth of checks and 
bonds since he was appointed in 192^ by Mayor 
Thomas McGrath , . . Mrs. Charles J. Herbert 
entertained members of the Young Women's 
Republican Club of Quincy at a picnic at her home, 1 1 
Bayberry Rd., Squantum ... A 1935 Hudson coupe 
with rumble seat, radio, heater and almost new tires was 
for sale at $195 at Swift and Bachman, 254 Washington 
St., Quincy . . . The North Quincy Knights of Columbus 
honored Past Grand Knight Michael Mahony with a 
testimonial dinner at Walsh's Restaurant, Billings Rd., 
Norfolk Downs . . . The Grand Award at the annual 
summer tombola at Most Blessed Sacrament Church, 
Houghs Neck, was a trip to the New York World's Fair . 
. . Typewriters could be rented for $5 for three months at 
the Quincy Typewriter Service, 12 Maple St. . . Insiders 
guessed that the Quincv tax rate for 1939 would be 
$33.40 . . . Homer Jenks of 66 Channing St., NOrfolk 
Downs, former city editor of the Quincy Evening News, 
was transferred from Boston to New York by the U nited 
Press . . . Bob Pearson set a Quincy Park League record 
by striking out eighty batters in a row as the Sagamore 
Plebes beat Copelands, 5-2, to clinch the first half title . . 
. President Franklin D, Roosevelt sent a letter to E.J. 
MacEwan. a member of the Quincy Bay Race Week 
executive committee, with best wishes for the second 
annual week of festivities . . . Frederick E. Tupper of 185 
Monroe Rd., former Quincy commissioner of public 
works and chairman of the board of assessors, died at 
Quincy City Hospital . . Patrolman Walter McKenna 
rowed the police rescue dory a quarter of a mile into the 
Bay to rescue two Merrymount boys, Donald Sprague, 
12, of 24 Neponset Rd., and Waller Deane, 16, of ^2 
Squanto Rd., after their 16-foot sailboat capsi/ed. . . 
Vcnetial blinds were selling for $ 1 at Kresge 25 cents to 
$1.00 store ("The Green Front Store") at 1459 Hancock 
St. . . Mayor Thomas S. Burgin promoted Fireman 
James J. Daly of 41 Upton Rd. to lieutenant on the 
Quincy Fire Department . . . Daly, a cousin of Boston 
Mayor Maurice J.Tobin, topped the list of Civil Service 
candidates. 



P«|« t Quinty Sun ThuMay. July «. I9«7 




Marie's Fvitchen 



B> MARIK .1. DOIIMIMO 



Sour Cream Fruit Salad 

Pretty To I.ook At, Hani To Resist 



Whenever there is any kind ot a part\ 
or get together, my ncighbi>r. Helen, 
makes her tamous sour cream Iruit salad 
It IS really something that goes with an\ 
kind of a buffet or luncheon, a light 
dessert that's pretty to look at and hard to 
resist! 

HKI.FN'S 

SOI R CREAM FRl IT SALAD 
1 cup bite size marshmallows 
1 cup crushed pineapple drained 
1 cup mandarin oranges, drained 
Vi cup walnuts (cut) 
'/: cup shredded coconut 
1 cup sour cream 

Mix the first three ingredients together 
in a large bowl, then add the walnuts and 
coconut. After this, add the sour cream 
and chill. This is a lovely fluffy mouth- 



watering dessert that can be made a 
couple of davs ahead of time if you wish. 
B\ tl)ewa\. because I am. i whipped cream 
lo\er, I sometimes substitute the cream 
and have also used both cream and sour 
cream together. So experiment, mix it 
anv way you like, I guarantee you'll love 
It either way. Of course it >ou'rc lucky 
enough to ha\c a gal like Helen as a 
longtime neighbor, you'd hardl> have to 
do it yourself 

(Marie D'Olimpio is the author of 
"Simply Italian - And Then Some," a 
collection of her own recipes. ( opies of 
the book are available at That's Italian, 
Franklin St., South Quinc>, Previte's 
Market, Sumner St.. Quinc> Point and 
Samoset Pharmac). Samoset Ave., 
Merrymount.) 




INTERNATIONA! FOOD FAIR and bazaar was held recently at the Islamic Center of New 
England, 470 South St., Quinc) Point. From left. Lou Ma and Vivian One serve Asgar Ali an 
egg roll from Taiwain. 

((Juini\ Sun phiitii h\ ( hnrir\ h'laKg) 



r^EWCARRIERS 
^WANTED 
Here's a chance to earn 
extra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



Debra Bambery On Dean's List 



Debra A. Bamberv of 42 
Delano Ave. in Quincy was 
recently named to the Dean's 
List at St. Thomas University, 
Miami, Fla. for the spring 



semester. 

Miss Bambery will begin 
her junior year at the school in 
September. 



Building Your 
Protection 

At Rilev & Riellv Insurance Agency we think ot 
vour insurance needs as a fineK crafted wall ot 
protection, just as each stone is caretullv chosen 
DV a mason to fit the wall, our insurance agents 
choose exactly the kinds of policies vou need and 
fit them together to form a solid wafl of protection. 
Wc find >olutu)ih. 



Riley & Rielly Insurance Agency, Inc. 

l(lS(lH.UH.nkStr».».fl't) lit)\^S|.guiiKS, MA()2:h4-(l3Tl 
bI747l-h2i»OlVrs()n.\IIX-pt •hl7471-(i()l=>C(tmnHrci.ilIX'pt 





MARRIED 60 VFARS- John and Marie(aruso of Norlhyuincvrecenll) Id.. H-H.i their 
60th wedding anniversar). , , / 

lOiiiniy Niiri /»n<»l>i J>» I mn l.uriniin i 

Mr., Mrs. John Caruso 
Celebrate 60th Anniversary 



Mr and Mrs John .1 
Caruso of 21 Berry St . 
North QuincN. reccniK 
celebrated their 6()lli 
wedding anni\cisary 

I he Carusos were 
married .Iul> 2. 1927 in Si 
.lohn's Church. Quinc\ 
C enter Mrs C aruso is the 
former Marie Serroni. 

I he\ ha\c three sons, (' 
.lohn Caruso and Robert 



.1 Caiuso. both ot 
Btaintrec, and Richard D 
Caruso o\ Bourne. H» 
grandchildren and three 
great grandchildren 

Mr C aruso is a retired 
postal deik ti>i the (>iinc\ 
Post Oltice He is a 
membei ot the National 
Association ol Retired 
federal \ inpios ees 
(N-\Rf I » and the Ameri- 



can I'ost a I \S or k. CI s 
I nion 

Mrs Caruso is a retired 
salesperson in (Juiiu\ 
stores 

Both natives o( Quuua 
Ihe\ have lived at ihn: 
present address lor 4? 
vears 

Prior to that, ihev Inul 



at 40'' Nev^port Au I 
Wollasion I 




MARIANNE ONEII. of 

North Quino received an 
associate in science decree in 
executive secretarial from 
Aquinas Junior College, 
Milton. 



MAIRA I.YDON ofQuinc) 
received an Associate in 
Science decree in letal 
secretarial from Aquinas 
Junior ( ollege, MiHon, 



CAROI RAYMOND of 
Quincv received an Associate 
in Science decree in Executive 
Secretarial from Aquinas 
Junior ( ollege. Miltcm 



Robert Louis Honored On Retirement 



Some 1(X) guests, including 
former colleagues and family 
members, attended a 
retirement party at the Quincy 
Neighborhood Club for 
Central Middle School 
science teacher Robert Louis 

Louis, a teacher for 36 
years, 34 of them at Central, 
also coached football and 
judged the Boston City Wide 
Science Fair for more than 20 
years. 



H e has a bachelor of science 
degree from Northeastern 
University and a master's 
degree from Harvard 
University 

Louis IS a lifetime member 
of the Qumc>, Massachusetts 
and National Hducation 
Associations. 

Louis expressed feelings of 
"pride and pleasure in helping 
to educate the fine young 
people who have attended 



in 



Central Middle Schoo 
Ouincv " 

A resident ol Braintrcc. he 
is married and the father o\ 
five children He also ha^ a 
granddaughter 

Angela Flaherty 
Fitchburg Graduate 

Angela M Llaheriv ot 
Quincy recently graduated 
from Fitchburg Stale ( ollege 
with a bachelor of science 
degree in nursing. 



SOUTH SHORE 
EVENING MEDICAL CARE 



21 School Street, Quincy Center 

Reasonable Fees • Walk In 

No Appointment 
Necessary 

• Adolescent and 
Adult Medicine 



Insurance Accepted 
• Qualified Physicians 



> Courtesy blood pressure screening. Friday evenings. 
• Heart disease risk screening and cholesterol $10" 

Hourt: 
Mondiy-Frlday, 6 pm • 9 pm, Saturday, 9 am • 4 pm 

Ttl: 773-2600 

A Madlcal Astociatat of Quincy Inc. Afflllata 




HKIDI J. JA( OBS and THOMAS H. PK ( IM 

Heidi Jacobs Engaged 
To Thomas Piccini 



Mr and Mrs. Ellis Jacobs 
(il Mullen. Nebraska, 
announce ihc engagement of 
their daughter, Heidi J. 
Jacobs to Mr Thomas R. 
F'lccini, son of Mr. and Mrs 
Joseph .Scarr\ and the late 
Mr James F' Piccini of 
Quinq. 

Miss Jacobs is a graduate of 
the I ni\crsit\ of Nebraska 
v^hcre she was alfiliated with 



the Alpha Delta Pi Sorority. 
She is currently employed 
with Metromaii Corporation 
as an account representative. 

Mr. Piccim is employed as a 
National Account Represen- 
tative for the Fund Raising 
Services Group, a division of 
Metromaii Corporation. 

A July wedding will take 
place at the United Methodist 
Church in Mullen, Nebraska. 



Births 



Al Quincv ( il> Hospital 
June 4 

Mr and Mrs Stephen 
Baldncr (Paula White), 9 
C ross St . Quincv, a daughter. 
Junr 8 

Mr and Mrs kcvin I'ngcr 
(l.inda Bwcchcri), 58 South 
St , Quincv. a son 
Junr 10 

Mr and Mrs Dennis 
Roche (Kimbcrlv Walgreen). 
S 7 I n d e p e n d '.- n c e A \ e . , 
Quincv. a daughter 
Junr 15 

Mr and Mrs Francis 
Boucher (Dons Manriquc). 
ft.S Miller Si . H'^. Quincv. a 
son. 

June 16 

Mr and Mrs. Scott Boidi 
(F lame Roncss). 126 Phipps 
St.. Quincv. a daughter 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Steinberg (Donna I eongello). 
7.S F dinboro Rd . Quincv. a 
daughter 

Mr. and Mrs Richard 
I ravers (Noriko Yoshida). 
2''4 Washington St., Quincv, 
a daughter 

Junr 18 

Mr and Mrs Joseph 
Fernandez (Mary Sapien/a). 
205 COpeland St , Quincv. a 

Mr., Mrs. Stephen 

Girard Parents Of 

Daughter 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen P. 
(iirard of 17 Kittredge Ave., 
Quincy are parents ol a 
daughter, Katelyn Fli/abeth, 
born June 2.^ at Norwood 
Fiospital. 

Mrs. (iirard is the former 
Janice Lovely. 

(irandpaients are Mr and 
Mrs. Robert I oveh ol 
Dedham .ind Mi. and Mrs. 
Normand (iiiard of Quincy. 



son. 

Mr and Mrs. Robert 
Vallone (Karen F)ewever), 
.1.18 Copeland St , Quincy. a 
son. 

Mr and Mrs. F)a\ id 
Meehan (I inda C lough). 4.1 
Quincv Ave. Qumcy. a 
daughter 

Junr 22 

Mr. and Mrs. James 
Murphv (Jill Price). 101 East 
Squantum St.. North Quinc>. 
a son. 

Mr and Mrs Scan Dennehv 

(Joanne Ci a Ha hue). 49 

Riverside Ave, Quincy, a son. 

Junr 23 

Mr and Mrs. F)ermot 
(iatlcv (Christin Davidson). 
12 FFill St . Quincv, a son 

Mr. and Mrs John Broome 
(F'aula O'Brien). .12 Atherton 
St . Quincy, a son. 
Junr 25 

Mr. and Mrs Frank 
Ru//ano (Marilyn F)oyle 
Corbin-Ru//ano). 98 I enox 
St . Quincy. a son 
Junr 28 

Mr. and .Mrs. Brad latreau 
(I isa Dickson). 45 Elm St., 
»6A. Quincy. a son. 



Social 



Thurtdaj. JmI> 9, IM7 Quincy Sun Page 7 




MR. and MRS. PETER CONANT 

(Mclntire'i Studio) 

Donna Abdon Wed 
To Peter Conant 



Donna Abdon, daughter of 
George and Pauline Abdon of 
Quincy. was recently married 
to Peter Conant, son of Roger 
and Barbara Conant of 
Weymouth. 

The nuptial Mass took 
place at St. Ann's church w ith 
a reception following at the 
Morrisette Post. The bride 
was given in marriage by her 
parents. 

Maid of Honor was Linda 
Willson of Quincy. 

Bridesmaids were Diane 
Abdon, Judy Abdon, Susan 
Hagerty, and Nancy linehan, 
all of Quincy. 

F immy Padonti of Florida 
served as best man. 



Ushers included David 
Conant of Quincy and Arthur 
Conant, Steven Conant and 
Paul Linehan. all of 
Weymouth. 

Serving as ring bearer was 
Eric Abdon. Nicole Conant 
was the flower girl. 

The bride attended North 
Quincy High School and is 
currently employed by State 
Street Bank. 

The groom is a graduate of 
Weymouth Vocational 
School and is now the owner 
of Conant Construction. 

After a wedding trip to 
Aruba, the couple is living in 
Quincy. 



Michelle Peirce Graduates 
Magna Cum Laude 



Michelle Peirce of Quincy 
was recentlv graduated 
magna cum laude from 
(ieorgetown Inivcrsitv, 
Washington. [),C. 

She obtained her bachelor 
of arts degree in governmental 
studies and was inducted into 
Pi Sigma Alpha, a national 
government honor society, 
and Phi Beta ICappa. the 



national liberal arts honor 
society. 

She was also chosen by the 
university in 1986 as a 
candidate for a Rhodes 
Scholarship. 

She will begin studies at 
Boston College Law School in 
the fall. She is a graduate of 
Milton Academy and Derby 
Academy in Hingham. 



Don Bosco 1977 Class Plans Reunion 



The Class of 1977 at F)on 
Bosco I cchnical High School 
in Boston v^ill hold a reunion 
Oct. 3 at the Boston Athletic 



Club from 7 p.m. to midnight. 
Members should contact 
Brother Tom at 426-9457 for 
further information. 



IF YOU CAN DRINK. 
THAT S YOUR BUSINESS. 

IF YOU CANT WE RE 
WILUNG TO MAKE IT OURS 
CALL 847-3841 ANYTIME 



■ff Nail Tipping 

& Overlay ®55 

if Sculptured 

Nails '55 

■^Pedicures *1*) 




for her... Monday Special 
Wash, Cut & Blow Dry $ 1 ^ 
Long hair slightly higher A *x 



for him...Tues. & Thurs. Special 
Blow Cut. includes Al 1 

shampoo X X 



\X cdiiesday Perm Specials: 

Uniperm ""as comp. Ckildwell Foam Perm .. 

Complete Slightly higher for longer hair 
Facial Waxintf Available Pedicures and Nail Sculpting 

All Specials Performed By One Of Russell's Staff 

Cor. Hancock & Chestnut & 1-3 Maple Sts. guincv 472- 1060 ^fr 



'51 comp. 



<Vn '^ ."i DailN Wed 
Thur Fn. Eves 




MR. and MRS. JA.VfES J. DODD Jr. 

tSusan h'ranvet Phttlnfiraf>h\) 

Jean-Marie Glavin 
Married To James Dodd, Jr. 



Jean-Marie Glavin. 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
William J. Glavin of Quincv, 
was recentlv married to James 
J. Dodd Jr , son of Mr. and 
Mrs. James J. Dodd of 
Wollaston. 

The Nuptial Mass was 
performed by Father Joseph 
Raeke at St. Joseph's Church 
in Quincv with a reception 
following at La Rosa Hall in 
Weymouth. 

The bride was given in 
marriage by her father. 

Jacquelyn Glavin. sister of 
the bride, served as Maid of 
Honor. 

Bridesmaids were Janice 
Glavin, Dawn Canniff and 
Mary-Jo Brogna. all of 
Quincy and a!] sisters of the 
bride, and Susan Tabak of 
Wollaston, sister of the 
groom. The flower girl was 
Kristen Brogna, the bride's 
niece. 

Best man was Ste\en Dodd 



of Wollaston, brother of the 
groom. 

Ushers included Andrew 
Dodd and Daniel Dodd. both 
of Wollaston and both 
brothers of the groom, Joseph 
Tabok of Wollaston, the 
groom's brother-in-law. and 
William Glavin and Brian 
Glavin. both of Quincy and 
both brothers of the bride. 

The bride is a graduate of 
Archbishop Williams High 
School and the University of 
Maine at Farmington. She is 
employed as a Special 
Education Teacher at the 
Boston City Hospital Family 
Development Center. 

.Mr. Dodd is a graduate of 
North Quincy High School 
and the University of 
Massachusetts in Boston. He 
is employed by the US 
Postal Service. 

After a wedding trip to 
Florida the couple will live in 
Wollaston. 



Rita Pattavina On Dean's List 



.Miss Pattavina graduated 
from Simmons in .Mav with a 



Rita Pattavina of Sea St.. 

• Quincy. has been named to 

the dean's list at Simmons 

College in Boston for the 

spring semester. 

Karen Koski On Dean's List 



bachelor of arts degree in 
management. 



Karen L. Koski, daughter 
of Mr. and .Mrs. Karl -K. 
Koski, of Quincy was named 
to the Dean's List for the 



sefoid semester at Saint 
Anselm College, Manchester. 

New Hampshire. 



eV i^oucA Of "^la^s 




Senior 

Citizens 

Discount 






Closed Mondays 

Optn Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 A.M - S 30 P M 



28 Grtcnwood A»e 



Wollaiton 



VISA 



P«|c I Qwlncy Sun Thunday, July 9. I«t7 



Crime 
Watch 

By ROBFRTHANNA 
Crimf Prevention OfTicer 
Quincy Police Department 




Assault Prevention 

Tips For Self-Proleclion While Walking 

• Walk with someone when possible Most muggers 
and other thugs will be discouraged if you have 
company, male or female. 

• Stay in well lighted areas and near curbs, away 
from alleys, entry ways and bushes. 

• Don't carry a purse unless it is absolutely 
necessary. If you do carry a purse, never set it down on 
store counters, supermarket baskets or on bus seats. 

• Avoid carrying extra money or valuables on your 
person. 

• Don't accept rides from strangers. Ifa driver stops 
to ask you directions, avoid getting near the car; you 
could be pulled inside. 

• If you are being followed by someone on foot, 
cross the street, change direction or vary your pace If he 
persists, go straight to a lighted store or a home and call 
the police. If you are being followed b\ someone in a 
car, turn around and walk in the other direction. If he 
persists, record his license number and call the police. 

• When you return home, have your key ready to 
open the door without delay. Leave an outside light on 
so you can easily see when you return. 

• Stay near other people; avoid shortcuts through 
parks, vacant lots aor other deserted places. 

36 On Vo-Tech 
Honor Roll 

Quincv Vocational Technical 
School lists 36 students on the 
fourth quarter honor roil. 

They are 

Grade 9: 

Distinction: Kimberly 
Daggcit 

High Honors: Christine M. 
Bullis. Cindy A. Rollins, 
Joseph Russell. 

Honors: Ruth .Swett, Peter 
Whyte 

Grade 10: 

Distinction: Brian Backman, 
Elizabeth A. Fortin, James 
Kccnan, William S McCaffrc). 
Patrick G. O'Donnell. James 
E. Pedretti, Scott D Rooney. 

High Honors: Christopher 
R Beatrice. Carla B 



Calligan. Chad E. Gitligan. 
Michael Perkins. Scott T. 
Picard. William L. Robinson. 

Honors: Robert Bal/ano. 
Lee K. Kelly. Theresc M. 
LaMorder, Dawn M. Losec, 
Dennis M. Plant. Harry 
Polito Jr.. Timothy M. Ring. 
Grade 11: 

Distinction: Christine M 
Arroyo, Steven M. Bonavita, 
Michael R. Cappadona. 
Anthony K. DeCosta, Robert 
M. Lingoes, Daniel A. 
Reynolds. 

High Honors: George 
Ma/e 

Honors: John M. Burke. 
Derek N. Franceschini, Kevin 
J. Purcell. 



Joseph Harold Eleeted 
To 37th DAV Team 



Joseph R Harold of 
Quincy was elected to his 37th 
term as State Adjutant for 
The Disabled American 



Veterans. Department ol 
Massachusetts, at its 66th 
Annual State Convention 
held recently in Chicopec. 



Quincy Police Log Hot Spots 



June 26: 

Break, .1:01 pm, Willard St . 400 block. Under 

Investigation. 

Break, 6:5.1 pm. Independence Ave.. 100 block. Under 

investigation. 

Break, 9:04 pm. Independence Ave.. 100 block. Under 

investigation. 

Break, 9:13 pm. Independence Ave.. 100 block. Under 

investigation. 
•Note: above breaks all occured in an apartment 

house. 
June 27: 

Break/ Arrest, 4:29 am. Rock Island Rd. Caller reports 

waking up to find a male party carrying a candle around 

the house. C-l Off. Peter lurowski and Paul Turowski. 

C-2 Off. D. Minton dispatched. Officers report they 

have a 26 year old Rockland man under arrest for 2 

counts of burglary, 1 8 counts of B & F motor vehicles. I 

count of larceny from a building. 

Break, 9 12 am. Farrington St.. 200 Block Under 

investigation. 

Armed Robbery, 2:01 pm, Qu'ncy Co-op. .100 Newport 

Ave. Wanted is a white, male 30 years, 5 It. 1 in., 

mustache, wearing dungarees and sneakers. Suspect 

driving a 198.1 Dodge with blue top. 

Fight, 10:01 pm, 213 Independence Ave. D-l Off. 

Burrell & Jones. 3-3 Off. Hcggblod assigned. Officers 
report they have a 17 yearoldCharlestown youth under 
arrest for assault and battery by means of a dangerous 
weapon. 

June 28: 
M/V Vandalism, 5.19 pm. Quincy Adams "T" Station 
Garage. Caller reports that the dashboard in hcrcar WJ^ 
damaged in an attempt to steal radio. Make or model 
not given. 

M/V Vandalism, 12:58 pm. Bentley's, Southern Artery. 
Caller reports that 2 tires on an '87 Mustang were 
slashed overnight. 

June 29: 
Police Info., 8: 15 am. Houghs Neck area To all cars Be 
on the lookout for a white '74 Buick Flectra color white, 
containing 3 or 4 men. Report these subjects arc driving 
around at night and going through yards. 
Shoplifter/arrest, 2:15 pm. Stop & Shop. 141 Newport 
A\e. Rcpaort manager is holding a female for 
shoplifting. B-2 Off. Bal/ano dispatched, requests 
wagon for a 36 year old Quincy woman. Further 



investigation reveals that there arc four outstanding 

warrants for this party. 

Break, 2:58 pm. Furnace Brook l»kwy , I2(K) block. 

Under investigation. 

Break, 5:31 pm. Palmer St.. 400 block. NOthing taken, 

kitchen vandalized. 

Break, 6:22 pm, WHitwell St 300 block A TV was 

taken 

June 30: 
Break, 3:14 am, Billings Rd., low numbers Fntrancc 
gamed through rear door, offices ransacked. 
Police Information, 9:08 pm. Brainlree Police repot t 
that at the Quintree Mall on Quincy Ave a handbaj; 
was just taken from a woman, who was dragged until 
she released it Suspect is operating a yellow or hcigc 
van: first three digits of Mass. Reg »I82-?.''.'. 

July I: 
Att. Auto Theft, 7:5 1 am. 5.10 Willard St. Caller reports 
an '83 Chev Caprice had a window broken and the 
steering column smashed in an attempt to steal the 
vehicle. 

M/V Break, 5: 10 pm. Mullen Ave. Caller reports that a 
1987 Su/uki Jeep was broken into. Taken was two sets 
of goll clubs valued at $850 

Break, 8:21 pm. Billings Rd , 100 block Fntrancc was 
gained by lorcing rear door. .X quantity of moncv aiuj 
jewclrv was taken 

July 2: 
Break, 840 pm. Beach St. 200 block Under 
investigation at this time. 

Break, 3:56 pm. Cross St , low numbers Under 
investigation at this lime. 

Break, 5 27 pm. I irjson Rd . Under investigational this 
time 

Police Information, 1 1:51 pm. I here have been several 
breaks in the daytime involving a red Poniiac Irans 
AM. Formula vehicle Occupants have been breaking 
into apartment buildings Vehicle further described as 
having "1" roofs and the words "lOR Mil A" on each 
side in yell(»w If vou see this vehicle, call ^11 
immediately 

Services lor Week 91 I ( alK-lo:. Wagon Runs-S.V 
Bchicles I ()wed-^>3. 

II sou have any inlorniaiion on anv ol the ahosi 
crimes, or anv crime, call the Quincv Police Dciectivi 
Bureau at 47y.|2l2 cm 371 N Ou will not be required lo 
idcnlitv voursclt. 



Jarnis ""Picks Up' Campaign Pace 



School Committee candi- 
date Robert Jarnis accelerat- 
ed his campaign efforts while 
running in the Merrymount 
Neighborhood Association 
Road Race. 

There were over 100 
runners at the annual July 4th 
holiday event. While there 
were runners of all ages. most, 
however, were young school 
age children, according to 
Jarnis. 



A regular jogger, he 
finished in the middle of the 
pack and said he was pleased 
with his time for the 2 5 mile 
course "Any time I can run 
under a 7 miriiite-pcr-milc 
pace. I am pleased," said the 
candidate "What is 
remarkable about this race." 
said Jarnis. is how very well 
these young runners were 
Most of the top finishers in 
the race were the youngsters " 

"It IS often easy to 



underestimate what \oun^- 
stcrs can do I he results ol 
this race can serve as a clear 
reminder that, given the 
correct framework and a little 
direction, the > outh ol Quincy 
have the energv and desire to 
be good performers and high 
achievers," he said 

I he candidate mentioned 
that all the citv's neighbor- 
hood associations, like the 
Merrymount Neighborhood 
Association, deserve a great 



deal of credit for provulini: 
such opportunities lot ilu 
neighborhood kids to ^.'i-i 
involved, to have tun. and '.<< 
be successful. 

"I he lesson this r ai.i 
provides." concluded .larnis. 
"is just how far our voungstiTs 
can go when given the ti^'hi 
support and a little direction 
Jarnis vowed to train hardti 
for next year's race so thai lu 
could "keep up with the kuJv 



Blood Pressure Screenings 
At Quincy Hospital 



9 Residents Receive 
Degrees At Bunker Hill 



Quincy City Hospital will 



wh«n it com«s 
, to insurance we 
keep good 

componies 

We represent many fine insurance 
companies. And we select the company 
we think can best suit your insurance 
needs — whether it's coverage for your 
car, your home or your business 

For insurance with an independent 
point of view, give us a call. 



conduct a tree blood pressure 
screening for the public 
Tuesday. July 21. in the 
Ambulatorv (are Department 
from l:.10 to 3 pm 

I he screenings, performed 
by nursing stall, will enable 
individuals to keep track ol 
their blood pressure, and be 
aware ol dangerous clevatu)ns 
in the pressure Persons in 
need of referral to a physician, 
will be advised to do so 

I he screenings, which will 
take place on the first and 
third I uesday of each month, 
arc free of charge 



Nine Quincv residents 
recent Iv received associates 
degrees at Hunker Hill 
C Ommunitv (i. liege 

I hey are 

Yun Kau ( haii. electronics 
technology, (iavle Mackav. 
with honors m computer 
programming. Iimothv 
Rvan. business administra- 



tion, Ronald St F'lerre. wiiti 
high honors in human 
services; Dau I v. business 
administration. Hi lai with 

honors in graphic design. I cU 
F ran. computer programming:. 
VK alter \asile. with hi^-'h 
honors in culinarv arts ,iiul 
Kathleen (jriftith in niirsmi.' 



2 Rcsidcnls Arccplc*! Al N.H. College 



Jacqueline I) Icnnessey 
and I racy I Wilson, both of 
Quincy. have been accepted 
into the New Hampshire 



College program m Business 
Administration lot the I all 

1987 semester 



SOUTH SHORE TILE 



berry 



Wsltham 

42 WESTON ST 



insorarKe agency inc. 

685 HA>JCOCK STREET. QUINCY 

479-5500 



894-1214 528-5200 




Franklin 

9 MAIN ST 



^/:^\ 



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DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 

338 Washington St 



QUINCY 471-3210 



^jg^^ 7 to 5 Mon., Tuet., FrI. Wed. & Thur». Ml 8 pm 



Thursday, July ♦, iW7 Quincy Sun Page ♦ 



I 




^^f^*^ 




MIMAN PONNKKKI) BOMS like this one hiII compete in Dingh) Da) Race and Obstacle 
( uurse Sunda> at Marina Ba\. 

Dinghy Day At 
Marina Bay Sunday 



l)I( K ( AHII.L, right, president of .Jack Conwa> Realt). Ki>es'*bail mone)" to Mike Keneai; 
of ke> Realt> (left) as George Uhite of the Patriot Ledger telephones friends for bail money 
during recent March of Oi>nes Lock- 1 p fundraiser at Marina Ba>. 

i(Juincy >un fihotn b\ I iim dormant 

Michael Tenipesta Receives Quincy Legion Award 



I he third annual DinghN 
Das Race and Obstacle 
Course will take place 
Sunday. July 12 at Manna 
Bay. North Quincy 

I he "daring adventure" 
and "outrageous obstacles" 
uill start at 1 1 am at the 
bulkhead and docks of 
Marina Ba\ Vachl basin. 

Ihc event is for boaters and 
spectators 

The Dinghs Dav race is 
open to anyone \*ith a human- 



powered boat that does not 
exceed I! feet. The rules and 
regulations are simple and 
concise: no canoes; no sails, 
no machine power; two 
people per boat; life 
preservers must be worn by all 
participants; eligibility is 12 
years of age or older; and no 
fishing or waterskiing is 
allowed. 

Ihe winners of Dinghy Day 
can win cash pri/es between 
$50 and $200 Winners fall 



Robvn Prewilt 
Receives AFL-CIO Award 



Robyn \ f'rcvK iit. daughter 
ol Mr and Mrs Ravmond 
Prtwilt. Sr . ot Quincy was 
M'kcted ax ihc recipient of the 
Ichn I ( oIIlt av^ard at the 
241 h .iniuidi schi)larship 
av^jni program ol the 
M.ivN.uhiisetts Ml CIO 
held rcicntlv at an annual 
dinner .it the .lohn V 
V "Micdv I ibrarv in Dorches- 
ter. 

Piev^ itt vkas awarded oneot 
Ihc over 2(M) union sponsored 
scholarships She is a senior at 
font bonne Academv. Milton 
and will be attending 
( umberland College. KN in 
the fall Her father is a 



member of the Plumbers and 
(iasfitters 1 ocal 12. 

f ach vear the Massachusetts 
AFI -C lO cin)rdinates the 
projiram with local unions 
throughout the state. These 
scholarships are open to all 
high school seniors and are 
given out on the basis ol the 
student's score on a labor 
historv exam and a written 
essay on a labtu issue of 
current interest 

I his past year, over 2000 
high school seniors from 2V> 
high schools participated in 
the program bv taking the 
exam. Labor organizations 
contributed $95,000 in 
scholarship money. 



Louis Kalz IL'acIs Damon Lodge 



I luiis Kai/ ol lielmont St.. 
Noith C^uinc-v. was installed 
r It cut I V as C hanccilor 
C iMiMiiuiidci ol Damon 
I odgc Knights ol Pvthias 

I his lodge IS Ihe oldest in 
the c »i u n t r y , r e c e n 1 1 v 
celebrating its lOOih birthdav. 



I hrough Kat/" ellorts as a 
member ol the lodge fund- 
raising committee, thcv 
recent Iv gave a si/able 
d «> n a 1 1 o n to aid area 
handicapped children. 

Supreme and Cirand Lodge 
officers participated in Kat/' 
installation. 



ill ^!^J7A1 



CORONK 




As low as 



Electra XT 
Automatic Correction 



$12995 



"We service 
what we sell" 



QUINCY 

Typewriter Service 

5 Maple St., Quincy Sq. 472-3656 



into two categories: most 
creatively decorated dinghy 
and order of finish. 

Marina Bay. sponsor of 
Dinghy Day. is a 400 acre, 
self-contained seaside 
community that includes 
retail, residential and 
commercial properties. For 
more information on Dinghy 
Day or Marina Bay. call 328- 
0600. 



Michael Tempesta, a 
member of the graduating 
class at Quincy Point Middle 
School, was recentlv 
presented the Quincy Legion 
Award by Past Commander 
and Quincy Point alumnus 
Robert Leo Eng. 

The award is presented on 
the basis of courage, honor, 
leadership, patriotism, 
scholarship and service. 

Tempesta is the son of 
Maureen and Michael 

Save Gat and Money ... 
Shop Locally 



lempesta. 
Students are nominated 



and selected by members of 
the school staff. 




Delivered by 
Celeljrity Look-Alikes, Bag 
Lady, Clown, Bunny. Pink 
Gorilla. Tuxedo & More' 

Disc Jockeys Available 
For All Occasions 



Stuffed Animate 
A Greeting Cards 

Com* Stop By Our Store 



674 Hancock St., Wollaston 773-0690 




^^Mar^^Bay 



333 Victorv Road 
Manna Bay • 328-0600 



ADDED SPECIAL SURPRISE EVENTS 



Pafc It Qw^j Siwi Tliufidsy. Jul) ». IM7 

Berniee C. Murphy, 77 

Retired Seeretar\' 



A graveside service v^as 

conducted Monday at Blue 

Hill Cemeter\. Braintrec (or 

Bernice C (Rider) Murphy. 

77. of Quincy. a retired 

secretary at the Braintree 

lovkn Hall, vkho died 

Thursday. July 2 at Waltham- 

Wcston Hospital in Walt ham 

Mrs Murphy was also a 

former secretary for the 

American Missionary Board. 

Born in Boston, she had 

lived in Braintree for 30 vcars 

before moving to Quincv 

three years ago 

She attended Boston 
schools and graduated from 



the School of Practical Arts 
and the Boston Clerical 
Sch(x>l 

She vkas a member of the 
Second Church in Dorchester 

Wife of the late Francis A 
Murphy, she is survived by 
tv»o sons. James E Murphy of 
Boston and William h 
Murphy of Marshfield; a 
brother. E Frank Rider J r of 
Oxford, a sister. Evelvn 
Mollarc of Winchester, and 
tvko grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements v^ere 
bv the Svkeeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals. Indepen- 
dence Ave . Quincy 







D Scott Deware 



^ 

§ 
^ 

i 



I 



A THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK 

It la true that th«re Is probably 
nothing In this world wa naad 
today as much as undarstandlng. 
Understanding behnrean parents 
and children: betwreen husband 
and wife: between friends: 
between races: between 
countries After all has been said 
and done, a smile, a kindly word, an understanding 
spirit and touch in all relationships count for more than 
we are usually willing to grant. 

It Is a sad fact that many people sometimes go 
through life misunderstanding associates, friends and 
family. Much misunderstanding Is due to the fact that a 
few drops of kindly understanding are not allowed to 
fall into cups that would be brimming with happiness if 
a little understanding were present. A little 
understanding can go a long way toward solving most 
serious situations. 

Everyone has some right and virtue in his point of 
view Resentment flares up if refuse to accord this right 
and probability. Isn't it true that many times we feel 
resentment If we think that the other person is not 
giving us our just due? ... Especially when we feel it is 
due us in the matter of understanding and 
consideration 

It Is really quite simple! A targe chunk of 
understanding can be bought at a very low cost. Try iti 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02170 

Tel: 472-1137 

Member of the New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

funeral specialist. 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

5e', ces ^enae'ea To An:, Dis'ance 



^ 
^ 

i 
^ 

^ 

^ 

^ 



^^^«^'--^'"^>"'-^-'-^- -^'-^^«^*-<^ '•^^■'•-^'-^-v^'x-^'*^^-^'-^'-^- 



Planning ahead can offer 
peace of mind... 



It IV unit human In put thinc^ off 
Bui pr'tie-r pUrniinj for Ihr t\rnt 
<i( >>nr> drilh ran sparr a famih 
m» > Ifau.natu dfcKKms and 
fi antial hurdrns. B\ prr- 
■rrantmt Ihf dfNirr. and »i%hrv of 
■ tnr s (unrral. burial and rxpfn^s 
ran bf \pnifird lo rhminalr 
<i>iiluMi>n diffrroicfs of i»pinion 
and dilfiiult drri\tonN on Ihr part 
lit famiK mrmhfrs lo ra\t Ihiv 
hiirdrii. »r arr makin| a>ailablr 
III Miu >Kht a booftlrl Milh all 
rmni\ar» informalion and forms 
III asMsl artd guidr wiu V^h\ nol 
tisil us or wrilr for tour f Mtt 
l'rfarf»nj«'mfnl Booklfl. 



Booklet co>rr^ 
Ihf following subjfrls: 

• huneriil and Interment Preferences 

• Vital Slaftslics and Data 

• Survivors Informalion. Social Securitv, Insurance, 
Bank Accounts. Real Kslale. Automobile, Safft> 
Deposit Box. .Savings Bonds. Stocks and Bonds, 
KetiremenI Accounts and Veterans Beneflls. 

• Pre- Arrangement Information 

• Three duplicate copies of a huneral and Interment 
Pre- Arrangement Agreement. 

Please send me m> cop> of "Vl> Specific Requests" 




/SddrcM 



Ctty 



Sim* 



(Ot HTKSV 0»^ 



Zipcod* 




Sweeney Funeral Service 

773-2728 
"Ihr JiiM-fth Siifftwy hunrrni lluiui'% 
74 Klm SI. Quinc> DennK S. Swefne> 



Obituaries 



Helene M. SlouU 82 

Taught At Central Junior 



A funeral Mass tor Helene 
M Stout. S2. of Milton, a 
teacher at Central Junior 
High School. Quincs. lor y'i 
\ears. vkas celchratcd 
Wednesday at St Hi/ahcth's 
Church 

Miss Stout died Sundav at 
Carney Hospital. Dorchester 
after a long illness 

Born in Boston, she lised in 
Milton man\ years 

Miss Stout began teaching 
at the Central Junior High 
School in September l*)2'' 
and retired in 1966 

She was a graduate ol 
I mmanuel C ollege 

Miss Stout was past 
president ot the Emmanuel 
College Alumni Association 
and the ProparvulisClub, and 
was a member of the I eaguc 



of Catholic Women and the 
Milton Catholic Women's 
Club. 

She is surviscd b\ a 
nephew. Frank J Stout ol 
Milton; and three nieces. 
Kathleen M Jenne\ of 
Way land. Virginia M Stout 
of Newton, and Fli/abeth M 
Seaver of Kalama/oo. Mich 
She was the Mstcr of the late 
I rank A Stout Jr 

Funeral arrangements were 
by John G Molloy Funeral 
Home. 1126 Washington St.. 
Dorchester. 

Burial was in Milton 
Cemeter> 

Memorial donations ma> 
be made to a scholarship fund 
in her name at f mmanuel 
College. Boston 



Margaret G. Burke 



A funeral Mass was 
celebrated JuK 3 in St John's 
Church h>r Margaret (i 
Burke. 92. of Quincy. a retired 
secretary who died Jul> 1 ai 
Quinc\ Cit\ Hospital alter a 
bnel illness 

Burial w.is at New Cal\ar\ 
Cemeler> in Malt a pan 

Born in Newl.iundland. 
Canada. Miss Hiirke had liveJ 



in Mattapan betore nuningto 
QuincN ten \ears ago 

Daughter ol the late 
Patrick and Mar\ Mien 
(Ha\esl Burke, she issiu\i\ed 
b\ her sister-in-law. I \cKn(i. 
Burke ol Scituale and several 
nieces and nephews 

I iinera: airaiigemenis uere 
made h •> the S w e e n e \ 
Brothers funeral Home. 
IndepeniJeiue \\e (Jiiincv 



Boiea-BuonflglJo 

Funeral Home 



!b L^^ 






i?1 H fe 




Michael A. Bolea 
Director 



116 FranKlin St. 
Quincy, Ma. 

472-5319 



i— Hancoe 

Monument Co 




John Kieeiuli & Sons Inc. 

Visit our complete 

factory diaplay at 

366 Centre St., So. Quincy 

From Quincy Center, take Burgin 

Pkwy to Quincy Adams Station, at ^0^ ""^ ' g 

light, turn right on Center St., 3rd ' ' - ^ . 

building on right (building after 

car wash) 472 3447 

Bronx* arKl Qranit* Cleaning Eillmates on Ri-auetl 

Open Mon thru Sat by Appointmeni '.jn Suidays 



Samuel P. Coffman, 88 



A funeral service for 
Samuel V ("oilman. 88. of 
Newton, formerly of Quincy. 
a lawyer and owner of a 
Boston automobile parking 
business was held Sunday at 
Stanetsky Memorial (hapcls. 
1668 Beacon St . Brookline 

Mr Coflman died Juh 2 at 
Norwood Hospital after a 
brief illness 

Born in Russia, he lived in 
QuintT for 6.^ years before 
moving to Newton 20 years 
ago 

He graduated Irom Bt)ston 
I'mNcrsity I aw School in 
1924 

Mr Coflman was associat- 
ed with his two sons, Richard 
\. Colfman of Belmont and 
Neal B t offman of Braintree. 
in real estate and Coflman 
Auto Parks in Boston He 
operated several large parking 
lacilitics in Boston for many 
years 

Mr Colfman was a past 



president of the Prohus C luh 
of (ireater Boston, a founder 
of the New Fngland Parking 
Association and a member ot 
the board of directors ol the 
National Parking Associ.i- 
lion 

He was a member ol 
Temple Beth Fl and lemple 
Beth Israel ol Quincy and the 
Masonic lemple lodge ol 
Boston 

He was also a trustee ot 
I homas Crane I ibrarv ot 
Quincv. 

Besides his two sons, Mr 
Coflman is survived bv his 
wife. Ruth (Sklar) C oilman, 
three brothers. Nathan 
Collman of Portland. Ml . 
Max Colfman ol Brockton 
and Louis Collman ot 
Braintree; a sister. Dons 
(ironsicin of Walpole. seven 
grandchildren and two greai- 
grandchildren 

Burial was in Sharon 
Memorial Park 



Catherine Moslvn, 99 



A funeral Mass lot 
Catherine (Cotter) Mostyn. 
^^. ol WOliaston. was 
celebrated Julv y in St .Ann's 
C hurch 

Mrs Mosi\n died June 2^ 
at home alter a long illness 

Born in Passage \Kest, 
C\)unt\ ( i>rk. Ireland, she 
atleniled the C onveni ol 
Metcv Seliool ,r I'.issa^e 
West 

She leceiveil a leililicale m 
the theoi\ ot miisu trom the 
I ondoi! Ci>llege ot Music 

Uile ot the late William I 
Mosivn. she is siitvisect b\ 
ivso s(ins, Patrick S MonImi 



ot Braintiee and W illiani I 
Mostyn ol Fastham, si\ 
daughters, lv\ Desniond oi 
Walpole. Fllcn (iovatsos ni 
( anton. \ li/abeth C lowK 
( laire C ontos and N ii^iiiu.'. 
O'Donnell. all i>l Quukv a!;>: 

Maureen d Borhek ol I .1 ' 
Sandwuh. 2.^ giandchil.li ' 
and 24 gieat-grandchiKli<!. 

Burial was in Blue Mi. 
( emeieiv in Braintree 
Arrangements were b\ ; 

keohane Funeral Home "•" 

Hancock St . N\ollaston 
Meniorial clonal ions ci'i *' 

made lo ihe Quincv \ N \ .r 

Hi>spn.e NssiH-iation 



James T. MeNiff, 73 



A luneral Mass \vil! be 
celebrated todav < I hursdav ) 
at '^ a m m SI lohn's Church 
tor James F McNifl. ^V a 
lileUmg Quincv resident, who 
died Mondav at his home 
alter a long illness 

FFe was a foimer quality 
controller lor the iownsend 
( (up , Braintree Burial will 
be in Mouni \Ki>llasion 
Cemeterv 

Mr McNitI was a member 
ol the Knights of ( Olumbus 
and the tubular Rivet C^lub 

Husband ol the late Marv 



(l)nscolll \KNiII 
survived h\ ,i ^in. I.ci.' • M 
McNitI ol (J.imcv • .* 
daughters, Ri;ih kiKinci. 
( amden. Me . and Mat\ \' 
McNitI ol Weslwodd '^^ 
sisters, (irace Mullm 
Quincv and Ann F SKNi!! ' 
West Warwick. R I 

I uneral arrangements v^cfi. 
bv the Joseph Sweetu 
Funeral Home. ""4 F Im Si 




SuiEcneg Funeral ^cruice 

DENNIS S. SWEENEY, Director 
The "JOSEPH SWEENEY FUNERAL HOMES" 

COMPLETE '-HOMELIKE" 
ATMOSPHERE 





74 1 LM ST. 326 (DPI LAND 

C;UIN( Y W. OUIN( Y 

773-27:^ 773-27:8 

Ol R ONLY TWO LOC ATIONS 
NO I AFF II lAII I) Willi ANY OIHI R 

I i;ni kai homi in qi inc y 



HEARING AID 
"KNOW HOW" 

KNOW: He accepts MeOci i 
and all Insurance careers as 
payment in full 

KNOW: He gives 30 day '-Pf 

trials to insure you' satistac; "' 

with no charge for liHings O' 

molds 

KNOW: A salesman wiii not 

knock oo yoor doof uninviteo Py 

you and where would he tx" 'c 

loliow up service 

KNOW: There is unlimited tree 

follow up service lor the iite o' 

your riearir^ aid 

KNOW: He speciali/es m hear 

ing aids only 

IF YOU KNOW ALL THESE 
FACTS. YOU MUST KNOW WE 
ARE TALKING ABOUT 

BOB A KEN KARAS 

CERTIFIED HEARING AID 
SPECIALISTS 

QUINCY 

linf R HIARINO AID 

DISMNURt 




BOB KARAS 


KEN KARAS 


LOCATED 


LOCATED 


NEXT TO 


ACROSS 


BARGAIN 


FROM 


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WOOLWORTH 


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ISS* 


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nx-mm 


47f-S3S3 


MON -FRI 9-4 


MON FRI 9 5 


SAT 9-12 


SAT 9-12 



CALL NOW FOR APPOINTMENT 

773-0900 

WE MAKE HOME VISITS 
AND ACCEPT MEDICAID 



TiMnday, July % im Qi*Ky Sm P«|c II 



Catherine E. Donna, 94 

Former Teacher 



262 On Central Honor Roll 



A luncral Mass will be 
celebrated today (fhursday) 
at 10 am in Sacred Heart 
( hurch. North Qiimcy for 
Catherine K (Cileason) 
Donna, ^4. ol Quincy, a 
l»)rmer teacher lor F he 1 ittic 
Red School House, Quebec, 
( anada 

Mrs. Donna died Monday 
in Carney Hospital, Dorches- 
ter, after a briel illness. Burial 
will be in Mount Wollaston 
Cemetery. 

Mrs Donna was born and 
educated in Canada and had 



lived in 0"'T-'y for 60 years. 

She was a member of the 
Sacred Heart Church l.adies 
Sodality. 

Wife of the late Medie J. 
Donna, she is survived by two 
sons, Richard .1 Donna of 
(Quincy and John F. Donna of 
Necdham; two daughters. 
Patricia M Quigley of 
Marstons Mills and Cathleen 
M. Donovan of Norwood, 
nine grandchildren and two 
great-grandchildren 

funeral arrangements were 
by the Kcohane Funeral 
Home. Wollaston. 



William J. Forgeron, 74 

Retired Tailor 



A funeral service for 
William J Forgeron. 74. of 
Quincy. a retired tailor for 
retail stores, including 
Kennedy's and Bonwit lellcr. 
was held July 3 at the Joseph 
Sweeney Funeral Home, 
West Quincy 

Mr Forgeron died July I at 
Pond Meadow Health Care 
f acility, Weymouth, after a 
brief illness 

He is survived by his wife. 
Ci race R ( Peloqu in ) 
forgeron; four sons, Roger 
W Forgeron ol Quincy. 



Stephen J. Forgeron of 
Braintree, Richard G. 
Forgeron of Maine and 
William C. Forgeron of 
Maiden, a daughter. CJrace D. 
Forgeron of Dorchester; a 
brother. Robert Forgeron of 
Arlington; two sisters. Edith 
McDermott of Billerica and 
Shirley Butt of Woburn; 14 
grandchildren and a great- 
grandchild. Christina 
Forgeron. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery. 



Charles J. Affsa, 69 



Charles J Affsa. 69, of 
North Quincy, a retired 
employee ol the Boston Naval 
Shipyard, died fhursday. 
July 2 at Quincy City Hospital 
after a long illness 

Mr. Affsa had worked at 
the shipyard for 18 years 
before retiring in 1973. 

He was born in CnionCity. 
N J and had lived m 
Dorchester before moving to 
North Quincy 30 years ago. 

He was a member of the 
Quinc-y lodge of Flks and the 
West Roxbury Masonic 
I odge 

Mr. Affsa is survived by his 
wile. Rose (Matook) Affsa; a 
son. Paul C Affsa of 



Weymouth; three daughters. 
Helen R. Affsa of California. 
Barbara F. Hood of East 
Bridgewater and Shirley Ann 
Einch of Brockton; four 
brothers. Cleorge Affsa and 
Russell Affsa. both of Quincy. 
Fred Affsa of Weymouth and 
Edward Affsa of Braintree; 
three sisters, Lillian Maloof. 
Rose Salhaney and 1 illie 
Kandalaft. all of Quincy, and 
six grandchildren. 

A funeral Mass was 
celebrated Monday in the 
Church of St. John of 
Damascas in Dedham. Burial 
was at Pme Hill Cemetery, 
Quincy. 

Memorial donations may 
be made to charity. 



Frank Montuori, 72 



A funeral Mass will be 
celebrated todav (Ihursday) 
at 9 am m St Joseph's 
Church for frank Montuori, 
72, of Quincv. a blacksmith at 
the Fore River Shipyard 
under Bethlehem Steel and 
later (icneral Dv namics. 

He died Monday at home 
alter a bricI illness Burial will 
be at Blue Hill Cemelerv, 
Braintree 

Born in North larrvtown. 



N V Mr. Montuori had lived 
in Quincy for 65 years. 

He was a WW I! Army 
corporal and served in the 
Quartermaster Corps. 

He is survived by two 
sisters. Victoria V . Festa of 
Braintree and Elizabeth J. 
Magaldi of Holbrook, and 
many nieces and nephews. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the Sweeney Brothers 
Home for Funerals. Quincv. 



Louise R. Norton 



A funeral Mass for Fouise 
R (C Otter) Norton, of Quincy 
was celebrated I uesday in St 
Joseph's Church, Quincy 
Point. 

Mrs. Norton died Friday at 
the Milton Medical Center. 

Born in Boston, she lived in 
Easton and Jamaica Plain 
before moving to Quincy a 
year ago. 

Wife of the late William 
Norton, she is survived by her 
mother. Adcle (Franchini) 



Cotter of West Roxbury; 
three sons. Bruce Norton of 
I akeville, William Norton of 
Quincy and John Norton of 
Braintree; a sister-in-law, 
Francis Cotter of Holbrook; a 
nephew, Paul Cotter; a niece, 
Patricia Cotter, and 13 
grandchildren. 

Funeral arrangements were 
by Joseph Sweeney Funeral 
Home. 74 Elm St. 

Burial was in St. Mary's 
Cemetery. Randolph 



4 Quincy Volunteers 

Recognized At 
Milton Medical Center 



Four Quincy residents were 
honored at Milton Medical 
Center's recent Volunteer 
Recognition Day. 

Pins recognizing the 
number of hours spent serving 
the hospital were presented to 
auxilians Ruth Kjoss. 1.000 



hours; Dorothy McCarthy 
and Helen McCarthy. 500 
hours; and Betty Pckkincn, 
100 hours. 

Hospital President George 
Cieary and Director of 
Development Susan Hayward 
presented the pins. 



Central Middle School lists 
262 on its fourth quarter 
honor roll. 

(irmdt 6: 

Hich Honors: Inn Bcllefon- 
tainc, Kcrm A Berry, .lohn M 
Bilclli, Kristen M (ashman. 
David K. Chan. Edwin C hin. 
Shannon M (Olion, flizabcth A 
C rispo, Arthur ( rosby. Kara M 
Dciahuni, lohn M Digiacomo, 
Joanna ( Dyer, Jeffrey I, 
lamest, M J Eng. Johnson Fan, 
( arne A Ircnelte, David S 
(ioodman, Robert P. Ciordon, 
( alecc M. (irccley. Susannc M 
Hamilton, l.isaR Healcy, Jessica 
(i Hod, David Johnston. 
Michael J Kavanaugh, Michael 
P Kenncy. Janya N. Kutasz, 
Keith L. Lentini, Francette 
I.evangic, Suzanne I,. Lewis, 
Maureen K. Lind, Angela 
Marinilli. Patricia A. Meighan. 
Maureen C Mcllctt. Jessica A 
Murphy. Regina E Murphy, 
Sarah Y. Nelson. Pamela R 
Norton. Joshua D. O'Donnell. 
Krista I. Olson, Patricia E 
O'Mallcy, Eric M Osborne. 
Steven M C Parsley, Maria 
Pcpgionaj, Heather A Powell. 
Kevin A Price, Jennifer Ci 
Reynolds, Christie Richmond, 
Christopher J Roncarati, Mark 
Scott, Patrick Ci Shea. Luke 
H.W Sheets, William Sit, Nicole 
lantillo. Tucker Trainor. 
Christina M Trifone. Brenda L 
Varnadorc, Jennifer Walker, 
Edward Wong, Siu Wong. 

Honors: Jill Alexsunas. 



Melissa I Anderson. Brian J 
Auficro, Julie M Bernick, Joseph 
( hetk. Adam C hclla. Jeffrev 
C raig. Michael P DcsRoche. 
C hnstmc DiPaolo. Matthew .J 
Dovlc. Marv I Eddv. I eannc 
J W Lspc. Nadine Eallon. 
Kristina I) f arren, Dennis M 
(jrav. Robert M (luarnicri, 
Jennifer Head. Christos 
I lorio, Robert M Kane. John 
S l.aing. Michael H Lam, 
Michael Y W Lee. Elizabeth A 
Maclean, William I Mahoney 
Jr , Patricia A Nugent, Jennifer 
M (JHarc, Anna O'Neill. I racy 
L O'Sullivan. Matthew J 
Risitano. Melinda K Roberts, 
Robert J Shaw. Michael A 
Siteman, Jo Anne C Sprague 
C;rade 7: 

High Honors: Ellen M Barrett, 
I>illy Chan, Aimee Chin. 
Christian P Ciavarro, Michael 
M Conners. Jake Costa, Jeanette 
E Currie, Amy B Czarnov^ski. 
Cara H DiMattia, Kim 
Eitzgerald-Swan 

Jennifer M Cieorge, Judith E. 
Cjoodman, Tara M Guarnieri. 
Alyssa M. Haldoupis, Brenda 
Hayduk, CassianJac, Timothy P 
Johnson, Erin Kinnally, Samuel 
Kwan, Tracy A. Linehan, Irene 
H l.utts, Lesley A. Mahonev. 
Paul E McCluskev, Susan 
J. McColc, Hug^h J. 

Meighan. Robyn V. Mitchell. 
Dean Morris. Gretchen M. 
O'Hare. Nicole S H Ormon. Jodi 
A Pacheco, Eleanor L. Ryan. 
Rebecca J Siteman. Kan MR 
Tam, Anna Tom, Jennifer 



Whalen, Amy S Y. Wong, Steven 
Wong. Michael Yce. David A 
Ziolkov^ski 

Honor*: ' Philip O Bell. 
Gregory B Buck, Robert B 
C adv, Ciarvin M C han, Sarah B 
Crockett. Kclley M. C'ronin, 
Angela M DeMasi. Cheryl 
Devin, Katherine M DohertV/ 
Erin M Duff>. Mark R Evans, 
Matthew S Penncssy. Meredith 
J Lord, Lisa J Ciacicia. Amy E 
Cialman. Nelson Ciee. Michael J 
(iicse, Jesse Harding, Scott 
M Harris. Christine M Kelly. 
Taewan Kim, Marc V Larson, 
Dixon Lee, John W Lewis, John 
A MacNeil. Erin B Mancss. 

Michelle C Manning, Kimbcrly 
K Marsden, Jennifer A Masters, 
Terry M McCann, Claire M 
McCadhy, Holly R McDonough, 
Kathleen M McLoughlin. 
Marianne McSwecnev, Mclanie 
M Moffelt, Christopher R 
Olsen, Stephanie A Olsen, Maria 
C Passalacqua. Edward L 
Petunelli L fDaniel M. Reillv. 
Matthew L. Shea, Suzanne K 
Sidahmed, Jennifer A Stcen. 
Erica M. Trabucco, Sean J. 
Vermette, Cheryl A Vickers, 
Michael Walsh, Scrgi Wassiliew. 
Caroline Wong. Irene M Yalch, 
Mark Zych. 

Grade 8: 
High Honors: Jason A 
Bouffard, Lap W. Cheng, Shana 
S. Cobban. Jana Coao. Daniel 
D DeBettcncourt. Laila M. 
DiSilvio, John P Drohan. Julie 
C. Feurtado. Elizabeth M 
Flaherty. Sarah E. Goodman. 



Ja.son D. Cirotrian, Pauline M 
Hamilton. Dana W Johnson, 
Sharon M Kavanagh, Evan M. 
Kiley, Pauline Lam. Allan P 
Larson. Christopher J Lineman, 
Nicole M. Mahoney, Zef 
Marnikovic, Eric G. McClelland, 
Julie A .McCloskey. Lee A. 
Morganclli, Hipe T Ngo. 
Kenneth D Park. Jacqueline 
Poller, Katherine E Raymond. 
Jennifer M Richmond, Anthony 
R Sabadini, Eva Shea, Scott R. 
Simmons. Beth E. Sulhvan, Kara 
K. Sullivan. Dean J. Tantillo. 
Jodie A Trafton, Robert V. 
Trifonc. Erin L. Twomev. Claire 
M Walsh. Allen WK' Wong. 
Anne Wong, Judy Yeung. 

Honon: Meredith A Barnes, 
Christine Barrett, Renee 
Barsanti, Sara C Buckley, 
Raymond J Byrne. Todd C. 
Carson, Maureen Culy, Carrie 
M DiTullio, Gonzalo, Donoso, 
William J Eddy, John C. Eahey. 
Jason Fan. Matthew Fratolillo. 
Kevin Glennon, Karen M. 
Gralton, Stephanie A Head, 
Alison M Hurley. Maria A. 
Kalantzis, Marie A Kane. 
Christine M Karvelis. Kelly 
Kimball. Yvonne Lam, Kin Y. 
Lee. Samson Lee, Mcrimee O. 
MacLeod. Thomas R Manning, 
Kristin M Manzer, Paul 
McDonnell, Traccy L. Nickcrson, 
Stephen Osborne. Ann M. 
Papagno. Dale K Parry. Cristine 
S Quiton, Joanna Rugnetta, 
Peter G Rvan, Daniel N. 
Solimini, Brian K. Swanton, 
Shawn Todd. Alvson Vidoli. 



Lori Allen Receives Quincy Legion Award 



Fori Allen, a member of the 
graduating class at Quincy 
Point Middle School, was 
recently presented the Quincy 



American Legion Post Award 
by Past Commander and 
Quincy Point alumnus 
Robert Leo Eng. 



The award is presented on 
the basis of courage, honor, 
leadership, patriotism, 
scholarship and service. 



Allen is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul Allen. 

Students are nominated 
and selected by members of 
the school staff. 



CITY OF QUINCY 

CHANGE IN RESIDENTIAL RUBBISH PICKUPS 



1 



NOTICE: Effective July 13th, 1987, ONLY the following streets will undergo a 
schedule change. If your street is NOT listed, you will be continued to be picked 
up the same day as you now are. 
The following streets will change from Monday to Tuesday: 

East Elm Ave. 
West Elm Ave. 
Davis Street. 
Franklin Ave. 



(from Sachem to W. Elm) 
Gould Street 
Muirhead Street 



Staunton Street 
Briggs Street 
Mason Street 
Willow street 
Phillips street 
Marlboro Street 
(from Waterson Ave. 
to Willet St.) 



Kemper Street 
Bass street 
Speakman Street 
Green Street 
(from Waterston to Elm) 
Bromfield St. 
Elm Ave. 
Beach St. 



The following streets will be changed from Monday to Thursday: (These streets 
will be picked up on Monday and Thursday the week of July 6th only. Thereafter, 
the pickup day will be Thursday.) 



Faxon Avenue 
Saville Avenue 
Huntley Road 
Russell Park 
Edgewood Circle 
Edgemere Road 
Cedar Place 
Adeline Place 
Johnson Avenue 
Linden Court 



Gilson Road 

Woodward Avenue 

Greenleaf Street 

Putman Street 

Clifton Street 

Merrymount Road 

(from So. Artery 

to Hancock St.) 

Left Side of Southern Artery 

from Sea Street to 
Furnace Brook Pkwy. 



Butler Road 
(from So. Artery 
to Hancock Street) 
Lafayette Street 
Armory Street 
Hudson Street 
Marginal Road 
Furnace Brook Pkwy. 
(from Hancock SL 
to Southern Artery) 



ALL OF THE GERMANTOWN SECTION WILL BE CHANGED FROM 

I!L^iE.iU^J^'!!l2*^^ 

The following streets will be changed from Tuesday to Wednesday: 



Billings Street 
(from Newbury to 
Commdr. Shea Blvd.) 



Sagamore Street 
Blackwell Street 
Prospect Street 
Young Street 



Kendall Street 
Coe Street 
Price Street 
Hunt Street 



The following streets will be changed from Thursday to Friday: 



Booth Street 
Payson Street 
Brook Road 



Quincy Street 
Jackson Street 
Pleasant Street 



Stevens Street 
Marsh Street 
Water Street 
(Brook Rd. to Bridge) 



Page 12 Qiilncy Swt Tlmnday. Jdy ♦, Ifl7 



Independence Day 

Breakfast Held At 

Squantum First Church 



Surrounded by waving 
American flags and the sound 
of patriotic marches, the 
congregation of the First 
Church of Squantum met out- 
of-doors yesterday for its 
annual independence Hay 
breakfast before the Sunday 
ser\ice 

The breakfast was 
sponsored by soung people ol 
the church to raise money for 
summer camperships at 
Christian camps and 
conferences. 

During the ser\icc. Re\ 
I)r (iene I angcMn. pastor, 
preached on the subject. "1 he 
Roots Of Our Freedom." 
tracing fundamental concepts 
implicit in the American 
Constitution back to their 
Biblical origin. 

Dr Fangevin urged his 
listeners not to be the muddle- 
headed kind o\ Hag-waver 
who thinks that American 
leaders can do no wrong but 
rather that kind of Christian 
patriot who truK lo\es the 
\alues that American 



democracy represents at its 
best and who applies his or 
her critical intellect to the 
issues of the day as an 
expression of that lo\e 

Once again. Dr. L.angc\in 
attacked the present 
American policv of supporting 
m e r c e n a r > fighters in 
Nicaragua 

"Supporting the contras is 
supporting terrorism in the 
name of the American 
people." he said. "It is 
important for us as Christians 
to read our daily newspapers 
and sec what these so-called 
'freedom fighters' are realh 
doing " 

He was also concerned 
about charges that empknees 
of the American government 
ha\e been in\ol\ed in a 
cocaine-smuggling operation 
ol massive proportions to 
earn mone\ to support the 
contras 

"These are the people who 
dishonor our flag." Dr. 
LangcNin said. 

A Senate committee 



headed by Senator John 
Kerry will be opening 
hearings on these charges 
within the next few weeks, he 
noted 

Dr I angevin called upon 
members of the church to give 
their first allegiance to Jesus 
Christ and his Kingdom and 
then to use their influence to 
support and correct and build 
American democracy as "the 
greatest experiment in 
freedom in the history ol the 
world " 

Dons Sinckler. Mary 
Ruth Scott. Bob Gorill and 
Fred MacMillan sang "O 
(iod. Beneath Thy Ciuiding 
Hand" as the offertory 
anthem Stewart Scott and 
lore Wallin were the ushers 
Ha/el Mayne and (irace 
Holmes were in charge of the 
relreshments tor the 
Fellowship Hour after the 
serv ice 

1 his Sunda\. the congrega- 
tion will once again gather for 
worship at 9:30 am Visitors 
are welcome. 



Outdoor Service At 
Covenant Congregational 



This Sunda\, the 10 a.m. 
worship service at Covenant 
Congregational Church. 
Whitwell and Granite Sts.. 
will be held outside, in the 
church park adjacent to the 
building, weather permitting. 

Those attending may bring 
their own lawn chairs, but 
chairs are provided. All 
members are reminded that 
each one is a greeter lor the 
summer. 

Rev. Fred I.awson's 
sermon will focus on the 
thought "Be Merciful" from 
Luke, the first in a series of 
messages based on that 
gospel. Richard Smith, 
minister ot music, will plav 
the prelude, offertory and 
postludc on the portable 
electronic organ and 



accompany Ken Nelson, 
baritone soloist. 

An attended nursery is 
available for children age five 
and younger in the church 
building. Following the 
service, a coffee hour will be 
shared in Person Hall, hosted 
by Anna and Bob Day. 

Highlights of the 102nd 
annual meeting of the 
Evangelical Covenant Church 
held in Sturbridge were 
included in the church 
bulletin Delegates to the 
meeting were Rev Ered 



Law son and Robert Dano 

Tomorrow (Fridav). the 
Christian Education Board 
and all volunteers for the 
Vacation Dav Camp will meet 
at the church fhe \'acation 
Day Camp will be held 
Wednesdays June 15 through 
Aug. 12 trom 9 to 1 1 30 am 
There will be a registration 
fee. The theme will be "A 
Journey to Japan " 

More information about 
any of the church's activities is 
available bv calling the church 
office at 479-5728. 



Masons Bloodmobile 



Wollaston Church 
of the >Nazarene 




1 he Quincy Masons will 
sponsor a c o m m u n 1 1 v 
bloodmobile Saturday, July 
1 1 from 8;30a.m. to 1:30 p. m 
at the Masonic Jemple. 1170 
Hancock St., Quincv 

Anvone 17 vears old or 



older, who is in good health, 
weighs at least 110 pounds. 
has never had hepatitis and 
has not given blood in the past 
eight weeks may donate 

Seventeen year olds must 
have written parental consent. 



j7 E Elm Ave , Wollatton 
— Service* — 

Sunday HOOim t6 00pm 
W*dn«»diy 7 00 p m 



(( 



-" '^ 



65 Washington Street Quincy, MA 02169 

479-6512 / 479-4932 

.'.'.* '"I. Sunday School 9 30 a n 

Starling July 1 - Sept 1 

Morning Worship 

Evening Service 

Wed Evenings 

Bible Study & Prayer Service 

Nursery provided at all services 
Rev Sid A Veenstra, Pastor, Teactier 

A.M.: APPROVED BY GOD 
P.M.: SENT FORTH 

Affiliated with Baptist General Conference 
Northern Baptist Conference 



1000 a m 

6 00 p m 

7 00 p m 



CENTRAL 

BAPTIST 

CHUMCH 



^ 



God so loved the world 

that He gave His only Son . . . 

Now . . . 
What can YOU do? 

Do you think you can meet God in the Catholic Church? 
Have you ever thought about becoming a Catholic? 

For a non-pressured inforindl look at the Catholic Church, try 

"Conversatiori^s in the Catholic Faith", sponsored by 

St. JoTin the Baptist Parish community. 

For further information, call St. John's Adult Center, 

Tel. #770-1586 

Church of St. John the Baptist, 44 School St., Quincy 773 1021 




BKIHW^ S( HOI ARSMIP recipients were, from left. Shirk) l*>ne. Iimm> Nu//flla, 
Barbara .Sluarl. Jackie Rivers, Danielle Spring. Susan /.eiba. ( hrislopher Roberts and Krik 
Pulsifer. 

11 Presented Scholarships 
At Belhanv Church 



Eleven scholarship awards 
were made recentK to 
Bethany students who are 
beginning or continuing their 
higher education. 

Recipients were I)a\id I 
Murphy. Jacqueline P. 
Rivera. Christopher S 
Roberts, I miiv B Ross. 



Danielle I Spring. Barbara 
A Stuart, and Susan P 
Zeiba. all of Quincy. Richard 
M Carr of Braintrcc. Shirles 
D. Pyne of Milton. lamms 
Voz/ella of Weymouth and 
fcrik C" Pulsifer of Pembroke 
The scholarship awards 
come from special lunds set 



up for that purpose 

.Awards this year wen 
made from the Bcthan\ 
Scholarship Fund. Munrn!.- 
D Mad ean Schoiurship 
fund. }■ Ha/el Madirego; 
Scholarship fund. \ irgini.i 
Wakeman Noyes Mcmona! 
Fund and the Cioudcv luni) 



'God Will Manage' 
Sermon Topic At Bethany 

tK.- ..iimm#T ;il litnntivt Hnur\cr nursc 



During the summer at 
Bethan\ Congregational 
Church, Coddington and 
Spear Sts. Quincv (enter, 
there will be only one worship 
service at 10 am m the 
sanciuar\ 

I he Res J William 
Arnold, senior minister, will 
preach the sermon on 
Sunday. July 12, entitled, 
"(lod Will Manage" I he 
sermon will be based on 
scriptural texts from I Kings 
19:9-18 and I torinlhians 
\2(>-}\ SyKia A Sanchez 
will be the la\ scripture 
reader I he associate 
minister. Res Joel I 
Huntington, will ser^ e as the 



liturgist 

Bethany's baritone soloist, 
Paul Dasid Johnson, will sing 
two selections " I h e 
Shepherd's Psalm" b\ 
Demaresl and "Somebods 
Bigger I han Vou and I" b\ 
I ange I he guest organist will 
be Ke\in (ialie 

During the service the 
sacrament of ( hrisiian 
baptism will be administered 

to C raig Michael Moore, son 
ot Andiew M Moore and 
Anne (I ho mas) M oore 
(lodparents will be Mary M 
Moore and I awrence 
Donaghue 

I he C hurch Sch(»oI is 
closed lor the siinimei. 



However, nurserv cate 
babies and toddletv i- 
provided 

Ihe service will h 
broadcast "live" direct lii>;i 
Bethanv's sanctuarv at !' 
am over radio si.i! 
WJDA, \}{H) ke 

•\ lellowship houi vvi!! ^ 
held in the Mien P.uJni ,r, 
am following the v^^||^(; : 
seiv ice huliv iduaN ,i' 
families trom the afe,i ,'. 
invited to share in hoii ' 
worship and lellowship 

lur more intoini.i! ■ 
about Bethanv's ministi = 
and programs, please ci'ii!,!. 
the church olticeat J^'^-^^i" 



Applications Being Taken 
For Head Start Program 



Ihe First Chance Head 



EVERY DAY CAU THE 

DAILY IIBLE'' 

473.4434 

QUINCY POINT 

CONGREGATIONAL CHUKN 

COtltfl OF SOUTNCIN AIHIY 
AND WASMNGTON V . OUMCY 



Start pre-school program is 
taking applications for next 
V ear's program tor children 
who live in Quincv, Braintree. 
VNe\ mouth and Hull 

( hildren who enter the 
federallv funded program 
must be four years of age by 




I 



Church of 

Saint John the 

Baptist 

44 School St Oulncy, Matt 

PASTOR 

Rev William R McCanhy 

ASSOCIATES 

Rev Oanl«l M Graham 

Ra* Edward G Carroll 

Ra» Theodore Forlier 

Quincy Hospital Chaplain 

In ratldertca 

Ra* Mr Charlai Sullivan 

Deacon 

MASS SCHEDULE 

ALL MASSES IN THE UPPER CHURCH 

Saturday 4 00 & 7 00 pm 
SundHy 7 00. 8 15 9 30 and 11 00 am 1? 30 and 5 30 pm 
Daily Masses Monday thru F nday 8 00 am and 5 30 pm 




Confessions in Chapel 
Sat 3-3 45 PM. 7 45-8 15 PM 
Rectory-21 Gay St 




773-1021 



Dec .^1, I9K7 and mee! 
federal guidelines ChiUlien 
with special needs ma\ fiHi-' 
the program at age three 

I ransportation, snacks .iiul 
hot lunches are provuled i' 
children enrolled I here is ii' 
cost. 

Iirst Chance Head Start i- 
for the total familv as well aN 
the child 

Parents mav volunteer m 
the classroom and have input 
in all major decisions ot the 
program. 

Programs and assistance m 
the areas of cducalM'ti. 
nutrition, health, menial 
health and social services aie 
provided to families ..I 
children in the program 

It vou think your child 01 a 
child you know is eligible call 
the I irst Chance Head Stati 
program at K4K-HI42 



THE QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

Corner Soulhcin Artery 
and Washington St Quincy 

SUNDAY SERVICES. 10 a.m. 

Rev Fred Alwood-Lyon 
Rfv Carol E AlwoodLyor. 

773 6424 (Child Care provide) ' 
Call The Daily Bible 4 72 4434 



Tbyrt^y. July «. IW QfO^tj Sm f»|e IJ 





I 



EAGI.K SC Ol'T BAOCK is pinned on C'hmtopher S. Saniuk of Boy Scout Troop 90 by his 
parents, ( arol and Stanley Saniuk, during ceremonies at the Elks Home, Squantum. 

(Quincy Sun phoio h\ C.harU'% Flanf) 



LICENSE PLATES commerating Quincy's lOOth anniversary will |o on sale at next week's 
Sidewalk Sale in downtown Quincy for S5 each. From left, Quincy Centennial Committee co- 
chairmen Eugene C reed on and Joyce Baker present the first license plate to Mayor Francis 
McCauley. The anniversary celebration will ofTicially begin in June, 19U. 

lifuincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

Deirdre Miller Receives Degree 




Dcirdre E. Miller, daughter 
of Ms. Judith E. Miller of 
Linden Court Quincy was 
recently awarded a Bachelor 
of Science in Education 
degree from Lesley College. 
Cambridge 



A 1983 graduate of Quincy 
High School, Miller majored 
in Early Childhood Educa- 
tion Moderate Special Needs 
with a minor in Psychology. 

She was a member of the 
Dean's Advisory Council. 



Miller held field placement 
positions at Murphy School, 
Dorchester. Winnbrook 
School in Belmont and 
Hilltop School in Brandford, 

W. Yorkshore, England. 



I HOW CREATIVE ARE YOU? I 



yes 



no S« 



n 



TLDDY BK \RS Pl( NIC was lots of fun for students such as. from left. Marcia Hern, 

Martha Sledman and Rebecca Kavorito who are from the Parker .School District but are 

atlrndine the Montclair School. ,, ^ . , , , 

HJuiiu\ >un /ihiiiDs h\ I niu (,nriiinnl 

Gary Grimes Named President 
At O'Connell Management 



1. Do you have a favorite song'? 

2. Do you have a photo album full 
of great pictures'?* 

3. Do you have a VCR? " C 

4. Can your favorite songs and pictures 

be made into a meaningful music video'' ~ Z 

If you answered yes to all of these questions. 

you are very creative!! 

Now. bring your favorite photos and your favorite 
music to Quincy s finest transfer center 



Gary S. Grimes has been 
appointed president of 
O'Connell Management Co., 
Inc., a division of the Quincy 
based O'Connell Develop- 
ment Company. 

Some of O'Connell 
Development Compa.iy's 
projects include the World 
Trade Center in Boston, 
Marina Bay in Quincy and 
Monarch Place in Springfield. 

Current president Peter F. 
O'Connell will continue to 
work on special development 
projects within the company 
both locally and internation- 
ally. 

"We arc very pleased that 
Mr. Grimes will be joining 
O'Connell Management, Inc. 
and feel that his immense 
experience and expertise will 
contribute positively to the 
company's growth." O'Connell 

said. 



Grimes was elected vice 
president of General 
Dynamics Corp. and named 
vice president - general 
manager of the Quincy 
Shipbuilding Division in 
May. 1983. He had served as 
general manager of the 
division since September 
1980. 

Grimes, a native of 
Schenectady. NY., joined 
General Dynamics in 1%9 
and was transferred to the 
Quincy division in 1970 as 
general supervisor of 
production support. 

He has held increasingly 
responsible management 
positions, including assistant 
to the general manager of 
General Dynamics, director 
of planning and facilities and 
controller. 

He received a masters of 
business administration 



degree in finance from 
Syracuse University in 1969. 
Mr. Grimes had previously 
earned a bachelors degree 
from Alfred University, in 
Alfred. New York. 

Grimes will join O'Connell 
Management, Company, Inc. 
a company with over 500 
employees. July 6. 




PHOTOQUICK OF QUINCY I 



1433 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

Together we can make beautiful 
music videos!! 



^ Slides, movies, and artwork can also be transferred i^ 
§ to video tape. Come in for a free demonstration. ^ 



I" 



I- 

i 



"It's Simply Italian -- 
And Then Some" 

And They're All Simply Delicious 
A book featuring the recipes of 

Marie J. D'Olimpio 

On Sale In Quincy At 

That's Italian, Franklin St. 
Previte's Market, Sumner St. 

And At 

Samoset Pharmacy 
Samoset Ave., Merrymount 
Price: $5.95 



|,. ..tm TT"»tmv*tttLLi^tnni.icgri 



^"^" 


Political Advertisement 


Political Advertisement 






The McCauley 
For 






Mayor Committee 




^H^^ ^^ 


r^^^^H 


CordxaWy invites you 
to join with 






Mayor Frank McCauley 






for 




^^^^^^B ^^^^V/^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^l 


The Grand Opening of the 

McCauley for Mayor Headquarters, 

1661 Hancock St., comer of School St., 

Thursday, July 16, 1987, 7 P.M. 

McCaulev for Mauor Committpp 


Eleanor Reidy, Chairperson 1 
211 WhitwellSt 1 






Pmp 14 Qulncy Swi Thiiraday, July *, iW 



Quincy Hospital Meetings 



Quincy City Hospital 
announces the following 
schedule of meetings which 
are held free of charge. All arc 
welcome 

Conference Room: Admln- 
Ktnition Building • second 
floor: 

{)\crcatcrs Anonymous. 
Sunday. 7 p.m. 

( onference Room: Hunting 



Buildint • third tloor: 

Alcoholics Anonymous, 
daily. 10 30 am 

Alcoholics Anonymous- 
Beginners' Meeting. Sunday. 
I p.m. 

Alcoholics Anonymous- 
Twelve Step Meeting. 
Monday. 7:30 p.m. 

Narcotics Anonymous- 
ly cl\e Step Meeting. 



1 hursday. 7:.30 p.m. 

Adult Children of Alcohol- 
ics. Saturday. 8 p.m. 

Al Anon. Sunday. 8 p.m. 

I motions Anonymous. 
Tuesday, 7 p.m ; Sunday. .^ 
p.m 

Overcaters Anonymous. 
Wcdnesda\. 7: 15 p m., 
Frida>. ^ p m. 



HOW LONG SINCE 
YOUR LAST HEALTH 
CHECK? 



It vc>ii\e been pnnin|J 
offa clieck-up because you 
liaven't ^>t a "HuiiiK' L^vtiir" 
— or hccAx.^ \iHir Klsv 
sclxxiiile nii^kes waiting w> 
see die L\vti)r difficult, 
this could be inipoitai it rKf^"s 
tor \'ou and \\>ur haniil\'. 
Thomas Bleii ML). 



aixi Mass Bay Me».l»cil 
Care have opened their 
new otiBces in Quuicy. 
Finally, a [\x'tor s 
i>tfice Willi a personal 
touch, and a coniiiiitnient 
ti> prtinipt service. 



hMA 



Phystcol Exams 
Colds & Flu 
Minor Infunes 
Loceratioos 
High Blood Pressure 
Bladder Infections 
Mv)c Exams 
BrthGDntd 
Immunizations 
AJlergy Shots 



CHEK 



iitSSK 



THOMAS BlfHL M.D.. • ^MSS BAY MEDOi CARE • H 57 H ANCOCK ST QUINO AA A 
CAU FOR A PROMPT APPOfNTMENT TODAY • NSURANCE ACCEPTED • 61 7 47 1 0234 



Sun 
Videos 






^' 



Preserve those precious personal 
moments or important business 
events forever on video tape to be 
seen again . . . and again. 

We have a complete video cassette recording 
service specializing in: 



• Weddings 

• Anniversaries 

• Testimonials 

• Birthday Parties 

• Lectures 

• Seminars 

• Corporate Meetings 

• Court Depositions 

And other special events 



We do it right and at the right price. 

For further Information write or call: 



Attention: Debbie McCarthy 

1372 Hancock St., Quincy 
471-3100 




SFVFNTH ANM Al. relirfment dinner dance was held recenlh b> (he Quinc> Police 
Deparlmeni al the Bryan VK\N Post. Police ( hief Francis Unn.cenler.conj-ralulaled 1 1. John 
Klaherl). left, who H retiring after 32 >ears service, and Officer Raymond Haskell. retiring afler 
38 years on the force. 

ll^hiini \ >nn i>hi>lii In lo/ii (.urniiitii 

99 On QHS Honor Roll 
For 9th, 10th, 11th Grades 



Quincy High School lists 99 
students in the ninth, KM hand 
llth grades on the fourth 
quarter honor roll. 

I hev arc: 

Grade 9: 

Distinction: ArUnc A mo, 
.IcdrcN J Bina. ( hristcn M 
C larke, Marsha R (ioodman, 
1 dward J lorio. Peter K 
1 espasii). Suchiira S Maltai, 
lenniler Pettinelli. John A 
Porcaro 

High Honors: .lohn J 
Brad\. Darlene I)e( Osta, 
Shannon I I vans, David A 
Johnston. Kathleen Kane. 
Amy S Kufert, Alma Mak, 
Michael Scolaro, Hok C. 
Wan. 



Honors: ( hristmc M 
C hilders, I ranca M Devito. 
I rina I) I urhish. I li/aheth 
(ion/ale/. Barbara I Kellcy, 
John Killilea. Robert W 
Manupelli, I homas R 
Morrell, I rm ( O'Brien, 
Dung I . On. I inda A 
Palmicro, fdward I) Ricks, 
Dora Isang, Fii/abeth \'o. 
Rina Zeidan, Ian |- Zhou 
Grade 10: 

Distinction: Mand\ ( han, 
Deanne M DeSantis, Fnnio 
F leuteri, Julie A flaherts, 
Sharon R (loodman. Jason 
(" Macka>. Lisa M 
Melchione, Daniel F^iccim. 
•lessica S Rutan. F'alricia F 
Stewart, Irene 1 S. Man, Beth 



A Wei.xler 

High Honors: Vongchang 
Fang, Corrmnc C" lichtncr, 
Robert I (irant Jr , Ha H 
Huynn. Darlene C Parr\ 

Honors: (ircgors S 
Amantc, Maureen B. 
C loonan, Maura A (iolden. 
Denise 1 Hurles. J Fodd 
K'mmell, St::c;, I eetc. I isa 
Marani. Darien J Murphv. 
I ram FF Iran. John V F* 
Fan. Jcanette /upkofska. 
Grade II: 

Distinction: Jonathan F 

llcrtoni, Michael J Bosce. 

Keilh F C annitl, Kevin J. 
Di( esare, \alerie A Fen. 
Renee F (iaura. Khala\ek FF 
FFanna. Marion J Miller, 
(iavie F Morrell, I'alricia C 
Morrell. lulie A Munn. 
F h/abeth K \ acca. Susan M 
Welhscr 

High Honors: I arrv J 
Heck rn an. M u h a c I I 
H cniet) n. Kathleen I) 
Moran. Richard Morris. ( hii 
H Ng. Hanh N Nguven, 
Wendv R Stirling. F)ebra M 
I honiNon. I niciv I ran 

Honors: I \ nn A Bevcn, 
FF eat her Binscu, ( hervl F 
Blaney, Richard F ( oletta, 
Demian David. Vioreen M 
F arrand, F'rashant M dadre. 
A nne Fl a, I homas .1 
Keileher. FFong I lang. Beth 
A. Manning. Kevin M 
Marstim. Janet i Morrell. 
F uen \ Wan. Catherine 
Wclliver 



" I wish 

rd known that 

before" 

We hear people we serve say this often. 

That's why we extend an open invitation to 
anyone to consult with us in advance. 



Keohane 

FUNERAL HOMEJNC, 

785 and 333 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 
773-355 1 
'PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE" 



LEGAL NOTICE 



C OMMOSNMAI IH 

OF MASSAC HI SI I IS 

IMF IKIAI ( Ot Kl 

I HI I'KOBMI AM) 

I AMII N (Ol Rl 

Norlolk l)iv ision 

Dotkcl'No K^I'U>M( I 

NOTK K m 
( ()\SKM\ MOKSHH' 

10 \i\ A'RK ' M (iKM)> 
ol yt IN(N 111 \aui ( lUiniv ,in,' 
all persons inlcresicd m :' i 
csidtc ul HI A IRK i M 
(iR ADN .itui In ihi M.iss,iii 
sctis Deparlmeni <'( Mitii.i 
Hc.ilth. a peiiiion h.is hcit: 
presented in the abiivi 
captioned m.tllci pr,ivitif; ih.i! 
\ A I F R II I* A I M I R • ! 
ifi INC > in Ihe C oiitit\ ' 
NOR I Ol K he appoinUi! 
(.onset \,ii. IF vMlh siiielv on i^ u 
bond 

11 voii desiie lo ohiect to ttu 
allovKame ol said petitioti. vm, 
ix vour attorncv musi lilt .1 
vMillcn appearance m s.m) 
( oiiri .It Oedhani on or hcloic 
ten o'clock in the lorcno.'ii ■ 
Aii>:iist *> NK' 

W ilness. R.ihcti M I : 
F squire. I irst lusiut t<\ s.n,; 
( oiiri at Dedham this t»eni\ 
lourth dav ol .lunc, in the vc.r 
ol our I Old one thousand intK 
hundred and ci^ihlv seven 

IMOMXS PMHK k HI (.U}'> 
Heihttt of I'robiiif 
"" 4 «■' 

( OMMONWI Al III 

OF MASSA(Hrsi I is 

IHI IRIAI ( OIRI 

IHI F»ROBAII AND 

I AMII V ( 01 R I 

Norlolk Division 

Docket No 87F'I66KI I 
Fsiatc ol RICHARD 1 
VARNF V late ol QIINC > m 
Ihe County ol NORIOI K 
NOTICK 

A petition has been presented 
in the abovc-captioncd matter 
praying that the last \»ill ol said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that PAlll A I VARNFV 
ol QUINCY in the County ol 
NORKOIK be appointed 
executrix named in the vvill 
without surely on the bond 

If you desire lo object to the 
allowanec of said petition, vou 
or your attorney should file a 
vvriltcn appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on August 
5, 1987 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (.^0) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Witness. Robert M Ford. 
Esquire. First Justice ol said 
C Ourl at Dedham. the twenty- 
sixth day of June, one thousand 
nine hundred and eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATHK K HI (.HIS 
Regbler of Probate 
7 9 87 



Tkm*4»y, My % tm QmkKj Sm fif* 15 



Sterling Middle School lists 
62 students on the lourlh 
quarter honor roll. 

Ihcy are: 

(•rade 6: 

High Honors: Jason S. 

( ORR STKRMNG 

Jill Caldvicli. Daniel I. 
(iardincr. Jcnniler I (iillis. 
Adorna A Hank ins. Nicole 
r. Mullen. Mar> I. Munier, 
Steven B. Nguyen. Brandon 
A. I'alu//!. Jolene M. 
Schumacher 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWI Al IM 

Of MASSAC Ml sens 

IHl IRIAI (OIRT 

J HI PROBAIl AM) 

I AMIl V COIRI 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No K7PI47KM 
Estate of ANNA H (iANGI 
AKA ANN H (iAN(iI laic ot 
Ql INC Y in the County ol 
NORIOl K 

NOTICE 
A petition has been prcNcnted 
in the ahovc-captioncd matter 
praving that the last \kill of said 
detcdcnl he proved and allo\*ed 
and that 1 Ol IS V CiANC.I ot 
griNC V in the C ountv of 
\ORf Ol K be appiunied 
executor named in the \mI1 with 
out surciv on the bond 

If sou desire to object lo the 
allov^ancc ot said petition, sou 
or sour attornev should tile a 
vsrillen appearance in said 
C ourt at Dedham on or before 
H)tH) in the lurenoon on .lul\ 
22. IVK'' 

In addiiion vou should lilc a 
wrillen stdlemcnl i>l obieclions 
lo tl\c peiiiion. giNinj! the 
speciln. j:r<>und'> iherctoti.'. 
vkilhin Ihirix ( Vli da\s alter the 
return da\ lor suth olhei iiine as 
I he C ourt. on motion vMih 
notice to the petitioner, ma' 
allo\» I in acinrdance \*iih 
Probate Rule 16 

\K ilness. Robert M I ord 
Iscjuire, first .liisiiee ol said 
C i>urt at Dedham. the ninth da> 
ot June, one lhi>usand nine 
hundred and eij.'ht> seven 
ItlOMAS PATHK K HI (.HfS 
RrfHitrr of Probate 
7 «) 87 

COMMONWI Al 1 H 

Of MASSAC fllSh I IS 

IffI IRIAI COl Rl 

Ifll PROHMl AND 

f AMIl ^ COl Rl 

l)f PARIMIM 

NORIOl fs DIMSION 

Docket No K.M .M)27tl 

NOTKK OK 

KlDl (lARVS A((Ol NI 

lo all persons interested in 
the estate ot MARIAN 1 
MACiOt'N latcolC^l INC N. in 
said CountN. deceased 

> Ou are herebv notilied 
pursuant lo Mas- R C i\ P 
Rule 72 thai the tirst. second 
and final atcount(s) ol JOHN 
I SIMONDS as Conservator - 
(the fiduciarv)of thcpropeily ol 
said MARIAN f MACiOl'N 
has -have been presented to said 
COurt for allov^ancc 

If you desire to preserve your 
right lo nic an objection to said 
account(s), you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before the 
iwclflhday of August, 1987. the 
return day of this citation You 
may upon written request by 
registered or certified mail to 
the fiduciary, or to the attorney 
for the fiduciary, obtain without 
cost a copy of said accounl(s). If 
you desire to object lo any item 
of said account(s), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
within thirty days after said 
return day or within such other 
lime as the Court upon motion 
may order a written statement 
of each such item together with 
the grounds lor each objection 
thereto, a copy to be served 
upon the fiduciary pursuant to 
Mass. R C IV P Rule S 

Witness, Robert M. ford. 
Fsquire. f irst Justice ot said 
Court, this second day ot July. 
1987 

THOIVIAS PATRK K HI CHKS 
Rcgislcr 
7 9 87 



62 On Sterling Honor Roll 

.1 I.... n,mAm !■ /"..J. •. 1-C. 5 



Gride 7: 

Hi{h Honors: Rachel M 
Butland, Patricia R. Vacca 

Honors: Meredith Blake, 
Barba I I3ella, Kathleen I) 
(iriffin, Jennifer L. Higgins. 
David Khaw, Deborah A. 
Kilnapp. Heather Larkin. 
Christopher Loi. Heather S 
M c M u r d \ . Alexander 
A Par/ych, Sharon \. 
Pettengill, Paraskevi Regas. 
Hai H. Iruong, Marlene T 
Venuto 



Grade 8: 

High Honors: Donna M. 
Colby. 

Honors: Christina J. 
Abban, Cheryl Adams, 
Kathleen Boyle, Kathy J. 
Brown, Christa Cole. Gina A. 
Collins. Alfonso Cuomo, 
Bryan J. Enos, Robert 
Flaherty, Erica (ied/iun. 
Phuc H. Ha, Peter D. 
Henderson, Chuong T. 
Huynh. Barbara Jones. Trang 



Stephen I.oi, 
Lucas. Winna Mei 
Michalakis. Chri 
Miele. Barbara J. 
Patrick A. Neil, 
Piccarini. Dorothy 
Christopher G 
tli/abeth I Scott. 
K. Sheils, Mic 
Sherwood. Mel 
Sullivan, l,ynne R. 
Courtney Tierney, 
M. Jimmons. 



Melissa 
, Georgia 
stine A 

Mullin, 
Gina M. 

Ruscio, 
Schult/. 
Meaghan 
hael R. 
anie E. 
Swanson. 
Kimberh 



Rachelle Romberg Receives 
Degree From Emerson 



RachcMc Romberg of 
Quincy has graduated as the 
valedictorian of Emerson 
College with a bachelor's 
degree of fine arts in creative 
writing for mass communica- 
tion. 

She was a member of the 

Gold Key Honor Society and 
was inducted into Who's W ho 



Among StudentM in Ameriran 
Colleges and L'niverxitiet 

earlier this year. 

Romberg was also 
president of the Society for 
Advancement of Management 
and the associate producer of 
an Emerson sitcom 

She plans to move to Los 
Angeles and pursue a career 
writing for television. 




American Cablesystems 

Channel 23 

471-9143 

Request Club Members Call 328-9090 
Each Request TV Movie Is Only 3.95 





AMERICA'S #1 RENT-A-MOVIE CHANNEL." 



Page U Qttincy Sun Tburtday, July 9. I9t7 



Quincy Cable TV 



New Swim Schedule 
At Hancock Pool 



The local program srhrdult for 
Quincy C ablesystcms ( h. 3 and 
C'h. 9 from Wrdnesday. July 8 to 
Friday. JuIt 17. 

Ch. 3 

Wednnday, July S: 

■' pm SummcrlcM-IIV F-B.iriin 
Hugos Orchestra from the Ruth 
Gordon Amphithcairc 

Thursday. July 9: 
6:5'' pm Rh\mes of the Iimcs 
"f pm Ice Mucci's Bodv Works 
■':30 pm Ou'nt> Maga/inc 

8 pm C ahletalk 
8:30 pm Dan hcvcr 

9 pm Job Scarch-.lcrrv Flhs 

Friday. July i«: 
2:2'' pm Rhymes of the Times 

3 pm Senior Smarts (R( 

3:30 pm I ibrar> Book Nook (R) 

4 pm Davey & (loliaih 

Sunday, July 12: 

4 pm The Carpenter's Union 

4:30 pm You Are the Light of the 

World 

7 pm Summcrfcst-Douai Boys 

Choir 

Monday. July 13: 
6:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 

7 pm Rcadmg Discovery 
7:30 pm Senior Spotlight 

8 pm Senior Smarts (R) 

8:30 pm Joe Mucci's Body Works 

Tuesday. July 14: 

6:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 



7 pm 1 ihrary Hook No«(k 

7 30 pm I ocal Focus 

8 pm School a\^a> from School 

Wednesday, July 1$: 

7 pm Summcrfcst - live - Rene and 
Maria Rancourt live from the 
Ruth (iordon Amphitheatre 

Thursday. July 16: 

1 pm I ivc from the Sidewalk 
Ba/aar - Watch us or come down 
and talk to us on air W'ev^ili have 
giveaways and pri/es all day 

Friday. July 17: 
2:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 
3 pm Senior Smarts (R) 

3 30 pm library Book Nook (R) 

4 pm Davey &. Goliath 

7:15 pm Miss Quincy Bay 
Pageant live from Quincv Center 

Ch. 9 

Wednesday, July 8: 

1 pm Summcr(est-I IVE-Baron 
Hugo's Orchestra Irom the Ruth 
(iordon Amphitheatre. 

Thursday, Jyly 9: 
■» pm Joe Mucci's Body Works 
■^ 30 pm Ou'if) Maga/ine 
8 pm (ahletalk 

8 30 pm Dart hevcr 

9 pm Job Search-Jerry Ellis 

Friday, July 10: 

I0:.30 am Talk about the Mind 

(R) 

11:30 am Evan Korcv's Variety 

Plus(R) 

2 5'' pm Rhvmcs of the Times 

3 pm Senior Smarts (R) 



3 30 pm ! ihrar\ H.xik Nook (K) 
•1 pin Dii\c\ A (ioh.iih 

Sunday, July 12: 

4 pm Ihc Carpenter's Union 

4 30 pm You Are the I ight ol the 

W orld 

'' pm Summerfest - Douai Choir 

Monday. July 13: 
' pm Reading Discovery 

7 30 pm Senior Spotlight 

8 pm Senior Smarts (R) 

8 30 pm Joe Mucci's Body Works 
Tuesday. July 14: 

7 pm Fontbonne Fikus 
■'30 pm I ocal Focus 

8 pm Talk about the Mind 

Wednesday. July IS: 
7 pm Summerfest-l ive-Rene and 
Maria Rancourt from the Ruth 
Gordon Amphitheatre 

Thursday, July 16: 

7 pm Joe Mucci's Body Works 
7:30 pm Screening Room 

8 pm Cableialk 
8:30 pm TBA 

9 pm QJC Maga/ine 

Friday. July 17: 

10:30 am Talk about the Mind 

(R) 

1 1:30 am Focus on Education 

2:57 pm Rhymes of the Times 

3 pm Senior Smarts (R) 

3:30 pm Library Book Nook (R) 

4 pm Davey & Goliath 

7:15 pm Miss Quincy Bay 
Pageant live from Quincy Center 



Ihc Qiiincy Recreation 
Department announces its 
new schedule of recreational 
svk ims at the I incoln- 
Hancock Community School 
Pool for the summer. 

Ihc schedule features 
se\eral new suimming limes 
and took ellect Monday. 

The pool is open lo Quincy 
residents who obtain a 
participation card in the poo! 
entrance on Water St. in 
south-west Quincy There are 
a variety of memberships 



available for family, youth, or 
adults, for either one half year 
or one full year Ihc new 
schedule is as follows: 

Family Swims: M»>nday 
through Friday. 6 pin to 
6:50. 

I uesday and I hursday, 7 
p.m. to 7:50. 

Saturday and Sunday, 
1:50 to 2:30 or 2 40 to 3:20 

Voulh-Ase 6-12: Monday 
through Fridav, 5:10 p.m. lo 
5:55. 



Saturday and Sunday. I 
p m to 1:40 

Adult Swims: Monday 
through Fridav. 8 pm to 
8:50. 

Saturday and Sunday. 4:20 
pm to 5 p.m. 

Youfh-AKe l.Vlg: Monday. 
Wednesday, and Friday. 7 
p m. to 7:50 

Saturday and Sunday, 3:30 
p m to 4: 10 



=H= 



Quincy Sun 
Ch.8 



Purtu'fi 



(Quincy. rrfional. national 
and world news around the 
clock seven days a week. 
Phis 

5ip*cial Vidro News Reports 
and Features. 

Mondays. 5 30 P M , 7 30 P M 
Tuesdays. 10 A M . 5 .10 P M . 
1 }0 P M 

Wednesdays. ID AM. 5 .10 
P M . 7 30 P M 

Thursdays, lOA M . 5 .10 P M . 
7 30 P M 

Fridays. 10 AM, 5 .10 P M , 
7 10 P M 
Saturdays. 10 A M 



HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

FOR ANY DAY • EVERY OCCASION 

"There's No Taste 
Like Homemade 

68A Billings Rd. 
N. Quincy, MA 

472-8558 



:^ 




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with the ones you love. 



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can watch together. 

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Don't miss a minute of the magic. Enjoy quality 
programs all summer long with The Disney Channel. 
CalJ your local cable company to subscribe today! 




Top Ten 

Video 

Rentals 



1 "Hannah And Hrr 
.Sistrrs" starring; Woody 
AUen, Mia Farrow ;ui(l 
Michael Caine (MH(» 
Cannon) l^st Wctk No 1 

J "LittU- .Shop < >f llor 
rors" stiUTinn Rick Mora- 
niN. Steve Martin and 
John Candy (W;irn«T) N<» 



'\ ".himpin" .lack Flash ' 




Tho^fst^S^ Channel 



CALL 471-9143 



rnrn, i,i.r»,™, i,„.^„ 




.Starring Whoopi Goldberg 

(CBS/Fox) No. :i 

4 The Color Of Money" 
.starring Paul Newman and 
Tom Cruise (Paramount) 
No 4 

5. -Crimes f )f The Heart" 
starring Diane Keaton, 
Jessica Lange and Sissy 
Spacek (I/onmar) No. 7 

6 "Peggy .Sue (Jot Mar 
ried' starring Kathleen 
Turner (CiiS/Fox) No F> 

7 -Wanted Dead Or 
Alive" starring Rutger 
Hauer (New World) No 10 

H. "Ferris Bueller's Day 
Ofr starring Matthew 
Broderick (Paramount) 
No. 6 

9 "Children ( )f A Ix>s.ser 
God" sttaring William 
Hurt and Marlee Matlin 
(Paramount) No. 8 

10 "Heartbrealc Ridge" 
starring Clint Eastwood 
(Warner) No. 9 



NFW RKI.KA.SKS 

I he Color Purple 
Ihc (ioklcn ( hild 
Modern (nrls 
I hat's i lie 
Impure I houghlx 



Sp<>n\orrd b> 

"\our MolhwiMMl ( onnfclion" 

'^DEOEXPRESSSS 




471-1959 



<19 HANCOCK ST MO OUINC" MA 



(a\r\ I 



Legion Baseball 

Morrisette In 3-Way 
Tie For First Place 



TiMinAir. My 9. I9t7 QmkKj Sm Pkf* 17 



The Morrisette legion 
baseball team ended their 
week in a first place tie with 
Milton and Mass I ruck 

Morrisette. who has pla>ed 
all ol its games to date, stands 
at 9-3 while Milton and Mass 
I ruck are t>-2 and Brainirec is 
5-2 with make-up games 
pending 

Morrisette took a win b> 
forfeit as Carter Post tailed to 
field a team fhc> downed 
NVollaston 5-3 but bowed to 
Milton. 4-2. 

Against W o 1 1 a s t o n . 
Mornsette's Larry laglieri 
and Wollaston\ Jay I espasio 
hurled with their backs 
against the wall for the first 
SIX innings as they were forced 
time and again to pitch out ol 
trouble in a \ery close game. 

Morrisette had the 
opportunities to open the 
game up but could only 
manage one run on 10 hits. 
leaving nine runners on base. 
Wollaston had fwe hits and 
left seven stranded 

Mornsette's big inning 
finally struck in the seventh, 
scoring four runs. 

laglieri went the distance 
and upped his record to 5-1 
He allowed seven hits, fanned 
five and walked three 



Losing pitcher Lespasio 
went six and one third 
innings, giving up 12 hits, two 
walks while striking out nine. 
He was relieved by T.J. Stecn 
who surrendered two hits. 

Wollaston took a 1-0 lead 
in the bottom of the third 
when I om McDonald singled 
and moved to second on a 
Mark DiMattio sacrifice who 
reached base on a throwing 
error Dave I occhio moved 
the runners with a sacrifice 
and then Shawn Lhompson 
singled m McDonald. 

Morrisette tied the score in 
the top of the fourth. Rob 
McDonald opened the inning 
with a single but was forced at 
second on Ron Fletcher's 
fielder's choice. Chris Ricciuti 
and Billy McDougal then 
singled to load the bases. A 
run was forced home as Larry 
laglieri drew a two-out walk. 

T here was no more scoring 
until the seventh when 
Morrisette came up with 
four runs on four hits and two 
walks. Steve Minichiello led 
off with a walk and was 
sacrificed to second by Dan 
Biagini. An intentional walk 
to McDonald backfired as the 
next batter Fletcher singled 
up the middle to drive in the 



go ahead run. The runners 
reached second and third 
when the relay was mishandled 
Ricciuti drove them both 
home with a single to left and 
took second on the throw to 
the plate. He then scored on 
Taglieri's single 

Wollaston came back with 
two runs in the bottom of the 
seventh I occhio led oft with 
a double and scored on Tom 
Logan's single. Rogers, a 
pinch runner, reached third 
on an infield out and a wild 
pitch and then scored on 
another wild pitch. 

Morrisette had all singles: 
two each by Fddie Flavin. 
Minichiello. McDonald. 
Ricciuti and one apiece by 
McDougal, F'letcher. Biagini, 
Wayne Chambers and 
laglieri. 

Wollaston's locchio had 
two hits while Tom 
McDonald. Lespasio. Logan. 
Thompson and DiMattio had 
one. 

For the second time this 
season, Morrisette lost to 
Milton. Milton ace Doug 
McNeil hurled six innings of 
two-hit ball striking out 12 
and walking one. 

Morrisette's Wayne 
Chambers suffered his first 



defeat of the year, allowing 
one earned run. seven hits, 
two walks and fanning 10 
Chamber's was hurt by 
Morrisette's five errors. 

Milton scored one in the 
third, one in the fifth and two 
in the sixth to take a 4-0 
advantage. 

But Morrisette struck back 
m the seventh to score two 
runs. Iheir comeback effort 
ceased when they left the 
bases loaded 

Rob McDonald opened the 
inning with a single and then 
scored on walks to Ron 
Fletcher. Chris Ricciuti and 
Billy McDougal McNeil was 
relieved by Maguire who 
struck out the next two 
hitters. Flavin then hit a run- 
producing single but the rally 
fell short when Minichiello 
flied to center. 

Morrisette was held to four 
hits, two by Flavin, and one 
each to McDonald and 
Fletcher. 

Morrisette will play Mass 
Truck Sunday afternoon at 
Strong Field in East 
Bridgewater, travels to 
Randolph on Monday at 6 
p.m. and plays Canton at 
Canton High School at 6 p.m. 
Wednesday. 



Quincy Running Up 
Against Tough Luck 



I h e C^ u in I. V legion 
baseball team is running up 
against a streak of had luck 
after a fine start 

I asi week. C^uincy lost to 
Milton and Holbrook and 
tied Braintrcc and W cvmoulh. 

Qumcv had a 7-6 lead over 
Weymouth but Wcv mouth 
scored a run in the seventh 
inning. I he game was then 
called on account of daikncss 
and Will be plavcd i)ver at a 
later date 

Against Bramtree. the 
game was called with I he score 
tied at I- 1 at I0;3() p.m 
because of a curfew at 
Bramtree I he game, which 
lasted 1 1 innings, will be 
played over from the start on 
July 14 at Bramtree at 7 30 
p m. 

Joe lay lor started pitching 
for Quincv and went eight 
innings before being lified for 
pinch hitter MikeToland who 
singled for Quincy's onlv hit. 

Steve Happas pitched the 
last three scoreless innings. 

Ted Novio uent the 
distance for Braintree. 
fanning 14 and walking three. 
Quincy hit some shots but 
right at Braintree fielders 



Braintree had seven hits 
and five walks off two Quincy 
hurlers but were held by 
Quincy's strong defense 
Centerfielder Bill Roche ran 
down some well hit balls and 
third baseman Sean Ciately 
turned in some timelv fielding 
performances. 

Quincv scored their run in 
the fourth inning when 
Happas and Jim Dennis 

walked, both moved on a 
fielder's choice and Happas 
scored on a wild pitch. 

Bramtree tied it in the fifth 
when Bob Kearney singled, 
moved to second on a fielder's 
choice and scored on Rick 
Delvecchio's single. 

Quincy lost to Milton 5-3 
even though Quincy had eight 
hits and loaded the bases three 
times. Kyle Robertson led the 
attack with two singles and a 
double. Sean (lately had two 
singles while Steve Happas. 
Bill Roche and Nick Dragone 
had the remaining hits. 

Milton starter Fred 

Quinlan broke a finger sliding 

into third base in the fifth and 

was relieved by McNeil who 

gave up four hits but no runs 



in three inriings. Karlson had 
two triples for Milton, one 
with the bases jammed to 
drive in three runs. 

Joe Taylor took the loss for 
Quincy. Robbie Higgans 
made a relief appearance, 
striking out three in two 
innings. 

Against Holbrook. Quincy 
suffered a 7-4 loss, 
committing seven errors. 

Jim Dennis pitched well for 
Quincy, giving up eight hits, 
fanning five and walking 



none. Holbrook scored six 
unearned runs. 

Quincy had seven hits with 
Dennis having threeand Mike 
Toland two, who started his 
first game. Bill Roche and 
Rob Higgans had the other 
Quincy hits. 

Quincy plays Wollaston. 
Carter Post and Canton 
Wednesday. Thursday and 
Friday respectively at 8:30 
p.m. at Adams Field and then 
Weymouth next Monday at 
Adams at 8:30. 




KRISTOPHER KFNNEV, 9, of Quincy, finished in third 
place in the male 12 and under division with a time of 34:09 
in (he New England Baptist Hospital's third annual Spring 
Run for Fun race. .Approximately 150 of the runners 
participated in the race which raised SI. 000 for Mission 
Possible. Inc.. an organization which sponsors programs 
for (he \ou(h of Mission Hill. 



Sun Sports 



Locker Room 
Base Ball Cards 

Bought - Traded - Sold 

Weymouth Market Place 

Shaw's Plaza Rte 53 
Open Sat. 9-5 
Sun. 9-5 

843-4476 - 479-2102 



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when you buy 
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VALID ONLY AT: 

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By Roxies 

• N. OUINCY 

275 Hancock St 
• By N Ouincy T 

GOOD THRU JULY. 1967 
Pr*sent Coupon Before Ordering 

Limit one coupon per custome' pef visit 
Not valid with oirie' otters coupons or 
cards 



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473 Southern Artery 
By Roxies 

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275 Hancock St 
By N QuirKy T 




GOOD THRU JULY, 1987 



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Quincy Canton Hanover 



Paf« II Q«incy Sun Thursday. July 9, I9S7 



Donahue Says: 



Keeping Youngsters 

From Drugs Worth 

More Than Pros 



By TOM Sl'LLIVAN 

Quincy's Brian Donahue is 
discovering the politics that 
go on behind the scenes m pro 
sports and also that a 
background of drug abuse can 
hurt your chances of being 
signed. 

The 295-pound giant, a 
1980 graduate of Abp. 
Williams High, was one of the 
outstanding football players 
in New England, although he 
gained most of his fame in 
track 

He won the New England 
title in the shot put at Abp. 
Williams with a toss of 59 feet 
and later broke the national 
record with a toss of 66-1 in 
Chicago while at Exeter 
Academy. 

Last year Donahue signed 
with the New York Jets as a 
tree agent. The jets knew of 
Brian's background in drugs 
(he admits he began 
experimenting with drugs in 
high school), but took a 
chance on him 

"Things were progressing 
well with the Jets but I had a 
feeling I was losing myself and 
didn't have a total grip on 
what I was doing." Donahue 
said. 

"I felt I was getting in the 
situation I was in before with 
drugs. 1 got married just 
before camp and. although 
the Jets are a fine 
organization. 1 left camp 
because, just when you think 
vou have it beat, you are readv 
for a fall." 

"If I can help one child stay 
away from the misery I went 
through, it would be worth 
even not making the pros." 

Donahue has been in 
contact with the Los Angeles 




NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
H«rt's a chanc* to earn 
extra monty by building a 
Quincy Sun bom* dalivary 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



BRIAN DONAHIE 

Raiders. Miami Dolphins. 
Houston Oilers. New Orleans 
Saints. New England Patriots 
and Tampa Bay Buccaneers 

"1 tried out with the 
Patriots. Raiders and 
Cowboys, but most were 
pretty well stocked with 
defensive linemen." Donahue 
said. "My lack of experience 
hurt and I feel my past drug 
problems hurt me. 1 have been 
clean since the Jets camp and 
have gone around talking to 
youngsters." 

Donahue feels his former 
agent. Irving Marks of New 
York, hurt his chances when 
he put him in contact with the 
Dolphins and told him not to 
do anything, as he was all set 
with Miami. However, things 
didn't work out and Donahue 
passed up several other 
chances while waiting to hear 
from the Dolphins. 

"My new agent is Charles 
Caddy of Indianapolis, whom 
1 met at the Cowboys' tryout." 
Brian said. "1 honestly feel my 
drug background is hurting 
me. Officials of one team will 
talk to another and I think 
they are afraid to take a 
chance with me. You just 
don't know what goes on 
behind the scenes " 

Brian still has hopes of 
making the NEL and he also 
would like a chance to make 
the 1988 Olympics 

"I feel I could be a good 
representative of the L'nited 
States in the Olympics." he 



Comp/»r« BODY I FENDER REPAIRS 

WHIll AUGNING • FIAMI STIAIGHnNING 
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said "If I don't make the 
NEL. at least I know I gave 
KM) per cent." 

Brian and his brother Jack, 
himself a former drug abuser, 
formed the Heavenly High 
Youth Ministries, an anti- 
drug organization and the two 
devote their summers to 
discussing and describing the 
evils and dangers of drugs and 
alcohol. 

Marty Einnegan. coordina- 
tor of athletics in the Quincy 
schools, had conducted more 
than 200 chemical health 
programs at schools 
throughout New England and 
Brian has been with him at 
about 25 

"He does a wonderful job," 
Linnegan said. "The kids arc 
awed by his size and you can 
hear a pin drop when he 
speaks. Brian is a terrific boy 
and I hope his past drug 
problems don't prevent him 
from making the pros." 

Brian has been a member of 
the Quincy Tiack Club since 
his high school days and has 
won several national and New 
England titles in the shot put 
QTC coach Jeff Hennessy is 
one of his biggest boosters. 

Brian went to the U. of 
Texas for a year and a half, 
playing football and throwing 
the shot put He transferred to 
lona so he could train for the 
shot put with Olympic coach 
Tony Neclario. 

One of Brian's outstanding 
achievements while trying out 
for the pros was running the 
40 yards at 4.75 while 
*veighing 292, a fine 
accomplishment. 

Brian is married to I.ori Lee 
Defhomasis of Albertson, 
Long Island whom he met 
while at lona. They have a 
four-month old daughter. 
Jessica. 

Michael Haves 

Receives Award 

At Lowell 

A Quincy resident was 
among several persons who 
received awards and 
scholarships at the I'nivcrsity 
of l,owell for academic 
excellence in the Department 
of Chemistry. 

Michael D. Hays, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. (icoffrey Hays 
of 25 Virginia Rd.. was 
awarded the Louis A. OIney 
Book Prize 



BORED? 

Start A Quincy Sun 
Delivery Route. 

Youll Be Part Of 
Tlie Business World* A 

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or Apply In Person 

1372 M w c i cfc StrMt, Qiii«cy S^mrt 471-3100 



1K^ 



Over $1,700 Raised 

In Quincy Schools 

Alumni Golf Tourney 



B> ROBERT BO.SWORTH 

Over $1.7(M) was raised in 
the first annual Quincy Public 
Schools .Mumni Scholarship 
(ioH lournamcnt held 
recently at the Halifax 
Country Club and featured 
about KM) alumni, stall and 
Iriends ol Quincv High. North 
Quincv High and Quincv Viv 
lech 

According to M a r t v 
I inncgan. Quincy coordinator 
ol athletics and scholarship 
lund committee co-chairman, 
the money will probably be 

div ided into three scholarships, 
one for each school 

Einnegan called the event a 
big success and thanked 
everyone who participated 
" I he participants and the 
merchants who donated 
pri/es made this event a big 
success," Linnegan said 

In addition to raising 
scholarship funds. Linnegan 
said the event had a positive 
impact on adult -v out h 
interaction. 

"Ihis is just one more 
example of adults caring for 
youth. I he more we can do to 
show this development ol care 
and concern for our young 
people, the greater our success 
will be in bringing respect and 
love among all." Einnegan 
said. 

"Ihe adults and kids got 



together and were able to 
cimimunicate and experience 
love U)r one another," he 
added 

I ee time was 1 p m. on June 
29 and all goiters were oil the 
course by 6 p.m. A roast beel 
dinner followed and then 
pri/es were awarded to the top 
finishers. 

I hey were: 

L(>w gross: I onv Malvesii. 
80. 

Second low gross: John 
Malvesti Jr , 81 

I bird l«»w gross: Nick 
Malvesti. 81. 

Eourth low gross; Jim 
Herbert. K2. 

leam low gross: John 
Malvesti Jr., John Malvesti 
Sr , Nick Malvesti and I ou 
Malvesti, 73 

Low net: Armond Poirier. 
70. 

Second low net David 
Smith. 71 

I bird low net Bill Hams. 
72. 

Eourth low net: I rank 
levaroni. 73 

leam low net Id Miller 
Jr.. Ed Miller Sr . (buck 
(iosselin and PaulCasagrande. 
bb. 

Merchants who donated 

pri/es were: Quincy 

Municipal Credit Inion, 

Triangle Eilling Station. 

Common Market Restaurant. 



Mpine Restaurant, Villa 
Rosa Restaurant, W'ollaslon 
Wine and I iquor, Cathav 
Pacific Restaurant, Balducchi's 
Pi//a. Hancock ( ar Wash. 
Bonliglio's Auto Service. 
Sage's I xxon Service Station. 
Water Street Auto Bodv, 
(iot)dhue I rt)phy Shop. 
Beacon Sporting (ioods. 
Atlas Hardware, Murphy's 
Beer and W inc. (ioggins (iolf 
Shop. Ihe Egg and I 
Restaurant. 1. and (i. 
liquors, McNiece Variety. 
Walsh's Restaurant. Pearle 
Vision Center, Dunham 
Loot wear, Bob's Speed and 
.Auto Parts, Quincv Minute 
C ar Wash. Dynamite Auto 
Sales, Mr. Auto Parts, Kelly's 
Pub I nterprises, Samoset 
Pharmacv. Lighting and 
I amps, and Curry Hardware. 

Serving on the Public 
Schools doll Scholarship 
Ci>mmittee are Henrv Berrv. 
W ilham ( ahill. Peter 
Chrisom, I homas C Onnors. 
Martin C linnegan. Ilovd 
Hill, William Hutchinson. 
John M ahonev . I on> 
Malvesti, (icorge O'Rourke 
Jr . Eordie Pitts and Scotly 
Whiielaw 

I innegan said the tourna- 
ment will expand to include 
120 golfers next year He said 
It will be held again at 
Hahtax 



Registration Starts For 
Competitive Swim Camp 



Recreation Director Barry 
J Welch, announces that the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment is accepting registrations 
lor Its CompetitiveSwimming 
Camp which will be held Julv 
13-17 

Registration will be taken 
on a first come first serve basis 
at the Recreation Department. 
100 Southern Arterv. 
Monday-Lriday. 8:30 am- 
4:30 p m as long as openings 
still exist 

I his camp is a ( ompetiiive 



Swimming Program with 
emphasis on refinement o( 
competitive skills and 
exposure to a number o( 
different types ol training It is 
not a learn-to-swim program 
and all applicants must be 
able to swim and acclimate 
themselves to the rigt)rs ol 
training. Some of the areas 
that will be covered are as 
lollows: 

Strokes (Ireestyle, back- 
stroke, b u 1 1 e r f 1 V and 
breaststroke). starts and 



turns, videotaping, and 
chalkboards analv/ing Ihe 
skills of world class 
swimmers Camp director is 
William Walker, head coach 

of swimming at North Quincy 
High School Ihe camp will 
be at the I incoln-Hancock 
Communilv School Pool 

Age I en-high school, must 
have intermediate level 
swimming ability, c o - 
recreational lime 8:30a m. - 
12:.V) p.m. Co.st $19. 



Beach Schedule 



Thursday. July 9, High 
Iide-IOlO, Beach Hours-8 
am - I p m.; Beginner! A-12. 
Beginner I B-12 30; Beginner 
II A-ll. Beginner II B- 1 I.V). 
Advanced Beginner- 10: 30. 
lntermediate-8:30; Swimmer- 
8; Basic Rescue & Water 
Safetv-9-IO:30 

Erjday, July 10: High I ide- 
11:07; Beach Hours-9 am - 2 
p.m ; Beginner 1 A- 1 p.m.; 
Beginner I B -l:.30; Beginner 
II A-12; Beginner II B- 1 2:30; 
Advanced Beginncr-10; 



lnlermediate-9:30. Swim- 
mer-y. Advanced I ilesaving- 
10:30-12 

!V1onda>, July 13. High 
Iide-l:.SO, Beach Hours! I 30 
am -4:30 p m , Beginner I A- 
3:30, Beginner IB-4, Beginner 
II A -2:.M); Beginner II B-3; 
Advanced Beginner- 1 I 30; 
Intermediate- 1 2; Swimmer- 
12:30; Advanced I.ifesaving- 
1-2:30 

Tuesday, July 14, High 
Iidc-2:45; Beach Hours- 1 2 
noon-5 p.m.; Beginner I A-4; 



Beginner I B -4 30; Beginner 
II A - 3: Beginner II B-3 .30; 
Advanced B e g i n ner - 1 2 , 
Intermediate- 12:30; Swim- 
mer-!; Basic Rescue A Water 
Sa(etv-l:30-3 

Wfdnesda>, July 15, High 
Iide-3:38; Beach H'ours-12:.30 
p.m -.*i:30 p m.; Beginner I A- 
4:30, Beginner I B-5; Beginner 
II A-3:.M); Beginner 11 B-4; 
Advanced Beginner- 1 2:30; 
Intermediate-!; Swimmer- 
1:30; Advanced Lifcsaving-2- 
3:30. 



Pvl. William Plant Completes MP Training 



Pvt. William E. Plant Jr.. has completed training as an 
son of William E. and Ann L. Army military police 
Plant, 48 Kent St.. Quincy. specialist under the one 



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PRES WELDING INC. 

^ MONDAY-SATURDAY 
Jy^ 8:00 AM. to 4 P.M. 




825-2444 



station unit training (OSU T) 
program at Fort McClellan, 
Ala. 

OSUl is a 13-week period 
which combines basic training 
with advanced individual 
training. 

Students were trained in 
civil and military law, traffic 
control, map reading and self- 
defense. 

Plant is a 1981 graduate of 
Quincy Vocational Technical 
High School. 

Victor Papagno 
On Dean^s List 

Victor R. Papagno, Jr. of 
102 Glendale Rd.. Quincy, a 
freshman majoring in 
mathematics was named to 
Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute's Dean's List. 



JtuaUtr, Jul; «. IM7 QidiKr S« rafe t* 



100-Mile Endurance Race 

Hot Sun Forces 
Seamans Out After 



48 Touffh Miles 



Triple A 



By ROBKRT BOSWORTH 

A hot dcscri sun: it makes 
most people run for the 
nearest ocean, pool or air 
conditioner. 

But not Qumcy's Bob 
Seamans 

A 5K-year-o!d advertising 
executive. Seamans ran under 
a hia/ing sun in the June 27 
Western states KM)- Mile Same 
Day Indurance Race Not 
only did he contend with 
scorching sunshme but also 
Rt)tky Mountain terrain and 
e\en rattlesnakes. 

I nfortunatel>, the sun got 
just a liltli- too hot tor 
Seamans" liking and lorced 
hiin out ot the grueling race 
after he pouruJed the lourse 
lor 12 hours and 4K nulcs 

" I he temperature reached 
KM) degrees !n ihe shade and 
K)^ degree^ in the sun." 
Seamans said He said the 
1 1 rs t f i\ e hou ! > were 
■'beautilul" b (.iiuse thcie was 
cloud covei .1!.'* a bicc/c 

" 1 hen tht -Ml came mi! and 
(he temperatjic gt)l into the 
KMK It was iust too much." he 
said 

Still. Seamans said ii he had 
had more uater to douse 
himself to keep his bod\ 
temperature coo! tu- would 
'lase went lurlhi-i. pcih.ips 
•\en finished 

"Before sou quit. \ou 
ihink a lot ab(M.ii all the 
training you pn; in I could 
have gone on but I coin J have 
hurt myself 

"I made the right decision." 
said Seamans. adding that he 
was no! close to dehvdration 

Seamans ran the race last 
vear. completing 57 miles 
before bowing out 

His naming routine 
consisted ot running W) miles 
a week, then incicasmg the 
mileage ti^ ''5 to 85 miles t)ne 
week before the race. 
Seamans said he ran six 
times a week, taking a dav off 
to "refresh the bodv 

I he race began in Squaw 



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Eiperienctd Staff 

SAUS 

SCRVKE • INSTAUATION 



7SS SoutlMrn Artory, Ouincy 
FREE PARKmC 472 2177 




BOB SKAMANS 

\ alley. C alit. and lourneyed 
through i>kl mining trails, 
around menacing rattlesnakes 
and ventured to peaks ol up to 
4.(MMI feet before ending in 
Auburn. Calif 

Seamans stopped his run at 
Devil's I humb which he 
described as "terribly steep." 
I he mountain has a 25(M) foot 
vertical drop from the base of 
the canyon to the peak. 

Ol the 375 entrants, onlv 
150 finished, the lov\est 
percentage in the 1 1 -year 
historv of what some call "the 
most grueling one day- 
physical event " 

Seamans said a 35-year old 
chemical engineer from 
California won this year's 
event in 17 hours and 45 



minutes. 

Last year's winner quit 30 
miles into this year's race, he 
said. 

As an example of the 
intense heat, Seamans said his 
canteen water turned warm 
just one mile after refilling. To 
make matters worse, 
contestants were warned 
against drinking stream water 
for fear of contracting a 
disease. 

As a precaution against 
dehydration, checkpoints 
were set up along the course 
Seamans said after .10 miles, a 
checkpoint reading indicated 
he had lost four pounds in 
fluids At a second check 
point 10 miles later, a reading 
showed he had lost seven 
more pounds. 

But Seamans questioned 
their accuracy, saying he and 
other runners did not believe 
they lost that much fluid so 
quickly. 

lo qualifv for the race. 
Seamans said one must run a 
50 mile race in 10 hours or 
less. He said his time was 
between seven and seven and 
a half hours 

I hen a lottcrv ;.n held to 
select the proper amount of 
participants. 

"Lven if vou run a 50-milc 
race in IC hours or less vou're 
not aut omat icallv in." 
Seamans said 

Seamans. who was the 
I^KO New Fmgland 50- Mile 
Masters Champion, calls 
himself a "common runner." 
He has competed more than 
100 marathons, including the 
Boston Marathon over 20 
times and the Newport 
Marathon 1 1 times. 

As for next year's 
endurance race. Seamans said 
he will definitely enter. 

"1 won't train any harder. 
I'll just carry five canteens 
instead of three." 



LOW LOW PRICES 
AT 



Sullivan, Buddy Pace 
Tigers Over Indians 



Brian Sullivan's stellar 
pitching and Ken Duddy's 
power hitting paced the Tigers 
to a 9-2 win over the Indians. 

Sullivan fanned 14 and 
allowed just five hits in his 
complete game performance 
He did not give up a run until 
the fifth inning. 

Sullivan was given plenty of 
support from his Tiger 



teammates as they ran up a 
three run lead and exploded 
fo; four more runs in the fifth. 

Duddy was perfect at the 
plate, connecting for two 
doubles and two singles. He 
scored four runs and drove in 
two. 

Jay Wakelin had three hits 
and two RBIs, Justin Tobin 
had a triple and a double 



while Jay Evans. Pat Donaher 
and Sullivan had a double 
each. Jamie Korvelis 
contributed an RBI single. 

For the Indians. Sean 
Cleary had 13 strikeouts and 
two walks in six innings of 
work. Cleary and Bacallo hit 
triples and Bacallo also had a 
double to drive in both Indian 
runs. 



5 Track Club Members 
Qualify For Jr. Olympics 



Kive Quincy Track Club 
Athletes have qualified forthe 
1987 National Tac Junior 
Olympics by placing in the top 
three of their events at the 
regional championships held 
recently in Portland. Maine. 

In the intermediate division 
age 15 and 16. Riki Ciirnius 
won the girls discus with a 
personal best of 113-10. Alicia 
Porro took second in the 200 
meters in 25.12 and third in 
the triple jump with 35-2. 



Division (17-18) Debbie 
MacWaJter won the heptathlon 
and took second in the javelin 
with a throw of 136-2 Tom 
Giacobbe took the discus title 
with 133-2. Finn Kelly 
finished second in the young 
men's 800 meters with 1:54.00 
In the youth division ( 13- 
14). Ann O'Sullivan won the 
discus and took second in the 
shot put Chris DiGiacomo 
finished second in the boys 
high jump. 



In the >oung Womens In Midgets (11-12) Halcv 



Houle finished second in both 
the high jump and hurdles, 
Jerry Marshall placed second 
in the boys hurdles and John 
DiGiacomo placed third in 
the shot put and discus. 

In Bantams (9-10). Colter 
Houle won the shot put and 
finished third in the 1500 
meters. 

Athletes who placed in the 
top three in their events 
qualify for the finals to be held 
July 22 through July 25 at 
Brigham Young I niversity in 
Provo. Ltah. 



Youth Sport-A-Rama Saturday 



Ihe second annual Quincy 
Housing Authority Youth 
Sport-.A-Rama will be held 
Saturday. Julv I I. at 10 a.m. 
in (iermantown. 

The event is open 10 boss 
and girls ages mx to 16 

Free \ -shirts and lunch will 
be given to all participants. 

EvenJs will include track 
races, basketball games. 
double dutch, football and 
Softball throws. 

Ihe schedule will be: 

10-10:30 a.m., registration, 
9 Bicknell St. 

10:45-11 a.m., opening 
ceremonies. Palmer Park. 

11:15-12:30 p.m., track 
events. Doane St. 

Noon, basketball, Taffrail 
Rd. courts. 

12:30-1:30 p.m.. lunch, 9 
Bicknell St. 

I p.m., OHA-vs-QPD 



Softball game. Palmer Park. 
1:45 p.m.. field events. 
Doane St. 



2 p.m.. 
laffrail Rd. 



Double 
courts. 



Dcich. 



Johnson Motor Parts 

472-6776 65 School St., Quincy 479-1155 



Motor 
Oils 



Lifetime Guarantee 
on all belts and hoses 



Buy Any 3 

Filters 

get a 1/2 

gallon 

Summer Cooler 

by 

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SUMMER SPECIALS 



Waxes 

Upholstery Cleaning 

Armorall 

Car Washes 



Complete 

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Air Conditioning 

Parts 



COLMANr 



Sports 
Stumpers 



1. Name the last National League team to win 
back-to-back division titles and the year in which this 
occurred. 

2. Name the first manager to ever guide the California 
Angels into post-season play. 

3. Name the last manager to guide the Minnesota Twins 
into post-season play. 

4. Name the last manager to guide the San Francisco 
Giants into post -.season play. 

5. Name the Minnesota Twins outfielder who led the 
American League in 1977 with 119 RBI's. 

6 Name the Houston Astro who had the nickname. The 
Toy Cannon." 

7. Name the Chicago White S<ix who had the nickname, 
"No Neck." 

8. (True or False) Bob (Jibson once played basketball 
for the Harlem Globetrotters. 







Bob Gibson 



Answers: 1. The lx>s Angeles Dodgers won the N.L. 
West m 1977 and 1978, 2. Jim Fregosi in 1979; 3. Bill 
Rigney in 1979; 4. Charlie Fox in 1971; 5. Larry Hisle; 6. Jim 
Wynn; 7. Walt Williams; 8. True 

© 1987 »»y KmK hV.aures Syiul 

COLMAN'S 
SPORTING GOODS 

The Right Answer For 
AH Your Sporting Needs. 



Pagr 20 Quinr> Sun Thursday. Jul> 9, I9S7 



sg- Special Features 



'^"fOM IDBRE CAUi^HrVTHE COURT UX>ULD LH^BY VES 

jf -"V^ AH\> RBORE-TS/ i HONOR... 



My Wiincn Saltier 




Clare Annswclls 



*4 

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Rural Delivery 



B\ Al Smith 



WEEK OF: July 9 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

You'ro noli'd lor your enthusi.isrn <mi<I w.irrntli and ( uriositv 
You somotiiiu's (iiul it cliff jcull to st'«' [irf^|«'cts thrnucjh to coin 
pU'tion ■ but hcivt' no problem rrcruilin;} tlit' iiui of frirnds This 
yoiir's focus is on expondintj prosi'iit interests r.itber thfin 
di&coverinij new ones 



DOV, THAT BOSS GETS 
SOME OF THE CRAZIEST 

DEAS I 




AQUARIUS — January 21 • rporuary i^ 

Improved n'lotionships ,it work .ue luijhinjtiled I lorne rel.ited 



February 19 

iprove ' ' ' 

tc»sKs niiiy be surprisimjiv costly P<irtner's opinions tire cbcimj 



Swamp Bral5 



Hy Warren SaUlcr 



OE OATotiS DEPRESSED.. 
HE ivo^i'r EAT r^urriN ' ! 



IIA ON 

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GEr nm a PSVCMi/^iR/sr/ 




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NAPOLEON 




I WiSM YOU'D STOP L1CK.1NG 
TMA,T OL' <=>OAPV BATH WATEC 
AN' GET OUTSIPE WHERE YOU 
BELONG./ 




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MAP P06/ MAD P06 ' 










TWITCH 




iny by the hour II traveling, keep your sens*? of humor 

PISCES - February 20 • March 20 

Creative .k tiviiies ore spotliyhted .md may lead to new friend 
ship Watch tendency to "test" others you re m a less than- 
trusliny mood, f-itness routines should follow a natural course 

ARIES - March 21 • April 20 

Communications are hiqhiighted through the period, this is a 
superb lime for writing ousiness letters or telephoning VIPs 
Entertaining wilh flair is your current strong point 

TAURUS - April 21 - May 22 

Watch tendency to be lessthan cautious dunng summer's siz/l 
ing days Money matters also demand more care and atten 
tion In romance, however, spontaneity is all important 

GEMINI - May 23 - June 21 

Your diligence over a demanding project wins the admiration 
of a higherup Travel companion may be unexpectedly adven 
lurous Your acting talent shines, us a good week for 
auditioning 

CANCER - Juit« 22 • July 22 

Spirit of adventure soars • this is a good week for launching 
a pet project Attention to detail is critical especially if deaf 
ing with contracts Love life is perky 

LEO - July 23 - August 22 

Combined efforts may bring surprisingly effective results Home 
surroundings are livley Volunteer assiunment bnngs unexpected 
rewards Nlodest monetary gains acfd a plus to the week 

VIRGO - August 23 - September 22 

Arademir pursuits are favored, yf)u may fiiui yourself consider- 
ing course's for the fall fiusiness ideas art- brujhl but benefit 
from discussions with trusted friend Home life is more 
harmonious 

LIBRA - September 23 - October 22 

Make an .i.-ldej effort to encourage friends and family members 
to reali/e their lull potential Money matters show s;giis iA im 
provement l)ut prudence is important in this area 

SCORPIO - October 23 • November 21 s 

Watch lei.dency V> challenge the ideas of others, ami avoid 
impulsive inoods in financial realm Love life is sweeter thanks 
to parlii.'r''- 'nprr)ved humor anf! voar own optimism 
SAGITTARIUS - November 22 ■ December 22 

Novel ideas m.n, pay off after the weekend Improveci relation 
ships Willi 'dlleaijues are highlighted Lorvj term goal'' become 
clearer wi;i. the help of research Domestic scene is hectic 

By How Rands CAPRICORN - December 23 • January 20 

Career interests broaden, personal relationships bei ume less 
demanding, and financial newsbrightener may arrive after the 
weekend Sporting events arc unusually satisfying, especially 
through the weekend 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July 9th. actor Richard F^nundlree. lOth. actress Sue Lyon. 
1 1th, actor Tab Hunter; 12th. actor Bill Cosby. 13lh, host Dave 
Garroway, 14th, actress Polly Bergen. l5th. singer Linda 
Konsladt 



By Foster Moore 



-? 1 <7 



Cirossw^ird 



IT JUST SO HAPPENED 

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EXTRA! 



OuincySun 




Car Care Guide 



Today ^s computer technology makes happy endixigs possible 



Accidents will happen Unfortunately, 
man) o( us experience a fender bender. 
Fortunately, getting our car back un the 
road isn't the problem it once was Com 
puler technology is helping to speed the 
insurance claims process, l(Katc replace- 
ment parts, and keep costs as low as pos- 
sible 

As recently as five years ago, car own- 
ers plowed through red tape to get their 
cars operating after an accident 

Insurance adjusters were caught up in 
endless paperwork and the claims pro- 
cedures could be time consuming The 
prices at auto repair shops were high and 
many times owners were told that parts 
were out-of-stcKk 

For most Americans this added up to 
higher insurance premiums, expensive 
parts and service charges, and the incon- 
venience of not having one's car 

Streamlined system 

Today s priKedures have been reduced 
\o a claim adjuster checking off damaged 
Items on a line drawing of a car Such 
skeletal drawings are availaNe for every 
American car and most imported cars 
built during the past 10 years 

This information can be transmitted by 
either computer terminal or phone mo- 
dem to a central database Immediately, 
a printout is returned containing replace- 
ment parts identification, location and 
cost In addition, labor costs are indi- 
cated 

This information comes from a data 
base containing more than 40 million 



Items It IS apparent that this computer- 
ized system of ADP Collision Estimating 
Services (a division of the computer 
services giant Automatic Data Process- 
ing Inc.), saves auto insurance policy- 
holders both time and money 

The ADP Parts and Assemblies Loca- 
tor System (called "PAL") is a special 
feature developed two years ago to pro- 
vide even more help to auto insurers, re- 
pairers and auto parts distributors in 
providing the very best service possible 
to the public. 

Due to the vast number of auto re- 
placement parts pnxluced — both by the 
manufacturers of cars and by indepen- 
dent manufacturers of auto parts — a sin- 
gle simplified system was needed to 
locale replacement parts at reasonable 
cost in any area of the United States. 

The system developed by ADP Colli- 
sion Estimating Services does just that. It 
even goes so far as to give the specific 
name, address and phone number of auto 
parts distributors, available inventory, 
pan numbers, name and cost 

With the use of telephones, portable 
computer terminals and modems, such 
detailed information is instantly available 
at any location in the country It's liter- 
ally "quick as a wink," and from an in- 
dependent source not controlled by an 
insurance company or repair service. 

All of this adds up to getting your car 
back on the road within the least amount 
of time 

According to ADP Collision Estimat- 




ALL THE KING'S HORSES AND ALL THE KING'S MEN couldn't put your car 
together afpun ai) fast as auto repairer*) uAinf( the PAL System (nu-t« and Asaemfaliea 
Locator System) from ADP. Using today's computer technology and an exclusive 
North American database, PAL finds the right part at the best price in the least 
amount of time. 



ing Services president Garen K. Staglin, 
the company is processing more than 
20,000 computerized auto damage esti- 
mates each day in the United States and 
Canada This adds up to more than four 
million estimates a year. 

In addition, the system provides a de- 
tailed inventory and the location of graded 
salvage parts, which offers the potential 



for even greater savings. 

The ADP Parts and Assemblies Loca- 
tor System is yet another example of 
computers relieving the frustration and 
anxiety we all experience at various 
times in our lives. If the worst does hap- 
pen, and your car is banged up, there is a 
simple and effective system for getting 
everything back to normal. 




Is your auto damaged? 



Restore your investment to 
pre accident condition. 

\ I / 




Li t^ ^ t 



Mike's Auto Body 

Avenue Car Rental & Sales 



503 Quincy Ave 
Rte 53. Braintree 



848 9486 
8489487 



"We supply subslilul<> transportation" 



Serving the South Shore for Over 25 Years. 




GOODYEAR 




FAGLE ST RADIAL 



55 



$72 






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Op«n Dally 6:30 am - 9:00 pm 





JSC TIRE CENTER 

297 Quincy Ave. 843^502 







Auto Glass Specialist 

since 1923 



2 Locations Quincy 



196 Washington St. 

Quincy, Mass. 

479-4400 



119 Parkingway 

(next to Paperama) 

Quincy, Mass. 

773-1700 



Windshields replaced at no cost to you 

with insurance 

Mobile Service too! 

14 other locations, consult your yellow pages 



QUINCY MINUTE 
CAR WASH 

459 SOUTHERN ARTERY ^^.'s^oThS 

For complete & thorough cleaning of your cor inside 
and out - Induding all windows & osh troys! 



SAVE 75' 



ON YOUR NEXT 
CUSTOM WASH 
WITH HOT WAX 
INCLUDING UNDER CARRIAGE SPRAY 

Good only with this Ad 



South 
"^^ Shore 
Buick 

OVER 80 YEARS OF VALUE 
QUALITY & RELIABILITY 

LEASING 

ANY MAKE OR MODEL 

770-3300 

50 ADAMS ST. QUINCY 
for 80 years we've put customer satisfaction above all else' 



VOLKSWAGEN 

FOREIGN CAR SPECIALISTS 
TOYOTA • HONDA • DATSUN ETC. 

FACTORY TRAINED MECHANICS 

COMPLETE ENGINE REBUILDING 

Scheduled Maintenance Performed 

Gas and Diesel Repair 

fOREIGf^ 



I^UTo 







GEYER'SGARAGE 

9 MILL LANE BRAINTREE 

843-9530 849-1476 



ECONO 

CAR RENTAL 

of QUINCY Inc. 



• Excellent Rates • Late Models 
Convenient Location • FriencJIy Service 
• Sales 

479-4098 

459 Southern Artery 
Across from the Police Station 






. 



P«fe 22 Quinc) Sun ""lorsdB'. Jul) '. '•'^7 



Arts/Entertainment 



Little Miss, Little Mr. 
Houghs Neck Selected 



} i\c-ycar old Jessie 
Cashins ot 50 Hooper St was 
clowned "I ittle Miss Houghs 
Neck of l<)8T' at the annual 
Field Da\ of the Houghs 
Neck Conimunit> Council, 
held this year at St Thomas 
Aquinas Hall 

I he daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Richard Cashms of 5() 
Hooper St.. she received a 
cash award, trophy, winner's 
ribhtin and flowers Similar 
awards were given to Sarah 
Wilson. 4. and Shauna 
Harrison. 5. first and second 
runncrs-up. 

Four-year old Jaymc 
O'Neil. son of Mr and Mrs 
John O'N'eil of 21 Lakeside 
Dr. won the "little Mr. 
Houghs Neck" competition. 

Runners-up were Shaun 
Chcnev. 6. and Robert Smith. 
4. 

Winners of both competi- 
tions will ride in the 1987 



WOUASTON 
THEATER 




1^ 



JESSIE CASHINS 
Little Miss Houghs Nrck 

Quincy Christmas parade. 

Top winners in other events 
were Brian Nolan. Jessica 
Loud and Melissa Hardiman. 
decorated bicycles; Julie 
Gibbons. Diana Berbcranand 
Laura Davis, decorated doll 
carriages; Heather Moore. 
Brian Nolan and Jacoall 



Bergstrom. "horribles" 
parade 

Darlene (iardincr was 
chairman lor these competi- 
tions 

Awards in the "I I o\c 
Houghs Neck" sales tickets 
went to the team of Jean 
Bragg and Marion Nelson, 
followed by Margaret 

Mel ean and Carrie Frenetic 
Recei\ing honorable mention 
were Kristie Cheney. Leah 
Schofield. Sean McArdle. 
Jason F'ennelly and Anthony 
Bragdon 

Other awards went to Bud 
Hago and Jack McCarthy, 
with Jamie Schat/el receiMng 
a set of baseball cards. 

Betty McLean had charge 
of these e\ents. 

Receiving Manet Over 
Sixty awards were Mrs. L.H 
Ruggles of Bird St ; I heresa 
Worrell of Davis St.. 
Weymouth; and Ruth 
Gordon of Babcock St. 



■LUSAmL 



773-4«qp 



Wed & Thurs July 8 4 9 

Michael J Fox 

-SECRET OF 

MY SUCCESS" (PG- 13) 

Great Family Fun 
E»e« 7 00 On ly 

Stans Fri July 10 

"RAISING ARIZONA" (PG) 
Wonderlully Loopy Comedy 

Bizzare & Original 

Fri & Sat 7 00 & 9 15 

Sun-Thurs 7 00 Only 

Mon A Tues Dollar Night 



ADM. »2.50 20 A OVER '2.00 



Tuppies On Parade' 
At WoUaston Beach 



Ihe Metropolitan District 
Commission's Reservations 
and Interpretive Services Unit 
will present "Puppies on 
Parade." Saturday. July 1 1, at 
10 am at the Wollaston 
Beach Reservation. Qu'ncy 

Pri/es will be awarded for 
the biggest, smallest, cutest 
and ugliest dogs. One pri/e 
will be awarded for the dog 
with the closest resemblance 
to its owner! 



niisterSUB 

Homemade Italian Cuisine 

Chicken Parmigiana 

Chicken Campagna 

Lasagna 

Beef Stroganoff 

Salad & rolls with butter 
included with dinner 

64 Billings Rd., N. Ouincy 328-9764 

Mon -Sat 10-10 



All participants should 
meet at Caddy Park at 1 a.m. 
and all dogs must be on a 
leash. 

MetroParks. a service of 
the Metropolitan District 
Commission, offers free 
activities for children and 
adults. 

For more information, 
contact the MDC's Public 
Information Office at 727- 
52 1. V 

2 QHS Students 
Win Art Awards 

I wo Quincy High School 
students won awards in the 
Quincy Art Association show 
held recently. 

Janice Murray, a junior, 
was awarded lirst place in 
painting and the best of show 
award. Robert Hunter, also a 
junior, was presented a first 
place award in painting as 
well. 



Save Gas 
and Money ... 
Shop Locally 




Restaurant 

For Business Luncheons 

and 

Eiegont Dining 

Best Food on the South Shore 

Tablecloth and Candlelight Dining 

Now Enioy LUNCH on Weekdays And BBQ on Weekends and Holidays 
at the South Shore s only OPEN AIR POOLSIDE RESTAURANT 

Background Music - Tasty Tropical Drinks 
Also: Don't Miss Our BOILED LOBSTER Specials 



FRI & SAT.: PRIME RIB X-LARGE »9-» 

ALL DINNER ENTREES From »8^» to M3»« e .'I'l^rf'^ 

I iiki^4i t- .-. -. ^ Salad & Potato 

LUNCH From »3" - Plus Daily Blackboard Specials 




^^Jf)9 ttulncy Bay Inn 

20 Hwtcock St. , Qumcy 
Call for reeervatkKw 320*1500 

Availsbte For Fonctwrw Located Next to The Nepor>9«t Rtver Bridge 
Free Pertcing - Noo-Smok»r>g Secttof) Aveiiable *^**^ S«*jf<Jiy Lunch 
Ctoeo Sunday 1 Noon 




A PI.AV on the "Making of ■ Ke^olulion" was rrrenlly presrnlrd by Lincoln llancocli School 
students. Krom left, are Deanna (•riffin, Anthony Sansr\rro, Martha (liarrapulo, Krrriannr 
O'Nril. Brian Robinson. Kric Kicupero. Jay kocenick, .Scott Mrcuriu. Phil Btmlrn. Ihepla> 
was dirfclrd b\ teacher Ste\rn ( anirlli. 

(Qiiinr\ Sun /Wmlii h\ Tnnt hormnin 

Storytelling Concert At 
Crane Library July 14 



West of the Moon will 
present a stor\ telling concert 
at the I ho mas Crane Pubhc 
Library, Quincy Sq , 
Lucsday. July 14. at 7 p m 

Fllen Block and I aura 
Pershin are the West of the 
Moon storytellers, I heir 
repertoire includes familiar 
toll(tales. tales ot magic and 
enchantment, as well as more 



contemporary stories. Next 
week's program is the third 
\isit to Quinc\ libraries by 
this duo uho ha\e delighted 
previous audiences with the 
humor and rhythm of their 
storytelling Chants and songs 
are frequently part ol their 
program as well 

West of the Moon begins a 
series of storytelling concerts 



being held at the library 
during .luly and August July 
2K brings Sumner Villain to 
Quincy. followed by I ee Mm 
Mo Aug. II and lony 
C apaccio on .Aug 25 All 
storytelling concerts are 
funded b\ the Quincy Arts 
Council and are olfered to 
children age li\e and older 
and to adults 



Honorary Deputy Sheriffs 
Plan Annual Clambake 



I he Norfolk Counts 
Honorary Deputy Sherifis' 
Association will hold its 
annual clambake July IM 

More than 2(K) members 
and friends are expected to 
participate in the lamil\ 
e\cnt. which will be held at 
Romu\a Park. 7| Ciaremonl 
Anc . Brockton 



A New i ngland clambake 
will be served with lobster in 
the shell, steak, chicken, and 
more For the younger 
members of the famil\. there 

will be hot dogs, hamburgers 
and cold drinks Beer and 
mixed drinks will be available 
at the cash bar 



Live 'Summerfesl'* Coverage 

Quincy C O m m u n 1 1 \ 
lelcMsion's live coverage ol 
"Summertcst" will continue 
on Wcdnesdas, Julv 1 5 at "* 



p m with the performance ol 
Rene and Maria Rancmirl 

Quincy C o ni m u n 1 1 v 
ielcvision Channel ^ will 



ALPINE 

RESTAURANT 




A Good 
Plo<* To Eat 

nind^p..nd.-nr,. A»,. Oumcy4;qsiu REASONABLE PRICfS 



4 Different Dinners Will Be 
Posted on Blackboard Daily. 

Call us for the specials 



DINNER SERVED SUN TO THURS. Til 9:45 P.M. 

FRI. & SAT Til 10:4 5 P.M. 

lUNCHEON SPECIALS SERVED DAIir 



I here will be soltball. 
horseshoes, nail driving, and 
many other events including 
races with pri/es for the kids 

Fickets will be $20 per 
person with Iree admission for 
children. F or ticket informa- 
tion call Bill Weddleton at 
}2^-t>7M) ext .VS 

On CJi. 3 

broadcast Ii\c from the Ruth 
Cordon .Amphilhealre each 
week (or the rest ol ihc 
Summerfesi season 

I lie program will he 
repealed again Siindavs jt 7 
P m on ( harinel } 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun tiome delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 




y 



CtuW3o A 






Luncheon Specials 




Dinner Specials 


»■ 




11:30- 3:00 p.m. 




3:00- 11:00 p.m. 




• 


Chicken Parmigiana 




• Queen Prime Rib 


♦8.95 




spaghetti 


MOO 


• Chicken Parmigiana 


*5.95 


• 


Seafood Ncwburg 


M.OO 


• Broiled Boston Schrod 


♦6.95 


• 


Baby Broiled Haddock 


M.75 


• Beef Burgundy 




• 


London Broil Au Jus 


M.25 


nee pilal 


♦5.95 


• 


Broiled Beef liver 




• 1 ggpiant Parmigiana 


♦5.95 




onions & bacon 


*3.75 


• Veal Caccialore 


♦6.95 




. 




• Chicken Marsella 


♦6.95 




(itfl ( ertificates 
Available 




Served w fresh v^iinirn ^,i,dr; 
soup, potdto, vey or paste 


or 
1 



live enlprtdinmenl in our lounqp 
Thurs - Sat Bob Benoil. Sun - Frank Dunn 

75 Franklin St., Quincy 
472-1115 



Thursday. July 9. 1*17 Quincy Svn Page 13 



LEGAL NOTICES 



( IIV Ol yi IN( V 
IN ( ()[ \( II 
OKI)! K NO '<* 

ORDI Kl I) l.tniiais 20 [^H^ 

HI I I OK I) MNI I) \n itic ( ii\ ( uiirKil nt llu ( t\\ <.l (^uini.\ .is 

JdlloMS 

I hat I he KcMMil Oriliti.nuiA nl ihc ( ii\ ot Ouitu\ . !'*■'(>. .in itmctulcd, 
Kt- (iifihcr unuTulcil .is tnll.iWN 

■\K IK I I VII l'\KKIN(, AM) I ()M)|\{, Kl (.)l IK I Ml N IS 
Section ■'2 TibI* of I'arkini: Krquirrmrnis 

Oll-sirctt p.itkmt: lacililics sh.ill bt- proMdid .is lolldus 

Kr^idrncr B 

Sirikf I *> (spjics) pir I I) unii 

InstTi I ■'S (spaces) pit Ml unit 

I'asstd lo Hi- OnLiinvd luni' |K. IVK"" 

MUSI John M (iilhs 

( Icrk i>l ( (luncil 

\ppro\cd luni- 2:. IVH"' 

I r.inns \ MiC aiik'v 

Ma\<if 

N Iruf ( opx-Atttst. I hnmas K Hurkc. Asst ( itv ( krk 



III 



CriY Ol Q[ |N( > 

I inal Statement of Communitv Development Objectues 
and Projected I se ol ( DHd I unds 

I9K7I9KH F'rogram Vear 

intruduction 

the ( il\ ol yuincv xull receive $I.Kn.(MK) in ( ommunitv 
I>e\elitpmeni Hloc drani ((DHd) I niitlemeni lunds from the 
I S Department ol Housing and I rban [>c\clopmcnt for the 
I9K7-IVKK projiram vear I his statement describes communitv 
development objectives ol the (itv ol yumcv ,ind projected use 
ol (DHd lundslor the I9K7.|98K pro^iram ve.ir .ind expenditure 
ol ( DHd kinds to date lor the pnijiram vc.ii ending June 30. 
I9K7 Public comments rcgardinj; this statement are v^elcomc 
and should be addressed to the Department ol 1'i.inning .ind 
Communitv Development Quincv ( itv Hall 

Communil) DrvrlopmrnI Objrelivrs 

\s the (itv plans and implements iis communitv development 
activities, ii .iims lo carrv out the ( DHd Program's pnmaiv 
national ohieciives which include decent housmganda suitable 
living environment and expanding economic opportumiv. 
principallv lor persons ol lou and moderate income 

lo this end. the ( ilv has established several objectives lor its 
(DHd program 

1 Housing 

- Maintain decent, sale and saniiarv housingconditions lorall 

residents. 

- Preserve and rehabilitate the ( itv's housing slock. 

- ( reate allordable reiiial and homeow ncrship opportunities 

lot lovk and nuHlerate income residents 

2 Public Serv icc 

• Provide a varietv ol health programs, social services, 
educational and cultural opportunities and recreational 
activities lor residents ol all ages 

.' Iconomn. DeveU>pment 

- I ostcr economic stabilitv and growth in the City's 
commercial areas, 

- I eveiage private investment vnih the communitv and create 

additional emplovment opportunities forlheCilv's lov\ and 
moderate income residents. 

4 Public NNorks 

- Maintain and improve the ( itvs infrastructure in order to 

promote neighborhood revitali/ation; 

- Renovate existing public parks and playgrounds and 
construct nev* recreational facilities 

through the establishment and pursuit of these objectives, the 
Citv of Quincv makes a firm commitment to all components of 
Its neighborhoods - housing, infrastructure, parks and 
playgrounds, public services and commercial development The 
projected use ol lunds allocated for the I9K7-I9XX program has 
been developed so as to give maximum leasible priority lo 
activities which will bcnelit low and moderate income persons. 
Tic City has allocated 74 percent of total funding for this 
puiposr. 

Proiectrd t m of CDBC KnIillcimnI Funds for (he I987I9U 
Program Year 

Housing Commercial Rehabilitation $458,000 

Housing Development Corporalion I50.(X)0 

Quincy Neighborhood Housing Services 22.500 

Public Works improvements: 

Atlantic 

Cermantown Houghs Neck 

Moniclair 

Quincy Point 

Southwest 

Wollaslon 

Quincy Center 



ComnfKrcial Development Loan Fund 
Business and Professional Organi/aiion 

Elderly Outreach Van Program 
Neighborhood Recreational and 
Social Services: 

Atlantic 

Gcrmantown 

Adams Shore 

Houghs Neck 

Beech wood 

Ward Two 

Squantum Community Center 



.174.450 

100.000 
15.000 

109.925 



Planning and Administration 
Contingency 



TOTAL 



165.625 

.1I.V000 
128.500 

Sl.837.000 



Expenditures proposed under the 1987-1988 CDBG program 
demonstrates the City's continuing commitment to the goal of 
providmg decent, safe and sanitary housing for all residents Eunds 
are provided to extend the City's housing rehabilitation loan and 
grant programs and to provide support for the operation of Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing Services. Inc. 

A new housing initiative is planned which is intended to create greater 
affordable housing opportunities for low and moderate income 
pcnoftt. Under this iniiialivc. uart-up funds will be provided for the 



(I IV Of f;i IN( Y 
IN ( Ol N( II 
ORDI K NO 40 
<>RI>IRM) .lanuarv 20. I9K^ 

HI I I ORDMNI Dbv the ( itv ( ouncilol ihcC itv ol (Quincv that the 
Revised Ordinances ol the (itv ol Quincv I9'''' as amended, be 
lurthei amended .is follows 

\H IK I I Ml PAKKINd AND I OADINd RK^I IKI MENIS 
Section ■'2 Table of Parkinf; Requirrments 

Ofl-strcet parking lacilitics shall be provided as lollows 

Business ( 

Strike I (spaces) per I unit 

Insert I 5 (spaces) per I unit 

Passed To Be Ordained June IK, I9X^ 

ATTEST: John M dillis 

Clerk ol Council 

Appriived June 22, I9K"' 

hrancis X McCaulev 

Mayor 

A I rue Copv-Aitest. Ihomas R Burke. Assi Cilv Clerk 

■» 9 8T 



Quincv MIordable Housing Development Corporation (QAHfK). a 
local non-prolit corporation made up of representatives of 
development firms, banks, busmcss groups and concerned citi/en 
groups By aci^uiring and developing privately or Citv-owned land 
and by rehabilitating and converting deteriorated or abandoned 
structures into residential units, the QAHDC hopes to increase 
availability ol owner-occupied or rental housing for low and 
moderate income families, elderly citi/ens. minorities and 
handicapped persons 

I unding for reconstruction of streets and sidewalks and other public 
works improvements to be carried out in all areas ol the City, is 
substantially increased under this budget 

The ( Ommercial Development I oan Eund.a new program initiated 
over the past vear. proved to be effective m meeting the City's goals ol 
assisting in rehabilitation and expansion of local businesses, 
leveraging additional private investment in the City's commercial 
areas and creating additional emplovment opportunities for low and 
moderate income persons .Xccordinglv . additional lunding to meet 
the demand for these loans is provided 

finallv. the City's continued commitment to human services, 
particularly to addressing the needs of the elderly, is rellected in this 
year's budget The City's proposed alliKation. which reaches the 
maximum level of expenditures allowed for public services, once 
again provides tunding for the Citv's elderlv outreach program and 
for operation of seven community centers providing health, 
educational and social services for residents of all age groups 

l\ CDB(; Entitlrment Funds Expended During 1986-1987 
Program Year. T he current programycar will end June .30. 1987, 
Below are expenditures through March .30. 1987 onlv: 

Housing Rehabilitation $536,749 

Commercial Rehabilitation 512,551 

Quincv Neighborhood Housing Services 35.908 

Public Works Improvements 83.023 

Tree Planting 1.815 

Prolessional & Business droups 12.000 

Elderly Outreach Nan Program 76.674 

Neighborhood Recreational & Social Services 124,292 

Planning and Administration 240.552 

Property Acquisition Appraisal 48.856 

TOTAL $1,672,420 

NOTES: I. The above expenditures were drav^n from the CDBG 
allocation for the 1986-1987 program year and from 
previous years' allocations 

2 The City anticipates additional program income, from 
revolving loan funds, of $200,000 to be used to fund 
residential rehabilitation loans 

A major objective established for the past year's CDBG 
program is the preservation and improvement of the City's 
housing stock, particularly those residences located in low 
and moderate income neighborhoods A review of 
expenditures indicates the Citv's commitment to carrying 
out this objective. Approximately one third of total 
expenditures has been spent on major housing initiatives: 
A housing rehabilitation program providing low cost loans 
or grants to eligible homeowners and landlords, and 
funding of operating costs and capitalization of a revolving 
loan pool to be operated by Quincy Neighborhood 
Housing Services in its new target area, Quincy Point. 
Quincy Neighborhood Housing Services provides 
rehabilitation loans tailored to the financial capabilities of 
eligible applicants. 

Provisions of basic and necessary human services, another 
goal of the 1986-1987 CDBG program, is addressed by the 
program's public service component. This includes 
operation of seven community centers providing health, 
educational and siKial programs for residents of all ages 
and operation of a senior citizens' van transportation 
program. While public services expenditures are capped by 
CDBG regulations, the City is consistently at the 
maximum level of expenditures allowed. 

The City increased its efforts toward the goal of 
commercial area revilalization by initiating a commercial 
development loan fund to provide local businesses w ith low 
cost loans for expansion and rehabilitation. Businesses 
receiving assistance under this program, in turn, create job 
opportunities for low and moderate income persons or 
assist in eliminating slums and blight. 

The City's commitment to its stated goal of improving the 
infrastructure and renovating public parks and 
playgrounds is reflected in approximately $85,000 in 
expenditures for tree planting and reconstruction of streets 
and sidewalks. 

Finally, the City has given maximum feasible priority to 
funding activities which benefit low and moderate income 
families. Nearly 80% of CDBG funds expended over the 
past program year were used for that purpose. 

'. OisplaceflMiit 

The City of Quincy undertakes all of its CDBG programs 
and activities in a manner which either eliminates or 
minimizes the displacement of persons. To this end. the 
City has prepared and is following a displacement plan. A 
copy of this plan is available through the Quincy 
DepartHKnt of Planning and Community Development. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



(OMMONSM Al IH 

Q)h MASSACHl SEF IS 

THE TRIAL COIRT 

\\\l PROBATE AND 

f AMITY COl Rf 

Norlolk Division 

Docket No K7PI700EI 
Estate of FRANCES S 
FHOMSON late ol QLINCY 
in theCountv of NOREOI K 

NOTICE 

TO THE MASSAC HI SETTS 

ATTORNEY GENERAL S 

OFFICE 
A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that ARLINE I LAVERY 
of BRAINTREE in the County 
of NORFOLK be appointed 
executrix named m the will with 
surety on the bond 

If vou desire to object to the 
allowance ol said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
v*ritten appearance in said 
C ourt at Dedham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on August 
12. 1987. 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Witness. Robert M Ford. 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham. the first dav 
of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRICK HIGHES 
Register of Probate 
7 6 87 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSAC HUSET fS 

THE IRIAI COLRI 

THF PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COl R7 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No K7PI635EI 
Estate of MARY V I I'CCI late 
of Qt IN( Y in the Countv of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that ROSE MARY 
KIRWIN of BRAINTREF in 
the Countv of NORFOLK be 
appointed executrix named in 
the will without surety on the 
bond 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or before 
10:00 in the forenoon on August 
5, 198"' 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty (.30) days after the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Witness. Robert M Ford, 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham, the twenty- 
fourth day of June, one 
thousand nine hundred and 
eighty seven 
THOMAS PATRICK HI GHES 
Register of Probate 
7 9 87 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO 25 
ORDERED: 



February 17. 1987 



The City of Quincy ZoningOrdinance. Chapter 24. .Article V, Section 
52 as amended, is further amended by deleting from The Table of 
Dimensional Requirements the requirements set forth in the column 
entitled. "Minimum Lot Area Per D.U (Sq. Ft.jand insertingtherein 
the following minimum lot area per dwelling unit (sq, ft) 
requirements; 



-Res A - 7.650 

Res B - 2.500 

4-16 Units- 3.500 

17 Units and up - 3.500 

Res, C - 2.000 



Bus A - See Footnote 5 

Bus B - See Footnote 5 

Bus, C^ - See Footnote 5 

Ind, A - None 

Ind. B - None" 



And by adding to Article V. Section 52. the following: 

"Footnote 5. Notwithstanding any provisions in the Zoning By-Law 
to the contrary, the minimum lot area per dwelling unit is 2.500 sq, ft. 
for residential uses as may be permitted in other districts, including 
Bus A. B, and C." 

The City of Quincy Zoning Ordinance. Chapter 24. Article III. The 
Zoning Districts. Section 31. Subsection 2. as most recently amended, 
is amended by deleting: 

MAX NO 
OF STORIES 



-MNIMUM PUD PUD-I 
AREA PER DU (SQ. FT.) 



LOGO 10* 

*In a PUD I District, the maximum number ofstories shall be limited 
to eight (8)." 

and inserting therein: 

"MINIMUM PUD PUD-I MAX NO. 

AREA PER DU (SQ. FT.) OF STORIES 

2,000 8 

The City of Quincy Zoning Ordinance, Chapter 24. .Article V 
"Dimensional Requirements" Section 52, Table of Dimensional 
Requirements, is amended by deleting the maximum number of 
stories in Res. C, Res. D, Bus. B. Bus. C. Ind. A and Ind B zones and 
adding thereto and inserting therein the following maximum number 
of stories: 



District 

Res. C 
Res. D 
Bus. B 
Bus C 
Ind. A 
Ind. B 



Dimensional Requirements 

6 
6 
4 
6 
4 
4 



QUINCY DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING 
AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 



7/9/»7 



and further, by amending Article V "Dimensional Requirements" 
Section 52. "Table of Dimensional Requirements. Maximum 
Number of Stories, Footnote 4." as most recently amended, to read as 
follows: 

"Notwithstanding the number of allowable stories, no residential 
building shall be more than 60 feet above the existing average grade 
exclusive of those necessary features appurtenant thereto as 
enumerated in Section 56, except for buildings in a P.U.D.-P.U.D.-I 
District and commercial buildings where the height shall not be more 
than 80 feet above existing average grade. I n no case shall any building 
exceed six stories except for those buildings in a P.U.D.-P.U.D.-I 
District. Any commercial building with residential housing will be 
subject to the six-story above-grade limitation." 

These amendments shall not apply to any building for which a permit 
to construct foundations was issued prior to January I, 1987. 

PASSED TO BE ORDAINED JUNE 15. 1987 

ATTEST: JOHN M. GILLIS 

Clerk of Council 

A True Copy-Attest 

THOMAS R BURKE 

Auistant City Clerk 

7/9/87 



Pagf 24 Quincy Sun Tkunday, July «. 1*17 



149 Permits For 
$12 Million In Construction 



I he Building Department 
issued 149 permits for work 
estimated to cost $12,088,477 
during the month of May 

Building Inspector Kenneth 
.lohnson said that $I.V*i.48l 
was recei\cd in permit fees 
and $395 for public satrty 
inspections. 

A total of six dwelling units 



was added through ncu 
construction, and \^o 
through alteration 

Permits were ivsucd (or six. 
one-family dwelling estimated 
to ciwt a total ot $4K3.8(K) 

Two permits for mercantile 
buildings estimated to c(«t a 
total of $6,820,000 were 
issued 

There was also one permit 



LEGAL NOTICES 



INVn MION FOR BIDS 

CITN Oh QVi\i\. M \SSACHl SH IS 

PI RC H \SI\(i 1)1 F'XRIMFM 
I.W H'WC 0( k SI . Ql INC N. M \ 0:i6'J 

Invites sealed bids proposals for (urnishing and delivering to the C"il> 
of Quincv 
School Dcpi - 

Cleaning and Storage 

of Mhletic Fquipmcnt July 22. 1987 (ff 1000 AM 

Vacuum Pumps Julv 22. I9H7 (a 10 .^0 AM 

Detailed specifications are on file at the office of the Purchasing 
Agent. Oumcv Cit> Hall. 1305 Hancock Street. Quincv. MA 02169 

Bids must slate exceptions, if any. the delivery date and any allowable 
discounts 

Firm bid prices will be given Tirst consideration and will be rccened at 
the office of ihc Purchasing Agent until the time and date stated 
abo^e. at which time and date thc\ will be publiciv opened and read 

Bids must be in a sealed envelope I he outside of the sealed envelope is 
to be clearlv marked. "BID ENCI OSFD" with time djtc of bid call 

7 he right is reserved to reject anv or all bids or to accept an> pari of a 
bid or the one deemed best for the City 

I rancis \ McCauley. Mayor 
Robert I Denvir, Jr . Purchaxing Agent 



7 9 87 



ORDER NO 29 
ORDERED 



CITY OF 01 INCY 
IN COl'NC II 



January 20. I9K-' 

Be It Ordained bv the City C ouncil of the C iiv ol Quincv that Revised 
Ordinances ol the ( iiv of Quincv. Chapter 24 1 he Zoning Ordinance, 
as follows 

In Article VII Parking and loading Requirements. Section "'3 
Location and layout of Parking Eacilitics 

Add the following 

8 I he minimum si/e (or patking spates shall he as follows 

90' Parking - nine feet wide, eighteen feet long with a twentv-four 
foot turning radius (Diagram A & B) 

Parallel Parking - eight (eet wide. twcnty-t*o feet long with a 
twentv foot turning radius (Diagram C) 

4.^ Parking - nine feet wide, nineteen feet deep with iwentv-two 
fool turning radius (Diagram D) 

60' Parking - nine feet wide, tv^entv feet deep with a twenty-two 
fool turning radius (Diagram F) 



I 



T 



JSL 



T- 



I* .- 't> 



JmOL 



J 


a 








t 


1 '®'r, **■ 1 





90* PARKING - DOUBLE 



MtN. 

90* PARKING - SINGLE 





PARALLEL PARKING 




MIN. 

45* PARKING 



MINIMUM ARlA per space 



■tIM 

6 0* PARKING 



PARKING REQUIREMENTS 



PAHKir^G REQUlHtMENTS 

A - M" PMHinif - Uouoi* 
B - IM" HarKioq - :>inqi« 
C - CdHliml Pjrkiny 
D - 4^" PMKing 
f - Ui" Packing 

1 hese amendments shall not apply to an> building for which a permit 
to construct fourtdatiuns was issued prior to January I. I9K''. 

Passed lo Be Ordained June 18. \9H^ 

ATFFSI John M (mIIis 

C lerk of C ouncil 

Approved June 22. 198'' 

Francis X MtC aulcy 

Mayor 

A Frue Copy-Attest; Thomas R Burke. AsU City Clerk 

1 9 87 



for a garage, estimated lo cost 
$l.*i.OOO. 89 residential 
alterations at $827,495; 17 
other alterations. $3,710,192; 
12 removals. $92,200; seven 
signs. $16,250; 15 miscellane- 
ous. $12.3. .540. 

The totals for May. 1986 
vserc $25,213,486. 



Gerald Holmes 
In South Korea 

Air Force Sgl. (ierald A 
Holmes, son of Tnid I.. 
Holmes of 218 Belles uc Rd . 
Quincv. has arrived lor duty 
with the Fighth Security 
Polic" Squadron. South 
Korea. 

Holmes, a security 
specialist, is a 1983 graduate 
of Quincy Vocational High 
School. 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



C IIV Ol QliINC V 
IN COUNCII 



ORDER NO W 
ORDFRri> 



Januarv 20. 198"' 



BE IT OR DAINE D by the ( itv C ouncil of the C itv ol Quincv that the 
Revised Ordinances of the ( iiv ol Quincy. I9''6, as amended, be 
luriher amended as follows 

Chapter 24 - Section 21 

Add New l.inn 

MARINA - Dock or basin where slips, moorings and olten supplies. 

repairs and other services are available for craft 

Passed lo lie Ordained June l«. I9K"' 

A I I ESI John M Ciillis 

(lerk of C ouncil 

Approved June 22, I9K-' 

Francis X McCaulev 

Mavor 

A I rue Copv -Attest; Ihomas R Burke. Asst C it) Clerk 

-> 9 »i 

CITY OF Ql'INC Y 
IN COl NCII. 



ORDER NO 31 
ORDERED 



Januarv 20. I9K-' 



BE II ORDAINED bv the Citv Council of the C itv ol Quincv that the 

revised ordinances of the C iiv ol Quincv. I9''6. as amended be further 

amended as follows 

ARIICIE III /ONINO DISIRICIS Section 31 

Establishment of Districts - (c) Oll-streci parking facilities shall bi- 

provided as follows 

Retail 

Number of square feet requiring one sp.ice 

Delete 500 and insert 400 

OfTice 

Number ol square feel requiring one space 
Delete .S(K) and insert 400 

Passeo Id Be- Ordained lunc IK. I9H'' 

A I II SI John M (iillis 

C lerk ol C ount.ll 

Approved June 22. I'^H"' 

Erancis \ Mc( aukv 

Mavor 

A true Copv-Atiesi, J homas R Burke. Asst ( iiv C lerk 

■» ** K'' 



C IIV Ol Ql INC V 
IN ( Ol N( II 
ORDER NO 32 
ORDERED Januarv 2(» \9H-> 

BE I I OK DA IN ED by the ( itv ( ouncil of thi (its ol Quincv ihai the 
revised ordinances ol the C ilv ol Quincv. I9''6. jsamcmted be luithcr 
amended as follows 

( haptcr 24. Art II - DEFINIIIONS - Scttion 21 

Insert the following PARKINC, SPAC K DIMENSION A! 

Each parking space must rncei ihe 
minimum requirement'" ol 
AR IK I E VII Set ^V Para K with 
the exception that for parking 
facilities with a minimum of filtv (50| 
parking spaces or more, up to 20' f ol 
parking spaces, mav be .illocated to 
compact car parking with minimum 
dimensions of XV k P' 

I hese amendments shall not appl> to anv building for whici) a permit 
to construct foundations was issued prior to Januarv I. 198'' 

Passed lo Be Ordained June IK. 1 98'' 

A I lESJ John M (nllis 

(lerk of (Ouncil 

Approved June 22. I9X'' 

Erancis \ Mc( aulev 

Mavor 

A True C opy-Atlest. Fhomas R, Burke. Asst C ity C lerk 

■'9 8'' 

(IIV OE Ql IN( Y 
IN C()IJN( II 



ORDER nV3 
ORDEKI I) 



Januarv 2(1. I4K7 



BE II ORDAINI D by the ( ily C (luntil o( the C itv ol Quincv as 
follows: 

I hat the Revised Ordinances ol the Citv ol (Quincy. 1976. as amended, 
bi- further amended as lollows: 

ARIK I E III. /ONINd DISIRIC IS Seiiion 31 2(1) - 

IXIete - anv change or amendment m the plan nr written 

description shall require the approval ol ihi ( ilv 
( ouncil bv a iwo-thirds (2 3) vole ol all member". <il 
the ( Itv (ouncil 

And Insert 

Ihereol - anv change or amendment in ihe Plan or 

or written deseripiinn shall rrquirr Ihe 
ifrirmativr rrcommrndalion of Ihe Planning 
Board and the ,ippi<i\,il nl tin ( ilv ( nuntil 
bv a 2 3 vote nl all iiiembeis ul ihe Citv ( nuneil 

Passed lo Be Ordained June IK, I9K7 

Al IFSI John M (nllis 

Ckrk of Council 

Approved June 22. I9H7 

Erancis X McCauley 

Mayor 

A Irue C opy-Attcst. Ihomas R Burke. Asst ( ily Clerk 

7 9 87 



C IIV OF QIINC Y 
IN iO[ \i II 
ORDER NO M 
ORDERED January 20. I9K7 

BE II ORDAINI D bv the (itv (ouncil ol the (itv ol Quincy as 
lollows 

I hat the Revised Ordinances »>( theCityol Quincv. I9''6. av amended, 
be lurthcr amended as lollows 

ARIICI E VII PARKINt. ANDIOVDINCi RIQIIRI MENIS 
Section 72 - Table of Parking Rrquirrmenis 

Off-Mrrcl parkinc facililirs shall be provided as follows: 

ADD NKU LINK: -- Marina - .50 per approved slip and/ 

<K mo«>ring 

Passed lo Be Ordained June IK. 1987 

A TIES I John M dillis 

Clerk .)f C ouncil 

Approved June 22. 1987 

Erancis \ Mc( aulcv 

Mavor 

A Irue C opv-Attcst. Ihnmas R Burke. Nssi ( iiv Clerk 

7 9 87 



CIIY OFQl INC V 
IN COl NC II 



ORDER NO 35 
ORDI Rl D 



7.oninK Districts 
Dflrlr - 



January 20. 1987 
This ordinance becomes effrclivr Januarv I, 1981. 

Be It ordained bv the Citv ( ouncil ol the ( ilv ol Quincv that the 
revised ordinances of the Citv ol Quincv , 1976. as amended, be lurthet 
amended as lollows 

ART VIII - ENVIRONMI NI M (ONIROI S- Section 81 Signs 
[VIcic: (D) Ihe si/e ol all temporary signs shall 

not exceed lour bv eight feet (4x8 i 
Insert (D) Ihc *i/e ol all temporarv signs shall 

not ficred four bv four feel (4\4'). 

Passed lo Be Ordained June 18. I9K7 

Al II SI John M (iillis 

(lerk ol ( tiiineil 

Approved lunc 22, 1987 

Erancis \ McCaulev 

Mavt>r 

A Irue (opv-Xtiest. lh»)nias R Hurke, Asst ( iiv ( Icik 

7 9 87 

(in Ol gl IS( > 
IN ( Ol N( II 
ORDI K NO ^6 
ORDI Kl I) January 20 Nh^ 

Bi I I ORDMNI I) hs the ( itv ( ouncil <>l ihc ( ilv .>! Qmniv jv 

lollows 

I hat the Revised Ordinances ol the ( iiv .>! Quincv h^'h as .imendcd 

be lurihcr anu'iided as lullnvvs 

ARI l( I I Mil A I I OOI) I'l AIN DIM K HI Section 86 - 
Para ^ - I se Rcguiaiions Sub-I )ivisi(m Ktel - 

Duelling lawlullv exisiing pnoi to the 
.idiiption ol these piovisions (including 
enlaigemeni in area or volume up to twentv 
live (25l percent ol gnnind lovciage) 

.And Insert Ihereof- Dvselliog lawlullv existing piior lo thi 
adoption ol these pii)visions (including 
enlargements in area up lo n»cniv-live (25l 
percent ol ground coverage 

Passed lo Be Ordaine.l June 18. 1987 

Al IFSI John M (nllis 

C lerk of C ouncil 

Appr.)ved lunc 22 \9X^ 

Erancis \ Mc( aulcv 

Mavor 

A Irue ( opv Aticst. Ihomas K Burke Asst (ilv (lerk 

7 9 87 

CM V Ol Ql IN( V 
IN (OINC II 
ORDER NO V 

ORDI RI I) Januarv 20, 1987 

BE II ORDAINEDbythcCityC ouncil of the ( Ity of Quincy that the 
Revised Ordinances of the Ciiy of Quincv I9''6. as amended, be 
further amended as follows 

ARIIC I E VII PARK INC, AND I OADINd RI Ql IR EMEN I S - 
Section 72 Tabic of Parking Requirements 
Off-street parking facilities shall he provided as ((»llows: 
Residence A 

Strike I (spaces) per 10 (units) 
Insert 2 (spaces) per 10 (units) 

Passed lo Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

AJ I ESI: John M (iillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22, 1987 

Francis \ McCaulc> 

Mavor 

A True Copy-Attest, Thomas R Burke, Asst Citv Clerk 

7/9 87 



CEIY OE QUINCY 
IN COIINCII 



ORDER NO 38 
ORDERED 



January 20. 1987 
BE II ORI)AINFDbythe( ily( ounciloltheCityofQuincythai the 
Revised Ordinances of the (ity of Quincy. 1976. as amended, he 
further amended as lollows 

ARIK IE VII PARKIN(i AND I ()ADIN(i RI QDIREMEN IS 
Section 72 Table of Parking Requirements 
Off-street parking facilities shall be provided as follows 
Re«idene ( 

Strike 15 (spaces) per 10 units 
Insert 1.75 (spaces) per 10 units 

Passed lo Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

Al 11 SI John M (iilhs 

Clerk 4)f Council 

Approved June 22. 1987 

Francis \. McCauley 

Mayor 

A Irue Copy-Attest Ihomas R Burke. Asst City (Jerk 

7 9 87 



LEGAL NOTICES 



LEGAL NOTICES 



Tkunaay. July f. IW7 Q^ncj Sun P«|« 25 



LEGAL NOTICES 



CIIYOFQI INCY 
IN COIJNCII 



(IIY OF QIINCY 
IN (Ol NCII 



ORDIR NO IK 
OKI)! RID 



January 5. I9K7 



He- II Ordained b\ the ( its ( ouncil ot the ( ii\ ol Qmncv as follows 

I hat Ihc Revised Ordinances olihc Cil> oiyuintv. 1976 as amended, 
are turlher amended in ( hapier 24. I he /onm^! Ordinance. Arlitle I 
Adminisiialum. Setlion 14. Board ot Appeals lo read as (oilows 

Section 14 Hoard ot Appeals 

I I here shall he a Hoard ol Appeals as provided hv the 
(icneral I av^s, C haptet 4<)A. Section 12. as amended, which 
shall act on all matters within its jurisdiction under this chapter 
in the manner prescribed in such section and shall have all 
powers granted bv such section, subject always to the rule that 
It shall give due consideratum to the promotion o( public 
health, saletv. convenience and welfare, encoiiragint; the most 
proper uh-oI land, and conseningpropertv values, that it shall 
permit no building or use injurious, noxious, ottensive or 
detrimental to a neighborhood and that it shall prescribe 
proper conditions and safeguards in each case 

I he Board shall consist oi five (^) members to beappointed by 
the Mavor All members of the Hoard shall be residents of the 
Citv . one member shall be an aitornev at law. and one shall be 
cither an archileci. engineer or master builder I he terms shall 
be arranged, so that one member ls appointed on the first 
Monday of each February for a term of five years Any 
vacancy in the Board shall be filled for the remainder of the 
unexpired term 

There shall also he three (.1) associate members of the Board of 
Appeals who shall be appointed in like manner and have the 
same qualifications as the regular members of the Board, but 
for a term of three years In case of an unfilled vacancy, 
inability to act. or interest on the part of a member of such 
lit ard. the chairman shall designate one (l| of the associate 
members to take the place of such member 

1 he Board of Appeals shall exercise the powers and perform 
the duties prescribed for a Board of Appeals under the 
provisions of the (ieneral laws. Chapter 40A, or any 
amendments ilKreto Any action of such Board under such 
sections shall be in accordance with and subject to the terms 
thereof 

2 The Board of Appeals may request the written comments 
and recommendations of the I'lanning Department and any 
other municipal office it deems proper during its review of any 
petition Any such request, however, shall not toll the periods 
established by Chapter 4<)A of the (ieneral laws within which 
the Hoard must act 

Passed to He Ordained Juno 2«J. i9S" 

ATT ESI John M dillis 

Clerk ol council 

Approved June 30. li^K? 

Francis \ McCauley 

Mayor 

A true Copy. Attest. Ihoin.is R Hiirkc. \ssi C its C krk 

7 V 87 



cm Ol Ol i\( t 

IS ( Ol N( II 



ORDI R C4: 
ORDI Rl I) 



l.inu.ii\ 20. l^ih' 



HI I I OR I) MM I) by the (ii\ ( .xiikjIoI ihcC ilv oIC)uiik\ ih.ii I he 
RcviMil Oritin.inces ol the C iiv ol C.>uiik\. ^""6. .iv .mundcil bi 
liiiihcr anuiiiKil as lolli)\ts 

\R IK I I Ml I'NRklVd \\l) I 0\l)l\(, Rl gilkl Ml MS 
Scciiiin -.^ lablr or i'arkine Kcquircmrnis 

DH.F I K: I ooiiioic cj 

Passed lo Hi- Ordained June l«. \9H'> 

ATIFSI John M Ciillis 

C lerk of Council 

Approved lune 22. I'iX'' 

Francis X McCauley 

Mayor 

A I rue Copv-Atiesi. I homas R Hurkc. Asst City Clerk 

•'9 8'' 



CIIY OF QIINCY 
IN COliNCIl- 
ORDFR NO 4.^ 
ORDFRFD January 20. 198'' 

He it ordained by the City Council of the C iiy ol Quincy that the 
revised ordinances of the City ol Quincy. I9''ft. as amended are further 
amended as follows 

AR1ICI F Vll PARKINCi & I OADINCi RFQl'IREMEMS - 
Section ">} («5| Location & lji)oul of Parkinj; Facililirt 

Item S 
STRIKK: 

Parking Facilities shall beat least ten ( 10) feet Irom a sircci linc.and 
shall be- at least three (3) feel from any other lot line, and shall be at 
least (ft) leet Irom any building, and shall not be located between the 
street line and the required setback line 

INSKRT: 

Parking facihlies shall be at least ten (10) feet from a street line 
Parking lacilities in a Res A district shall be at least (.1) Icct from any 
other lot line, and shall beat least five (M feet from any building and 
shall not be ItHaied between the street line and the required setback 
line Parking facilities m all other district shall beat least ten ( 10) (eel 
Irom anv other lot line and shall be at least ten (10) feel Irom any 
building and shall not be located between the street line and the 
required setback line 



I hese amendments shall not appiv to any building lor which a permit 
lo construct foundations was issued prior lo January I. 198''. 

Passed lo Be Ordained June IK. I9K'' 

AM I SI John M dillis 

Clerk ol Council 

Approved June 22. I9K'' 

Francis \ McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copy- Attest; I homas R Burke. Asst City Clerk 

■> 9 87 



ORDFR NO 41 
ORDI RFD 



CIIY OF QDINCY 
IN COL NCII 



January 20. I9K'' 



BF II ORDAINFD by the City Council of the City ol (Quincy as 
follows 

I hat the Revised Ordinances ol the City of Quincy. I9"^6. as amended 
be further amended as follows 

AR I IC I I Vll - Parkini; and l.oadin|> Requirements - Section ''2 - 
Table of Parkin|> Requirements - Class ol Allowed Ise - Assembly 
(2a. 2b) - 

Number of Seal» Requiring 1 space 
Delete Business A 5 
Business B K 
Business C 10 

and insert therefor 

Number of Seats Requiring I space 

Business A 4 
Business B 4 
Business C 4 

Passed lo Be Ordained June 18. 198"' 

ATFFST John M Gilhs 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 198-' 

Francis X McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copy- Attest; Thomas R Burke, Asst. City Clerk 

7 9; 87 



C\l\ Ol QIINCY 
IN cor NCII 



ORDI R fl4S 
ORDFRFD 



Januarv 20. 1987 



Bl I I ORDAINI I) by the C ity Council ol the C ilv of Quincy as 
lollows: 

I hat Ihc Revised Ordinances of the City ol Quincy . 1976. as amended, 
be lurihcr amended as lollows: 

ARIICIF V - DIMFNSIONAI R FQIIREMFN I S - Section 52. 
Table of dimensional requirements - 

Minimum Yard I incar Feet 
District Rear 

Business B Insert iherclor - 20 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

ATTEST John M Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 198^ 

Francis X. McCauley 

Mayor 

A I rue Copy-Attest; Thomas R Burke, Asst. City Clerk 

7 9 8'' 



( II\ OF Ql INC^ 
IS (Ol S( II 



ORDI R ::4h 
ORDI Rl I). 



Januarv 20. 1987 



HI I I ORDMNl 1) b\ Ihc C us C ouncil i.| the C ii\ of Quincy as 

lollows 

I hat the Revised Ordinances ol ihe Cil\ ol Quincy. I9''6. as .iincnded. 
be lurlhei amended .is lollows; 

\RIIC1I \ -DIMFNSIONAI R FQl IRFMFN I S - Section 52. 
fable of Dimensional Requirements - 

Minimum >.ird I inear Feel 
District Re.ir 

Husincss C Inscti ihcieloi - 2() 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18, 1987 

ATTEST: John M C.illis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 1987 

Francis X. McCauley 

Mayor 

A I rue Copv-Attest, Thomas R, Burke. Asst. City Clerk 

7 9 87 



CITY OF Ql INCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDFR NO 47 
ORDERED 



January 20. 1987 

BF 1 1 ORDAINED by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

I hat the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy. 1976. as amended, 
bl further amended as follows: 

ARTICLE V - DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS - Section 52, 
Table of Dimensional Requirements - 

District Green Area Open Space per D.l . (Sq. ft.) 

Residence H 

4 to 16 units Delete - 500 

and insert therefor • 700 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

ATTEST John M Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 1987 

Francis X McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copy-Attest, Thomas R. Burke. Asst City Clerk 

7 9 87 ' 



CITY OFQllNCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDFR NO 51 
ORDFRFD 



January 20. 198"' 

Be It ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincv that the 
revised ordinances of the City of Quincy. 1976. as amended, be further 
amended as follows 

ARMCI EV- DIMFNSIONAI R FQUIR EM FN FS -SECTION 52 
I able of Dimensional Requirements 

District Minimum \ard IJitear Feet .Side 

Business B Insert therefor 

IS 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

ATTESI John M Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 1987 

Francis X. McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copv-Ailcsi; Thomas R Burke. Asst Cilv Clerk 

7 9 87 



ORDER NO 48 
ORDERED 



January 20. 1987 



BF IF ORDAINED by the City Council of the City of Qumcy as 

lollows 

I hat the Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy. 1976, as amended, 
be further amended as follows 

ARTICI F V - DIMFNSIONAI REQUIREMENTS - Section 52, 
Fable ol Dimensional Requirements - 



[)istricl 

Residence B 
1 7 Units'and Up 



C;recn Am Open Space per D.l . (Sq. fl.) 

Delete - SOO 

and insert therefor - 700 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

ATTEST John M Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22, 1987 

Francis X McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copy-Attest; Thomas R Burke, Asst. City Clerk 

7 9 87 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO 53 
ORDERED: January 20, 1987 

Be It ordained by the City Council of the City of Quincy that the 
revised ordinances of theCity of Quincy. I976,as amended, be further 
amended as follows: 

ARTICLE V - DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS - Section 52. 
Table of Dimensional Requirements 

Districi Miatmum Yard Linear Feet Side 

Business A IS 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

ATTEST John M Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 1987 

Francis X. McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copv-Attest; Thomas R Burke. Asst Citv Clerk 

7 9 87 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO 54 
ORDERED January 20. 1987 

BE IT ORDAINED BY THECITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF 
QUINCY THAT THE REVISED ORDINANCES OF THE CITY 
OF QUINCY. 1976. AS AMENDED. BE FURTHER AMENDED 
AS FOLLOWS: 

ART V - DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS - SECTION 52. 
Table of Dimensional Requirements 

'^*'"^* Minimum Yard Linear Feet-Rear 

Business A Delete - 10 

Insert therefor ■ IS 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

ATTEST John M Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 1987 

Francis X. McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copv-Attest; Thomas R Burke. Asst Citv Clerk 

7 9 87 ' 



CIT\ OFQUINO 
IN COUNC II 



ORDER »55 
ORDERED 



Januarv 20, 1987 



HE IF ORFVAINED bv the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
follows: 

I hat the Revised Ordinancesof the City of Quincy. 1976. as amended. 
be luriher amended as follows: 

\RIICIF\ DIMFNSIONAI REQUIREMENTS Scction52, 
Table of dimensional requirements - 

Minimum Yard Linear Feet - 
District Front 

Business A Insert therefor - 15 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18, 1987 

ATTEST: John M, Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 1987 

Francis X McCauley 

Mayor 

A True C^opy-Attcst; Thomas R. Burke, Asst. Citv Clerk 

7 9 87 



CITY OF QUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDFR NO 57 
ORDERED: 



January 20, 1987 

BE IT ORDAINED by the City Council of the City of Quincy as 
lollows: 

I hat the Revised Ordinances of the City of Qumcy. 1976. as amended, 
be further amended as lollows: 

ARTICI F V - DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS - Section 52. 
I able of Dimensional Requirements - 

District Minimum Y ard Linear Feet Side 

Residence B 

4-16 Units Delete - IS fl. 

and insert therefor - 2S ft. 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18. 1987 

ATTEST; John M Gillis 

Clerk of Council 

Approved June 22, 1987 

Francis X. McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copy- Attest; Thomas R. Burke, Asst. City Clerk 

7 9 87 



Prnft 2* QvtiKj Sm Thynday, July •. Jft7 




EVERYBOOrS MARKETPIACE 



HELP WANTED 



PART-TIME DRIVERS 



Retirees, Homemakers, Students 
Welcome! 

Program Management Services is currently 
seeking Part-Time Drivers to transport 
handicapped adults to and from So Shore 
area to Quincy location Early AM and 
afternoon shifts available Mon -Fn approx 
4-5 hours per day $7 00 per hour 
If interested please call Nancy at 

328-0300 



Wanted 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
BOOKKEEPER 
Call 471-3100 - 335-1747 

For Appointment 



LEGAL NOTICE 



C IIV Of Ql INO 
IN COl NCII- 



ORDER NO 58 
ORDERED 



January 20, 198"' 



BF ir ORDAINED b> the City Council of the Citv of Ouinc> as 
(ollows. 

That the Revised Ordinances of the City ofQumcy. I9''6. as amended. 
St further amended as follov^s: 

ARritlF V - DIMFNSIONA! REQUREMEN fS - Section 52. 

fablf of Dimensional Requirements - 

Dhlricl 

Residence B 
P units and up 



Minimum lot Area Per D.l'. (Sq. Ft.) 

DrIeir 2.500 

• nd insert therefor - .),500 



Passed lo He Ordained June IK. IV8' 

•M nSI John M (.illis 

( Icrk of ( ouncil 

Approved June 22. Nh"" 

f rancis X Vft( auk'v 

Mavor 

■\ Iruc ( ()p\-\iu-sl. Ihomas R Burkt. Asst C it\ Clerk. 

"9 8"' 



CUV Ol 01 IN( V 
IN COl NCII 



ORDER NO 59 
ORDERED 



January 20. I98'' 



BE n ORDAINF D b> ihc ( il\ ( ountil of the City ol Oumcy as 
follo\ks 

fhai the Revised Ordinances of the C ity of Quincy. I9''f). as amended, 
be further amended as follo\*s 

ARFICl E V - DIMENSIONAI RFQI IRF MINIS- Section 52. 
Fable of Dimensional Rec|uiremcnis - 

DiMricI Minimum l,ot Area Per D.l . (.Sq. El.) 

Residence B r>eletc - 2.5(XJ 

4 - 16 Units and insert therefor - .V5(K) 

Passed lo Be Ordained June 18. 198'' 

AT FESF John M Oilhs 

C lerk of ( ouncil 

Approved June 22. 198'' 

Erancis X Mc( auley 

Ma>or 

A I rue Copy-Attest; Thomas R Burke. Asst ( it> (lerk 

■^ 9 HI 

CITY OE 01 INCY 
IN COUNCIL 
ORDER NO 60 
ORDERED January 20. I98-' 

BE IT ORtJAINKD by the i iiy Council of the C ity of Quincy as 
follows: 

Fhatthe Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy. l9''6.asaiTiended. 
be further amended as follows 

ARTICLE V- DIMENSIONAI REQUIREMF N FS - Section 52. 
Table of f>imensional Requirements - 



Dislrici 

Residence B 
P Units and up 



Minimum Vard linear Errt Side 



[>clctc - 2« ft. 

and intert Iherrfor - 25 fl. 

Passed To Be Ordained June 18. 198'' 

ATTEST John M Cnllis 

C lerk of Council 

Approved June 22. 198'' 

Erancis X McCaulcy 

Mayor 

A True Copy-Allcst. Thomas R Burke. Astl. City Clerk 

■' 9 8"' 



HELP WANTED 



OFFICE ASSISTANT 

Chadwick-Miller Incorporated has opening for 
flexible individual to assist various departments 
Candidate must have good typing skills, pleasant 
telephone manner, like working with figures, and 
the ability to function well with all levels of 
personnel 

We offer a 37'r hour work week, excellent fringe 
benefits, including profit sharing, health and dental 
insurance Please call Bette Brophy for an 
appointment 

828-8300, ext. 223 

CHADWICK-MILLER INC. 



300 Turnpike St. Canton, MA 02021 



J 9 



CASHIER 

Wanted experienced cashier, preferably 
with automotive experience, to work in 
busy office. Must be neat appearing. 
References required. 

For confidential interview call: 

770-3300 



Ask for Mike Dee 



7 9 



$ QUALITY JOBS $ 

FOR 

$ QUALITY TEMPS $ 

Earn $5-$15 Per Hour 
Flexible Hours. Local Assignments 

S«cr«tarial/W.P., Clerical, Accounting, 
Light Industrial, Data Entry 

QUALITY TEMPS, INC. 

Olvltlon of Quality Personnel 



5M-0500 r.T7'"'.'«"r.'.'"B'" ""'.■ 328-6400 

Brockton' °"""<»" °' ^^^'^^ ^•'•^''^^ Quincy 

Full A P. Time Permanent Alto Available 



1 ^8 8fl 



EXPERIENCED 

PASTE UP ARTIST 

Full or Part Time 

Call 471-3100 for appt. 




1372 Hancock St., Quincy 
471-3100 



TELEMARKETING 

30K |r**rly Incom* plus (salary 
commiijion and a good benefits 
package) is possible for applicants 
who possess strong telephone skills 
are aggressive self-motivated and 
are positive thinkers The fastest 
growing established conmputer 
products distributor in the U S 
needs you now to conlinue its rapid 
growth For interview call Harold 
Stel^er at 

COMPUSOURCE 
337-8400 I 

7/9 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Hare's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Iambucan 

VCAHCER 
fSOOETV 



FEDERAL. STATE ft 
CIVIL SERVICE JOBS 

$16,707 to $59 148/year, Now 
Hiring CALL JOB LINE 1-518- 
459-361 1 exi F4464 lor info 24HR 

7/16 



LEGAL NOTICES 



NOTICE 

OF PI BLic hi:arin(; 

Ihc Norfolk C'ount\ 
CommisMoncrs will, pursuant 
to M.G.I Chapter .^4. Section 
14. conduct a public hearing on 
July 2.1. l9«-'at ''OO I' M. The 
public hearing will be held in the 
Second Hoor Conference 
Room of City Hall Annex 
IcKaicdat I.M)5 Hancock Street. 
C^uincy. MA 

The purpose of said pubhc 
hearing is to obtain commenis 
from the public with respect to 
the sale of land owned by 
Norfolk County located at 20 
Coddington Street. Quincy. 
containing approximately 
50,2'' I square feet of land 
improved with a building 
known as the "Old C^uincy 
C ourlhouse." 

Norfolk County Commissioners 

James J Collins. Chairman 

George B McDonald 

Uivid C. Ahcarn 

■'2. 9 8'' 



HELP WANTED 



SALES AND CASHIERS 

FULL/PART TIME 
BUILD A BETTER FUTURE! 



CHANNEL HOME CENTERS. INC the nations largest 
independently owned home center cham, is a great place 
lo build a career Right now, we have openings for 
qualified men and women who have upbeat personalities 
We will tram highly motivated, intelligent individuals with 
the drive to succeed 

We offer attractive salaries and comprehensive benefits 
package for full time employees Our part timers receive 
paid vacation and holidays All of these positions offer the 
opportunity for advancement 

APPLY IN PERSON 



CHANNEL 

HOME CENTERS, INC. 

5S0 Adamt Strt«l 

Oulncy, MatMchutttU 

Equal Opportunity Employtr M/F/H 



ATTENTION! 

Full Time & Part Time 

TELEPHONE OPERATORS lo take catalog ofders 
tor European Company Choose yoor own hours. 
start Aug iO Ideal for students homemahers 
teachers, actors and actresses and anyone looking 
tor full or pan lime schedule Will tram Must have 
pleasant speaking voice and enjoy workina wiih put>- 
lic Good working conditions and salary Convenient 
to Red Line So Station area Flexible hours availa- 
ble betvk^en 8 30am to 8 30pm Mon Fn 9- 5 Sat 
Call Maureen 426 5218 



RETAIL ADVERTISING 
SALES PERSON 

Part Time 



e ^%vi.±xxo3r 



1372 Hancock St., Quincy 
471-3100 



HELP US, 

HELP KIDS ! 



COMPASS , a pnvale. non 
profit agency serving 
adolescents is presently 
seeking foster parents We 
provide comprehensive 
sen^ices to clients and foster 
parents including 24 hr 
Support and weekly reim- 
bursements 

For more information please 
call 

524-2333 

WE NEED YOUR 

HELP!!! 827 



RN or LPN 

Charge Nuttt lot 3 to 11 thitt each 
Friday and alternate weekendi 
Eicelleni salary Call471-4046 Friel 
Nursing Home Wollatton MA 

7/16 



TEEN PART-TIME 

SUMMER JOB 

Dependable teen (15 or 
older) wanted to clean CPR 
mannequins and answer 
telephone. 20 hrs/week 
Call South Shore Red 
Cross 471-5440 

7/9 

Shop Locally 
Savo Qaa t Monoy 



PARENTS AND 
COLLEGE STUDENTS 

Data-Entry Operators 

Schtdule to your Needs 

8:30 am to 8:30 pm 

Call 288-3400 

for mtarvitw a|>pt. 
coll 211-3400 



;/» 



EX. HOUSEKEEPER 

For week-ertdt. Hour* • to 2. 
Eicellent aalary. FrIel Nursing 
Home, M Beach St . WoNatlon. MA. 
Call m AM. 47»-7722 

7/16 



HIRING! 

Federal government jobs your 
area and overseas Many 
immediate openings without 
waiting list or test $15-$68.000 
Call refundable (602) 838-8085 
Ext 2379 7/?3 



HELP WANTED 

A willing, healthy person, over 
fourteen years, for occasional 
yard work $4 00 an hour 
Reference roqtiested 749-7777 

7/9 



Thunday. Jdy 9, IW7 Qul«cy Sm Ptfe 27 




EVERYBODY'S MARKETPIACE 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



CLYDE POOL SERVICE Inc. 

Vinyl Liner Replacement 

General Masonry 

Coping, Decks, Walkways, Patios 

Opening/Closing 

Sales Service & Repair 

337-4949 328-7290 



7 30 



NANCY'S NOOK 

N«w baby bouHqu*. chrtolaning 
and baby aqulpmanl. ale. Naw 
and ganlty uaad chlldran'i and 
woman • apparal Quality 
contlgnmanU accaplad. 25A 
Baala St . WoNaaton. 773-9293 



AUTO-TRUCK-MARINE 

138 Washington St , Qumcy 

Quality Parts - Quality Service 

Fair Discount- Why Go Elsewhere'' 

471-3731 471-3732 

7 9 



BAY STATE 
Home Services 

• Inleno' and E«Ierior Pamting 

• Waiipapertng 
Insured Frpp Estimates 



878-4567 



7/16 



CUSTOM MATTRESSES 

to til any AniiquP Bed Any 
size'tirmness Specialists smce 
53 Advice horne visits Siesta 
Sleep Shop 479-51 19- Steve 



LAWNS MOWED 

Hedges Trimmed 

Reasonable Rates 

Call for Free Estimate 

479-1165 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

HOUSE FOR SALE 

B'Hiniree pnrne location 3 
t)edroom Colonial Cape with 
garage i baths country 
kitchen excellent condition 
Owner anxious to sell S159 900 
843-0806 

7 16 



FOR SALE 



GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U Repj") Delinquent 
tax property Repossessions 
Call 805-687-6000 Ext GH-3019 

9 17 



FOR SALE 

Antique brass double t>ecl Needs 
polishing We polish $700 You 
polish $400 Also a boudoir 
chaise lounge $100 773-6454 

7 9 

FOR SALE 

Tub safety transfer seat, metal 
legs ad|ust to reach over tub 
Rubber-lipped legs, padded back 
rest Yours for $35 471-9759 

7 9 



MISCELLANEOUS 



PATENT SUIT 

Patent 4.481.674 suit against 
govt Make upto3million dollars 
That s $6000 to each dollar paid 
996-1637 $500 cost Wayne 
Sllva 97 Park St . New Bedford. 
MA 02740 7"6 



PERSONALS 

Thank You 

Blessed Virgin and St. Jude 

my prayers have been 

answered 

HL M 
7/9 

Thank You 
SL Jude 



MLF 
7/9 



^ 



GARAGE DOOR 

MSTALUTION I REPAIRS 

ELECTRIC OPENERS 

FrM Eitimatti 

698-2304 9 3 



'<aTweTr'^"''-^VVewan, 
thegara" r''''''^«c«''ar 

337-8552 ''^ estimate 

8 ?7 



APT. WANTED 



PROFESSIONAL MALE 

Seeks efficiency apartment or 
room with kitchen privileges 
(Ouincy area) Call 335-1747 

TF 



WANTED 



WANTED 

Used baby furniture for girl High 
chair, car seat gates etc For 
temporary need by grandparents 
Call 479-5924 

7 9 



INSTRUCTION 



Reservations 
Agents 
Ticket Agent 
Ground Service 
Representative 



Start locally full time part time 
Tram on live airline computers 
Home study and resident 
training Financial aid 
available Job placement 
a<!sistance National Hdqirs 

Lighthouse Pt FL 
ACT. TRAVEL SCHOOL 



1 800 327-7728 



Accr»dlt*d 1 



FOR RENT 



Cottages 
For Rent 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore, House- 
keeping cottages. 
Studio and 3 room 
available. Weekly 
rentals MBS - »250. 
Private beach. Tennis 
a\;ailable. Call 328- 
1300, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

TF. 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Qumcy K of C Building 

5 Hollis Avenue 

f-or information please call: 

32S-6967 

TF 



HALL FOR RCNT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380, 

American Legion, 1116 Sea St 

4794149 

TF 

HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings, Showers. 

Meetings, Banquets 

cjks HorT»e, 440 E Squantum St 

OuirKy 

472-2223 

TF 



^ 471-5323 

Specializing in 
Custom Vinyl Exteriors 

• Vinyl & Aluminum Replacement Windows 

• Aluminum Storm Doors & Windows 

• Siding • Rooflng • Seamless Alum. Gutters 

Lie ENSED AND INSl RED 7 9 



D.R. Smalley 
Carpentry 

Quality work m all fazes of 

Building 

Remodeling 

Roofing & 

Siding 

Custom Decks 

Free Est. Anything 

Don with 

479-7436 Wood 

7-16 



LABELS 

Custom printed labels - Big or 
small orders - Any size shape 

or colors 48-hOur jiffy 

Stickers Call FDK Ml<tg N 
Quincy 472-4306. 

' 9 



PRIVATE CHARTERS 

C'uise Sightsee. Whalewatch 

U S CG Lie 

Capt R F McDermott 

Reasonable rates day'mght 

843-8601 Eve, 

10 "'■ 

ROBERT L. ELLIS 

Decks, Porches, Windows 

and Remodeling 

Free Estimates 

Licensed 331-9977 



STEVE'S 
CLEANING CO. 

GENERAL CLEANING 

COMMERCIAL 

FLOOR CARE 

FREE ESTIMATES 

770-9799 

24 Hour 

Answering Machine 

7-9 



College Pro 
Painters 

of Quincy 

Residential 
Exterior Painting 

Two Year Written Guarantee 
FREE ESTIMATES 

Call 
923 - 4545 



7 9 



GLASS & SCREEN REPAIR 

Wood & Porch Screens 

WOLLASTON GLASS CO 

9 V^ollaston Ave., Wollaston 

Reasonable Rates 

Overnight Repair 

472-6207 9 10 



ELECTRICAL & APPLIANCES 



' A &T VACUUM 

• $1.4 95 Overhaul Special 
Qn any vacuum 

• ORECK XL VACUUM 
(as advertised by WBZsDave 
Maynard on sale Now '249' ) 

Almost New Electroiux s 
Start ing at »299* 

'We now have a Large Selection ' 

of Video Movies ' 

' 99C Membership Fee 

S2 per Movie 



27 Beale St , Wollaston 
479-5066 



TF 



SERVICES 



BATHROOMS 

REMODELED 

also 

MINOR REPAIRS 

Ceramic Tile 

or 

Formica Enclosures 

One Price 

Reasonable Rates 

CALL 472-1310 

Lie "124' Since I960 

Free Estimates 



Your South Short 

Headquarters 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
IMAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St , So Quincy 

472-1710 

TF 





EXPERT, 

\ LAiMP lEPAIRr 

\t REWWMG) 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



BOWES CUSTOM 
DECK & FENCE 

Free Estimates 
Call 698-2304 



JOE'S FLOORS 

Sanded & RefJnished 
Best Quality and Prices 
•^REE ESTIMATES 
254-7539 9 17 



TREE WORK 

Pruning, removal brush 
chipping Free estimates Mike 
Sullivan, 472-3595 

9 24 



SERVICES 



Larry's 
Home Repair 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 
• Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceding 

All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 



328-8735 



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TF 



B & W 
RENOVATIONS 

Painting Interior, Exterior 

Remodeling 

335-2452 472-7276 

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ancJ Sun Cable Classified Ads 



MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 HancocIt St., Quincy, MA02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 




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QUINCY SUN 

QUINCY SUN & 
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T.V. COMBO 



D $4.50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, IOC each additional word 
D With your Sun ad you can also run 20 times per day for 3 days on 
Channel 8-Sun Cable T.V. for only $1 per day 



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a Services 

D For Sale 

a Autos 

D Boats 

a For Rent 

G Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

D Pets, Livestock 

D Lost and Found 

D Real Estate For Sale 

D Real Estate Wanted 

D Miscellaneous 

a Work Wanted 

D Antiques 

D Coins A Stamps 

D Rest Homes 

a Instruction 

D Diiy Care 

D Personal 

a Electrical & Appliances 

Cable Ads will be 
abbreviated if neccesary. 



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D With your Sun ad. you can also run 20 times per day for 4 days on 

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D $4.00 per insertion, up to 20 words for 8-1 2 insertions of same ad 

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13 WEEKS or more 

QUINCY SUN & 
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SUN CABLE 
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D With your Sun ad, you can also run 20 times a day for 7 days on 

Channel 8-Sun Cable TV. for only $1 per day 

D Run your ad on Channel 8-Sun Cable T.V. alone 20 times per day 
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NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION. 
DEADLINE: TUESDAY, 10:00 A.M. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD. 



Pa(c 21 QMtncy Sun Tkiinday. July 9. I9t7 



Doughnut Shop Traffic Hearing 
Placed On File For Year 



By JANE ARENA file a hearing concerning business as Dunkin' Donuts. 

The City License Board, in traffic conditions at at the corner oT Hast 

a special meeting, placed on Squanium Donuts. doing Squantum St.. and Quincy 




Shore Dr. 

Rona (loodman. president 
of the Squantum Community 
■Association, told the board 
last IhursdaN some improve- 
ment has been made since 
hearings were held in late 
Ma\. but ihai the problem 
had not been alleviated. 

In May the board had 
suggested that the shop block 
ofl the last Squantum St 
entrance to the shop and that 
the Qumcy Shore Or 
entrance be used as a two-way 
entrance and egress 

Neil Kerstein. altornes tor 
the shop's owner, Paul 
(iovostes, said that the shop 
did not block off the entrance 
because the VI DC pt)lice had 
said that a separate entrance 
and e.\it are needed 

Building Inspector Kenneth 
Johnson said that the Quincy 
Shore Dr. entrance could be a 
twivway because it is wide 
enough to meet the 24 f«ot 
requirement for a two-way 
entrance and e.xit. 

The board had also 
suggested that the curb on 
East Squantum St. be 
extended in order to prevent 
cars from turning illegally off 
Quincy Shore Dr. to enter the 
shop. Kerstein said that 
barriers had been erected for 
this purpose. 

Police Chief Francis Finn 
recommended that the shop 
continue to cooperate in the 
matter and thrfl the citv 
petition to extend the island 
onto a small portion of MDC 
operated property The city 
would have to petition the 
MDC for the use ol the 
property. Chief Finn also 
recommended that Quincy 
Police Captain Walter Fra/ier 
monitor the traffic conditions 
and set up a morning detail in 
the area if he linds it 
necessary. 




THREE LEGGED RACE was amonf the ictivilin al Jul> 4 
field da.> activitin held af Eurr River Field b> the Ward 2 
Civic Association. From left, iirtft Sanloru. 10. and Mall 
McSweenr), 9, with painted face, give it their bent. 

((Juincy Sun fthoUi kf\ I'.harlrt hla/tici 

Employer Challenge 
Serves Quiney 



FmpUner Challenge, 
created by the Jewish 
Vocational Service lo assist 
older workers in finding full 
and part time positions, serves 
Jewish and ni>n-Jewish clients 
m 22 communities including 
Quincy. 

Funded by the state Olfice 
of I raining and Fmployment 



Policy. Challenge is for 
individuals age 55 and over 
who meet federal eligibilitv 
guidelines 

I here is no charge. 

F o u r - w e e k refresher 
training courses are offered 
throughout the vear 

For more information, call 
U4-M(K) 



William Heim Rereives Armv 
Achievemenl Auard 



Sgt William K Heim. son 
of William { and Marv I 
Heim of .^1 Division St . 
Quincy. has been decorated 
with the .Army Achievement 
Medal al fort' Sill, Okia 

I he Achievement Medal is 
awarded to soldiers lor 



meritorious service, acts ol 
courage, or other accomplish- 
ments 

Heim IS an artillerv radar 

operator with the 25lh I leld 
Artillerv 

He IS a l'JK4 graduate ol 
North Quincv High School 



Soigh ITS "T*' TIME 

SllOre LeSABRE & RIVIERA T TIME 
nek THAT IS 



Best in 
Class 



WE HAVE A VERY FEW 
RIVIERA T TYPES LEFT 
TAKE ADVANTAGE WHILE YOU CAN 

List Price '26,927 



22,900 



#1166 



YOU$ 
PAY 

COMPANY DEMONSTRATOR 



SIMILAR SAVINGS 
ON OTHER MODKLS 
IN STOOK. 



EQUIPMENT: All Riviera Luxury Equipment Plus: Riviera T Type Package • Automatic 
Electric Door Locks • Electnc Trunk Pull Down • Electric Rear Oefogger • Illuminated 
Entry System • Electric Mirrors • Twilight Sentinel • Deico Bose Music System • Heavy 
Duty Coolant • Sinnjlated Convertible Top • Luggage Rack • Body Side Stripes ft 
Moldings. 



WE HAVE MADE A SPECIAL 

PURCHASE OF LeSABRE 
GRAND NATIONAL T TYPE COUPES. 



List Price ^17,356 



YOU$ 

PAY 



16,019 



EQUIPPED AS FOLLOWS: Air Conditioner • Carpet Savers • Console • Engine - 3 8 Litre 
(231 C.I.O) SFI V6 - LG3 • Front Wheel Drive • Gage Cluster - Quartz Analog - Trip 
Odometer. Tachometer, Volt Meter, Oil Gage & Temperature Gage • Tinted Glass • 
Halogen Headlamps • Body Side Moldings • AM; FM Stereo/ Graphic Equalizer & Cassette 
Tape • Power Steering • Tilt Steering •Leather Wiapped Steering Wheel • Gran Touring 
Suspension • Steel Belted Radial Tires* Automatic Overdrive Transmission • Aluminum 
Wheels • Pulse Wipers • Electric Door Locks* Power Windows • Electric R Window 
Defogger • Electric Mirrors • Lighted Mirror-Pass. • Cruise Control • Auto Power 
Antenna • Concert Sound • Heavy Duty Cooling • Power Seat 6- Way • Custom Stripes 

• '^ 5"" Then Your Choice Of 



800. 



00 



CASH 
BACK OR 



311 O/ GMAC 
jl /O FINANCING 



DEPENDING ON 
LENGTH OF CONTRACT 



50 ADAMS ST., QUINCY 770-3300 



OPEN EVENINGS 
Hon. thru Thurs. 



i 



.Rcpufotioii 

t For 80 y*m ■ wt'vt put custonm iAitf*ction ^ovt ail «lj«^ 



1 ■ 



t (^ 



I 





vol . 19 No. 42 




Thursda). Jul> l«. 1987 



Seen As Crime Deterrent 



One-Man Patrol Cars Take Road 



B> NAN( V Mcl.Al (;HI IN 

The Quincy Police 
Dcparlment was 
scheduled to put into 
effect yesterday (Wed- 
nesday) the one-man 
patrol car system which 
was recommended in a 
report of the department 
last year. 

However, two-man cars 
will still he used lor certain 



sections of the city, and lor 
certain situations. 

"StalisticalK. one man cars 
have been pro\cn to decrease 
crime." said Capl. Fred 
{.aracy. actmg chiel in the 
absence of Chief Francis Finn 
who is on vacation. 

"Some people are for it. 
some are against il." he said. 

"I feel it's worthy of a 
tryout. If we find that it is not 
successful, then we^ll change 
It. 



"if it is successful, then 
adoption of it is acceptable." 
said Laracy. who noted that 
Boston has employed the 
system for several years. 

According to Laracy. the 
same number of officers as 
before will be on patrol, but 
distribution will be according 
to need. 

Quincy, which had been 
broken down into five areas 
for police purposes, will now 
have four sections, he said. 



The .North Quincy section 
will now have four, one-man 
cars: Houghs Neck section, 
which starts at the police 
station, will have one, two- 
man car for Germantown, 
and two one-man cars; 
QumcyN Point three, one- 
man cars, and West Quincy, 
t h ree, one-man cars, 
according to Laracy. 

"We'll make sure at least 13 
cars are on the road at all 
times." he said. 



in addition, eight members 
of a special impact shift, 
generally assigned 6 p.m. to 2 
a.m.. will be used in trouble 
areas, said Laracy. who noted 
that those hours have proven 
throughout the country to be 
the peak hours for crime. 

"They'll give assistance to 
the officers regularly working 
that night," he said. 

"We e.xpect to run into 
minor disruptions, but they 
will be corrected as we go 



along," Laracy said. 

in addition to increased 
police visibility, the one-man 
patrol car system reportedly is 
safer, police officers are more 
alert, and there is better 
product output, according to 
Laracy. 

Quicker response time to 
calls is also reported to be a 
benefit, he said. 

According to Laracy. the 
department has been working 

li'.imt'd on Page 5) 




Pair 2 Quinc> Sun Thureday. Jul> I*. I«I7 



3 Days Of Good Fun, Good Buys 

Downtown Sidewalk Bazaar Opens Thursday 



Over 60 colorlul. selling 
and activit\ booths will 
be tcatured at the 
annual Sidev\alk Ra/aar in 
downtown Quinc\ which 
starts today (ihursda\) and 
continues to Saturday. 

Colorful streamers line the 
streets and merchants are 
gearing up for the three-da\ 
e\ent which will include 
bargains, entertainment and 
other special features. 

I ntertammeni will range 
from celebrity look-alikes 
who will lip sync popular 
fa\orites to Yankee Jack- 
Mane & Compans 

Ronald McDonald shows 



are scheduled, as are square 
dancing and romul dancing 

I he Miss Quinc\ Bay 
Beautv I'ageant I ridav at 
l.M) p m at QuincN tenter 
Pla/a will be the highlight ol 
the e\ent sponsored b\ the 
QuincN Center Business and 
Professional Association 

lwenty-fi\e contestants 
will compete for the crown 
and the honor of reigning o\er 
Quincy Ba\ Race Week Jul\ 
29 to Aug 2 

More than $2,500 in pri/es 
will be shared by the fi\e 
finalists. The winner will 
receive the largest share. 

Official opening ceremonies 



will take place at 10 .i m 
today 

Ma\iH Francis McC aulev 
will cut the ribbon at Ciranite 
and Hancock Sts. 

McC'aules. as well as 
Robert J Quinn. (^C BPA 
president, and Michelle loth, 
last year's Miss Quincy Ba\. 
will be dm en from (^uinc\ 
City Hall in an antique 
Maxwell car b\ Bob Barker of 
Quinc> lypewriter Service 

At the ribbon cutting site. 
McC"aule\ will be joined b\ 
officers, directors and 
members ol the QCBPA as 
well as a number of Miss 
C^incy Bay beaut\ contestants. 



Building Your 
Protection 

At Rilo\' &: RielK Insurance Av;onc\' \\v think ot 
\i>iir insiiiMiue luvds as a tinoK crattod wall o\ 
piiUcvtion. Just as eadi sti>nc' is caivtulK cHoslmi 
nv a mason to tit the wall, our insurance agents 
choose exactly the kinds ot policies vou nvvd iM^^.\ 
tit them together to torm a solid uafl ot protection. 



Riley & Rielly Insurance Agency, Inc. 

lll^itH.inuKkStivft-rO l<o\ "ol •C>uiiH\. .\IA(i2:(>^>-0o| 
(il747l-(i2(Hl IViMHi.iliVpt •(i|7471-(yll^CiimnuTu.il IVp 





Hancock St between 
School and Ciranite Sts will 
be turned into a pedestrian 
mall as the street is closed to 
traffic. 

Radio Stalii)n NVJDA will 
co\er Sidewalk Ba/aar 
activities li\e. 

I he Miss (^uinc\ Ba\ 
Beauty Pageant and other 
activities will be telecast live 
bv QuincN C'ablesvslems C"h 
}. 

Quincv Sun C"h S will show 
highlights of the Sidewalk 
Ba/aar and a preview and 
highlights of the Miss C^uincv 
Bav Beautv I'ageant 

Activities lor the three davs 
will include: 

lliundav 

Olficial opening cere- 
monies, 10 am . corner of 
Ciranite and Hancock Sts 

Caricatures Unlimited. 
10 a.m. to 9 p m . m front 
of Bank of Boston 

Hand & I ace Painting, 
sponsored bv Rotarv C lub 
of Quincv. 10 am to 9 
p m . at former lags 
Kurniture. 

WJ|)A-I.U)0 (live 
remote broadcast), during 
dav, near Bank ol New 
Fngland 

Quincv Health Depart- 
ment, blood pressure 
screening sponsored by 
Hurlev Insurance Agency. 
10 am. to } pm . at 
Cottage Ave 

Ronald McDonald 
Show. I p m and 3 p.m.. 
Cliveden-Hancock Sts 

Quincv Art Association, 
exhibit and demonstration. 
lOa m to9p m .at former 
Kincaide I urniture site 

limousine Celebrity, 
bride-groom photos. 10 
am. to 9 p m , near 
QCBPA office 

Automotive display. 
Quirk hord-Chcvrolct- 
Hyundai. 10 am to 5 
p.m.. near Quincy Fair 




Whaf s up 
and coming in 
health care? 

The New QCH! 



Quincy City Hospital has begun an impressive S57 
million renovation Almost two-thirds of the build- 
ings and other facilities will be replaced— all part 
of a dramatic plan to better serve the growing and 
changing health care needs of the South Shore. 

The focal point of the new hospital complex will be 
a brand new six story building that will contain 234 
patient beds as well as all of the necessary patient 
care support services 

Since Its founding in 1890. Quincy City Hospital 
has been in the forefront of health care on the 
South Shore. With cur new facilities we II continue 
to deliver the highest quality health care services 
with v\«rm, personal attention 

At QCH— we re building for the future on a 
proud past 




The .Niw 



J^M Quincy City Hospital 

ik^ 1 11 W hitwell Street, (Quincy, M\ 02169 (617) 773-61(M) 



M4n*q«d hy 



Uf^Jh TIM HaaHhci 



I Company 



QuiiKV Police IKpail 
ment. crime prevention 
N p o n N o r e d b v I \N 
VVooluorth ( o . 10 a m to 
^ pm . opposite Haskin- 
RobbinN. 

Quincv CahlcNVNtems. 
live telecaNiN. during dav, 
in front of Bank ol Boston 
Wl'MB (I'liiveisiiv ol 
Massachusetts at Bosion). 
during dav. in Iront ol 
QuinWell I ravel 

Pepsi Cola laste lest. 
lOa m to 5pm .at lorinei 
Roval Discount Bookstore 

>anki.v .lack-Mane & 
(ompanv. counirv music 
award winners. 7 p m to 9 
pm. near Bank ol New 
I ngland 

John Horrigan School 
of Drumming, students m 
concert. 7 pm to H.M) 
p.m.. near QC BPA oltice 

Milton Post Band in 
c»>ncert. 7 p m to 9 p m . 
near Quincv f air 

Square dancing, caller 
Buckv Donahue, round 
dancing, callet Birgil 
Maguire. 7 p m to 9 p m , 
near Heavenlv Rounds 
Kridi> 

Caricatures I nlimited, 
10 am to 9 p ni . in (ri>nt 
o( Bank ol Boston 

Hand and Face Painting, 
sponsored bv Rotarv C lub 
ol Quincv. 10 am to 9 
p m . at former lags 
Kurniture 

WJDA-I.M)0. live 
remote broadcast, during 
dav. near Bank o( New 
England 

Quincv Health Depart- 
ment, blood pressure 
screening sponsored bv 
Hurlev Insurance Agencv. 
10 am to } pm . at 
Cottage Ave 

One man band -juggler, 
noon and } p m.. at 
Bav Bank Norfolk I rust 
Booth (at QC'B'*A Office) 

Ronald McDonald 
Show. noon. 2 pm and 
pm . Cliveden-Hancock 
Sts. 

Qumcv Art Association, 
exhibit and demonstration. 
10 am to 9 p m .at former 
Kincaid I urniture site. 

limousine Celebritv. 
bride-groom photos. 10 
am. to 9 p m . near 
QC BPA olhce 

Quincv Police Depart- 
ment, crime prevention 
sponsored bv I VS 
Woolworth Co , Id am to 
5 pm . opposite Baskin- 
Robbins 



Quincv C'abk-svsiinis. 
live telecasts, during dav, 
in liont ol Bank ot Boston 
I aimers Maikel. loc.il 
growers. I I 30 am to S 
p m , Hancock Paikm^> 
Area 

WTMB. (Pnivcisitv oi 
Mass at Boston), diiimj: 
dav. in tioni ol Qiiinwdl 
travel 

Pepsi Cola laste lest, 
10 a. m to .Sp ni .at l«)rniei 
Roval Discount Bookston- 
Celebritv I ook-Alike, 
hp svnc songs-popular 
favorites, sponsored h\ 
.lason's Music & I Shin 
Shop, V 30 p m to 7 p ni 
near Bank ol New 
I ngland 

Bau>n Hugo's Orchestra. 
inct>ncert. ^ p m to 7 p tn 
near QC BPA t.flice 

Miss Quincv Bav Beautv 
Pageant. 7 30 p m . 
Quincv Center Pla/a 
Saturday 
Caricatures I nlimiled, 
10 am to 5 p m . in lrt)nt 
ol Bank ol Boston 

Hand and I ace Painting, 
sponsored bv Rotarv C lub 
of Quincv. 10 am to .S 
p m at tormer I ags 
lurniture 

WJ|)A-I30(). live 
remote broadcast, during 
dav. near Bank ol New 
i ngland 

Quincv Cablesystems. 
live telecast, during dav. 
oppi>site Bank ol Boston. 
Quincv Art Associatu)n. 
exhibit and demonstration. 
10 am to 5pm .at former 
Kmcaid f urniture site 

Automotive displav. 
Quirk F ord-Chev rolet- 
Hyundai. 10 am to 5 
p m . near Quincv f-'air 

limousine C'elebrilv. 
bride-groom photos. 10 
am to 5 p.m.. near 
QC BPA office 

Quincv Police Depart- 
ment, crime prevention 
sponsored b v f- W 
Woolworth Co. 10 am to 
5 pm . opposite Baskin- 
Robbins 

Wl MB (I niversitv of 
Mass at Bosion). during 
dav. in front of QuinWell 
Travel 

Pepsi Cola laste lest. 
10 a m to 5pm .at former 
Roval Discount Bookstore 
I oriv I upo-H urdv - 
Ciurdv Man. Mv Monkev 
and Me, 1 1 a m to 2pm. 
at Bav Bank Norfolk 
I rust Booth (al QC BP\ 
Office) 



Quincy Beaches 
''Swimmable' 

Qiiincv's 15 beaches were coliform ctuinis ol less than 

considered sw mini able 2(M) swimmable 

according to water qualitv Counts of over 200 art 

samples taken lulv 7 unacceptable and unhealiln 

I he Quincv Health '"f swimming, according in 

Departmeni ccmsiders beach 'he Health Depaitment 

water samples df fecal I he results arc 



lOI \l 



hK \l 







(Ol IIOHM 


( Ol IMIKVI 


Avalon Beach 




.^5 





Mound Beach 




20 





Broads Bcath 




60 


20 


Cicrrnantoun F irc 


Station 


20 


10 


Rhoda Beach 




20 





l.dgewatcr Drive 




M) 


.5 


Parkhiirst Street 




140 


1.5 


I'osi Island Road 




40 





(hukatawbut Ro; 


d 


220 


90 


W'ollasioii-Rice R 


o.id 


90 


35 


VVollaston Sachcrr 


1 Street 


50 


20 


Wv)llaston-C hanning Street 


Mm 


140 


W'ollaston-Milton 


Street 


4(M) 


170 


Nickerson Heath 




70 





Orchard Hcach 




20 


5 



Tkanlij. M; l«. in? Qnlmcj Smm PaftJ 



Legion National Commander Elect: 

Comer Personally 
Supports North's Actions 



By JANK ARENA 

National ( ommandcr-elecl 
of the American legion. 
John P ("Jake") Comer said 
in a press conference Tuesday 
that "The American legion 
has not taken a position on 
(I.I. ("ol. Oliver) North," but 
said that he personally is in 
support of him 

"I have to feel that he was 
acting on orders from above," 
Comer said He further stated 
that America is "privileged" 
to have a patriot such as 
North 

"I wish Oliie North all the 
best I believe he was a man in 
uniform doing all he could for 
his country and that he felt he 
was doing the right thing," 
Comer said 

These statements were 
made during a press 
conference called by Comer to 
discuss his recent trip to El 
Salvador and Nicaragua and 
the American Legion's policy 
toward those countries. 

"Our organization is in 
support of the Contras," he 
said, "and in support of 
democracy in those areas." 

Ihe past four National 
Commanders of the American 
Legion have made visits to 
Central America. Comer 
noted, but he chose to make 
the trip before he is installed 
into office in August so that 




JOHN P. COMER 

he can discuss the issues at the 
Legion's National Convention 
soon after he takes office. 
Comer said that he also hopes 
to meet with President 
Reagan soon after he is 
installed. 

Among the issues he plans 
to review with the president is 
the American trade embargo 



on Nicaragua, he said. 

"The embargo on Nicaragua 
may very well be hurting the 
people we want to help," he 
said. "It hurts the people in 
terms of supplies," 

Comer noted that people in 
the country are having 
difficulty even locating 
supplies and materials to 
repair shoes, and also related 
that people must purchase 
toilet paper by the piece as 
they stand in lines to use 
public facilities. 

"Central America is a 
devastated place," he said. 
"The poverty is unbelievable.' 

Comer said that he also sees 
the need for increased 
economic support to the 
Contras in Nicaragua "if there 
is to be a democracy there." 

"Even if we don't give 
military aid," he said, "they 
still need economic support." 

Comer further stated that 
scholarship aid to Nicaragua 
is lacking and that Russia is 
giving more scholarship aid 
than the U.S. 

"The American Legion has 
always been a strong 
supporter of scholarship aid." 
he noted. 

Comer also spoke about 
the Communist regime of the 
Sandinista government and of 
his dealings with government 
leaders during his two-day 



visit there. 

He said that the Sandinista 
ambassador in Washington 
had told Comer that he would 
be able to visit a military air 
base in Nicaragua and that 
arrangements had been made 
for the visit. However, 
government officials in 
Nicaragua told Comer that 
nothing had been arranged 
and that a request must be 
made to visit the base 48 hours 
in advance. Comer called the 
incident an example of 
"Communists speaking out of 
both sides of their mouths." 

He also told reporters that 
his hotel room in Nicaragua 
had been searched twice 
during his stay, and spoke of 
"Communist harassment 
tactics" against Catholic 
priests in the country. 

"We stopped our support of 
the Sandinistas because the 
people were better off under a 
totalitarian regime," he said. 

He further stated that the 
American Legion will be 
"supportive of Contra aid 
until free elections can be 
certified." He stressed, 
however, that the American 
Legion is strongly opposed to 
sending American troops into 
Nicaragua. 

"The American Legion will 
never again sponsor a war 
that we cannot win," he said. 



Sheets Opposes 
Expansion Of 

S. Q. T Garage 



Ward 4 City Councillor 
James Sheets said he will 
introduce a resolution at the 
next City Council meeting 
opposing the expansion of the 
Quincy Adams Parking 
Garage, South Quincy, from 
2000 to a 3000 car parking 
capacity. 

The state Department of 
Transportation had announced 
an interest in expanding the 
facility which now allegedly is 
at capacity, according to 
Sheets 

The councillor indicated he 
will work with the Quincy 
delegation on Beacon Hill. 
Representatives Michael 
Morrissey, Thomas Brownell 
and Robert Cerasoli. as well 
as Sen. Paul Harold to block 
the proposed expansion. 



Sheets indicated that the 
expansion would add to the 
traffic and air pollution of the 
area. 

He also said that if the plans 
called for adding a number of 
parking decks, the appearance 
from Independence Ave. and 
the closeness to the homes on 
the Independence St. area 
would be "absolutely 
unacceptable." 

According to Councillor 
Sheets, the city was not 
informed of the intention of 
the Department of Transpor- 
tation. 

Sheets said that if the 
department insists on 
proceeding, he will demand a 
full environmental impact 
study, among other things. 



City Advertises For 
New Building Inspector 



Robert LaFleur Graves Registration Officer 



Mayor Francis X. McCauley 
announces the appointment 
of Robert J Ulleur of 43 
Curtis Ave.. Quincy, as 
Veterans Graves Registration 
Officer in the Veterans 
■Services Department at a 
salary of $26,670. 

He will fill the vacancy 
created by the retirement of 
Ixiwrcnce Carnali who has 
held the position for the past 
20 years. 

Iji Fleur is a life-long 
Quincy resident, who has 
been employed by the public 



works department as a special 
motor equipment operator 
and maintenance man since 
December, 1973. 

A Vietnam Era veteran, he 
served with the I'.S. Navy. 

He is a member of the 
Quincy Veterans Council, the 
Ward 2 Civic Association, 



and is a past commander of 
the Morrisette Legion Post, 
l^ Fleur is married and has 
two children. 

He will be sworn in, to his 
new position Wednesday, 
July 22, at 10 a.m. in the 
mayor's office, new city hall. 

LaFleur will assume his 



new duties Monday. July 27. 



The city advertised in the 
Boston Sunday Globe last 
weekend for a building 
inspector to replace Ken 
Johnson who recently left the 
$39,501 position after about a 
year to take a more lucrative 
job in the private sector. 

"We decided to go out and 
readvcrtise." said Mayor 
Francis McCauley. who had 
offered the job to a local 
resident who declined the 
position. 

In the meantime. McCauley 



said he appointed Assistant 
Building Inspector Taylor 
.Ahcarn to serve as Acting 
Building Inspector. 

Ahearn. a career employee, 
will receive the salai^ of the 
building inspector and will sit 
on the Quincy License Board, 
McCauley said. 

The city also readvertised 
for a traffic engineer to work 
out of the Planning 
Department to implement 
some recommendations made 
in the Traffic 2000 Study, the 
mayor said. 



Prices effective thru Sat. , July 18. 



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NEWCARRIERS 
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USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co Inc 

1372 Hancock St Quincy Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworlh. Jr Publisher and Editor 

25« per copy. $li 00 per year by rnaii m Quincy 
$12 00 per year by mail outside Oumcy $1S 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston Mass 



Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Su" 1372 Hancock St Oumcy Mass 02169 



Tht Oiiiricy Sun i»»umei r>0 f'n«nci«l respontibility «or 
typogrBpliicai errort in •a»«rti»ementl Bui will reprint that 
0«n C)« »n «a*erti»em«ot m «f(C'i th« typogripfiic*! error 

occurs 



'AQ«^' 



Readers Forum 

A New GOP Start? 



Editor. The QuincN Sun 

The MassachuNetis Repub- 
lican Part> In still the elephant 
joke ot the counti^ 1 he Ba\ 
Stale IS now so secure!) in the 
strong hands of the 
Democratic Part> that the 
state GOP has become little 
more than a political 
nuisance. Howe\er. one-part> 
states are unhealth) because 
the dommant partv decides 
the entire political agenda 

L'p in New Hampshire, the 
same thing is happening 
except 1 1 ■ s the New 
Hampshire Republicans who 
are in charge. However, the 
weaker dranite State 
Democratic part\ chaired h> 
J Joseph CJrandmaison is not 
waving a white Hag and with 
state leaders like Paul 
MacFachern. a strong but 
unsuccessful gubernatorial 
candidate last \ear. the 
Democrats are better off than 
the\ ha\c been in \ears 

While the Republicans 
outnumber them in the State 
House of Representatives and 
State Senate b\ a two-to-onc 
margin, the Democrats are 
continuall> fighting back 
Even though the giuernor 
and Kith IS Senators are 
members of the GOP. the 
Democrats are beginning to 
win special elections m the 
Legislature and hope to make 
giant inroads in statewide 
offices as well. One reason for 
such optimism can be found 
in the Democratic beliet that 
thev can bounce back East 
\ear. they took their issues 
and sold them to the political 
center, a strategy that is 
geared for victory 

However. ..the Massachu- 
setts Republican Partv 
remains in the eyes o( the 
electorate to be nothing more 
than an anti-Democrat Partv 
7 his image and strategv must 
change if the state GOP is ever 



to elect more ol their numbers 
into electoral office 

The Massachusetts Repub- 
lican Partv must be more than 
a narrow-based conservative 
partv It must reach out to the 
political center and sell their 
issues to [democrats and 
independents as well as to 
Republicans But when the 
state GOP is infighting so 
often, how can it reach 
outside to non-Republicans' 

The Republican leadership 
now in command under 
chairman Ra> Shamie must 
mold the state partv into an 
open partv aiming for the 
centrist majoritv of the 
Commonwealth iM Massa- 
chusetts \\ fi 1 ! e active 
Republicans tend to be mt>re 
conservative, the vast 
majoritv of the entire 
statewide electorate is much 
more moderate and is turned 
oft bv eviremc conservative 
positions 

President R Lagan's 
charisma ma> have carried 
Massachusetts in twn 
presidential elections but 
Reagan Republicans will tmd 
It extremely hard to do 
likewise when running for 
legislative and statewide 
public offices. 

The bottom line for 
Massachusetts Republicans is 
to reach out to the electorate 
as a partv with open arms. 
readv to accept all. The party 
that once housed the 
Christian Herters. John 
\ olpes. Erank Sargents and 
Ed Brookes must be readv 
and willing to share the 
political scene with the John 
Sears, the .Andv Cards, the Ed 
Kings and the Ray Shamies 

Remember, when you're 

down and out. the onK way is 

up Todootherwiseis to wave 

the white flag of surrender! 

Sal (iiarralani 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Special Primary — Maybe 





BROV^NtLI 



City Clerk John Gillis estimates it^wHUost about 
$20,000 for a special primary and 
final election to determine Rep. 
Thomas Brownell's successor. 

Big question Will there be a 
special election? 

There's no doubt that Browncll. 
uho has been nominated for a 
judgeship at Plymouth District (.11 I IS 

Court by (iov Michael Dukakis vmII 
be confirmed by the dovernor's 
Council 

Brownell would like to stay on 
until October to steer legislation he 
has filed through the House One 
piece, ironically, is a judicial reform 
bill. 

If he does stay until then a special election might not 
beset until Januar> or February It takes something like 
14 weeks lor the election process to allou candidates 
time to take out nomination papers, collect signatures, 
to campaign - and. ol course to publici/e the elections 
for the \oters 

To call or not to call a special 
election will be up to House Speaker 
George Keverian who says he may 
but. then again, may not 

If the election couldn't be called 
before Januarv or Eebruary. the 
indication is that kevenan would 
leave the scat open until next vear's 
regular stale election 

He notes that C<>uincv meanwhile still has twi) other 
legislators who could look out for Brownell's district 
(Second Norfolk i constituents. 

But Cit\ Councillor I'at loland. 
considered a strong potential 
candidate, disagrees with that 
thinking 

"It would not be fair to the 
district." she says, "to leave that scat 
vacant until January. I*^H^ "I hat is 
what It would mean if it was decided 
to wait until the November. I9HK state election to till the 
seal The winner ot that election would not take olticc 
until January. I9S9 

If a special election is called it would be better for 
Toland and two i)iher potential candidates if it were to 
be held in Eebruarv 

Thai would be far enough away from this year's citv 
elections so that Toland. Ward I C ouncillor Michael 
Cheney and School Committeeman Vice Chairman 
Steve Durkin could run for re-election this year instead 
of having to make a choice this year whether to seek re- 
election or run for the Brownell seat. 

Right now, the only definite candidate is former 
Ward I Councillor Leo Kelly 
loland would like to run for the Brownell scat but. 




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she says, until the special election matter is "clarilicd" 
she is a caruJidate for re-election to the City Council at- 
large and nothing else 

C heney is thinking about it. 

Durkin has indicated he will seek re-election to the 
School Committee but might run for the Brownell seat 
if the special election is set for around February 

Meanwhile Sheila Mclniyre. wile of the 'aic 
Mayor-Senator James Mclntyre. who was also a state 
representative, is still giving serious thought to rummj; 
as IS lony Siciliano. IX-puiy C ivil Defense Director 

Newest name being mentioned as a candidate iv 
C^harles Shea. Jr.. son o( lormer City C ouncillor and 
State Rep Charles Shea 

I here are others waiting in the wings weighing their 
chances. 

D 

CiFNLRAI Alexander Haig. Republican candidate 
for President, will be the speaker at a breakfast meclin^ 
of the South Shore Chamber ol Commerce N^ednesdav 
July 22 at I.antana, Randolph Sit down time is "44 
am 

D 

EORMI R Quincy Ally Samuel C oilman who died 
recentiv at age XS, was a man a little ahead ol his tinus 
when It came to foresight 

Some 25 or so years ago. Collman proposed buildiiiL' 
a parking garage in the Ri)ss parking area 

But some ol C^uincv's business leaders ol that time 
shot the idea down at a C itv C ouncil hearing A garaj;c 
in the Ross parking area would spoil the beautv ol the 
beautiful rear enlrancees to some ol the stores -- one in 
particular -- the anti-garagc theme went 

Some ol those stores no longer have a Iront entrance 
Ihev're no longer here. 

Years later, when a parking garage was built there, a 
few ol these leaders still left, thought it was a great idea 
lo hear one or two ol them you would have thought it 
was their idea 

Some of these so<alled leaders were the same ones 
who opposed linking downtown Ouincv to ( apens 
Bridge in Braintree back when the Siiuthcasi 
Expressway was being built 

And. when that wasfmally dtme - vearslater with the 
Burgin I'arkwav extension -- they thought that was a 
terrific idea, too 

Ah. hindsight! 

D 

\ I I NDR AISER "pool paitv" h.is been planncil H\ 
the I aRaia lor Mayor C ommittce. to be helil luesdav 
lulv 21. at the Ouincv Bav Inn Imm 
^-11 pm 

A bullet will beoflered..ilon^' with 
musical entertainment Dicss is 
casual 

lickclsareS2.5 per couple and in.iv 
be obtained by calling the I aRaia 
For Mayor Headquarters at 77U 
9IKI. at 79 I'arkingwav. (^umcv Center, as well as 
purchased at the door 

Sarah Schecle Bay State Graduate 




Sarah Scheelc. ol Quincy 

has graduated I rom Bav State 
•lunior ( () 



associate 




lege 
decree 



V* 1 1 h an 
in lri>;il 



secretarial Sarah plans , 
attending I Mass. Boston i. 
St udv political science 




M1M3E1 mmi 



»"* *'»i 




... Hrallh intprclor 
( larrncr Idwards irttrd 
dnnkinf (la%%rt fur baclrna 
count in IH5. 



. . . Vuu were n<»l just a 
Polio Number and rrtainrd 
tour own idrnlil), when 
personal ser»icf was aiMa>s 
(hrn . . . Il still is ai 



Iff. ^ , 

"BURGIN PLAINER INS. 



QUINCY 



1357 HANCOCK STREET 



472-3000 



Ihur«day, July l«, IM? Ouincy Sun Page % 



Siciliano Seeks Changes In 
Laws Affecting Aux. Police 



A 111 ho n\ Suiliiino. 
yiiiiu\\ Aii\ili.it\ |»t)ln.c 
Cliicl. h.is wiilliii loihc Sl.iU- 
Secret. ir\ ol I'liblu SiiU-l> 
sl.ilin^; 111- kcK il is his '\\in\, 
.iinl usponsibihlN" to SCI' (h.il 
ch.ii)j:os .lie m.iili- in ihe l.iws 
vsliuh j;t>\i.in.ni\ih.ii\ pohcc 

yiiiiKv's \ii\ili.ii\ I'ltlice 
oIIkcis hii\c nut Kiii.illouetl 
to pciloiin Ihcii iliilKs since 
lale l.isi \e.ii hec.iiise ol 
ptissihle leji.il h.ihilii\ lo the 
ollieer oi eit\ 

Sieih.iiio's lellei e.inie .itlei 
.1 ( ii\ H.ill nieeliiij: Lis! week 
where Ihose .illeiuliii}; .ijiieed 
the pi hie 111 cin't be 
.idiliesseil on .1 loe.il le\i'l 

In the .lnl\ '4, k-iiei to 
( h.iiles M.iii\, SkiIi.imo 
sUiletl ih.il the l.ivvs niiisi he 
eh.iiijied "hee.iiise eiieiim 
stances lequiie ih.ii wc 
iee\.ihi.iie the tliieelioii .iiul 
fiiKils ol ■ij;ene> piopuiins." 

"In m\ capacil\ asyiiinc\"s 
Depuiv Diteetoi ol 
S.ilel\ ( i\il Delense. 
I tie \ii\ili,ii\ PoIko 



ami also as chaiiinaii ol the 
Massaehiisells Aiixiliaiy 
I'olice Assoeiation liie l.isk 
I orce. I led that it is my duly 
and respoiisihilily lo see that 
levisions and changes are 
hioujiht about." he staled 

" I he teiiii ■liability' is used 
coiisi.intK by loeal ollicials 
legaiding auxiliary police 
titili/alion 111 the city ol 
Quincy and in coniniunities 
throughout the ( dminon- 
we.ilth ol Massachusetts 

"Ollicials ;iie not always 
aw.iie that ihey loo may be 
held legally liable il they aie 
not piep.ired to respond 
properly lo emergencies or 
disasters 

"I iirlheinioic. Ihe\ m.i\ be 
liable il lecogni/ed polenli.il 
li.i/.irds are not included 111 
I he 1 1 I o C.I I e merge ncy 
response plans ( Ourl cases 
have already established legal 
pieceilenis m boih ol these 
areas 

" . II Auviliary I'olice 
(hut volunteers are to sii nile. 



I'liblie 

.IIUI .IS 



waiting loi an emergency 
situation to h.ippen. then how 
are Ihey lo be expccle«l lo 
perlorm properly when a 
situation does happen' 

"Auxiliary I'olice volunteer 
personnel who are properly 
trained under the guidelines 
ol the Massachusetts 
Criminal luslice I raining 
( (luncil should be allowed by 
law to perlorm duties which 
could be consideretl as 
continuous training in nori 
emergency situations suth as 
vandalism patrols ol sehools. 
playgrounds, crowd control, 
etc 

" I he ( ommonweallh ol 
Massachusetts is m danger ol 
losing their most precious 
asset, unless something is 
ilone to protect il i( ihey are 
not kept active and trained in 
non-emergency roles, the 
auxiliary police may not be 
available at limes ol intense 
emergencies and disasters " 

Siciliano also wrote a letter 
last month to Robert .1 



Hoiilay. director ol the 
M.issachusetis ( ivil l>tlensc 
Agency, rcqucsiing a meeting 
with Ally (len lames 
Shannon. It.irry, and the 
Mass Auxiliary I'olice 
Association I ask I orce 

Purpose id the meeting 
would be to review and 
change, il necessary, the 
regulations which govern 
auxiliary police in cities and 
towns which will enable them 
lo be called out lor dutv in 
non-emergencv situations 
also 

Houlay responded thai 
Stan Adelman. legal counsel 
lor the I xeculive Ollice ol 
Public Salety who attended 
the Ouincy ( ity Hall meeting, 
would prepare a synopsis anij 
lindings ol that meeting 

Siciliano said he was 
pleased that the issue was 
reaching the state level 

"It encourages me," he said 
".At least we have the state 
listening to us " 



One-Man Patrol Cars 



il mil il II •nil I'li^i 1 1 

on the one-man cai system tor 
several vears 

I he change in patrol 
sv stems will atlect some I0(» 
patrolmen and communication 
personnel, according to a 
piess release troiu C hiel I inn 
I he majoritv are men. but 
some are W(>men 

"Ml otiicers concerned 
with this change have received 
iiisi ruei ions at in-serv lee 
naming sessions m order to 
cre.ite .1 s.ilc Ii.insiiion lo the 
one-man cai patrol system." 
stated I inn 

" I he saletv ol the police 
olticer IS the deep concern ol 
the department It is with this 
objective in mind that 
operating procedures have 
been devised lor the one-man 
patrol unit." he said. 

"Maintaining a communi- 
cations link between the 

City's MOOth^ 

Plates On Sale 

At Bazaar 

Quincy's lOOth anniversary 
license plates will be on siile 
tod;'y ( I hursday ) through 
Saturday at the annual 
downtown Quincy sidewalk 
ba/aar 

\nvone wishing to ortler 
license plates, at S5 each, mav 
contact \nihonv Siciliano at 
4"'2-MIK 

•\niii\ersarv license plates 
will be available citv wide. 

John Klinjj;<Mistein 

On Presiclcni's 

Honor Roll 

John A. Klingenslein ol 
Quincy has been named to the 
President's Honor Roll at the 
I'niversity ol luKa lor the 
spring semester 

lo be named lo the list, 
students must achieve a 
perlect 4(1 grade point 
average in all credit-be.iimg 
coursework completeil dm ing 
the semeslei 



motori/ed unit and the 
ilispatcher is vital loi the 
protection and assistance ol 
an ollicer in the tield. 

" I he dispatchei must share 
the burden ol protecting the 
otiicer 111 the motori/ed unit 
He must be kept tullv 
inlormed ol any situation 
alleeting an assignment or ol 
any action initiated bv a 
motori/ed unit." 

"I he dispatcher is the 

^'oniicA' Ar)»eriisemfnl 



partner ol the otiicer in the 
one-man car." 

I he procedures include 
suggested actions tor 
situations broken down into 
three levels ol hazard to the 
ollicer. 

Seven situations require 
response trom at least two 
ofliccrs. according to I inn 

Ihey are an assault on an 
ollicer. on-scene arrest tor a 
felonv or violent misdemeanor. 



resistance to arrest, use fit 
force, crime in progress, 
family disputes and tleemg 
suspect. 

I he one-man patrol car 
system was among a number 
of recommendations suggested 
in a controversial report on 
the Quincy Police Department 
that was suggested by the 
Field Services Division ot the 
Massachusetts Municipal 
Association in October. 1986 



Po'Hicai AOveM semeni Poiiiica A3.t--t,se^e'" 



ca Aa»e" se^e" 



CHARLES J. PHELAN 

Candidate for 

WARD 5 COUNCILLOR 




NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 

route. 

Telephor>e: 
471-3100 



I would like to thank all the 
residents of Ward 5 who signed my 
nomination papers. I look forward 
to meeting you personally in the 
coming months before the 
election as I continue to visit the 
neighborhoods. Once again, 
thank you. 



Chuck 



July 15-21, 

I95,> 

32 \ earh Ago 



STEPHEN DOHERTV 

1^ riAVIS STREET WOLl ASTON 






Quincy's 
Yesterdays 



Plan A Referendum 
Signatures Certified 

A ( Ity Hall snurcc disclosed that 5.7fK> out of 7,5'Xj 
signatures on flan A petitions had been ccrfified. mr^rc 
than cncjugh to place the ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
question on the referendum 
ballot for the No'. H cilv 
election. 

However, the u i n c \ 
I a X p a y e r s Association 
announced that it 'Aold go 

ahead uith plans tfj hire a 

handwriting expert to 

challenge the validit; oi the signatures Needed to 

qualif\; 4.599 

CJl> Clerk f^inald f Crane said he uould not release 
official word on the petitions until he returned frum 
vacation in nnid-August 

If Plan A proponents were successful in the fall, the 
nev^ form of cit> government would go into effect in 
January 1958 Quincv operated under the Plan E t>pe of 
government since 1950 

QLINC V-ISMS 

A gasoline price war raged on the South Shore y,ith 
some stations selling regular gas as low as 22 9 cents a 
gallon . . . David Ames. 15. of 488 Beale St . \^ollaston. 
a junior at Quincv High School, left for Lincoln. Neb . 
to compete in the National Junior Chess Tournament . . 
. The Bostonians, a countrv and western band, was 
packing them in at the Sportland Grille. 80 Copeland 
St.. \^est Quincv . . Master Sgt Francis X Starr of 32 
Greenleaf Place. W ollaston. was chosen one of the five 
best soldiers in the First Armv Division stationed in 
\\ uer/burg. Germanv . . . .■Xdam McGhee. secretarv of 
the Quincv Public Schools Custodian^ Association, was 
elected to his eighth vear as treasurer of the State Public 
Schools Custodians Association Great Hill 

.Association Inc.. voted to sponsor a Girl Scout troop to 
be led b> Mrs. Norman LeBe! and Mrs Howard \^ alker 
. . . Dollardav specialsai .Mohican .Vfarket. 29 Chestnut 
St.. were three pounds of hamburger, two pounds of 
bacon. 50 pounds of potatos and four cans of tuna fish. 
each for a dollar . . . John r. Simpson. " I. of 64 Chestnut 
St., Quincv. a retired sailor, exhibited his sculptures in 
the window of the Institution for Savings in Boston . 
Charles T. Sweenv ot 49 Ames St. signed to pla> a 
leading role in the Eastern Slopes Summer Theater 
production of "Sabnna Fair" in North Conwa. N.H. . . 
A 1951 two-door Chevrolet was on sale for S695 at 
Hassan Brothers. Inc.. 450 Southern .Arterv. next to the 
Police Station . . . William H. Woolsev ol 68 Hodges 
.Ave.. North Quincv. known to his fellow hams as 
Wl WFQ. was selected to set upan organisation of local 
amateur radio operators to offer emergencv 
communications aid in case ol disaster . The Dick 
Donovan Day committee met at the Elks Home to plan 
festivities for the Chicago lefthander from Quincv 
between games o\ a Red Sox-White Sox doubleheader 
Sept. II... Mavor Amelio Delia Chiesa announced 
that a three-foot high fence will be built the length of the 
traffic island in Quincv Square to control pedestrian 
crossings . . . President Dwight D. Ei>enhov\er signed a 
5250.000 bill to dredge Town River lust before he lei'i 
for the Summit Conference in Geneva . Dr Warren 
EC. Wacker of 19 I.inden St . W ollaston. was awarded 
a March o\ Dimes Fellowship bv the National 
Foundation for Infantile ParalvMs The Houghs 

Neck Rangereites won two trophies in their first 
competition as members of the National Baton Twirling 
Association . . . Jovce and Patricia Cummings and 
Sheila lane and Judith CuNhing captured the junior 
team trophv and the Cummings girls won the doubles . . 
. .Airman Third Class Paula Rioux. IS. recentlv selected 
"Miss Air Force o\ |9^^." wa-* spending a lO-dav leave 
at the home of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Henrv Rioux 
oi II Gertrude Ave. Germantown. . The 10 am 
kiddies show at the Adams Theater featured Walt 
Disnev's "The I iving Desert."' Audie Murphv and Man 
Blancnard in "Destrv" and Chapter \} <.A the serial 
"Jesse James Rides Again." plus five cartoons C 
Owen Doolev ot Milton was chosen to serve as Quincv 
district chairman of arrangements for the sixth biennial 
convention ot Holv Name Societies of the I nited States 
in F^tisburgh in the fall Quincv Elks, led bv Exalted 
Ruler Edward A. Densniore. returned from the annual 
Cirand I odge Convention in Philadelphia 1 he 

Bargain Center Meat Department had top round and 
rump steak for 55 cents a pound and bologna and 
frankfurts at 25 cents a pound Bethlehem 

Shipbuilding Co.. and the CID Shipbuilding I nion 
announced a new contract agreement thai would raise 
pav up to I9 cents an hour First cla>s mechanics 

would eel 52. 2"' an hour . . . 



Pifr * Quinr) Sun TliHn4a*. Jiil> I*. IM7 



■■w 



Marie's Kitchen 



B> MAKIK .1. 1)01 IMIMO 



Iced Apple Cake 

A Delicious, Moist Desserl 



At our .Iui\ 4ih \\cckcnd cookoui. 
some ot m\ guests brought dessert One 
ot m\ nieces. Ann. uho can bake just 
about ansthing. brought her original 
recipe tor iced apple cake, a most 
delicious moist desserl It lust went st> 
well with a cup of tea when 1 was able to 
sit for a minute Here is the recipe 
ANN'S IC KD APPI F ( AKK 
Peel and cut four or ri\e large apples, 

set aside. 
Mix: 

V/i cups sugar 
•/: cup margerine 

Stir in I cup of milk 
Mix together: 
3 cups flour. 



4 tsps baking powder 

1 tsp salt 

Add: 

2 Tbsps cinnamon and cut up apples 

Mix together and bake in V'^O degree 
o\cn tor M) minutes C\>ol and ice with S 
cup contectionar\ sugar with about ti\e 
or SIX tablespoons ot water until smooth 
Pour o\cr coi)lcd cakeaiid cut in squares. 
(Pan si/e appri>ximatel\ 10 \ 14) 

(Marie DOIimpio is the author of 
"Simpl> Italian-And Then .Sonie." a 
collection of her own recipes. ( opies of 
the book are a\ailable at That's Italian. 
Franklin St.. South Quinc>; Pre\ite's 
Market. Sumner St.. Quinc> Point and 
Samoset Pharmac>, Sam<iset A\e., 
Merrvmount.) 




JOVC y M. NOONAN. 86 
Highland A\e.. Quinc>. has 
graduated frum Merrimack 
( ollege Hith a bachelor of arts 
degree in ps\cholog>. summa 
cum iaude. 



\^ollaston recei>ed an 
Associate in Science degree in 
medical assistance with 
honors from Aquinas Junior 
(ollege. She is a member of 
the Phi Theta Kappa Honor 
Societ>. 



GRADl ATK-I.isa C ampbeil. 
.108 Common St., Quinc>. 
was recentU awarded a 
certiflcate in dental h>giene 
from Forsyth School for 
Dental Hygienists. 



Kallileen Golch'ii HtTcives Deforce 



Kathleen M Golden, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Donald Golden of Bellevue 
Rd.. Squantum. was recently 
awarded a Bachelor of 



Science in Lducation Degree 
from Lesley C 1 1 e g e . 
Cambridge 

She IS a graduate of North 
Quinc\ High School 



CITYSIDE 

Limousine Service 

269-6848 

fully equipped Lincoln stretches 

for ANY OCCASION 

A budget to fit your needs! 




For Mort Into Cal tha 

TaNUng PfMMMbook 

972-6000 

and Than Ptm* Thia Coda! 



i 



^^J 



Golden majored in 
tlemenlar> Fdutationai 
Moderate Special Needs She 
interned at the Bishop School 
in Arlington and the loyAell 
School in Watertown. 

Women "s .\pIow 
To Meet July 28 

Sharon 1 e Beau will gue 
her testimons and share about 
her ministry I uesday Jul\ 2S. 
at 7:30 p m at the Quinc\ 
Women's Aglow Icllowship 
to be held at the Woodward 
School. 1102 Hancock Si. 
QuincA 

Miss I.e Beau is a deacon 
and teacher at (Had lidings 
Church in Quincy. 



,SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSfe^SJ^%SS^Vi.SSSftW^S« 




SOUTH SHORE 
EVENING MEDICAL CARE 

21 School Street, Quincy Center 

I Reasonable Fees • Walk In 

• No Appointment 

• Insurance Accepted Necessary 

^ ^ i<- J r>u • • • Adolescent and 

• Qualified Physicians T'T .*\V^ 

Adult Medicine 

I Courtesy blood pressure screening, Friday evenings. 

• Heart disease risk screening and cholesterol $10^ 

Hours: 
Monday-Friday, 6 pm - 9 pm, Saturday, 9 am - 4 pm 

T*l: 773-2600 

A Medical Associates of Quincy Inc. Affiliate 




\ SSdO ( MK K wa> prcsinltd h\ th. guino ( hapl.r of iIh- \meririin Xssuciiilion ..f K.;ir.«l 
I'frsom to Quinc* ( ilN Huspital I rom lift, are Ma>or I rancis Mc< aulr\. I rud* Huikl.N. 
yuinc\ \ \KI' board meiidur and e\tculi»f stcrrlar> of Ih.- i)l II board of manacers. Mark 
Mund>. U( M director; and William S|K'ncfr. yuinc> \ \KI' prtsidtnl 

i( *i/ nil \ S|, (I /i/iiilM /i\ I mil I ,:ir iiiiiti 



67 On Woodward 



Honor Roll 



I he Woodward Sehool h.iv 
n.imed 6" studenis to ihe 
honor roll lot the se*.iHul 
semester. 

I hose receiv ing High 
Honors are 

(;R ADF 12 

Quincy: lan\.i l.inies, 
krisien Pelletiei. I rniK Ko>n. 
Ann RowbotharTi. Kathleen 
R\an. Mu\ Dchhie \aeea 
(.KADK 10 

Quincy: Kern I'elleliei. 
Kosa IVpf^jonai. ami I inda 
I a n ne r 

Milton: Rebecca l)a\idson, 
Patricia DiVlmico. and I'opi 
(iianakoiiras 

Mull: lenniler Stone 
(.RADK 9 

Quinc>: Nicole Dinsmore. 
\iin kesaris, and (irace 

K.esjr|s 

(,RA[)K 7 
Quincj: Maureen SiKernian 

(iradr 6 
Quinc>: Susan Shea 
Pembroke: Katy Kroll 
I hose receiving Honors 
are: 

(.rade 12 
Q u i n c ) : Ann Mane 



I I.IIUljLl.Ul, I is.l I MIKOClll . 

I isa Muiph\ and Kathleen 
Walsh 

(.rade II: 
Quinc) : Kiin Kcscs 
Maltapan: lomika l)ohh\ii 
Ufvmoulh: ( alh\ Deeiv 

(.RADF 10 
Quino: Knsiin M.n.l)unalil 
DorcheNter: Lira Kellc\ 

(.radr 9 
Quinc\: \iui M.iliiujiiist 

(.radr K 
Quino: Donna DeK.irski. 
Rohm I'raetsch 

Millcm: lesMc.i Se\mouiian 
Dorchester: ( snihia Hlake 

(.fade 7 
Quinc>: KimhciK Heain. 
Am\ Pakkala 
Dorchester: I em (iillen 

(.rade 6 
Quinc>: Michelle I lecheiie. 
deoi^ia Kesaris 

I hose stiiilentN named to 
the Vierit Roll include 
(.rade 12 
Braintree: Lisa Honse\ 
(anion: Sheiri Kiasman 



(.radr II 

NN e> m out h : M u he 1 U 
Kearne\ 

Uest Ro\bur>: lietnaiiciu 
\ eiHK hi 

(.rade 10 
Quinc>: Su/.inne MacNeai 
Molbrook: Sn/anne Olson 
Dorchester: (nllian Sill 
l*t\mouth: ( ame ( aid 

(.rade 9 
( anion: ( h.ii lotie I )icks(iti 
Randolph: Heather I ei^ien 
Sciluale: Kcthaiu Maschin 

(.rade R 
Quinc> : \ ni\ ( la i k 
I icme\ I a\ lot. and I is.i 
\ ukt>>>.i 

Matlapan: Niki l)ohh\ti 
Stoughlon: Sarah Hraen 

(.rade 7 

Quino: Kimberls Del 

I ongo. Ken McD«>nouj;h 

\eronica Mulkem. and luli 

Stranher^; 

Braintree: lanet Miirph\ 

(•rade 6 

QuirKv: lenniler Brams. 

.lulie McJ lm»)n. Ili/aheih 



Nohlc. i rin I'ellelier. Nicole 
West Ro\bur>: Katen Sla\ in and Michelle \ai.a 
Vet roc hi 



Nicholas Drniclrioii In lioiior S><*i(>l\ 



Nicholas I )cmctiioii ol }] 
I iirnace Ave was amonj; the 
nine new nicmbci^ lecenlU 
inducted ml o I he I alhei 
I ouiN Rinaldi ( haptei ol llu 
National llt)noi Socielv at 
Don Moscii lechnical lliuh 
School 111 Most on 

Book8 Available 
At .Atlantic- Mi<l(il<> 

Ihe Atlantic Middle 
School is offering summer 
reading material for incoming 
grade 6. 7 and 8 students. 

Students may borrow 
books from the Atlantic office 
on Wednesdays from 10 am 
to 2 p.m. 



lo hi- II. mud ii> iIk noi h.i\ . 
students mils! m.imi.im .i 
ciinjiilalivc .ivci.i^'c ol S*i. he 
iinoKed in scmkc to the 
school ami i.ommiini!\. 
\oliinteci 2ll lioiiis. Iia\c a 
school seiMce piojccl and 
displ.n ^•iMul Icadciship .iml 



cImi .icUi 

I'icsem mcmkis ol tlu 
soiicu mcliulc Stephen S 
Mm. Ill ol 4(1 K.iwson K>l 

I km a 11 N I sail L- ol 1." 
\\ollaston \\L- .and \nlh>'n\ 
I \ i.ipiano ol (>(i I ilw.mis s; 



Workshops At Oeslview 

Cresivieu Healthcare Management Resources will 

I acihts ol K6 Creenleal St . be- the speaker 
(^uinc\ will host a series ol jhis program will include a 

two workshops entitled, lull lunch, pros ide K I contact 

"Managing ( onllicl-Mana- houis of continuing education. 



ging Stress-A (are lor 
Caregivers" Approach." 
F riday. Sept 25. at 9 am till 
4 pm 

Judi l.ucas. RN. ol Stress 



and will cost $35 

Reservations must be made 
b\ Sept 14 bv calling Paula 
Souther, at 479-297K. 



SOUTH SHORE THE 

DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 

338 Washington St.l 



QUINCY 471-3210 



HOURS: 7 10 5 Mon.. Tue«.. FrI. Wed. & Thur». til 8 pm 



Thurviay. July I*. IM7 Qiiincy Sun Page 7 




BRl ( K H. KIN(, itnd I AMM\ I. ( AN Alt 

ll'tlfiur >(u(/ii< In) I 

Tammy Canale Engaged 
To Bruce King 



Mt and Mis I mi is C analc 
ol Qiiinc\ anriDuncc Ihc 
cnj;agcmcnl ol their daujihlct. 
I amm\ I \nn to Bruce R 
kmj;. son of Mr and Mrs 
Mhcil Kn^: ol Quinc\ 

Miss ( anale is a I4h4 
j!raduatf ol QuincA fhjih 
School and has attended 



QuincA Jr ( olieijc She is 
ernplosed at Jt)hn Adams 
Nursinti Home m Quinc>. 

Mr Kinj; IS a 198.? graduate 
of QuincN High School and is 
emplo\ ed at S> mmons 
industries Inc . Braintree. 

An August wedding 
planned. 



IS 




\ 



PM I I BRINKM AN and MARIK K. ( Al I AHAN 



Marie E. Call 
To Paul T. 

\ll .I'Ui \1is I chK.iid 
( .ill.ihan ol QuiiUA announce 
I he eiiLMjieiiienl ol llieir 
(laughlei, M.iiie I to Paul I 
Mrinkni.inn ol I'enihioke 

Mi lUinkm.inn is the son 
ol Mi I i,inci>. Hrmknuuin ol 
\binj:lon and Mis I'aliicia 
Mnnkni.uin ol \\ e\ mouth 

Miss C allahan is .1 giaduate 
of yuiiK> High School and 
\c\vhu!\ (Ollege, She is 
eniplined at Rile> and Rile> 
Insurance Agenev. in Quinc\ 



INJURED? 

Over 25 yea^s 
experience 
in trial of personal 
m)ury cases 

Free Consultation 
Call for Appointment 

Attorney 

Richard W. Barry 

339 Hancock St. 
Quincy 328-6900 



! Miltrr >lu(ltiil 

ahan Engaged 
Brinkmann 

as a marketing coordinator. 

Mi Hrinkman is a graduate 
ol \\e\ mouth South High 
School and ha- attended 
M a-sas oit C H ni mu n 1 1 \ 
C olleiie. He is empio\ctl at 
DM & S I umher Co.. m 
\ o I w e 1 1 as an inside 
Salesperson. 

A September wedding is 
planned 



Social 




MR and MRS. DAMKI J. 



RO(HK 

( Mllltr .N(ii(/l<»/ 



Joanne Mulcahy Wed 
To Daniel Roche 



.loannc R. Mulcahs. 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
John .1 Mulcahv of Quinc>. 
was recent l> married to 
i)aniel J Roche, son of Jr 
and Mrs. Robert F. Roche of 
Quinc\. in a ceremonv at St. 
.Ann's Church. \S'ollaston. 

A reception followed at the 
Neighborhood C lub 

the bride's gown was made 
ol i\or\ satin, accented with 
\enise lace, seeded pearls and 
a cathedral train Her veil was 
finger-tip silk accented with 
rhmcstones and pearls. 

A graduate ol Archbishop 
\N illiams High School and 
•\quinas Junior College, she is 
emplo\ed as an e\ecti\e 



secretary. 

I h e bridegroom, a 
graduate of Quinc> High 
School and the L ni\ersit\ of 
Lowell. IS employed b\ 
Horizons Technology. Inc.. as 
a systems engineer 

Maid of Honor was 
Maureen Mulcahy. Honor 
attendants were Lisa Childs. 
Eileen Malone and Jan Marie 
Pi//anello. 

Best man was U illiam 
Roche. Ushers were Mathew 
Jamieson. John Mulcahy. 
Christopher '<oche. Mathew 
Roche, and I edd Rodman. 

.After a wedding trip to 
Jamaica, the newlyweds are 
li\ing in Plymouth. 



Alicia Burns Receives Degree 



Alicia K Burns, ol .V^ 
Buclkingham St. in Quincy. 
was among students who 



received .Vlaster's degrees 
recently at the Ln^ersity ol 
Wisconsin. Madison 



y^-s.t»^».^^»»"ttts.t»»-^^»-^"-^^».^s^".^-.t^s.T'H.^ 



"It's Simply Italian -- 
And Then Some" 

And They're All Simply Delicio-s 
A book featuring the recipes of 

Marie J. D'Olimpio 

On Sale In Quincy At 

That's Italian, Franklin St. 
Prevites Market, Sumner St. 

And At 

Samoset Pharmacy 
Samoset Ave., Merrymount 
Price: $5.95 



f-^.<.^^^s^»»i^^»tT.^-.<-'-^^e»-^^"-»-.s.s.s.s.s.^.s.^«^-^t 



tS> 



5cn5 



if Nail Tipping 
& Overlay ... 
if Sculptured 



«55 



Na.ls '.>.-» 



it Pedicures 



I*) 




for her. ..Monday Special 
Wrtsh. Cut & Blow Dry $ 1 y1 
Lonjj hair sligtitly higher J- ^ 



for him...Tues. & Thurs. Special 

Blow Cut, iitcludes 

shampoo 



ni 



V> (>(liie«iHay IVriii Specials: 

Unipertn ''SS comp. Ck)ldwell Foam Perm .... *51 comp. 

Complete - Slightly higher for longer hair 
Facial Waxintf Available Vedu ur«- and Nail Siulpiinq 

All Specials Performed By One Of Russell's Staff 

Opt-n 'J-S Dailv. Wed 
Ihur . F n fcvcs 



Cor Hiimock & C heslnui Ai l-.i Maple Sts. guino 4''2-U)6U 




^^ 





MARVANNE Ml RFHY 



lHi)hb% Sludiui 



Maryanne Murphy 
Engaged To Bruce Ivil 



.Mr. and Mrs. V\ illiam J. 
Murphy of E\ans St . North 
Weymouth, announce the 
engagement ol their daughter. 
Maryanne. to Bruce A. l\il. 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Rohert S 
Ivil of Putnam St.. East 
VV'ey mouth. 

Miss Murphy, granddaugh- 
ter of Mrs. Frances Veno of 
Quincy, was graduated from 
\Ke\mouth North High 
School and attends the 



Quincy Junior f illege 
Nursing Program as a 
member of the class of 1988. 

She IS employed at 
Braintree Rehabilitation 
C enter 

Mr. I\il was graduated 
Irom Weymouth North High 
School and attended Coyne 
Electric School, Boston. 

He is employed at Beiienoit 
Electric. 

A Sept. 20 \^edding is 
planned. 



Mr., Mrs. Gary Snell 
Parents Of Daughter 



Mr. and Mrs. Gary Snell 
formerly of Quincy are 
parents of a daughter, Jaclyn. 
born .June 1 1, at Quincy City 
Hospital. 

The Sne • a' • also parents 
ol I)a\id \ ho s three \ears 
old. 

Ntrs Snell is t' ■ lormer 



Ginny Cicolo. 

(irandparents are Mr. and 
Mrs. Virgil Snell o\ Quircy 
and Mr. and Mrs Joseph 
Ciccolo formerly o\ Quincy. 

Save Gas and Money ... 
Shop Locally 



LOVF IS 




-^3t 



a perfect wedding at the 
Golden Lion Suite 

Speak to Tfrry .Sinicro ■ SlM'tourrrntal 
■|rnl - sprcialuing in compiett w(ddin( 
par <gr plans and aH otlwr occasions. 
Tht l.oldrn Lion Suilf arcommodatcs 
up til .VM>. The Vrn«(ian Koom up to 140 
lursts. (;it( T(TT> a call for an 
appoinlmfnl for tour rrsffsation. New 
bruchurrs are available 

I \ir conditioned) 

CALL 

Quino Vtns of Itah Social (.trttt 

129 QuarT> Street, Quincy. MA %l\i^ 

Syv, N' VtBER i»4-': <«00 



V Jf^cA (f W^s:, 







Senior 

Citizens 

Dncount 




ftC 






S^ 



28 Gre«nv»CK)d A»f 



Closed Mondays 

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 AM - 5 30 P M 

Op«n Thofs •w»\ 'i' 8 30 



WolUston 



\\ 773-5266 



VHA 



V 




Pace I Quincy Sun ThurMiay, July Ift. 1*17 

Crime 
Watch 

B> RORKKT H ANNA 
Crimf Prevfntion OfTicer 
Quinc) Policf Departmenf 



Office Security 

Protect Your OfTice: 

• Station a reception desk at the office entrance. 

• Ask each visitor if they need assistance. 

• Lock all private offices during non-duty hours. 

• Post "I'nauthori/cd Area" signs in appropriate 
areas. 

• Locate coat closets in areas least accessible to the 
public. 

• Report suspicious persons oractivity to the proper 
authorities immediately. 

Protect Your Equipment: 

• Keep all small office machines, e.g. mini 
calculators, locked in desks when not in use. 

• Attach larger office machines, e.g. typewriters to 
desks via locking devices 

• Mark all equipment with easily identifiable 
markings. 

• Ne\er allow removal of office equipment until 
proper authorization is received. 

• Conduct periodic inventories. 
Protect Your Keys: 

• Keys to offices, cabinets, etc. should be kept in a 
locked container. 

• Never place keys to locked cabinets in unlocked 
desks or under typewriter pads. 

• Report the loss of keys immediately. 

• Key cards should be treated the same as any other 
key. 

Protect your ofTke funds, petty cash and char|;e cards: 

• Don't leave money in desks. 

• Funds. GTR'sand credit cards should be placed in 
a safe. 

• Coffee gift funds over S20. should be kept in a 
secure area 

• Don'i advertise the existence of coffee or gilt funds 
with signs. 

• Report all losses immediately. 
Safeguard Personal Belongings: 

• Keep \our purse in a locked desk or cabinet. 

• Never leave your car or home keys in your coat. 

• leave excessive cash at home d 

• Don't leave valuable items on vour desk 

See you at the Quincy Sidewalk Ba/aar. I he Crime 
Prevention Office will have a booth at the Sidewalk 
Ba/aar July 16, 17, 18. I he booth will be located intront 
of Baskm-Robbins Ice Cream F'arlor, 1434 HanccKk St. 
Stop bv and say hello. 



ARRESTED 

DRUNK DRIVING? 

Know your legal rights, possible legal defenses 

and potential legal consequences 

on* hour contuttatton *50.00 

TRIAL LAWYER ROBERT K. KELLY 

Call 479-8133 for appt. 



Quincy Police Log Hot Spots 



June 3: 
Suspicious Man/ Arrest, 2:45 am, M I St. Caller 
reports a man carrying a shotgun in a blanket at the 
above location. D-l Off Ryan & Braba/on, D-} Off 
Heggblod, E-l Off Edgar, K-l Sgt. McFachern 
dispatched. Officers report i 23 year old Qu'ncy man is 
under arrest for, I) possession of a firearm. 2) Illegal 
possession of a loaded shotgun. 

July 4: 
Break, 8:58 pm, Propcct St. Entrance was gained 
through a rear window. Nothing taken. 
Fight, 9:17 pm. 1284 Furnare Brook Pkwy. .Several 
calls stating that 10 people re fighting at the above 
location A-l Off Barnes A Breen. E-l Off. I . Kelly 
dispatched. Officers report fight broken up. A }5 year 
old Quincy was arrested for I) Assault and battery by 
means of a dangerous weapon (a club) 

July 5: 
Break, 12:51 am. Young St. Entrance was gained 
through a rear door. A VCR, TV ai 1 a quantity of 
stereo equipment was taken. 

Break, 74.*! am, Davis St. Entrance was gained through 
a side window. A VCR and other items were taken. 
Break into M/V, 8:30 am. Shore Ave. Caller rep orts 
that a 1984 Mercedes was broken into during the night 
A cellular phone was taken and the dash was damaged. 
Break, 5 58 am, (iranite St., 200 block, fntrance was 
gained through a rear screen door. A 12' IV, jewelry 
and a stereo were taken. 

Jul) 7: 
Att. Rape/ Arrest, 3:57 am, 105 Sea St Callei reports 
she was taken in a car by two men who attempted to 
rape her and then threw her out of the car E-l Off. 
Savard, D-3 Off Quinn, A-l Off Horrigan & (ilynn 
dispatched After an investigation two men were 
arrested. A 25 year old Quincy man was arrested for I ) 



Assault with intent lo rape. 2) Kidnapping A 29 year 
old Sfoughton man was arrested for I) Kidnapping 2) 
.\ssiiult and I UiUry with a dangerous weapon (beei 
bottle). 

Break. 721 am. Independence Ave Entrance was 
gamed through the front door. A VCR. stereo, and 
coins were taken 

Break, 4:52 pm. Presidential Dr. Entrance was gamed 
through a UKked window. A VCR was taken 
Vandalism/ l-arceny, 8 03 pm. Veterans Memorial Park 
Sea St. Caller reports that the Hag pole lock was 
smashed and an American (lag stolen from this UKation 
in the past 24 hours. 

July 8: 
Att. Larceny, 1:49 am. 182 Quincy Ave. Caller reports 
that two subjects in a dark colored Chev attempted lo 
steal the tires from two cars parked at the rear ol the 
above ItKation. Subjects lied when alarm on one vehii. k 
sounded. 

Break. 8:.39 am. Quincy Dog Pound Dog Ollktr 
Phyllis Berlucchi reports somecmc broke into the pound 
overnight and lei five dogs loose 

July 9: 
Break, \ M) pm. (nlbert St Entrance was gained 
through a kitchen windt)w A TV. jewelry and other 
Items were taken 

Arrest. 7 32 pm. Kincaide l»ark 0-I4 Oil IVter 
lurowski. A-l Off Coppens & O'Brien report thev 
have a 19 year old Qumcv youth under arrest li)r being a 
minor in possession ol alcohol 

Services for week 911 Calls-331. Wagon Runs-39. 
Vehicles Fowed-32 

II you have any inJormation on any of the above 
crimes, or anv crime, please call the Qumcv Police 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext 37| Vou will not be 
required to identify yourself 



102 On Broad Meadows Honor Roll 



Broad Meadows Middle 
School lists 102 students on 
the fourth quarter honor roll 

Thcv arc 

(iRADK 6 

Hijjh Honors: Milagro \ 
Colon, Michael B Hughes. 
Jennifer 1 Jones. John I 
Siil 

Honors: (D lie en M 
Mitchell. Daniel A Morrell. 
I^eirdrc ODonncIl, foe 1 
Pham. Andrea M Plant, 
Rohert I'roude. Hcniamin 
R a d c 1 1 1 f e . William J 
R imov It /, Debora h I) 
Rohhins. Jason I Schofield. 
I homas C I rich, Steven M 
Uvanittc, Nichole M Walter. 
James White. Marc Ahru//o. 
Angela .Atciavatti. Robert M 
Barnes. Fimothv Byrne. I isa 
.\ C henctte. Davvn M ( uriis. 
Hcidi 1 Daggett. F'cter .1 
I) a m I a n o . S h e r r v M 
Dicker son, Steven M. 
fernald. Michael P feroli. 
I imot h y D dalligan . 
Michael D (iardncr. Scan M 
(iraham. IX-borah A. dray. 
Jill A Hawcs. Carrie \ 
Keith, Lauren Keith, fdmund 



W Kcnnev. Bryan S Kravit/. 
Heather I a Plume. Brian 
I, I Roche, Susan ( Mackav, 
Nicole M Manson. I isa M 
McDonough. April M 
McCiann, Matthev* Mcdouan. 
Stacv Medeiros 

(,R ADK 7 

High Honors: Shane M 
Abhouil, Sus.in M B\rnc. 
Hcnlv ( heng. Joseph I 
fcncki, Breeda M ()'( onnoi, 
Stacev I Pe//iilo, Jessica I 
Picarski 

Honors: Mane I \nshe- 
VMt/. Stacv M Honavita. 
•Xndrea C apobiarico, Michael 



S C arr. Paul d ( ivanaugh. 
Randolph N M ( hu. Amv B 
Dunn. Sarah H Idwards. 
Breeda M fahertv. Su/anne 
I lavata. Jacquiline M 
I reel, Stc\en .1 fullers, 
lenniler (iav, iellrev ( 
.lones. I homas I Kane, 
Steven W I oud, Roderick 
W I vnn Ir , Michael \ 
Ivons, Kern A Mahonev. 
\le\ Mak. Keiih I Norns, 
Nicole I N 1) s e v\ o r I fi \ , 
M.tiireen A O'Donnell, 
Ionia M Popowil/. Sharon 
Sarise\erino 

(.KADK 8 



Hifh Honors: I aune 1 
Hovi. ( hristophei P Nichci 

Honors: Susan M Barr\ 
Michael I Bavlis. M.iik I' 
Mogan, Karen I Hi' u- 
Pamel.t A Brown, .lasn'i K 
Bucklev. Dav id M ( hapni.i 
Susan ConnolU Kaicn I 
I )w\er, Mich.iel I l.i\ m I - ' 
Her r 1 ngt on . I a r r i . \ 
Hughes. I ilceii I '■ 
Shaven M Kenneijv. Kt n 
I adik Joan P ()•( oi.' 
\ ei .1 I'epd |ono\ 11 . I 
Reeves, Mark A R.'^h;'^ 
Richard Iillon, KiniheiK V 
W ilson 



48 Re8ident»i On Suffolk Honors List 



wh«n it comes 
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Suffolk I nivcrsiiN has 
named 48 Quincy residents to 
the spring semester Honors 
fist 

I hey arc 

( ollegf of fibrral Arts 

Hi|>h Honors: Sustui K 
C'aidaronc and Michael D 
Williams, both seniors. 
William Traynor and Julie M 
( Osta. both sophomores 

Honors: Wai-Mung ( 
Vang, a (reshman. James A 
Donahue and Sheila A I gan. 



both sophomores, I heresa M 
\ on] and Patricia M 
Mc( ormack, uith luniors. 
Susan M ( hcpclskv, Rcgina 
M, fru//ctti. Ruth A 
(iailaghcr, Robert J dutro. 
Donald H Spink, Kathr\n A 
Doherl>. Pamela M 
duadiano. C laudia F 
Salguero, Joanne I Sulli\an 
and Ol P S/e. all seniors 

Sch«M»l of Mana^fmrnl 
Honors: Michelle Rich- 



"I wish 

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before" 



We hear people we serve say this oft 



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That's why we extend an open invitation to 
anyone to consult with us in advance. 



mond. I inda M Saverv .itu; 
Steven ( W I e I k u s . .1 1 i 
sophomores, .loanne I 

Burns. John M ( ristiani 
F lien M Hachcv. Sol:.: 
Mannilli. Irene S Papam.ti 
kou. Joan F C limo. lohn M 

Mcdralh and Ann M.ur- 
FFines. all juniors, darv R 
F)inardo. Ralph d I rve It 
William K d .1 r il ne r 
Jeannine I Jarvis, laniev I' 

I jwloi. I ucinda F Moinll 
Valerie A F'rinciotio, Sheil.i 
M Walsh. Kathleen M Kilc\ 
Fdward I McDermoii 
Su/annc ( Murphv. lanu^ 

F Nee. F rancis R Sevm.uii 
Anna Wong. F'aul f ( ovman 
( hrisiophcr FFai i ingi ori. 
John F Mclaughlin, .m.i 
hmolhv I Iracev, -il' 
seniors 



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FIEE PARKING 472 7177 




hnlltmirtfi is a /i.«» itj nvn adull and childrvn s 
hni)ks and rvviirdinffs now ax'ailablv at the Thomas 
C.ranv Public Library: 

Fiction: Booby frapy. bv William Stevenson. 
Doubleday & Co.[ I9K7. I)eath'Of A God; a Ben Jurnet 
mystery, by S.I. Haymon. St. Martin's Press, 1987. 
More Die Of Heartbreak, by Saul Bellow. Wm. 
Morrow. 1987. Murder Straight Up, by Edward 
Gorman. St. Martin's Press, 1987. Nursery Crimes, by 
B M. Gill Charles Scribner, 1987. To Love And To 
Dream, by Elizabeth Nell Dubus. G.P. Putnam's Sons, 
1987. Toll Call, by Stephen Greenleaf. Villard Books, 
1987. 

Non-Fiction: Baseball by The Rules: an anecdotal 
guide to America's oldest and most comples sport, by 
Glen Waggoneret.al. •796.357 W 12. Dog Watching, by 
[)esmond Morns. Crown Publ., 1987. •636.8 MORd. 
First Do No Harm; reflections on becoming a 
neurosurgeon, by J. Kenyon Ainer, M.D. Villard 
Boosk. 1987. •617.48 RI3. Jackie Robinson: a life 
remembered, by Maury Allen. Franklin Watts. 1987. 
•796.357 AI,5i Loss Of Self: a family resource for the 
care of Alzheimer's Disease and related disorders, by 
Donna Cohen and Carl Eisdorfer. W. W. Norton, 1987. 
•616 89 C66. 

(hildren's Books: Draw Fifty Cars, Trucks and 
Motorcycles, by I.ec Ames. Doubleday, 1986. •J 743 
Am3drc. Cioing Buggv; jokes about msects, by Peter 
Roop l.erner. 1986. •J8I8ROO. Pigs From A to Z. by 
Arthur Geisert Houghton, 1986. JE Fiction. Secret 
life Of Silly McBcan, by Dorothy Haas. Bradbury, 
1986. J Fiction. Trucks, bv Bvron Barton. Crowell, 
1986 'JF 629 224 Ba8 

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South Boston, MA 02127 



NAME 



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Pa|c l§ Quinc) Sun Tkursdaj', July l«, 1917 

William J. Downey, 83 

Retired Bus Meehanie 



Obituaries 



Kalherine L. Connolly, 47 

Received SSARC Award 



A funeral Mass for William 
J. I")owney, 83. of Quincy. a 
retired bus mechanic for the 
former Eastern Massachusetts 
Street Railway Co.. was 
celebrated July 1 1 at Our 
lady of Good Counsel 
Church in Merrymount. 

Mr. DowncN died .luly h at 
Norwood Hospital. 

A nati\e of Ireland, he had 
lived m Chelsea many years 
and m Quincy 1 1 years. 

Husband of the late Marv 



(Curley) Downey, he is 
survived b> three sons. .lohn 
Downey. William \ Downey 
and .Joseph Ci. Downey; a 
daughter. Iheresa Ciardiner;a 
sister. Beatrice Brien ol 
Jamaica Plain; and nine 
grandchildren. 

Burial was in St. Mar\"s 
Cemetery. West Quincy 

Funeral arrangements were 
by the keohanc I uncral 
Home. 7S.S Hancock St. 
Wollaston. 



Dorothy H. Craven, 61 

Past Presi<leiil YMCA Swim Team 



Jan F. Mulligan-Ramirez 



A private funeral was held 
Saturday at the Joseph 
Sweeney f-'uneral Home for 
Jan K. Mulligan-Ramire/. .36. 
ol Calilorma. a native of 
Quincy and a waitress in a 
California restaurant who 
died Jul\ 7 in California. 
Burial wa> at St. Mary's 
Cemeterv. West Quincy. 

She IS sur\i\ed by a 
daughter. I upc R^^rn'-rc •' 



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California; her lather, John 
Mulligan, with the Quinc\ 
Police Department, and hci 
Stepmother. Frances (Britt) 
Mulligan, both of Quinc\: 
and three stepbrothers. 
Cierard Brilt, Ihomas Britt 
and Richard Brilt 

Memorial donations ma> 
be made to St Joseph's 
Building Fund, Quincy Point. 

March of Dimes 
SAVES BABIES j 



\ 1 u n e r a 1 Mass to r 
Dorolhv H (Rehill) Cra\en. 
M. ol last Weymouth, past 
president ol the South Shore 
N NK X s\nchroni/ed swim 
team and iormci ollicc 
ni.inager toi the Hingham 
.lournal. was celebrated Jul\ 
II at Immaculate Conception 
I huivh 

Mr> Craven died .luK Hal 
New I ngland Sinai Hospital 
in Stoughion alter a long 
illnesN 

Born in Boston, she lived in 
Don-hcslti btlure moving to 
Weymiuth 2K years ago. 

She was office manager of 
the Hingliain Journal, sister 
publication v' the Quincv 
Sun. from '^8 2 to I9«5 

She was also a former 
swimming instructor for the 
parks department n 
Wevmouth. 



Mrs Craven is survived bv 
her husband. Robert W 
Craven Sr.; five sons. Robert 
W Craven Jr and .lames B 
Craven, both ol Wevmouth. 
Mark I Craven ol North 
Weymouth. Donald M 
Craven ol Whitman and 
Brian J Craven ol Salem. 
N H . two daughters. 
Dorothv I DiMarco ol 
We\mt>uth and I lien M 
Barone of Quincv; a brother. 
James B Rehill ol Piv mouth, 
and 12 grandchildren 

Burial was in Ht)lvwood 
Cemeterv. Boston 

Arrangements were bv the 
McDonald I unerai Home, 
Central Square, hast 
Weymouth 

Memorial donations can be 
made to the Hospice ol the 
South Shore, 4(M) franklin 
St . Bramtree. \\\ 02 1 W 



A luneral M.iss for 
Katherinc I Connolly. 47, of 
Quincy. >vas celebrated 
I uesdav in St Marv ol the 
Hills ( hurch in Milton 

Mrs C onnollv died Juh 1 1 
at C arnev Hospital in BoNt»>n 
altei a long illness 

Born in Boston, she lived in 
Wrentham belore moving to 
Quincv 12 veais agt) 

She was empU)ved bv the 
South Shore Sheltered 
Workshop in Quincv 

In N8V Miss C onnollv 
received the South Shore 
Association lor Retarded 
C iti/ens' C lient of the Neat 
award I his awaid is given 
annuaiiv to the person who 



shows the most progn-ss 
toward independence. 

She is survived bv her 
mother. Kathryn (Maguire) 
Connolh ol Milton, iwo 
brothers. Walter M C onnollv 
ol Ashland and loseph .1 
Connollv o\ Marlboro, two 
sisters. Jean M Beale o| 
Scituate and Maiv I 
Connollv ol Wevmmiih, .itnl 
several nieces and nephews 

Burial was in Blue Mill 
Cemeterv in Bramtree 

Memorial donations m.u 
be made to the South Shon.- 
Association lor Reianliil 
C Ill/ens, yi] Ri\c- St 
Wevmouth, M A I»2IHK 



Irene P. Keelon, 82 



Ann M. Trabuceo, 60 



HELP FIGHT 
BIRTH DEFECTS 



A funeral Mass will be 
celebrated today (Ihursdav) 
at 9 a.m. in Sacred Heart 
C^hurch. Washington St . 



•.^>^%t^V.^1C^V.^^t^V<^V^>^>^»V^X.^- L^<^-«.^>-.^. 



/^o.-'^JlfV. 




A THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK 



•^r'! 



D 



Scott Deware 



CALL NOW FOB APPOINTMENT 

773-0900 

WE MAKE HOME VISITS 
AND ACCEPT MEDICAID 



On* of lh« bMl quolM on 
happin«ts w» havt com* across is 
on* by J. Walt*r Sylv**l*r ... 
"Happinass comas not from 
without iMJt from within. II com*s 
not from th* pow*r of poss**slon 
but from th* pow*r of 
appraciation." 

TH* struggl* to *n)oy lit*, to b* cont*nt*d and 
Batisfi*d, Is a constant ort*. In r*c«nt y*ars crlm*, 
corruption and crla*s ol lit* - addad to th* fast pac* of 
modam Hvlng • hav* mad* r*allzatlon ol contantntant, 
paac* of mind, tru* happlnass *v*n mor* difficult to 
acfilava. 

Th* s*cr*t Is still th* sama; H Has In th* mind ... Thos* 
who ar* aMa to limit thair goals, dasir** and draams to 
raasoftaiola onaa, who will kaap in mind th* lot of thos* 
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Tha kay to Innar hapinass, th*n. Is not to b* found In 
mon*y, pow*r, position or influ*nce ov*r oth*rs. It's to 
b* found in on*'s mind. In vl*wing ilf* r*lativaly, with a 
raallstic sansa of proportion, tharaby achlaving an 
innar paaca (and h*r« faith can halp) nalthar human 
baings nor dally avants can thraatan ... 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02170 

Tel: 472-1137 

Member of the "New England Funeral Trust" 

and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

luneral specialist. 

Serving All Religious Faiths 

Services Rendered To Any Distance 



g^uiceneg iFuneral S>EruicE 

DKNMS S. SWKENEY, Director 
The "JOSKPH SWEENEY FUNERAL HOMES" 

C OMPEETE "HOMELIKE" 
ATMOSPHERE 






L 



; } j f.^ ,j 326(OI'LLANI) 

0( isr > W UUINCY 

775-:7.> 77.v:7:s 

Ol K ONLN 7VV0 I Of MIONS 

SOI M I II lAll l> NMIH \N\ Ol HI R 
I LSI KAI \\USS\ l\ 01 IN( '» 



Wevmouth I anding. lor Ann 
M. (Moone>) Irahucco, W). 
of C^uincy, a former 
housekeeper for Boston City 
Hospital, who died Monday 
at QuincN C it> Hospital alter 
a long illness Burial will he at 
(iethsemane C'emeter\. \\est 
Roxhury. 

Mrs Irahucco was horn 
in Boston and had li\ed in 
QuincN for se\en \ears 

She was a graduate ol the 
.leremiah Burke High School 

She was a memhcr ol St 
Patricks Church. Ro\bur> 

Mrs Irahucco is sur\i\ed 
h\ her husband, Lawrence 
I . Lrabucco; a son. Lawrence 
T. lrabucco Jr of South 
Boston; a daughter. Margaret 
Y f r a b u c c o o I Last 
Wc\mouth; two brothers, 
.lohn Moone> ol C anton and 
Michael Moone\ ol I >nn; 
five sisters. Mars Bern ol 
lakeville. Helen Moone\ of 
I \nn, Catherine O'Keele ol 
New Jerse\. Patricia Benton 
ol Quincv and Josephine 
Sulluan ol Llorida, and a 
great granddaughter, Ann I 
I rabucco of Last Weymouth 

I uneral arrangements were 
b\ the Wickens and Iroupe 
Luneral Home. 26 Adams St , 
C^uincy. 



A luneral Mass lor Irene P 
( I \don) Keelon, H2, ol 
C^uinc). was celebrated Jul> 
1(1 in Our lad\ ol Ciood 
CDunsel Church. Merrs mount 

Mrs Keelon died Jul> 7 at 
C?uinc\ City Hospital alter a 
brief illness 

Born in .Abingtt>n. she had 
li\ed in C^uincy ^5 years 

Wile of the late Charles J 
Keelon. she is sursised b> two 
sons. Charles J Keelon Jr ol 



Aliquippa. Pa . and lames I 
Keelon ol Bramtree, .i 
daughter. Nancy L C h.iniberlin 
ol Wollaston, a sister. Ruth 
I >don ol Cambridge. Ii) 
grandchildren and two great- 
grandsons 

Burial was in Mourn 
wollaston C emeter\ 

Luneral arrangements were 
b> the Keohane Luner.il 
Home. 7KS HanciKk Si . 
wollaston 



Eleanor C. Hendrick, 67 



A funeral Mass for FIcanor 
C (l.ydon) Hendnck. 67. ol 
Quincy, was celebrated Jul> 
10 in Sacred Heart C hurch. 
North Quincv 

Mrs Hendnck died Jul> " 
at Quincy C it> Hospital after 
a brief illness. 

Born in Boston, she had 
lived in Quincv .15 years 

She was a member ol the 
Catholic Women's Club at 
Sacred Heart Church in 
North Quincy 

Wife of the late Walter J. 



Hendnck. she is survived bv 
two sons. Robert J Hendnck 
ol Duxburv and Waller H 
Hendnck ol Quincv, a sister. 

Marv McDonough ol South 
Boston, and two grand- 
children. Nicole Hendnck 
and Robert Hendnck 11 

Bunal was in Massachusetts 
National Cemeterv. Bourne 

Luneral arrangements were 
bv the Keohane Funeral 
Ht)me. ysy Hancock Si , 
N»)rth Quincy. 



Albert E. Litllehale. 33 



A luneral service lor Albert 
L I ittlehale, .VV ol Quincv. a 
bartendei lor the Houghs 
Neck legion Post, was held 
Mondav at Houghs Neck 
( ongregational (hurch 

Mr I Ittlehale died Julv 9 
alter being stricken ill 

Born in Boston, he lived in 
Qumcv all his hie 

He IS survived bv a son, 
Nith»)las I II tie hale o\ 



Bramtree. his parents. Albert 
I and Ann (Hartlordi 
I Ittlehale ol Quincv, three 
sisters. Patricia Smith ol 
Carver. Nancv C ollings and 
I orraine I ittlehale, both ol 
Quincv 

Luneral arrangements were 
bv the Joseph Sweencv 
Luneral Home, ''4 I Im St 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Cemetery. West Quincv 



Bolea-Buonfigljo 

Funeral Home 



Michael A. Bolea 
Director 



116 Franklin St. 
Quincy, Ma. 




472-5319 



, 





AAAERIOXN 
VOVNCER 
fSOOETY" 




Sweeney JBroihers 

HOME FOR FUNERALS 

RICHARD T. SWEENEY 
RICHARD T. SWEENEY, JR. 

1 INDEPENDENCE AVENUE • QUINCY, MASS. 

472-6344 




TlMnAiy. Jaljr l«, IM7 QirfMy Swi Pugt II 





When is 
taking a diance better 
tlian a sure tiling? 



When you spin our 
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at the Grand Opening 
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at 731 Hancocl( Street, 
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The Hibernia Savings Bank has always given its customers great 
rates on Term Certificates. But this time, we're leaving nothing to 
chance. From July 18-August 1, to celebrate the opening of our new 
Wollaston Office, we're giving our customers a chance to get more 
than just a great rate, they'll get a shot at an unbelievable one. 



One Year Term Certificates: 



From a minimum 
mw of 




To a maximum 
rate of 



20"^ 



>| iHHi Slim !i(i(i[»r(Misii I 

K\('r>(»ne who opens a one year term certificate has a 
chance to earn interest up to 20"o simply by taking a 
turn at our "Wheel of Fortune!' Simply open your 
account and spin the wheel whatever rate comes up 
w^ll t)e the rate of vour certificate. 



rdieoi rdieui 

8V4% 20 





($1,000 $100,000 Deposit) 

We haven't forgotten those of you who prefer 
a longer term either. The rock bottom 
rate on a two year term certificate will be 8 '/4%. 
However your rate could go as high as 20% 
if the right bingo ball falls for you. 



Pdrkini! 




.Another sure bet when you do your banking at 
our new Wollaston Office is that there will be 
plenty of free parking. Over 100 off-street parking 
spaces are available at our new facility. 




Menit)erFDIC/DIFM 

All f.iii'Ndre simple inlcrpM 

All ilep'isils must hf nr» funds in twnk So tfdnsfers dllowed 

Sniisidnt, il pfniU\ ((If fdfK withdrawal 



PLUS: 

FreelKp 

Drawing! 

Every account 
you open at 
our new Wollaston Office 
through August 15 gives you 
a chance to win a one week 
vacation for two in Bermuda 
(includes airfare and 
accommodations) 



Tlie 
Hibernia 
Savinos 

Bank 

Now in Wollaston. 



731 Hancock Street, Wollaston 02170 /479BANK 

Ottier offices at 
263 Washington Street. Boston 02108 / 227 9031 
51 Commercial Street. Braintree 02184 / 848 5560 



Pige 12 Quincy Sun Thuraday. Jul> U. IM7 



''Love Your Enemies' Sermon 
Covenant Congregational Topic 



On Sunday at the 10 am 
>»orship service ol the 
Covenant Congregational 
Church. W'hiiwell and 
Granite Sts . Re\. Fred 
liiwson will preach on the 
topic of Christ's admonition 
to i,ove your enemies.' 

This is the second in a scries 
of messages based on the 
gospel of Luke. The service 
will be held in the sanctuar\ 
rather than outside so the 
minister of music. Richard 
Smith, can play an organ solo 



All members arc reminded 
that during the summer 
season, each one has a 
responsibility to act as 
greeter .A nursery for children 
age fiNC and younger is 
available and will be attended 
bv I on- Anne I acella 
Following the service, a coltec 
hour vmH be shared in Person 
Hall 

On Wednesday, \acation 
Oav Camp began at 9:30 am 
Each session \m1I last until 
I I yo a.m. T here is a 



registration lee ol $4 per 
camper. vMth a maximum lee 
of $10 per family 

The theme is "A Journey to 
Japan" and activities vmII be 
related to that theme. 

The Hay Camp will be held 
through .Aug 12. and on the 
last day a trip to Drumlin 
Karm is planned 

More information about 
any of the church's activities IS 
available bv calling the church 
office at 479-572« 



^Rooted In God' Squantum 
Church Sermon Topic 



-Rooted In God" was the 
title of the sermon preached 
Sunday by pastor Rev Dr. 
Gene Langevin at the First 
Church of Squantum 

His text was the entire first 
Psalm, which begins. "Blessed 
is the man who walks not in 
the counsel of the wicked, nor 
stands in the way of sinners. 
nor sits in the seat of 
scofrcrs..." 

The hymns sung bv the 



congregation were "Praise to 
the Ford, the Almighty." "O 
for a Thousand Tongues to 
Sing." and "Stand Up. Stand 
Dp for Jesus." 

Pianist Janet Williamson 
and organist Mary Ruth Scott 
accompanied the congrega- 
tional singing. For the 
offertory. Janet Williamson 
played "Prayer" by Englcben 
Humperdinck. She was 
accompanied by Mary Ruth 



Scott. 

Kate Cu'N>man and Fva 
Martin weic the greeters for 
the morning Stewart Scott 
and lore Wallin were the 
usher'- May Lewis and drace 
Holmes hosted the Fellowship 
Hour after the service 

During the summer, the 
Sunday worship services all 
begin at 9:30 a m Visitors are 
alwavs welcome. 



Central Middle School Honors 
Students At Assembly 



Central Middle School 
recently held its final 
assembly of the school year 
v*here students addressed 
their classmates and awards 
v^ere made for academic 
excellence, perfect attendance 
and participation in special 
activities. 

Eighth graders presented 
annual awards for special 
recognition were 

Dean Tantillo. Hallem 
Haddad Memorial Award for 
excellent performance in 
science; Jennifer Richmond 
and Allan Wong. American 
Legion Awards; Debbie 
Ramos, the Moscardelli 
Pn/c; Jana C Ocio. Sarah 



Goodman. Jennnifer Hill. 
Simon Kwan, Nicole 
Lonergan. Julie McCloskey. 
Eric McClelland. Jacqueline 
Potter. Anthony Sabadini 
and Wayne Sit. Principal 
Awards. 

Robert Fng. past comman- 
der of Quincy Legion Post, 
made the American Legion 
Award presentations. 

The Skoler Familv Awards 
were presented to Peter Ryan 
and Christine Barrett by [)r. 
Peter Skoler The award is 
given to students who 
demonstrate above average 
scholarship and athletic 
accomplishments 



65 Washington Street Quincy, MA 02169 

479-6512 / 479-4932 

.-".'.' "."!. Sunday School 9 30 a n 

Starting July 1 - Sept 1 

„, .,. Morning Worship 10 00 a ni 

Evening Service 6 00pm 

Wed Evenings 7 00 p m 

Bible Study & Prayer Service 

Nursery provided at all services 
Rev Sid A Veenstra. Pastor Teacher 

A.M. TO WORSHIP AND TO SERVE 
P.M. BAPTISM AND FAREWELL 

Affiliated with Baptist General Conference 
Northern Baptist Conference 



CENTRAL 

BAPTIST 

CHURCH 



Grade six speakers were 
Johnson Fan. Robert 
Gordon. Joanna Dyer and 
Christina Trilone who also 
served as mistress of 
ceremonies 

Grade seven speakers were 
Cassian Jae. Jodie Pachcco. 
Amy Wong and Michael 
Giese who also served as 
master of ceremonies 

(irade eight speakers were 
Nicole Mahonev, Eric 
McClelland. Dean Fantillo 
and Jennifer Richmond who 
was also mistress ol 
ceremonies. 

Both the Central band and 
the Morning Chorus 
performed under the direction 
of Marion Clancv and 
Bernard (ioldstein 

Coaching the student 
speakers was Mary Catherine 
lannoni 



!»> 



THE QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

and Washington Si Ouincy 

SUNDAY SERVICES. 10 a.m. 

Rf?.' I- red Atv^oO'l-Ly'jn 

R"< Caro' E Aivwo lO-Ly'i 

773-6424 (ChiMCarf. provided) 

Call The Daily [-!ibl<- 47?.4434 



"God so loved the world 

that He gave His only Son . . . 

Now . . . 
What can YOU do? 

Do you think you can meet God in ihe Catholic Church? 
Have you ever thought about becoming a Catholic? 

For a non pressuretd informal look at the Cdtholic Church, try 

"Conversations in the Catholic Faith", sponsored by 

St. John the Baptist Parish community. 

For further information, call St. John's Adult Center, 

Tel. #770-1586 

Church of St. John the Baptist, 44 School St., Quincy 773 1021 




WORTHS ( AlSF - r>oll> SanlaKala.irfl.ofQuinry.lnr/ McCMiwan. crntrr.and Mar(.illis. 
both of Weymouth, sort items at Ihe I hrift Shop of Boston to brnrnt I hr New Kngiand Momr 
for l.itlie Wanderers. Thrv are members of the home's Wry moth chapter who \oluntrer to sort 
and price donated items to the shop for sale to brnrril the home. 

'What Ever Happened To Hell?' 
Sermon At Belhanv Church 



During the summer at 
Bethans Congregational 
Church. Coddington and 
Spear Sts . Qumcy Center, 
there will he one worship 
service at 10 am in the 
sanctuary. 

The Rev J William 
Arnold, senior minister. vmH 
preach the sermon Sundav. 
July 19. on the question. 
"What Ever Happened lo 
Hell"^' l-ay scripture reader 
will be Shi'rlev I) Pvne 

rdward Ouclletic tenor. 



vmII he the guest soloist. VMth 
Peter K Krasinski. Bethany's 
director oi music at the organ 
console Oucllette v^ill sing 
IV* o selet lions "Agnus Dei" 
by (ieorges f ranclk and "() 
Divine Redeemer" b> C harles 
(iountnl 

Ihe Church School is 
closed (or the summer 
However, nursery care lor 
habies and toddlers is 
provided 

Fhe worship service will be 
broadcast "live" direct Ironi 



Bethany's sanctuarv at 10 
am over radio station 
WJDA. I.VK) kc 

A lellowship hour will hi 
held in the Allen Parlor ai I I 
a m following the worship 
service Individuals and 
families (rom the area arc 
invited to share in both the 
worship and lellowship 

f (U more informalion 
about Belhanv's ministries 
and programs, contact ihc 
church office at 479-7.VKI 



Chris Peter Memorial Blood Drive 



The Chris Peter Memorial 
Blood Drive will be held 
I hursdav. .July I6(rom2p m 
to S pm at St. Thomas 
Aquinas ( hurch Hall. KXM) 
Sea St . Quincv 

( hris Peter, who was a 
strong supporter ol the blood 
program, was killed in 
September ol 19K4bvadrunk 
driver As a tribute to ihcir 
son. C harlie and I rudv Peter 
hold a bl«)(Hl drive to raise 



public awareness of the 
problem ol drunk driving and 
at the same time, ensure the 
adequate blood supplv lor 
patient . in need ol bloods life 
saving qualilies 

During the summer, it is 
most difficult to maintain the 
communitv blood supplv. so 
blood donations are essential 
Ihe American Red ( ross. 



Quincv commiinilv. hopes if 
colled over KM) units ol 
blood 

Bv donating blood, vou will 
join C harles and I rudv Peiei 
in this special tribute to lile 



lo make 
appointment 



a 

or 



donation 
lor mote 



with help from the lamih and information call Ihe Peters m 
friends of the Peters and the 47|-i>SK6 



International Exchange 
Appoints l\vo (lonununity 



AVI S\ International, a 
non-prolit student exchange 
program announces the 
selection ol Dcbra .lovce and 
Scott (ioldtnan as comrniinitv 
counselors lor the Brainliee. 
W eymouth, and Qiiincv area 

Dcbra .lovce, a I luveisilv 
ol Massachusetts graduate, 
grew up on the South Shou 
and has lecenlK leliitiu-il to 



Ihe area alter extensive travel 
abroail She is ,i |oh de\eloper 
lor the Boston cornmuiiiiv 
schools 

.Scull (lOldm.in. .in I nglisii 
t e .1 c h e r lor the Boston 
communitv schools, is .in 
acti\e member ol Bosioirs 
iheaUr coniiminitv. .is well. is 
being a \etei.tn tr.iveler 

A g r .1 d 11 .lie o I I h e 
IriiversiU ol \S isconsin. he 




Church of 

Saint John the 

Baptist 

44 School St Ouincy. Mati 

PASTOR 

Rev WIMIam R McCarthy 

ASSOCIATES 

Rev Oanltl M Graham 

Rev Edward G Carroll 

Re» Theodore Forlitr 

Ouincy Hotpllal Chaplain 

In residence 

Rav Mr Charle* SulMvan 

Deacon 

MASS SCHEDULE 

ALL MASSES IN THE UPPER CHURCH 

Saturday 4 00 & / 00 pm 
Sunday 7 00 8 1 S 9 30 and 1 1 00 am i ? ,30 and 5 30 pm 
Daily Masses Monday thru Friday 8 00 am and 5 30 pm 

Confessions in Chapel 



Program 
('onnselors 

has taught in Holvoke am! 
Amherst, and coached 
basket ball at ( oricoi d 
Academv 

1 he AN 1 S \ Piogi.iiii 
oilers American families. hiL'li 
school s 1 11 il e n I s . .i ii J 
i.omniimiIies ihe oppoiliinilv 
to incre.ise Iheii iindersi.iiul 
iri>; ol ihe ciiluiies ol I uiopc. 
Ihe Orienl. ( enlial Ameiu.i 
and Ihe Pialippii.cs h\ host mi.' 
an international sliideni 

( o m nm n ii \ leailc i ^ 
eiliicalors. parents, .mil 
siiuleiils .lie encourageil i*' 
contact .lovce anif (loldni.m 
at S24-4l».'in foi moll 
mlormalion about AVI S A ■- 
exchange programs, oi wiiu 
to AVI'SA lnleiiKilion.il 
Regional Oltice. ^11 Au^'i" 
Si . \\\^k Paik, VIA. orM'' 




Wollaston Church 
of the rNazarene 




j7 E. Elm Ave . Wollaston 
— Services — 

Sunday 1100am SSOOpm 
Wednesday 7 00 p <n 

Your Commurtily Church 



Tbonday, July U, IM7 Qmlnej Sm Pa|« IJ 




WAL 



Sale Dates July 16, 17, 18 
Thursday, Friday, Saturday 











NATASHA 
ANASTASI 



DONNA BKR(i 



LISA( ARROI.L 



MICHELLE 
COLIMBIS 



LORICOLLELA KELLIE DAVIDSON CORINNE FLEMING 



Photos by PhotoQuick of Quincy 



Pageant 7:30 P.M. Friday 

25 To Compete For Miss Quincy Bay Title 



Iwcnt>-fivc contestants 
vmII compete for the title of 
MissQuincv Bay of 1987 and 
some $2.5(K) in pri/es f ridas 
at 7^) p m. at Quinc\ Center 
Pla/a 

Ihe beaut> pageant, 
highlight of the annual 
Quincy Sidewalk Ba/aar, uill 
lor the fifth year be held at 
Quincy Center Pla/a at 
Hanc(Klk and (iranitc Sis 

It will start at 7:30 p m . an 
hour and a half earlier than in 
past years. 

Ihe neu queen, who will be 
crowned by last year's winner. 
Michelle loth of Weymouth, 
will reign o\er Quincv Ba\ 
Race Week .iuly 29 to Aug 2. 

She will also recei\e the 
largest share ol thcpri/es Ihe 
tour runncrs-up will also 
share m the pri/es which will 
include diamond earrings, 
restaurant gift certificates. 
sa\ings bonds and other gifts 

Music lor the pageant will 
be provided b\ Baron Hugo 
and his orchestra 

Bernic Reisbcrg will be the 
emcee. 

I here will be ti\c luilges: 
I)r () Clayton Johnson. 
Quincs Junior College 
presideii!; Sal Ciallinaro. 
QuincN Ba\ Race Week 
A s s 1 1 c I a 1 1 o n president; 
Cynthu! R\der. Quincy 
( e n I e 1 Business and 
I* r o f e s s 1 o 1 1 a 1 Association, 
Iricia A. fanner. Miss 
Quinc\ Ba> I9K5; Ronald E. 
Zooleck, cxecuti\e director. 
South Shore Chamber of 
C ommerce 

labulator is Richard 
Corner. 

Ihe first Miss Quincy Bay. 
Peggv Schaiibe Severson (»t 
\irginia. will recei\e special 
recognition 

Ihe .*i()lh anniversijry ol 
Quincy Ba\ Race Week will 
also be celebrated 

In case of inclement 
weather, the pageant wrll be 
held Saturday at 6 p.m. at 
QurncN Center Pla/a. 

I he pageant is cosponsored 
by the Quincy Center 
Business and Professional 
Association and the Quincy 
Bay Race Week Association. 

(< inil'il (III I'ani- lt>l 





DONNA (il.YNN 



ANNETTE (JODIN 



AMY GROG AN 



ERIN GROGAN 



DEANNE KING PAMELA MLRPHY 






SHERRY PADl I.A LAlREN PEARSON AILEEN PETERSON 



TRACEV PIERCE LISA RICHARDSON 



RACHELLE 
ROMBERG 







CAROLYN 
ROCHELLE 



TONI SOI.IMINI 



RENEE VARDARO 



TERESA VIGLAS 



HOPE WELDON JENNIFER WRIGHT 



r 



Page 14 Qaincy Sim Ttaanday, Jaly U, 1917 




^37 








^37 







CANTON 

Canton Center 
593 Washington St 

828-7780 

Mon.-Sal. 9:30-9:30. Sun. 12-S 



HANOVER 

Rt 53 

826-0073 

Mon.-S«t. 9:30-9:30. 
Sun. 12-5 



DON'T mSS THE ceuasATioN 

"/ / / 

MOsmLOS 

BAKERY and CAFE 

Corner of Chestnut and Cottage Streets 
773-2300 /-^/--v 

CAKE ( ^^ 





AND BALLOONS 

L^::r^ 



Ot\^/f% OFF ALL LUNCHEON 
fcV /O SPECIAL 

With This Coupon 



II witn I nis uoupon ■ 



SPECIALS GOOD DURING SIDEWALK BAZAAR-ONLY 



Eileen s 

Special Sizes 

Dresses 1 2y2-32y2 
Blouses 36-54 Pants 30-56 

We Specialize in the 

Latest Half Size Fashions 

at Budget Prices 

• Shorts 

• Loungers 

• Dusters 

• Swim Suits 

• Cover-ups 

• And Much 
More' 

30%-50% 

and more on 
ALL SUMMER MERCHANDISE 

Quincy s Only Store 
Specializing in Halt-Sizes 

■» 1454 Hancock St. i^^ 
^ Quincy 479-7870 .^ 

^^ (Across from Child World) ^m" 
Open 9:30 to 530 Thur. & Fri. til 9 



• Blouses 

• Slacks 

• Dresses 

• Sun Dresses 

• Skirts 

• Tank Tops 



OFF 



Jason's 

MUSIC 

T-SHIRT & LUGGAGE SHOP 
1514 Hancock St., Quincy 
' The Complete Record Shop ' ' 




I 



s 



1.00 Off AiTI 

|T-SHIRTS and ALBUMS I 
I Rock Concert and [ 
L _ _XL^sf ers__ j 



I^€$H 



UAIH.sr^LlSlS 



I I'idI Service Salon fdi \fi>i di U (mien 



MaMii)! Iroiilili Willi \iiur liuir. il jti><i won't <l<i 
y»\\M >iMi Will 1 1 It to' \J hill \<Mi niTit IS ll.THA 
HOI)\ I III' |ii' III tlidl not )-\<'ii \oiir liuir styiiMl 
••an I<-ll i» il iit-riii Nofi looking! to th«- «•>«•. ami 
fa>\ to lilovv ilr\ 



litra Ho<iy 

PKRMS 

^35 • 



( .olll|ilt-ti' 



rCill HAIK STYLISTS 

1 544 Hancock Street - Rear 

(Facing Hancock Parking Lot) 



I u#*s.->tti. H:liO-.> p.m. 
*r«l ■ thur».-hri. ll::<«)-9 p.ni 



773-7474 



Srniur < jlizrnb DiM'tiunl 
Tu«'s.-Thur». 



lOi m 9p m 
10 a m 9 p m 

Ourmg Day 
10 • m -3 p m 



10 1 m 5 p ' 



MMBn FOSt Hinu IMLUiK-WI ■ • '• ■ i "Tp'm •♦(> m 

Square Dancmg-Round Oancmg 7 p m -9 p m 

iCOwr Buoy Oonanucj lOiiitt Bitgit Miguirei 

' * FridayTjuiy 17 ~ 

Caric«tur« s Unttnvtad 
Hand ana Face Painting 

(Sponsorad Dy Rotary CluP ot Qumcy) 
WJOA-1300 (Liva Ramote Broadcast) 
Ouincy H«altr< Oapartmant 

(Blood Trassura Scraening 

Sponsored tjy Hurtay Insurartca Agancyl 
Or>a Man Band Juggtar 

Ronald McDonald S^ow 
OuirKv Art Association 

(Exhitxt arnJ Dsmonstratton) 
LifTKHisina Caiabf'ty (Bride-GrooTi Photos) 
Automotive Display 

(Quirti Ford-Chavroiat-Hyundai) 
Quincy Police Departmant (Crime PreveotKXi 

Sponsored Oy F W Wodwomi Co ) 

Quincy Cab*«systams (Live Tetacaats) 
Farn'ters Market (Local Growers) 
WUMB (University of Mass at Boston) 
Pepsi Cola Taste Test 
Celebrity Look-ALike 

(Lip Sync Sor>gs PopoUr f Jvorites 

SoonsoreO by Jason $ Music & T Shirt Shop) 
Baron Hugo s Orchestra (in Concart) 
Miaa Quincy Bay Baauty P ag— nt 

Cancatura s Unhmiiad 
Hand and Face Painting 

(Sponsored by Rotary Club of Ouincy) 
WJDA- 1300 (Live Remote Broadcast) 
Ouincy Cablasystems (Live Tatecast) 
Ojincy An Association (Eiti4M aid Dnnonttrtlan) 
Automotive Display lOart font-ChtyriM Hyw«a| 
Limousine Olebrity (Brida-Groom Pfiotos) 
Quirrcy Police Department (Crime Prevention 

Sponsored by F W Wootworth Co ) 
WUMB (University ol Mass at Boston) 
Pepsi Cota Taste- Test 
Tony Lupo-Hurdy-Qurdy Man 
My Monkey and Ma 



NttffSwtrtryiriw 

Near Heavenly Rour^ds 



In front of Bank o( Boston 

At lorfT>ar Tags Furniture 

Near Bank of N««v England 
At Cottage Avenue 



12 Noon » 3 p m At BayBank,Norfo4k Trust Booth 

(At QCBPA Office) 
1 2 Norn/ ? p m /3 p m Ciiveden-Har»cock Streets 
10am 9pm At Former Kincaid Furniture Site 

1 a m -9 p m Near CXBP A Office 
10 a m -5 p m Near Quincy Fair 



Opposite Baskin-Roftbins 



During Day In Front of Bank of Boston 

1 1 30 a m 5 p m Har>cock Parking Area 

Durir>g Day In front of QuinWe^l Travel 

10 a m 5 p m At former Royal Discount Bookstore 

S 30 pm -7 pm Near Bank of New England 



i p m -7 p I 
7 30pm 



10am -5 pm 
10 a m -5 p m 

During Day 
During Day 
10 am -5pm 
10 a m -5 p m 
10a m -5 p m 

10 a m -5 p m 

Durir>g Day 
10am -5 pm 

11 am -2 p m 



Near QCBPA Office 
CXimcy Center Raza 



In front of Bank of Boston 
At former Tags Furniture 

Near Bank of New England 

Opposite Bank of Boston 

At Former Kincaid Furniture Site 

Near Qiiincy Fair 

Near QCBPA Office 

Opposite Baskin-Robbins 

In front of QuinWell Travel 
At former Royal Discount Bookstore 
At BayBank/Noffolk Trust Booth 
(At QCBPA 0«ice) 



INDOOR /OUTDOOR 
-SIDEWALK SALE— 



INDOORS 



ALL 14KT GOLD EARRINGS ^ ^ # 

CHAINS CAU/ 0"0"^ Ticket 

CHARMS <^fcBB /n P'^'c»« exclucUng 

BRACELETS ^^ ^^ / U Specials 

14KT GOLD 1/4 CARAT T.W. DIAMOND STUDS *99" 

14KT GOLD .40CTT.W. DIAMOND STUDS *350 

1 4KT GOLD. 62 CT T.W. DIAMOND STUDS *375 

Other Sizes Available 
S*l*ct«d 14KT GOLD 18" MEDIUM HERRINGBONE CHAINS $79'* 

(including (jiamond cut) 
1 4KT SHRIMP RINGS « 2 9 •' 

1 4KT TEEN CLADDAGH RINGS * 2 4*" 

OUR BUYERS CHOICE CAROLERS ARE IN! 
CHRISTMAS LA YA WA Y 

WATCH FOR OUR FASHION JEWELRY BOOTH DOWNTOWN! 
ALL JEWELRY AT CLEARANCE PRICES 



OUTDOORS 



Phase II 



1361 Hancock St., Ouincy 
472-6618 




4 Pack 

LIGHT BULBS 

40-60-75-100 Watts 

(Reg. «2.99 SALE ^200) 



mo«»l\vortl\ 



1543 Hancock Street. 
Quincy 



fr 



Quir>cy Center 

148^ MancocH St , Qumcy MA 
Store Hours Q 30 S 30 Dailv 
Thurs . fri til 9 
Phone: 771-1888 



ntorui Kivcr rMU 

'unction 1 39 & 3 PemOroKc v^A 

exit 12 Qf^ Rt 3 

Store Hours 9 30 9 ^^on f-n 

Sat 9 30 6, 12 5 Sun 
Ptionc: 896-3101 



SUPER SALE 



Scholl 
Cobbles 
Penal jo 




SA VE 1/4- 1/2 



and more 




RED CROSS 
HUSH 



ENNA JETTICK 
FOOT THRILLS 

Bv Clinic 



MILLER SHOES 

1546 Hancock St., Quincy 



Quincy's Sidewalk Sale 

Has Arrived 

I isit L '.V During This 3 Day 

C 'elchration And Save' 

Ol R h:.\iiRi: i.\i t:MOR > 
REDICED 

Z^ ~JU/0 (or more) 

Many speeially priced items 
hroui^ht in just for this sale. 

DOS T MISS THIS SALE 
July 16th, 1 7th & IHth 

M on. -Wed. ^:M)-6:00 

Ihurs.-hri. 9:30-^.00 

Sal. 9:30-6:00 

1502 Hancock Si. 

Qui new Ma. 02 109 

(f)I7) 770-0066 




t'*^ 



urtimin 



.»- /ri 




limiKSlll 







•*iiies 



•'2^j 



Don't 

Miss Out! ,,,^^^^^^,,x^ 

SAVE 

ON DRESSES. SKIRTS. 

BLOUSES, SLACKS, 

JEANS AND 

SLEEPWEAR 



\. 



Ml hofHM Mjstt (I 4fi1 

;isA UiMOvri (.jid 

^'Ht (n .111 ( \pr( ss »M ijs* 

*i>in t iifn'tniHiN I haiqt 




Michelle Toth 
Miss Quincy Bay 1986 



YOU'RE INVITED!! 
Miss Quincy Bay Beauty Pageant 

Spt^nsored by 

Quincy Center Business and 

Professional Association 

and Quincy Bay 
Race Weclk Association 

FRIDAY, J LJLV 17, 1987 7:30 p.m. 

Quincy 

Center Plaza 







I 



Page It Quinry Sun Thunday, July U. I«t7 




MISS QIINCY BAYS from paM years confer on plans for this year's pageant Friday al 7:30 
p.m. at Quincy Crnler Pla7a. From left, are Michelle Tolh. last year's winner; Petty Schaub 
Se>erson of \ ir|>inia. Miss Quincy Bay of 1967; and Beth Ann Stran{e, pageant winner in 1981 
and chairman of the pageant committee. 

lQiiiii(\ Sun ithntii h\ ( hnrirt h'lrtfifti 

25 To Compete For 
Miss Quincy Bay Title 



(< onl il fnim I'ttftv I il 

Conlesiants. South Shore 
single girls age 16 and over, 
will be judged in evening 
gown and swimsuil competi- 
tion 

Ihey will be escorted by 
commodores of the Quincy 
Ba> Race Week associated 
yacht clubs. 

Pageant chairwoman is 
Ik-th Ann Strcngc of Hurley 
Insurance Agency She was 
Miss Quincy Bay of 1981 

Other committee members 
arc Henry Bosworth. Fhe 
Quincy Sun; Fileen ( ohen. 
Sweets and Ihings; Donna 
M c D o n o u g h . Roger's 
Jewelry; Richard Koch. Sr., 
executive secretary Quincy 
F'ark-Recrcalion Board; 
Bcrnie Reisberg. Bernie's 
Modern Formal; I on\ 
Siciliano, Quincv Deputy 



Civil Defense director; 
George White. Ihe Patriot 
ledger, and Lt. Francis 
Mullen. 

Contestants, in alphabetical 
order, are Natasha I 
Anastasi. 16. Quincy; Donna 
M Berg. 19. Quincv; l.isa M 

Carroll. 23. Hingham; 
Michelle I.. Columbus. 16. 
Quincy; Fori I Collela. 19. 
Mansfield; Keltic Anne 
Davidson. 17. East Weymouth; 
Connne M Fleming. P. Fast 
Weymouth; Donna J (ilynn, 
18. Wollaston; Annette 
Godin. 2}. Rockland; Amy J 
Grogan. 16. Braintree; Frin I.. 
Grogan. 18. Wollaston; 
Deannt D King. IK, \orth 
Weymouth; Pamela A 
Murphy. 21. WOllaston; 
Sherry F Padula, 19. North 
Weymouth; I a u r e n A . 



F'earson. 17. South Wey- 
mouth; Aileen A F'eterson. 
21, Quincy; Tracey A. Pierce. 
16. North Quincv; Fisa M 
Richardson. 20. South 
Weymouth. Carolyn Rochelle. 
20. North Quincv. RachelleC 
Romberg. 22. Wollaston; 
Foni M. Solimini, IK, South 
Weymouth; Rence R 
Vardaro. 21, Brockton. 
Feresa M Viglas, 17. fast 
Weymouth; Hope A Wcklon, 
16. [.asl Wey month, and 
Jennifer A Wright. 19. 
Brainlree 




^mwmiW^m\wimwmi\mmm^ 



I HOW CREATIVE ARE Y OU? 



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1 

2. 



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Do you have a favorite song'? 
Do you have a photo aibuni full 
of great pictures'? Lj 

Do you have a VCR'? n 

Can your favorite songs and pictures 
be made into a meaningful music video'? ', r 

If you ansv/ered yes to all of these questions, 
you are very creative" 

A/o//. bring your favorite photos arid your favorite 
music to Quincy '5 finest transfer center 



no I^ 



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PHOTOQUICK OF QUINCY I 



1433 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

Together we can make beautiful 
music videos" 



^ Slides, movies, and artwork can also be transferred ^ 
§ to video tape. Come in for a free demonstration. ^ 



$2,500 In 
Pageant Prizes 



Some $2,.S0() in pri/es Mill 
be a\^arlied al the Miss 
Quincy Bay Beaulv Pageant 
Kriday night. 

Ihe largest share viill go lo 
the winner Fhe lour runners- 
up uill also share in the pri/es. 
Fhe pri/es and donors: 
Quincv -lunior College. 
$I.()(K) scholarship to the 
winner. 

Sen »»aul F) Flarold. $50 
savings bond. 

Bank of New Fngland, $.50 
savings bond. 

Quincy Cooperative Bank. 
$50 savings bond 

Quincy Savings Bank. $50 
savings bond 

Bav Bank Norlolk Frust. 
$50 savings bond 

FaBilancia B«)utique. $.M) 
gilt certificate 

Bernie's Modern Formal, 
five tuxedo rentals, valued at 
$50 each 

(iranite ( il> F lectric. $50 
gift certificate. 

R\der's of Quincv. $50 gilt 
certificate 

Burgin-I'latner Inc. $.50 
gill certificate. I dmund 
Fit/gerald Restaurant 

Rik\ & Riellv Insurance, 
$40 gill cerlilicale. F inian's 
Restaurant & l*ub 

I oodles Fine ,lewelr\, 
pearl bracelet to the winner, 
$25. $20. $15. and $10 gift 
certificates to the runncrs-up, 
M) percent discount card to 
each contestant 

Stone's .Fewelers. Iresh 
water pearl and onv x 16-inch 
necklace 

Rogers Jewelr\. I pair 
diamond stud earrings 

F'osh Hair Stvlists. cut and 
blow drv. $17. ' 

Friendly Familv (enter, 
hair dryer. 

Marvel FJeauty Shop, $20 
gilt certificate 

South Shore Barber Shop. 
$16 gilt certificate 

Fkautv (iardens, blow cut 
Casual Concepts, wicker 
mirror. 

Hairplace One. $lh gili 
cerliticate. 

John Dellaria FJair Stylists. 
$25 gilt cerlilicale 

Ihom McAn-Qiimc>. $15 
gilt certificate 



Colman's Sporting (ioods. 
one bathing suit. 

Norman's Army & Navy. 
$10 gift cerlilicale. 

C u m m I n g s . $ 2 5 gilt 
certificate. 

Miller Shoes, $10 gift 
certificate 

A.!", (ioodhue, one satin 
jacket. 

Frantic Kramers. $25 gift 
certificate 

Anne's Book Stop. $20 gift 
certificate 

F'hoto Quick Quincy. large 
framed photo of each 
contestant 

Kileen's Special Si/es, 
beach towel. 

F W Wo»>lworth. $25 gilt 
certificate 

Interior F)eMgn (enter. $25 
gift cerlilicale toward area 
rugs. 

F ucille's F ittle FFouse. $25 
gilt cerlilicale 

Miller Suiduv one K bv 10 
color photo 

.)ohnsi)n Motor F'aris. one 
case motor oil. $.V^ value 

QuinWell F ravel. $25 gift 
cerlilicale toward a trip 

F red \illaii Studio ol Sell 
Defense, live, one month Irce 
lessons 

Kennedv Studios Inc , 
Iramed print, Robert 
Kennedv, $.^5 value 

South Shore F V. rechar- 
geable safelv lantern 

Standard F V. AM FM 
stereo headphones 

Sleep- A- Rama. 20 percent 
off all unadvertised items. 

F loral F)esign hv F abiano. 
$25 gilt certificate 

F'ostal Instant F'ress. 50 
pieces printed sialionerv. 50 
blank envelopes 

Jason's Music and I -Shirt 
Shop. $25 gift certificate 

Faj ( oin & Siamp Co . one 
bicentennial stamps and I7K9 
medal, one Ft (of William 
Washington medal 

IFeavenlv Rounds. $10 gilt 
certificate 

F ramers Workshop. 
Iramed print 

Arterv ( leaners. $20 gilt 
cerlificale 

Quincv ( a b Ic s V s I e m s 
(\)rp . hall inch \ FFS lapc ot 
pageant 



Richard R (base Inc.. 
mystery giM 

South Shore Biink. two box 
scat tickets to Red Sox game 
(iranite F ock. $20 gifi 
certificate 

Ihe Quincy Sun, tv^o South 
Shore Music Circus luckcts to 
show of winner's choice. 

The Patriot F.cdgcr, chaise 
Foungc and beach chair. 

O'F.indv's Quincy Ave. 
liines, $10 gift certificate 
toward bowling 

Hancock lobacco. $10 
towards scratch tickets. 

M.J. Curlev. mug and vase 
with llowers 

Dependable Cleaners. $20 
gill certificate 

Regina Russell's F ea 
Rot)m. five free readings 

Pilgrim Restaurant, dinner 
for two (maximum $15). 

F)unkin' F)onuts, five do/en 
mulfins. live boxes "munthies" 
lor reception 

Colonial Restaurant, lunch 
or dinner l«)r two 

Kmber's Restaurant, lunch 
lor two. $10 value 

Harulsh.ikes Cafe, lunch 
for two 

lia s k I n - R o b b I ns Ice 
(ream. live. 10 inch round ice 
cream cakes 

Monlilios Pjslrv Shop, 
three. $15 gitl certificates 

(athav F'acilic Restaurant. 
%M) gilt certificate 

F Milan's Rtsiaurani A F'lib. 
dinner lor two. $.M) value 

Ccniurv 21. $25 gift 
certificate. \in & Fddies 
Restaurant 

Nap»>li F*i//eria. two large 
cheese pi/zas 

Flarts lewelers. Fnc . $25 
gill certificate 

Stephen Frigh Jewelers, 
$25 gilt certificate 

Fndian Store. $20 gill 
certificate 

Hurlev Insurance Agcncv, 
$50 savings bond 

WJDA Radio Station. 
facial at Duende, Hingham 

Kev Realtv. $25 gift 
certificate, Bentley's 

South Shore Buick, dinner 
for two at Walsh's Restaurant 
Altv Richard Barrv. two 
tickets. Red Sox game 

Qmncv's Records & Fapcs, 
$10 gill certificate. 



Yankee Jack And Marie 

To Perform Al 

Sidewalk Bazaar 



Ihe award-winning Naiikee 
.1 .1 c k it 11 d M ,1 r 1 c and 
( ompariv will appeal lonighl 
(Fhufsdavi trom " lo 9 p ni 
neai Ihe Fiank ol New 
I nj;land duimg ilie 1 7|h 
annual "Sidewalk Ba/aar" in 
(,^uir)cv ( enter 

Yankee lack .iiul his group, 
teaturmg down casi countrv 
and western music, swept 
every ma|or award at the 19X6 
Massat h !isel Is (Ountry 
Music Awards, winning nine 
top hon«)rs. 

Awaid categories included: 
F nierlainer ol Ihe Year. 
.Mbum <»l the Yeai (Hot 'n 
Ffeavy), Four I'lece FJand o| 
the Year. Male Vocalist of the 
Year ami the People's ( hoice 
award 

Fhev als() perloimed their 
original son^! "Ihree Minute 
Romance." which last year 
was named Massachusetts 
Song ol the Year. 

Yankee lack's wile Marie 
was nominated by the 
Massachusetts COuntry 
Awards Association for 
Female Vocalist of the Year 
and in 19K4 she won the Most 
Promising Female awaid. 







^"'•flijfe 



Ififi- 



-acrlill 




VANKFK JA( K and MARIK 

Miss Qiiinry Bay Pafjeanl 
Live on Ch. 3 Friday 



Ihe Miss Quincy Bay 
F'ageani will be telecast live 
over Quincy Cablcsyslems 
Ch. y hriday night starting at 
7:15 p.m 

J TweitjyrFive contestants 
for the title of 



Miss Quincy Bav of I9K7 at 
Quincy C enter Pla/a. 

Contestants will F>e judged 
in evening gown and swimsuit 
competitions and for beauty 
and poise. 



Thursday, July U, 1*17 QuIiKy Sm Pag« 17 



Red Baron Shot Down 








THK A YKK Brolhrrs enir). Red Baron, crewed b> Brucf A>ers and Pal Hefffrnan. competes '" '"e dinRh) races at Marina Hay but tips over (right) in a disappointins ending. 

tQuinry Siifi phttinf h\ (harlrn h'laf[fit 



Morrlsette Drive In High Gear 



■2C= 




I he Morrisclic legion 
baschall team won tvvo ol 
three games during the past 
week to improve its record to 
11-4 as it continues its drue 
jtoward a playoff berth in 
[Zone 6 

The four lop teams will 
Imect in a double elimination 
)layoff scries to determine the 
rone's representative in the 
Hate playoffs I here is a real 
|og jam with Morrisetie, 
lilton. Mass I ruck of 
Weymouth and Braintree in 
the running fi>r ihe four spots. 
Morrisetie has played all its 
fames, but the other tree 
teams have several games to 

aiake up. 

Morrisette will meet 
Quincy Friday night at K 3()at 
Adams f leld and will be home 
t<i Holbrook. Monday night at 
8 M) at Adams 

Morrisette rolled over 
Randolph. I.V4. Monday 
night at Randolph as Dan 
Ovcrby got his first start since 
recovering trtmi tendonitis. 
He went five innings, allowed 
ive hits, struck out lour and 
'alked two. giving up no 
rncd runs larry laglieri 
lie\cd and struck out the 
ree men he faced 
Morrisette scored six runs 
the second inning, breaking 
I- 1 tie It added live in the 
urth and one in the fifth 
Dan Biagini and Rob 
c Dona Id supplied the 
reworks lor Morrisette as 
iagini went 4-tor-4, a triple, 
(Hible and two singles and 
ne RBI 
McDonald was 2-lor-.^ with 
ja walk. He had a ihiec-run 
homer and drosc in tour runs. 
Steve Minichicilo. Id Ma\in 
and Chris Ricciuti had 
singles 

In lis previous game 
Morrisclte lost lor the second 
time to Mass huck. 10-?. 
again hurting themselves with 
nooi delcnsc. Mike Marini 
went the route lot Weymouth, 
defeating Morrisette for the 



second time 

Wayne Chambers started 
for Morrisette and was the 
loser, dropping his record to 
3-2. 

Mass. Truck scored six 
unearned runs in the fifth 
inning to put the game away. 

Irailing, 9-0. Morrisette 
scored twice in the si.xth and 
three times in the seventh and 
left the bases loaded. 

McDonald had two hits 
and two RBI. Biagini had an 
RBI single as did Bob 
Cinquegrano and Minichiello. 
Ricciuti and Bill McDougal 
had singles. Tim Brillo 
pitched well in relief of 
Chambers. 

E-arlier Morrisette had 
exploded for 12 runs in the 
first inning and rolled over 

• Babe Ruth 



Braintree. 13-2. as Taglieri 
pitched his fourth win in five 
starts against Braintree in 
three years. In these five 
games he has a 1.50 ERA. 

Morrisette sent 15 men to 
bat in the opening inning and 
had eight hits, including two 
doubles, a triple and back to 
back homers It was aided by 
two Braintree errors and two 
walks. 

Leadoff batter Flavin beat 
out an infield hit, stole second 
and continued to third on a 
bad throw by the catcher. He 
scored as Minichiello reached 
on an error. Biagini doubled 
to left scoring Minichiello, 
McDonald reached on a 
fielders choice as Biagini 
scored. Ron Fletcher walked, 
Ricciuti reached on an error. 



McDougal singled, Mike 
Mullaney doubled. Taglieri 
walked. Minichiello singled 
and Biagini cleared the bases 
with a triple. McDonald 
followed with a two-run 
homer off lefty Chris Lane, 
who just came in in relief. 
Fletcher followed with a solo 
homer. L-ane settled down and 
allowed only two hits and a 
run over the next six innings. 

Meanwhile Taglieri was 
cruising along, scattering six 
hits, striking out fi' e and 
walking three in improving 
his record to 6-1. 

Biagini had another big 
night with a triple, doubleand 
single and four RBI. while 
McDougal had two hits and 
McDonald had his home run 
and four RBI. 



Sun Sports 

Norfolk County 
Junior Classic At 

Presidents Course 



Mulkern Fans 16 As 
Bryan^ Barry's Tie 



Sean Mulkern struck out Id 
as Bryan Post and Barry's 
Deli played to a thrilling 7-7 
tie in the Babe Ruth League 
The game was halted by 
curfew after eight innings. 

Denny McLean. Joe 
Bevilacqua and Mike 
Doherty played well for 
Barry's. 

Bryan scored first on hits by 
Aaron Silverman and 
Mulkern, but Barry's came 
back to take a 4- 1 lead on key 
hits by McLean if n d 
Bevilacqua Bryan closed to 4- 
2 on hits by I )onnic Anderson 
and Pat McDonough but 
Barry's widened its lead to 5-2 
on Mel can's long triple. 

Bryan drew to within 5-4 on 
hits by Andcison, Chris 
Slenmon and Brian O'Malley 
but Barry's added a run on 
hits by Ken Staskywic/ and 
.lim (llvnn. 



Bryan made it 6-5 on Barry's made it 7-5 in the 
Anderson's double but /<„,„>/<././'">:«•'«' 



Presidents Golf Course, 
357 W. Squantum St.. North 
Quincy. will hold the annual 
Norfolk County Junior 
Classic on Friday, Aug. 7. 

The event will consist of 18 
hole stroke play and three 
divisions, ages 12-14 (Div. 3). 
ages 15-17 (Div. 2) and ages 
18-20 (Div. I) 

Trophies will be aw arded to 
the winners of each divisior. 
and merchandise to the top 
finishers in each division. 

A $15 entry fee includes 
tournament fee and prizes. 

Entry deadline is Wednes- 
day. Aug. 5 at 5 p.m. Entries 
will not be accepted over the 



telephone. 



NOW OPEN SAT. 
UNTIL ^ NOON 




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By Ro»ies 

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275 Hancock Si 
Bv N Ouincy T 

m Present Coupon Before Ordering 

Limit o"e coupon per customer per usit 
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v\hen you bu\ 
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GOOD THRU JULY, 1937 



NOI V XI It) M sfUHl K» 



mH/^COOnSld'S " "" ' ^"^ '-"■-"'^DOn per customer per usit 

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SOFTBALL 
BASEBALL 

TENNIS 



Quincy Canton Hanover 



Pair It Quincy Sm Tkundav. Jul> U. IM7 

• Junior League 



Quincy Cable 
Takes 2 Out Of 3 



Quincy Cahle improved its 
record to I.V7 in the Quincy 
Junior Baseball I eague by 
taking two of three games last 
week. 

Cable squeaked by 
Kiuanis, 5-4, in an cxtra- 
inning contest and edged 
Foley Chrysler. 11-7 Burgin 
Plainer eased by Cable. 6-1. 

In the Kiuanis game. Aidan 
O'Donaghuc held Kmanis to 
one run until the sixth inning 
and needed relief help from 
Jay Schnabel to preserve (he 
victory. O'Donaghuc struck 
out 10 and Schnabel added 
three strikeouts in an mning 
and one-half m relief 

O'Donaghue and Schnabel 
uere both 4-for-4 as Cable 
pounded out 14 hits Terry 
Sheehanand Mike kavanaueh 
each had two hits uhile Jamie 

Schat/el and Brian Wood 
added singles 

Schnabel picked up the win 
in the Foley game, stnking 
out seven Schnabel also 
helped the Cable cause going 
.^-for-4. including a single, 
double and two-run homer 
lor fi\e RBI Sheehan was .^- 



(or-.V Schal/cl had two hits 
and other hitters included 
A J. Carthas. Ka\anaugh. 
Wood, Chris Sullivan. Neil 
Mahtmey and Clint Fullerton 

For Foley, Scrgi Wassilieu 
had three hits, including a 
grand slam homer, a double 
and single for fi\e RBI \ ok\ 
was held to six hits. 

Against Burgin Platner. 
Cable batters outhit their 
rivals. 7 to 5. but excellent 
defensive plays by Burgin 
plavers and a six-run. first 
inning proved to be the 

ditlerence 

After the tirst inning. Cable 
pitcher WiHHJ. in relief ot 
Schat/el. held the Burgin 
team hitleNN in the next fvHir 
inningN. striking out mx 

Cable scored its only run 
vkhen Sheehan dv->ub!ed to 
drive in OIXTJghue who 
reached second ba>e on a 
fielder's choice and a stolen 
baNe Other Cable hitters were 
Carthas (2-tor-?i. 0'[)onaghue 
(2-tor-3i. N^ood, a double, 
and I^an l>onahue 

For Cable, stunning 



defensive plays were turned in 
bv Carthas. who plaved 
shortstop and second base. 
M a h o n e y . \N d o d . and 
(Vl)«)naghue 

Burgin Plainer hitlers 
included Duane Holmes, who 
doubled ofl the ccnterfield 
lence at McCoy Field, and 
Brian Connolly and Pat 
Connolly 

Michael Dempsey 

Completes Basic 

Training 

■Xrmv National Guard 
Private Michael J Oempsey. 
son ot James U and Patricia 

M IVmpvfv ot '1 N Bayfield 
Rj , N.' Quincy. has 
compietev.' r^sic training at 
Fori Leonard Wood. Mo 

During the trainine. 
students received instruction 
in drill and ceremonies, 
weapons, map reading, 
tactics, military courtesv. 
militarv justice, first aid. and 
Army historv and traditions. 

He IS a 1485 graduate of 
Don Bosco lechnical High 
School 




t) 



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Granite City Clinches 
National League Title 



(iranile City Fleclric 
clinched the Babe Ruth 
league National league 
championship with wins over 
Sons of Italy and Bank of 
New Fngland. improving its 
record to 16-4 with games 
remaining with Quincv Police 
and Local 11.19 

Pitcher Frik IX-Bocr (4-0). 
coming hack from arm 
problems, struck out nine 
Morrisette batters, giving up 
only three singles as (iranite 
City won. }-\ Morrisctlc's 
Mat Smith deserved a better 
fate as he allowed t>nl\ si.x hits 
and struck out 1 1 

In the second inning 
IVBi^r singled, took second 
on a passed ball and scored on 
•\ngelo Kvr.«nis" single 
kv ranis moved up on a wild 



pitch. Steve Wysocki and 
Andy Colleary walked to load 
the bases and Wayne Sit's line 
single drove in Kyranis and 
Wysocki. 

I)cB(Kr had two singles and 
Wysocki and Mike Picariello 
one each. Shortstop lony 
Anderlionis and center fielder 
Jim Munroe anchored the 
(iranile City defense. 

(iranite City's 15-year old 
players. DeBoer, Kyranis. 
Anderlionis. Wysocki and 
Jim Munroe had fine seasons 
Against Bank ol New 
Fngland the 15-ycar olds had 
all 10 hits as (iranite Citv 
rolled. 10-4. 

Munroe led the attack with 
three hits, a double and two 
singles, aiid scored lour runs. 
Anderlionis had a great game 



at shortstop, had two singles 
and scored twice. DeBoer 
doubled and tripled and 
Kyranis. one ol the most 
improved players in the 
league, had a single and a 
ground rule double. Wysocki 
had the other hit. a single. 

Dave (iamsby pitched five- 
hit ball for (iranite City to 
improve his record lo 1-6 

Kevin Daly. lorn Bal/ano. 
(ieorge Ro/anitis and Rich 
McDonald had doubles and 
Kevin Johnson a single lor 
Bank ol N I Chris Abbate. 
Kevin McDougall. lorn 
Norton, (ieorge I ahey and 
Fric Spraguc plaved line ball 

Also playing well lor 
(iranite ( itv were Andv 
Vene/iano. Fd ( ostello. Dave 
Jollev. Viii Anderlionis and 
( orev Haddad. 



Mulkern Fans 16 As 
Bryan, Barry's Tie 



(( 11(1/ '</ frmii I'nitr IT) 

seventh on (ilynn's single 
Once again Brvan rallied to tie 
at 7-7 on hits by Mike 
Malvesli. O'Malley and 
Mulkern 

Bryan Post had the winning 
run in scoring position in the 
bottom of the eighth but relief 
pitcher Doherty shut the 
door 

Anderson had three hits for 
Brvan and Mark Kelleher. 
Kevin Mullay. Paul Murphy, 
Steven Waas. Steven I oud 
and Joe Marnikovic also 
contributed tt) the victorv 



(ilynn led Barrv\ as he 
reached base lour time\ and 
scored three runs 

Hrvan Post deleated ihe 
I iremen. I 1-6. as McDonough 
notched his sixth win ot the 
season 

Bryan broke the game i»pen 
with M\ runs m the seconil 
innmg 

Mulkern. O'Mallev .iiul 
Miillav had thiee hits lor 
Hrvan, with Mulkern having 
two doubles and OMallev 
one 

McI)ont>ugh singled twice 
and Malvesli had a long 



double Stenmt)n had a single 
driving in two runs 
Silverman, I (uul. Kelleher. 
Murphv. Nrulerson Marni- 
kovic and Waas all plaved 
well 

Hrvan denied a last dilch 
I ireman rallv in the seventh 
as ()■ Mallev . \K aas and 
Mullav ci»mbined (or an 
excellent 5-4- .1 double plav 

Brian Favitu and Steve 
Nieters paced the I iremen 
wiih lour and three hits 
respecluelv Shortstop Hill 
Monleilh plaved strong 
delense 



Hershey Track Meet 



Local Winners 

Advance In State 

Championship Saturday 



The Quincv Recreation 
Department recently spon- 
sored an area competition as 
the first step in the Hershey 
National I rack and Field 
Youth Program. 

Fhe winners of the local 
meet have their limes and 
distances compared to 
winners from 41 other l(Kal 
meets in Massachusetts Ihe 
top eight qualifiers will 
compete at the state 
championship .Saturdav. Julv 
18. 

7hc winners ol the 
Massachusetts championship 
are compared to winners from 
meets held in the six other 
North East states and the top 
qualifiers receive an all- 
expense paid trip to the 
National Championship at 
Hershey, Pennsylvania, in 
August. 

Focal meet winners from 
the Quincy competition have 
advanced lo the nationals for 
the las! five years. 

The event is held in three 
age categories for boys and 
girls. The 1987 local Hershey 
National winners in Quincy 
are: 

Girls 9-10: 5()-yard dash- 
Megan Shea; 100 yard dash- 
Catherine Mulcahy; 220 yard 
dash-Kelsha Brown; 440 yard 
dash-Jessie Ceurvels; 440 
relay-Catherine Mulcahy; 
Megan Shea; Jessie Ceurvels; 
Susan Sweeney; sofiball 
throw-Susan Sweeney; 
standing long jump-KeUha 



Brown 
Boys 9-10 50 yard dash- 

Robert Verney; 100 yard 
dash-Brendan (VBrien. 220 
yard dash-( hristopher Klier. 
440 yard dash- Brendan 
O'Brien; 440 relav-Christopher 
Klier; Robert Verney. 
Solomen Demeke. lerrence 
Roche; softball throw-Robert 
Verney; standing long jump- 
lerrence Roche. 

(iirls 11-12: l(K) yard dash- 
Regina Murphy; 220 yard 
dash-Haley Houlc; 440 yard 
dash-Jenmfer Pratt; KKO yard 
run-Kerry Mc(iahan; 440 
relay- Kerry Mc(iahan; 
Jennifer Pratt; Regina 
Murphy. Haley H o u I e ; 
Softball throw-Haley Houle; 
standing long jump-Rcgina 
Murphy. 

Boys 11-12; 100 yard dash- 
Scott Graham; 220 yard dash- 
Jerry Marshall; 440 yard 
dash-Anthony Mc(;ahan; 880 
yard run-Michael (iesse; 440 
Relay-Jerry Marshall; 
Anthony Mc(iahan; Kenneth 
Duncan; Christopher ( oy; 
Softball throw-Scott (iraham; 
standing long jump-Andy 
Morino. 

Girls I.VI4: I (K) yard dash- 
Rachel Murphy; 220 yard 
dash-Amanda Young; 880 
yard run-l.indsey Mc(Jovern; 
mile-Julie Heredia; 440 relay- 
Kalhryn O'Shea; Lindscy 
Mc(iovern; Rachel Marshall; 
Amanda Young; softball 



t hrow - An n O'Sul li v a n; 
standing long jump-Amanda 
Young 

Boys I.VI4; KM) vard dash- 
Akmtayo Adewole. 220 yard 
dash-Akintayo ,Adewt>le; 880 
yard run-(iuerslev Milord; 
mile-duersley Milord. 440 
relay -Michael Sweeney; 
Christopher Di(iiacomo; 
Michael McAdams; Brian 
Klier; softball Ihrow-Michael 
Sweeney; standing long |ump- 
Christopher l)i(iiacomo 

Recreation Director Barry 
J. Welch noted that the 
Hershey National Program is 
endorsed by the National 
Recreation and Park 
Association, and the 
President's Council on 
Physical Fitness and Sports. 

"This meet continues to 
provide youngsters with 
enjoyment, physical competi- 
tion, and the opportunity to 
participate in a positive 
leisure time activity with boys 
and girls from all fifty stales." 
he said. 

Welch also praised coaches 
(ieoff Hennessey of University 
of Massachusetts at Boston 
and the Quincy Irack dub 
and Kevin Kelly of North 
(^incy High School who 
served as local mecl officials. 
They were assisted by 
members of the Quincy 
Recreation Department 
summer staff. 



Tbunday, July H, IN7 Qaincy Sim Page 19 



Quincy Legion 
Fighting To 
Make Playoffs 



I h c y u I n c \ legion 
baseball team is lightinj; lor 
the playolls and won three ol 
lour games during the past 
jweek to improve to 6-6 

Quincy still has an outside 

I chance ol being one ol the 

tour top teams in Zone 6 and 

mualilsing lor the double 

[eliminalion playoll series 

Coaches hd Spring and 

!l)ick I aracy are pleased with 

the way the team has been 

piasing. particularis the 

Ipitthing ol Rob Higgins, Jim 

Dennis and Steve l^appasand 

[the hitting ol Kyle Robertson. 

JMike loland, Happas. 

|lX-nnis and Higgins 

Quincy lost a 4-3 
Jheartbrcaker to Mass. Iruck 
lol Weymouth Monday night 
las Weymouth scored lour 
junearncd runs in the fifth 
|inning Miggms took the loss 
Jespilc giving up only four 
iits. striking out five and 
talking four. One ol the hits 
kas a home run out of Adams 
iField by Mike Marini 

Quincy Icit seven runners 

ttranded. including the bases 

loaded once. Quincy had 

Icven hits, two singles by 

lobcrtson and Happas, a 

louble by Peter Tufts and 

jingles by Bill Mulkcrn and 

:nnis. Quincy had a chance 

j'tic or win in the seventh as it 
idu tnree oase runners, but a 
double plav and an infield fly 
ended the threat. 

Quincy defeated Wollaston, 
4-1. behind the si.x-hit 
pitching of Higgins. v^ho 
Itruck out seven and walked 

1*0. 

Wollaston's run came on a 
long home run by lom Logan 
in the fourth inning. 

Quincy scored twice in the 
fourth on walks to Mulkern 
ind lults. both scoring on 



singles by Sean (jately and 
Higgins Quincv added two in 
the lilth on two walks, two 
errors and a single by Fufls 
Higgins had two hits 

I.J Steen started on the 
mound lt)r Wollaston and was 
relieved bv Jav I espasio in the 
lilth. Wollaston mounted a 
threat in the last inning when, 
with one out, Steve Austin. 
C hris fliggms and I. espasio 
all singled to fill the bases but 
Higgins struck out lorn 
McDonald and Joel Rogers 
to end the game Chris Noble 
had the onlv other Wollaston 
hit, 

Quincy rolled over Carter 
Post of Dorchester. 1 0-1. as 
[)ennis pitched five-hit ball, 
struck out 13 and didn't issue 
a walk 

Quincy was led by 
Robertson, who had a three- 
run homer and reached base 
four times on a walk, error 
and single, loland, who 
caught his first game, had a 
double and single and scored 
twice. Dennis had two singles 
and scored twice. Paul 
Mcl.ellan had an RBI single 
and scored a run. Higgins had 
a single and scored twice and 
Nick Dragone had a single 
All Quincy players played in 
the game and performed well 
defensively. 

Quincy also walloped 
Canton, 1 1- 1, with Happas 
pitching a four-hitter, striking 
out five and walking three. It 
was his first start of the season 
after pitching in relief. 

Quincy scored three runs in 
the fourth and fifth innings 
and five runs in the sixth. 

Toland had three singles, a 
walk and scored twice, 
Happas had three singles. 
Mulkern had a triple and 
single, Higgins a double and 



r^ \ 




ROBKRT CASEY wins the race for seven-year-olds 
during the Quincy Housing Authority's second annual 
Youth Sport-A-Rama held in Germantown. 



NICHOLE PfTTS wins the race for five-year-olds in the 
Housing Authority Youth Sport-A-Rama. 

i(^uinr\ Sun photot h\ C'.harle» Flagfd 



Lipton Regatta Saturday, Sunday 



The Squantum Yacht Club 
will host the first Lipton Cup 
Regatta Saturday and 
Sunday. 

The regatta is sanctioned by 
the Massachusetts Bay Yacht 
Clubs Association. 

The MBYCA. in conjunc- 
tion with the Squantum club, 
recently unveiled the beautiful 
32-inch ornate silver cup. 
which was awarded by former 
Boston Mayor John "Honey- 
Fit/" Fit/gerald, grandfather 
of President John F. 
Kennedy, to Herbert 
Allbright in 1930 and will 
svmboli/e the event. 



Past Commodore Don 
McGilvray of the Squantum 
Yacht Club. Fred Hersey and 
Ed Gallagher Sr. met many 
times over the past few years 
with Allbright and finally 
prevailed upon him to put the 
cup back into active 
competition. Although he was 
entitled to possess the trophy 
for life under the terms of the 
Deed of Gift. Allbright opted 
to offer it back to the Mass. 
Bay Yacht Clubs Association, 
whose officers accepted it last 
December. 

The MBYCA has designated 
the Squantum club as the 



cup's custodian under terms 
which require that the club 
run a Sir Thomas J. Lipton 
Trophy Regatta this summer. 

It will be an annual event, 
hopefully one of the major 
regattas in the Northeast in 
future years. 

Friday is the deadline for 
race reservations. A perpetual 



trophy will be awarded along 
with keepers. 

The regatta will be 
preceded by a slcippers' 
meeting Friday night from 7 

to 9 p.m. at the Squantum 
club. There will be a reception 
and briefing with complimen- 
tary wine and cheese. 



single and Jim Kerns. Gately 
and Dennis a single each. 
Kerns took a hard ground ball 
in the face in the sixth and had 
to leave the game. 

All the outfielders played 
well as a heavy fog hung over 
the field. 

Quincy has a tough 
schedule over the next week 



It played at Braintree 
Tuesday, meets Braintree 
again tonight (Thursday) at 8 
at Adams Field, faces 
Morrisette Friday night at 8 at 
Adams, hosts Weymouth 
Sunday at 5 p.m. at Adams 
and plays at Milton Monday. 
It also has a game to make up 
with Randolph. 



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Whiffle Ball Tourney Results Mfii,nt riilirhes FlFSt 

„ ..:.„...„,,„, In Iheiunior division. chl'-'tyHnalsO be held a. RusM-ll lTJ.iJUllt. V-*iill V.*i V^ C5 J. i* l3 1- 



Playgrounds in District I of 
the Quincy Recreation 
Department recently held its 
annual whiffle ball tourna- 
ment on the grounds of 
Merrymount Park 

Seven teams competed m a 
single elimination tournament 
held at hennoSt. Playground. 
Atlantic Park with Adam 
DeBoar. Dave Pacino, and 
Thomas Brosnan defeating 
the strong Squantum team of 
Ryan Nickerson. Justin 
Madden and Nick Shea 
Adam DeBoar was the hero 
for Atlantic as he hit the game 
winning home run in the final 
game, as well as the game 
winning RBIs in the two 
previous games. 



In the junior division, eight 
teams competed at the Fcnno 
St. Playground. Welcome 
Young withstood a two-run 
homerun by Kc\in Nickerson 
of Squantum which sent the 
semi-final game into extra 
innings. Bobb> l^rkin had 
the game winning homerun 
for Welcome ^ oung to propel 
them into the finals against 
Beechwood Knoll. 

Beechwotxl Knoll surren- 
dered to Welcome Young. .^- 
0. after a long extra inning 
semi-final game where John 
McNeil had the game winning 
homer in extra winnings. Ihe 
Welcome Young team 
consisting of Bobby larkin. 
John ingrassia and Mike 
McEvov will advance to the 



city finals to be held at Russell 
Park Friday 

In the senior bracket of the 
whiffle ball tournament, only 
four teams competed at 
Fcnno Street playground. 
I cnno Street with Andrew 
( leary. Scan [>nch. Pal 
O'Donoghue. and D;inn\ 
Mclean defeated the Mass 
fields team consisting of 
Mike Connor, (ireg Runge. 
Jack (ircene. and Paul 
Murphy. Andrew tieary had 
the game-winning homerun 
off a defieclcd line dri\e. 
although the two additional 
homeruns by Sean Lynch and 
Danny Mclean added 
insurance runs which Mass. 
Fields could not overcome in 
their last at bat. 



Place, Scrambles 
For Second Spot 



Ihe Manet Men's Basket 
ball league, with one week 
left in Its first regular season, 
heads towards the playoffs 
with the Mount having 
clinched first place with an K- 1 
record. 

Fhe Quincy Nets. limmins 
Contracting and Jaehnig 
Chiropractic Club are tied for 
second at 5-4. Elm St. 
Universitv is 3-6 and Clean 



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Machine 1-8. 

I he playcills will hcgin next 
Iiicsday. .luly 21. at 7 and 
8:1.^ p m at the Quincs High 
girls" gym. Ihe public is 
welcome. 

I he Mount suffered its only 
loss at the hands of the Quincy 
Nets. f)7-54. as Al Wolfe. 
Steve Bclcastro and l:d 
Carroll combined for 45 
points to offset a season's 
high Mi points from the league 
leading scorer, Mark Millane, 
former North Quincy High 
and Fastcrn Na/arcncC ollegc 
scoring leader 

Ihe Mount bounced back 
to defeat Urn St . t>}-^9. in 
overtime as (icd Phelan came 
off the bench to spark an 
incredible ralK which saw the 
Mount overcome an IH-point 
deficit .)im Kelly. John 
Phelan and .lim Phelan 
combined lor 4K points F»at 
Bradlev led Mm St with IK 

I Im St defeated Clean 
Machine, 65-58. sparked b\ 
P .1 I av's 22 points and Dean 
C olctii's 21 Brian Donahue 
and Kc\in McCirath had l.*i 



each in a losing cause. 

Steve Millane's 32 points 
powered I immins Contracting 
over Clean Machine. HI -62. as 
I immins broke open a tight 
game with a second-half 
burst Bob McDonnell had 14 
points for Clean Machine 

I immins received 2() points 
from Bill Murphy and 19 
from Kevin Brogioli to defeat 
.lachnig. H4-68. des|.itc 26 
points from C buck Jaehnig. 

Jaehnig rebounded with a 
66-45 win over the Nets as 
Jaehnig featured a balanced 
scoring attack led by Glen 
Ryerson with 14 Kurt 
O'Sullivan kept the Nets close 
with a game-high 16 points. 

Ihe leading scorers: Mark 
Millane. Mount. 28 9 points a 
game, Steve Bclcastro, Nets, 
17 4; Ja> Osgood, Flm St.. 
17 3; Chuck Jaehnig, Jaehnig 
Club. 17.0; Kevin Brogioli, 
Iimmins. 169; John 
Iimmins, Iimmins, 16 7; 
Steve Millane. Iimmins. 16.6. 
Dean Coletti. Mm St . 14.9; 
Brian Donahue. C lean 
Machine. 146, Bill Murphy. 
Iimmins. 14.4 




DAN KELLY 



Kelly Receives 
Letter At Bentley 



Dan Kelly of Quincy was 
recently awarded a varsity 
letter as a member of the 1986- 
87 Bentley College ice 
hockey team 

A junior forward. Kelly 
appeared in 18 of the Falcon's 
22 games, scoring six goals 
(one game winner) and 
registering live assists. His 1 1 
points rankfd seventh on the 



squad. 

Ihe son of Paul and 
Pauline Kelly of 34 Bowes 
Ave . Quincy. he is a 1984 
graduate ol Archbishop 
Williams High School. 

An accounting major, it 
was his first varsity letter. 

Ihe Falcons were 9-13 
overall and 9-11 in ECAC 
North-South contests. 



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825-2444 



Thursday. July U. I9t7 QuiKy Sua Pagt 21 



Mass. Patriots Win Volleyball Tourney 



Tlic Massachusetts F*atriots 
White Flite 15 and under 
volleyball team won the 
recent Northeast Festival 
luurnamcnl held at the 
University of Rhode Island 

The champions were led by 
co-captains Debbie Panaro 
and Deirdre Murphy of North 
Quincy High and Nancy 
Ixiitincn ot Quincy High 

in a field of over 20 teams 
from as far west as Chicago 
and south to Kentucky, the 
Patriots" White team defeated 
every opponent, bree/ing 
through pool play, going 8-0, 
to be seeded lirst for flight 
play In flight play it won all 
three matches with a 6-1 
record to be seeded second for 
the championship round 

In the double elimination 
championship round. Mass 
White defeated last vear's 
champions and this year's 
third seed. Windy City from 
C hicago. in its lirst match. 2- 
I. 

I he Pat runs won their 
second match against the top 
seed and their sister team. 
Mass Royal. 2-1. and ended 
up winning the championship 
by beating Windy City tor the 
second time in the title round 
and third time in the 



tournament 

Murphy's explosive spikes, 
powerful hitting and tough 
blocking at the net were 
outstanding, while Panaro's 
defensive backcourt play was 
unbeatable with diving saves 
and consistent passes, 
coupled with her outside 
hitting. 

Laitinen demoralized 
opponent after opponent with 
her consistent blocking of 
shots at the net and her solid 
backcourt defense. 

Mass Patriots Royal 15 and 
under team, captained by 
Quincy's Amy Ciuidice and 
Frin Murray, finished third 
overall with a 15-7 record, 
losing only to Windy City and 
the Patriots White team. 

With a 6-2 pool record, 
Mass Royal earned a first 
seed for flight play. Ihey 
finished first in their flight 
with a 6-1 mark and were 
seeded first in the champion- 
ship round 

Ciuidice, a middle blocker 
and outside hitter for Quincy 
High, devastated the other 
teams with her great hitting 
and powerful serve, while 
Murray, a fine setter for Abp 
Williams High, consistently 
set the hitters and blocked at 
the net. 




THK MASS. Patriots White Elite 15 and under volleyball 
team won the recent Northeast Festival Tournament 
championship at the I'niversity of Rhode Island. Front, left to 
right. Jay Blanchard, Nancy L4iitinen of Quincy, Heather 



Cody and Deirdre Murphy of North Quincy. Back, assistant 
coach Kelly Enos, Nancy Lee, Susan Sullivan, Jennifer Ncal, 
Debbie Panaro of North Quincy, Jennifer Roberts and head 
coach Chris Prendeville of Quincy. 



62 On Sterling Honor Roll chamber Buttonhole Session July 23 



Sterling Middle School lists 
62 students on the fourth 
quarter honor roll 

Ihcv are 

c;rade 6 

High Honors: .lason S 
C rosby, C hcr\! .A. IV llioniaso. 
Kim S\ (iati'lv 

Honors: S.irah \ Bvinc. 
Iill C aldwcll. Daniel 1 
(iardincr. .Icnnilcr I. (iillis. 
Adorna A Hankins. Nicole 
F Mullen. Marv I. Municr. 
Ste\en B Njiuyen. Brandon 
\ i*alu//i. Jolene M 
Schumacher 

CiRADE 7 
High Honors: Rachel M 
Bulland, Patricia R. Vacca. 



Honors: Meredith Blake. 
Barba 1 Delia. Kathleen D. 
Ciriffin. Jennifer I . Higgins. 
David Khasv. Deborah A. 
Kilnapp. Heather l.arkin. 
Christopher l.oi. Heather S 
McMurdy. Alexander A 
Par/vch. Sharon I Pettengill. 
Paraskcvi Regas. Hai H. 
I ruong. Marlene \ Venuto 
GRADE 8 

High Honors: Donna M 
C olby 

Honors: Christina J. 
■\bban. Cheryl Adams. 
Kathleen Bovlc. Kathy J 
Brown. C hrista Cole. Ciina A. 
Collins. Alfonso Cuomo. 
Brvan J Fnos. Robert 



Flaherty. Erica Ged/iun, 
Phuc H. Ha. Peter D 
Henderson. Chuong 1. 
Huynh. Barbara Jones. Trang 
i.e. Stephen l.o:. Melissa 
I ucas. VVmna Mei. Cieorgia 
Michalakis. Christine A. 



Miele. Barbara J. Mullin. 
Patrick A Neil. Gina M. 
Piccarini. Dorothy Ruscio. 
Christopher CJ. Schult/. 
Fli/abcth I Scott. Meaghan 
K. Shells. Michael R. 
Sherwood. Melanie E. 
Sullivan. I.ynne R. Swanson. 
Courtnev iierney. Kimberly 
M. Timmons. 



Atlantic Center Planning Day Trips 



I he Atlantic Neighborhood 
Center. 12 Hunt St.. North 
Quincy. is sponsonng a 
number of da\ trips 
thtoughoul the month ot 
July. 

On July 16 there will be a 
trip to the \quariiim and 
Dolphin show I he bus will 
depart from the center at I 30 
p m and will return at 
approximately 4 p m The 
cost IS $.V50 pel person 

On July 21 theie wi!i be a 
trip to Fearin^j's Pond in 
Pl\ mouth, an ideal site for 
swimminj; and picnicking 
I he bus will depart at 9;.^) 
am and the cost is ?? lor 
adults and SI for children. No 
children will be admitted 
without .1 parent I he 
ramdate for this trip is lulv 
2K. 

A bus will leav • ^^\ 4 30a.m 
on July 2^ for a irip to the 
South Shore Music Circjs for 
their pnxluction of "Cioldilocks 
and the Ihree Bears" Ihe 
cost IS $4 50 per person and 
the trip requires immediate 
registration. 

On July .V) there will be a 
trip to Kings Castle lor 
children up to 12 years of age 
Ihe bus will depart at 10 am 
and return at approximately 4 
p m. Children may bring a 
lunch or purchase lunch at the 
concessions there. I he cost 
for the trip is SS per person. 



Children under eight years 
of age must be accompanied 
by a parent on all trips. The 
trips are filled on a first come 



first served basis. If the buses 
are not filled the trip will be 
cancelled due to the high cost 
of bus rental 



The South Shore Chamber 
of Commerce will hold a 
Buttonhole Session at The 
South Shore Bank on July 23 
from 5:30 to 7 p.m. 

A Buttonhole Session is an 

Satuit Band 

At Morriselle 

July 29 

The Satuit Band will 
perform a band concert at the 
Morrisette Legion Post. 54 
Miller St.. West Quincy. Juh 
29 fiom 8 to 10 pm. 

Admission is free. 

You should bring your own 
chair. 

In case of rain the concert 
will be held inside the Post 
home 



informal cocktail reception 
for Chamber members and 
their elected and appointed 
officials, meeting to address 



issues of mutual concern. 

Forrest Cook, president of 
South Shore Bank, will host 
the event. 



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Sports 
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1 With what m^uor league baseball team did former 
Boston Red Sox ace, Bill Lee. complete his career? 

2. Name all the times Dick Williams has managed during 
his career. 

3. What year was Roberto Clemente named Most 
\'aluable Player? 

4. Name all four teams Leo Durocher managed during 
his career. 

"i. How many National League permants did Leo The Lip 
capture? 

(). How many batting titles did Ted Williams capture 
(luring his illustrious career? 

7. What was Ted Williams' lifetime batting average? 

8. What year was Brooks Robinson named Most 
Valuable Player with the Oriole*? 

i-). Name the baseball owner who was instrumental in 
breaking baseball's color barrier in 1947. 

10. How old was Satchel Paige when he broke into the 
nuyor leagues'' 



Buy Any 3 

Filters 

get a 1/2 

gallon 

Summer Cooler 

by 

Igloo FREE 



SUMMER SPECIALS 



Waxes 

Upholstery Cleaning 

Armorall 

Car Washes 



Complete 

Stock Of 

Air Conditioning 

Parts 




1 1. Name all three National 1 eague teams of which Pete 
Rose ha> been a member. 

Answers: 1 Montreal Expos; 2. Boston Red Sox. 
Oakland As. California Angels, Montreal Expos, San 
Diego Padres and Seattle Mariners; 3. 1966; 4. Dodgers, 
(liants, Cubs and Astros; 5. Three; 6. Six; 7. .344; 8. 1964; 9. 
Branch Rickey, 10. 42 years old; 11. Reds, Phillies and 

Expos ® 1987 by King Features Sy-nd. 

COLMANS SPORTING GOODS 

The Right Answer For 
All Your Sporting Needs. 



PiKf 22 Quint) Sun lhursda>. Jul> Id. I0R7 



Arts/Entertainment 



Quincy Community 

Theatre Holding 
Babv Photo Contest 

.IM PiiHliiclions. Inc and tnsl-plat.f hah\ in each 

yuinc\ t \>mmiinit\ Summer caicjii>t\ baM-il on popular 

I heat re are conductinj: a vote C osi is SI per \oie 

bah\ photo contest in I'letures \\\\\ he Jisplaxed 

coniunction with the summer liom >* to I I .'(> pm on 

musical production ot Saturda\. .Iul\ .^1 at the 

"Baby." Function lent at Marina Ba\ 

■\ge catej;ories are nc\\ born lntr\ blanks ma\ he 

to si\ months. se\en months obtained b\ callin}; 4^1-154.' 

to one year and 1.^ months to All entrants will recei\e 

tuo years Ihere is a S5 entr\ complimentar\ tickets lo 

tee per phcMo Quinc) C ommunit\ Summer 

Maximum photo si/e is I heatre Night at Marina Ba\ 

eight b\ 10 and no photos will I ntry blanks can also be 

be returned obtained b\ calling 4''I-I.M.^ 

Inlries must be received no or b\ writing to I2K f Imwood 

later than f rida>. July 24 A\c'. Wollaston. MA 02170 

Fntries should be sent to "Bab\." .IM Productions 

128 Flmwood A\e. Wollaston and Quinc\ (ommunii\ 

02170. Winner will be chosen Summer theatre's lourth 

by popular \ote on Saturday, annual summer musical, will 

.Iul\ .^1 at the function lent be performed Aug 14 and 15 

at Marina Bay and 21 and 22 at North 

Pri/es will be gi\cn to the Qumcy High School. 

N.Q. Alumni Theatre 
To Present ''Lovers' 

Ihe North Quinc> Alumni I he production is under the 

F heater will present Renee direction ol Frank . I Mollett. 

Fa\lor and .loseph Bolonga's Ihe cast includes (ireg 

"I.o\ers And Other Stran- Inland. Kathrui (iralton. 

gers," July 22 through July 2.*> James Phelan. Sheila Egan, 

at K p m at the North Quincv Nanig (iherdian and f im 

High School Black Box McDonald. 

1 heatre lickets are S4.5() and will 

The play is a corned'., be sold at the door For more 

centering around the battle of information call .^2H-.'<5K!S 

the sexes. between 4-"' p.m. 

Salvation Army Summer 
(Carnival July 23 

The Salvation Army will tarnival on Ihursdav. Julv 
hold their annual Summer 




Phiy^rouncI Aelivities 
Schedule 



WOLLASTON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 



773-4ftQ(: 



Wed & Thurs July 15 & 16 

"RAISING ARIZONA- (PG 13) 

Wonderfoli/ Loopy Comedy 

Biz/are & Original 

E*es 7 00 Only 

Starts Fn jgiy 17 

HARRY a THE 

HENDERSONS" (PG) 

w'Big Foot The Monster 

Fri&Sat 7 004915 

Sun-Tnurs 7 DO Only 

Men 4 Tues Dollar Night 



ADM »2 50 20 4 OVER '2 00 



2.V Irom 6:.'<() p.m till «;.^() 
p m . at 6 Baxter St . Quincy. 
Ihe carnnal will include 
games, lood and pri/es 
Iickets will be sold at the 



hIKSi IM \( K \MNNFKS in Ihe I ouis^i Mu\ \leoll 
Dramatic Keadinj; iesti^al Merc Hani; lioang. center, and 
liana ( obhan. Mho tied fi»r t(»p honors at \tlantit Middle 
School. \l left, is (.eraid Butler, assislnat principal. 

Swim Lessons 
Schedule 

Following IS the schedule ol noon. Beginnei I \ 1 1 '0. 

swim lessons to be held ai Beginner II \-ll. Advanced 

various cit\ beaches b\ th> Beginner- l(t ^0, lnt--rmedi- 

Quincs Recreation Depart- atc-IO. S w i m met -^ ^(1, 

mcnt: Advanced I ilesa\ing-h-^ '0 

Thursday. Jul\ 16. FFigh Tuesday, luly 21. high lide- 

lide -4:.^2. Beach Flouis-1 H.*i6. beach hoiiis Ha m - 12 '0 

p.m -6 p 111 . Fkginner I \-l, P "i • Beginnei I •\-l2. 

Beginner I B-l .^0; Beginner II Beginner II \-l I <(). Beginner 

A-2; Beginnei II B-2 ^0. H f^''- \d\anccil Beginnei- 

Advanced Beginner-.V I" ^<». I n te i med i a t e- 1 0. 

Intermediate-.V.^O; Swimmer- Swimmer-'^ Ml, liisn. Kes>.ue 

4; Basic Rescue & Water & Watei Satet\-h-4 V) 
Safet\-4:M)-6 

Friday. July 17. high tide - VSednesday. July 22. high 

5:26; beach houis 2 pm - b tide-4.1.V beach hours h a in - 

pm ; Beginnei I \-2; I pm; Beginnei I \-l2. 

Beginner II A-2:.M); Advanced Beginner I B-12 Ml. Fieginnci 

Begmnei-3. Intermediate- || A-1 I . Beginnei IIB-II.Vl. 

ySO. Swimmer-4. Advanced Advanced Beginnei - 10 ^0, 

I ilesa\ing-4:.M)-6 Inteimediate- 10. Swimmei- 

.M<»nda>. July 20. high tide- y .^o. Advanced I ilesaving-H- 

H:ll, beach houis S a in - '^ M) 

Monlrlair Men's (Jiih 
Trip To Fenway Salnrday 

\ll \oiin>.'stcis signed up 



ALPINE >^ 

RESTAURANT 



AGood 
Ptoct To Eot 

33 Independence Ave Quincy 479 51 1 3 REASONABLE PRICES 



4 Different Dinners Will Be 
Posted on Blackboard Daily. 

Call us for the specials 



DINNER SERVED SUN. TO THURS. Til 9:45 P.M. 

FRI. & SAT Til 10:45 P.M. 

lUNCHEON SPECIALS SERVED DAIIY 



WS^f^^SfS^ Restaurant 

B ^P^^J I mf^A^M ^^^ Business Luncheons 

Best Food on the South Shore 

Tablecloth and Candlelight Dining 

Now Enjoy LUNCH on Weekdays And BBQ on Weekends and Holidays 
at the South Shore's only OPEN AIR POOLSIDE RESTAURANT 

Background Music - Tasty Tropical Drinks 
Also: Don t Miss Our BOILED LOBSTER Specials 



l<ii the Monti, laii \1en\ ( liib 
Nouth Program |)av ,ii 
I enwav Tark on S.iiuulav. 
.Iiilv IK should be al the 
clubhouse. '»;> H.'lhM)..k Kd . 
\orlli Quiiicv. no iaiei lliaii 
Ml M\ .1 m 

Since nianv ui|ue^l^ luive 
been leceived to alteiul the 
Red So\-()akLiiu) \^ "H.it 
I ).i\" g.inie. ami to msuii use 
ot all lickels. anvoiie utuihle 
!o go IS .isked to (.all l»ii 
(.lide.i al ':^-'^*«:'^ b\ 
1 hiiistl.iv ev ening 

Shop Locally 
Save Gas & Money 



Kiiiealion hiuctiu U.iiiv 

I Uclctl. .IIIIIOIIIKCS ihi 

I o 1 1 o vv III g si bed II le o I 
,11 1 1 V 1 1 Us a I Ml pe I V I si'il 
|iLivgiomh|s tliioiighoiil the 
ulv 

Squun t u m: \ i l s .i nd 
C Kills Wediiesdav, IM I "i 

\Ms ami ( I alts- 1 i uiav . 
s 4S Id 

I e 11 11 IS a nil .i 1 1 he i v - 
liicsdav. 11 |Vi 1^ 

M>le> Standish: \iis and 
cialls- I hiusd.iv. S 4S-I() 

Archeiv Wednesiiav. 12 :(l- 

I :(> 

Atlantic: \ils .uid cralls- 
lucsdav. IM I*; 

Arts and ( latts-l ndav . 12- 
II*; 

■\icheiv- I uesd.iv ^ ^(1- 
l()4.S 

Welcome \oung: \its and 
cralts- luesdav. 10 ^(l-l I 4*^ 

Arts and traits- 1 i idav , 

10 ;<o-ii 4*; 

I e n n I s .i n d .i 1 1 tic i v - 
lluusciav. 1 I I'^-l 1.*; 

Montclair (Mishopi \iis 
and ciails Al.uidav. S.4.S-1() 

Arts and cralts- \Sedncs- 
^\a\. K 4V|o 

lennis clinic - V^eilnesdav. 
10 4.S-I: IS 

lennis .i lul a i v. h e r v - 
Ihuisdav. h 4VI0 4.S 

Mass Kields: \iis and 
ciatls- I uesdav. X 4**- 10 

Alts and tialls I huisilav . 
10 ^0-1 I 4S 

Wollaston: Ails .nui tialis- 
Vioiidav, 10 ^(t 1 i 4S 

Alts aiui ciails-\\ iilnesilav . 
10 ^0-1 I 4S 

Hm Street: \ris .nul ci.ills 
I uesdav. 10 ^0-1 I 4S 

\ils and (.lalls- I liui vtlav . 
10 M\-\ 1 4.S 

Pond Street: Ails and 
ualls-Wiilnisdav. H ^0- |0 

lennis a mi a i «. h e i v ■ 
\1ondav. S 4S.|0 |S 

Faxon Park: Ails arul 
ualls-\1oiui,i\ 10 'wi 1 I 4*; 

Arls and i mIn U i diicsd.i . 
K 4S. 10 

I e 11 n I s a nd ,i i >. lie i \ - 
lluiisdav. I MM I'' 

\dams: Ajis aid ti.iM^ 
Ueiinesdav. 10 ^0 I I -1^ 

Ai |v a lid . ;.i!ls I i idav . 

lo ;o 1 1 j'^ 

lore Kiver: \i!s ,ir,il i. m!!s- 
\1oiuia,, IM l^ 

\ll^ .i:id V la'iv-XS i.-ilnesil,i\ . 
10 ^0-i 1 4S 

i e II II i s .1 'ul ,1 1 I lu- ■ ', ■ 
1 m-Mi \: '- .is. |ii4f 

I ei;';,s and all I'll v I : ul.iv 

Pollard: Ails ai ' (.mMs 
U , (iticsdav 



S M\ III 

I o k a M .1 mi .1 1 i lie I \ 
IiiimI.iv, !I IM 1^ 

Kusseli: XMs ami aalts 
I uesd.iv. i: I |S 

\: Is ani! I. i.iMs- I huiNdav . 
.'s M\. 10 

lennis c ii nu - Moiidav . 
|0 4V|: jS 

I emus and au lu'v -I rulav . 
S 4S |(I4S 

I ahri-que: \iis and cialis 
liiesi'av. 10 MM I 4S 

\ii^ ,ind t.i.ills- I hurstlav. 
IM IS 

lennis a n d a i c h e r v - 
Mondav. K4.S-I0 IS 

I emus and archciv -\ iiilav , 
K4S.')4S 

( hapel: Aiis and cralts 

I lulav. h 4S-J0 

Palmer Park (Quaitei- 
dci k I Arts and eratis 
luesdav. i:-l IS 

Aicheiv I iidav, 4 S(l- 
I04S 

Perkins: Aits anil cratls- 
I uesdav ^ 4S 10 

Alts and cralls I huisdav . 
10 .>0-ll 4.S 

lennis and auhei\-l ndav . 

II |S-i jS 

Heron Koad: Arts and 

aalls U^■^llK^d.lV 12-1 I .S 
\iis and cialls-l lulav. 12- 

I IS 

lennis M.ndav. 12 20- 
1 20 

Baker: Nils Ani.\ ciatls- 
I lui.iv. 10 M) I I 4S 

BeechMood Knoll: Arts and 
cralts- luesdav. K V)-l() 

Alls .iiiii ii.ills- I huisdav . 
12-1 |S 

\Kfier\-\1oiuiav. 12 20- 
I 20 

Shea: \ils and ci.itts- 
Mondav. > 4S. m 

I e II Ills ,11 id A I chei V - 
Ui-diuMiav. V 4S.||) |S 

O'Hourke: \ils Ami eialls- 
Moiula. . 12 1 is 

\i's .I'al ( i.itis- I huisdav . 
V 4S. Ill 

Kiiunide: \m- .nui iiatis 
\1op.l,!\. !0 '0-1 I 4^ 

\' V .mil I i,il!~ I [idav . 12- 
I !'■ 

I !■ II 11 IS ,1 till ,1 I I lie I V ■ 
\VLi!;ievii,r, v :^- lo I < 

I «irbe\ Mill: \m-. anr 
u,ri-.\1o,>Ja\ • ' ' I s 

\"^ .'I'.' ■, • - I huisdav . 



n 



iiul 



All ll;l V "A ii', Mlav . 
1 ?>' 

leiino Sifiii \i! 
uat'--\! . ,: ■ Ml 10. 

i n ' ,1 .1 1 1 he i V 

I uesda . ' 'S-i; 4^ 

I e n IMS .. : il .1 1 ». In.- 1 V 
!uirsi!a\ . ' 4~ HI 4S 



FRI & SAT.: PRIME RIB X-LARGE «9" 

ALL DINNER ENTREES From »8" to M3»» '"^'"^*^^ 

LUNCH From «3*' - Plus Daily Blackboard Specials"'^ * ^"^"^ 





At Thtt Quincy Bay Inn 

29M«»cock8t.:Oolncy 
Call for f •MTvatlona 328- 1 500 

Available For Functions Located Next to The Neponset RIvw BrlOge 
Free ParVing - Non-Smoking Section Avartabte ^^***^ Srturdty Lunch 
.^ Cto— Sunday M Noon 




Luncheon Specials 
11:30- 3:00 p.m. 

• ( hickcn Parmigiana 
spajihctli 

• Scalood New burg 

• liahv Broiled Haddock 

• I ondnn Hroil ,Aii .his 

• Hroiicd Heel I i\cr 
onions & bacon 

(lift C criificates 
Available 



M.OO 
M.OO 

M.75 

M.75 



Dinner Specials 
3:00- 11:00 p.m. 

• Queen I'rime Rib *8.95 

• ( hicken Parmigiana *5.95 

• Hroiled Boston Sthrod *6.95 

• Heel Burgundy 

rice pilal *5.9f? 

• I ggplant F'armigiana *5.95 

• Veal { attialore *6.95 

• (hicken Marsella »6.95 

Served w fresh qdrdcn s<ilod or 
S(nip, potdto, v/pg or pastd 



I ivp pnlprtainmcnt in our loiinqc 
I burs - Sdl Bob Benoil. Sun - I rank Dunn 

75 Franklin St., Quinc> 
472-1115 



Thunday. Jnly l«. Ifl7 Qvincy Swi Pagt 23 



Quincy Cable TV 



Ch. 3 To Cover Sidewalk Bazaar 



Ihf l(Kal priiKram schedule for 
Quinr> C ablr>>slrms ( h. 3 and 
( h. 9 from V\rdnrsda>, Jul) l5lo 
hrida>. Jul> 24 

Ch. 3 

\%ednesda>. Jul> 15: 

' pin SuniiiK'tlfd • \\\c - Rene and 
\1.iria K.KKoiiii live Imni ilu' 
Kuih (iiirilon Ninpliithealri- 

1hursda>, Jul> 16: 
I pni I iM Imni (Ik- Sulcwalk 
Ha/aai • ^^alih us oi comedown 
,1 ml talk ii' u^ III) an \S c w ill ha\ e 
L'i\cawa\s and pn/i-s all das 

l-rida>. Jul> 1 7: 
r ^^ pm K h\ itii->- 111 itu' I iniL'N 
< pm Si-nioi Sniails (R i 
1 <() pm I ibrais Hook Nook (Ri 
4 pm |)a\c\ & (lolialh 
" I S pm Miss yuinc> Has 
fafjcanl li\i- from (^uinc> (enter 

SI M)AV. Jul) 19: 

4 pm Ilie ( arpcnicr's Inion 

4 V) pm N ou Aie the I ijihl ol the 

\\orld 

" pm Siiinmerlest - Haron Hugo 

(Ri 

M(tnda>. Jul> 20: 

6 y pm RhMiies ot the limes 
■* pm Reading; Discover) 

7 M) pm Brainiree I lower & 
(larden Shi w 

X pm Seiiioi Sm.nis ( R i 

KM* pm loe Vlueci's Hmls \^ orks 

1ursda>. Jul) 21: 
ti y pm Rtnmes ol the limes 
"" pm I ihiaiv Hook Nook 

V) pm I ocal I oeus 
K pm Bieenlenmal Celebration 
lour jiroup ot the I S 
Constitution presents a 1-av.l 
musical 

Wrdnrsda). Jul) 22: 
"" pm Siimmeilest - live - Yankee 
lack countrv and vvesUin Irom 
the Ruth (loidon Amphitheatre 

Ihursda>. Jul> 23: 



r 



•h l 



Quincy Sun 
Ch.8 



Quinc). rr|>ional, national 
and Morld news around Ihr 
riock sr\rn da)s a week. 
Plus 
Special Video Ne»»s Reports 
and Features. 

Moi>da)s. S 30 1' M . 7 3(1 1* M 
Tuesda)s. 1(1 A M S 30 P M , 

■» ^0 V M 

Wednesdays. 10 AM. .S 30 

P M . "» M) P M 

rhursda)s. 10 \ M . .S 30 P M . 

7 XI) I' M 

Frida)s, 10 AM . 5 .'0 PM . 

1 M) P M 

Saturdays, 10 A M 

2 Residents 
Recognized At 
Agrieulliiral 
School 

Iwo Quincy rcsiticnts 
recently received recognition 
during the I9K6-K7 school 
year from Noifolk County 
Agricultural High School. 

Derek E Bennett, son of 
Mrs. Nadine Abru//o 
received Honors distinction 
lor the final term, as well as 
maintaining Honors status 
for the entire school year. 
Bennett will be entering his 
senior year in the fall. 

Linda I.. Novak, daughter 
ol Mr and Mrs. Idwaid 
No\ak received Honors 
distinction for the final 
marking term. Miss Novak 
graduated from NCAHS in 
-lune. 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



uy pnt Rhvmes ol the limes 

7 pm loe Mueci's Hod\ WOiks 

■' 30 pm Quincv Maga/me 

K pm ( ahletalk 

H Mi pm P M ( onnection 

4 pm lob Search - People to 

I'eople 

hrida), Jul) 24: 

2 "^^ pm Rhvmes ol the limes 
' pm Senioi Smaii^ ( R i 

3 V» pm I ibrars Hook Nook |R( 

4 pm Davev & dohaih 

Ch. 9 

Wednesda). Jul) 15: 

~ pm Summerlest-i i\e-Rene and 
Maria Rancmitl Irom the Ruth 
(lordon Amphitheatie 

Thursda). Jul) 16: 
' pm loe Muccis Hod> VNorks 
7 30 pm Screening Room 

h pm C abletalk 
K 30 pm I HA . 
4 pm yj( Maga/me 

Frida), Jul) 17: 
lO.V) am lalk about the Mind 
(R) 
1 1 30 am 1 1 . us im Iducalion 

2 5'' pm Rhvmes ol the limes 

3 pm Senioi Smarts (R) 

3 Mi pm I ibrarv Hook Nook (R) 

4 pm Daves & doliath 

7 1.^ pm Miss C^uincv Bav 
Pageant live Irom (^uincv Center 

Sunda). Jul) 19; 

4 pm I he ( .irpenter's I nion 



Vou Ate the I ight ol the 
Haron Hugo 



4 30 pm 

World 

7 pm Summerlest 

(Kl 

Monda). Jul) 2U: 

■" pm Reading I)isco\cr\ 

7 30 pm Hraintree Mower & 

darden Shovs 

K pm Senior Smarts (Ri 

K Mt pm .loe Mucci's Hodv V^ orks 

Tuesda). Jul) 21: 
' pm Iime-oui with Hutch 
Stearns 
30 pm I ocal I iicus 

( elebration - 



Quincy Community 
Television will broadcast live 
at the Quincy Center 
Sidewalk Sale, July 16 
through July 18. co\ering 
events ol the da\. 

f ntertammcni scheduled to 
take place during the sidewalk 

sale will be shown 



QCTV will be talking to 
Quincy Center Business 
owners as well as visitors. 
Trivia questions regarding 
QCIV programming and 
cable services will also be 
asked for pri/es. 

Highlights from some of 

this sear's programs being 



booth in front of the Bank of 
Boston where giveaways and 
a representative from 
American Cablesystcms in 
Quincy will be there to answer 
any questions regarding cable 
service. 

shown on Ch. 3 can also be 

seen during the live broadcast. 

QCIV wiil also have a 



Communitv Rallv Featured 
On QJC Magazine 



Is pm Bicentennial 
lour group ol 
( onstiiution pre 



t h e 
nt^ a 



S 
-act 



Jack 



musical 

Wednesda). Jul) 22: 

pm Summerlest - live - Yankee 
ack countrv and western band 
Irom the Ruth dordon 
Amphitheatre 

Thursda). Jul) 23: 
7 pm Joe MuccTs Hodv Works 
7;30 pm C^uincv Maga/ine 
K pm C abletalk 
K.^O pm P M Connection 
9 pm Job Search - People 
people 

Krida). Jul) 24: 
1030 am lalk about the Mind 
(Rl 

2 5'' pm Rhvmes ot the limes 

3 pm Senior Smarts 

3:.V) pm I ibrarv Book Nook 

4 pm Davev & doliath 



to 



The QuincN Junior College 
Maga/ine cable lelc\ision 
program will Icature video 
coverage ot the recent 
communitv rally to keep 
Quincv Junior C ollege as an 
independent institution 
Ihursdav at 9 p.m. on the 
American Channel. Ch. 9. 

The QJC maga/ine is 
hosted bv Frank Cammarata 
Speakers at the rally included 

Pageant On 
Ch. 3 

The pageant vmII be 
repeated Mondav. Julv 20 at 9 
p.m. on Ch. 3 and 9. 

Quincy Communitv 
Television will have live 
coverage of the Miss Quincy 
Bay Beautv f*ageant. Frtdav. 
July 17 beginning at ""IS 
p m . on C h. 3. 



city and state politicians, students and members of the 
college officials, former Board ot Trustees 



ffjisterSUB 

Homemade Italian Cuisine 

Chicken Parmigiana 

Chicken Campagna 

Lasagna 

Beef Stroganoff 

Salad <& ToWs with butter 
included with dinner 

64 Billings Rd., N. Quincy 328-9764 

Mon -Sat. 10-10 



This summer share 

The Disney Chamiel 

with the ones you love 



Television the whole family 
can watch together. 

The Disney Channel brings your family together 
like no other television can. With quality, commercial- 
free, magical entertainment you can't find anywhere 
else. Exclusive weeidy series and miniseries. Unique 
specials. Premiere movies. And much more. When you 
watch The Disney Channel you really feel the warmth, 
enjoy the excitement and thrill to the adventure. 

The Disney Channel Magazine is a year-round 
bonus that's yours absolutely free when you subscribe. 
It's an in-depth program guide that's filleid with enter- 
taining features and "behind-the-scenes" articles 
your whole family will enjoy. Kids will love the special 
pullout section that's just for them. 

Don't miss a minute of the magic. Enjoy quality 
programs all summer long with The Disney Channel. 
Call your local cable company to subscribe today! 





The^>«i^^ Channel 



CALL 471-9143 



f>NriV««llMr>(.i 



Paie 24 Quinc) Sun Thunda>. Jul> 16. I9g7 



■V ' 




Special Features 



GRUBRY 




oSoC-''' 




'X ' 



Swamp UraLs 




IJy W aricn Satllcr 

OH, DEU DOnV 0OTHCR I 
/M£- AX ALL / 










NAPOLEON 




BETTER Si^ACE >OUk- 










By Foster Moore 

-^ 7=51 



».\d'j;C 







TWITCH 



By How Rands 

J c ^ B:?^CBPr WHEN TME 



Clare Annswell s 



Starscope V 



WEEK OF: July 16 



BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

N'ou I. Ill hi' i)iiilo nost.ilijK . li.iviiii) slroiuj tu-s to voiit (iimilv's 
post Bill you look to ttu' kiliiro too .iml iJimut.iIIv ki-rp up 
vvilh till.' ch.myiiHj tinu-s N'ou ti-nd to ki'»'p your .iiimi'Iu's lH)lllril 
up Thi' months .ihiMil spotluihl "new. t!iri'ttK)Ms" .iiul locus on 
tr.ui'l .mil oxp.msion in your profession 

AQUARIUS - January 21 - February 19 

lnvi!.it;iin lo pii'stuji- evi-nt may nriiw liuriiii} tl)is prriovi Ti.k\"I 
is spotlujhtoJ. but pI.Tn for cluiiKjinij wt-.ithtT i.()nditions Con 
d. lions chiinjt' in friendship .iriM also ■ th.iiikfullv for the heller 

PISCES - February 20 ■ March 20 

Some diffii ullies .ippear m \\w lominiinii .ilions .ui'.i. Irv I" en 
suie th<it vour c.isual ct>mments .ire imI misinletpreled Oul 
sMndimj p.H'ment m.iv .irrive til List P.ulnei is r.ilnuT 

ARIES - IVIarch 21 • April 20 

.ook Id! (1 positivt' outli'l for buiil up U'lisiims C'owotktT m.iv 
De v.KUie (.' 
ou! of ttiun m^\• Ih' in lou^'h 



be v.KUie don'i hesil.ite !o .isk lor cl.ii:fn.,i!ii);, A fru'iul from 




TAURUS - April 21 - May 22 

The iiiinids of others are cnanijinij Ci.I.i.i! .iciiu.iinHnre 
becomes more uiuierst.indincj. uhiTe .1 sliy frietui .^ surprismylv 
assertive Your positive influence tias pijyed a part in all this 

GEMINI - May 23 - June 21 

Soil. lie} out financial papers mav prove unexpecletilv t,me 
consumiinj Conmiunity programs leaii lo neu- inlerests and 
possible new friendship Kelationship is much more ciearlv 
defined 

CANCER - June 22 - July 22 

If considennij major h'HJseholii tasks, be sure In examine the 
broader picluie caiefuiiv Musical events may be accented on 
the weekend New relationships are increasinijly harmonious 

LEO - July 23 • August 22 

The week is like a lapesln, rich in deiai. ami culor Take I, me 
lo stand back •^nd sluiiv ihe patterns On ,1 more 'practical level. 
pestv financial affairs riujuire attenliiin 

VIRGO - August 23 • September 22 

Partnership endeavors are (jenerallv hnjhlnjhled. provided earli 
participant underslaiuls the individual responsibilities a\m\ tfie 
combiiu'il (jual You may be asked to sponsor a commuiiity 
or social event 

LIBRA - September 23 • October 22 

Avoui !ak;iii} >!ior!culs. and (.valch a teiuleiu y lo m.ike excuses 
Haril work and lonij hours pay off Family is support. \.e of your 
iiieas Pt'ls are ft-atured 111 weekend activities 

SCORPIO - October 23 • November 21 

Scf)rjiio IS surprisin(jiy idealistic ihrouyh this period, fujhiing for 
prinripies witli vnjor Wit is sharp and you meet someone 
who's almost your etjual [-ami'v ties are tu^htened 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 December 22 

Watch lendenry of promisiny too much to too nuiny. and try 
lo (Jive yours. -If some much deserved pampering After a few 
false starts, a pel project is in full swincj 

CAPRICORN - December 23 - January 20 

An independent streak surfaces. antS as a result voj make im- 
portant strides in professional environment After the weekend, 
the emphasis is on financial and possibly real estate dealings 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July l()th. actress Ginrjer Rogers. 17th. actress Diahann 
Carroll. ISth. actor Ked SKelton. 19lh. singer Vikki Carr. 20th. 
actress Diana Rigg. 21sl. actor Don Knotts. 22nd. actor Jason 
Robards. Jr 



€]r(0)SSW(0)Fdl 



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poqodo :\ f'f,jy,-r Ciujiny 

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TlHinAijr. July H, Ifl7 Qaincy Sm fagt 2S 



Hibernia Savings Opens 
Quincy Operations Center 



The Hibernia Savings Bank 
(NASDAQ: HSBK) announ- 
ces its Quincy operations 
center and retail banking 
facility will officially open for 
business Saturday. 

A ribbon-cutting ceremony, 
to be attended by Mayor 
Francis X. McC'auley. is 
scheduled for 9 a.m. 

ITie new office, located at 
731 Hancock St., will offer a 
full Imc of sa\ings and loan 
services to residential and 
business customers m the 
South Shore area 

Ihc bank also announced 
that Mary Beth Shea has been 
hired as assistant treasurer 
and branch manager ol the 
new facilitN Prc\iousl\, she 
served as the savings oHicer ol 
Fast W'e\ mouth Savings 
Bank 

F o attract potent la I 



customers, the bank is 
launching a scries of 
promotional incentives. 
Starting opening day, those 
who choose to invest in the 
bank's one-year term 
certificates get an opportunity 
to spin a "Wheel of Fortune"- 
type device which will 
determine the account's 
interest rate, ranging from 8 
to 20 per cent Similar 
promotional events are 
scheduled throughout the 
grand opening celebration 
running from July IK to 
August I, 1987 

"Our mo\e to a new 
operations center in Quinc\ 
reflects our strong commit- 
ment to the expanding 
economy of the South Shore." 
said president Mark A. 
Osborne, who made the 
announcement. "The office 



will allow us lu bciici provide 
the area communities with 
innovative savings and loan 
products, and comprehensive 
banking services." 

The opening of the Quincy 
office comes during a major 
period of growth for the bank. 
On Sept. 5. 1986, Hibernia 
completed its conversion to a 
publicly held institution, 
raising over $8.7 million in 
new capital. Earnings for the 
first quarter of 1987 were 
$360,001. or 44 cents per 
share, a 235 per cent increase 
over the $252.62 1 earned for 
the same period last year. 

F he Hibernia Savings 
Bank, founded in 1912. is a 
state-chartered, federal!) - 
insured thrift institution with 
additional offices located at 
263 Washington St.. Boston, 
and 51 Commercial St.. 
Braintree. 



Salvation Army Shelters 
Feline Family Of 9 



B> N\N( ^ Mel \l (.HI IV 

F he Salvation Armv on 
Baxter St . Quincv (enter, 
provides such things as 
lood. clothing and shelter 
to people in need 

But r e c e n 1 1 V . the 
But reccntiv . the organi- 
zation has branched out - to 
serve a cat in need and its 
eight recenllv born killens 
According to command- 
ing otliccr. Maior I'aul 
( arlino. and his wile, 
.loan, the triendlv. grav. 
long-haired cat with blue 



eyes lirst started visiting 
the Quincv lempleCorps 
about a month ago 

Obvioiisiv pregnant, the 
cat would come into the 
building when a door 
opened, and go to the 
kitchen door where the 
cook would Iced her. 

I he cat disappeared 
over the Julv 4 weekend, 
and reappeared a lew davs 
later but stall members 
had no idea where the 
kittens might be 

.\ short time later, the 



''Qiiiiiry Magazine*' Summer 
Edition Starts Julv 21 



Quincv C able C h. 3 will 
begin a special summer 
edition ot the "Quincv 
Maga/ine" seiies on F uesdav . 
Julv 21 at K p m 

F he series will concentrate 
on events happening in 
Quincv over the summer, and 
on issues o( concern to Quincv 
and South Shore residents 

F he tirsi program will 
tealure a report on "Four 
I lit le F'jgcs." franklin 
Roberts' one act musical 
drama about the dralling ol 
the IS Constitution which 
was performed recentlv at the 



Quincy Bay 



Adams \alionai Historic Site 
in Quincv 



kittens were lound under 
the red collection box 
outside ot the Salvation 
Armv. 

Several ot the kittens 
have the mother cat's 
coloring, and the rest 
resemble tiger cats, 
according to the Carlinos. 

A neighbor is caring for 
the kittens until homes can 
be found for them. 

Anyone interested in 
adopting a kitten, or 
having intormation about 
the mother cat which is 
wearing a flea collar, 
should call 472-2345. 

"It's just one more 
homeless family we're 
trying to assist." quipped 
one staff member 




O V ^ 




Julv 



16 
17 
IK 
19 
20 
21 



A.M. 

3:55 
4:52 
5:52 
6:55 
7:57 
8:56 
953 



P.M. 

4:32 
5:26 
6:20 
7:17 
8 11 
9:06 
9:57 



DISCOVER THE MEANING 
BEHIND THE SYMBOLS. 

*OFFERED ONLY BY MAIL. 
FOR A GUIDE BOOKLET 

*RUSH A S.A.S.E. + $1.00 TO 




Price Effective During Test Campaign Only! 



IGNORING A 
MEDICAL PROBLEM? 



The ^XM^ news is 
this; any nietiical pix>hlem that 
can he tracked e;\rly \\\s an excellent 
chance of heinj^ treated successKilIy. 
Many of ils are at a loss when 
it comes to kiKiwing a per^>nal 
[\xH)r...one to call K>r a 
quick check-up, (^r an in-depth 
physical..ii family d(Vtor. 



Mass Bay Medical Care is the 
Himily Dix.'ft)r. Ihe staff ot 
Dr. Thomas Blehl is ready to 
serve the Quincy community 
witli tlie persoruil care asscxriated 
with A Family Physician, 

HAVE A 
HEALTHCHEK 



iiiSKBK 



THOMAS BLEHt M.D., • MASS BAY MECXCAL CARE > 1 1 57 HANCOCK ST OmNq MA 



LaRaia Tours Senior Facilities 



rouncillor Joseph J. 
LaRaia, candidate for mayor. 

completed a tour of scheduled 
visits to all senior citi;en 
housing facilities in the city. 

l^aRaia's most recent visit 
was to 1000 Southern Artery 

l>aRaia said he spoke in 
support of bringing back the 
retail district to Qumcy 
Center. He cited the loss of 
many popular retail stores 
including the recent plans to 
close the Remick store. 

[^Raia vowed to implement 
a mall-type development at 
the city parking lot adjacent 
to the Court House. 

He cited his original plan 
when he was mayor in 1977. 
which will provide the same 
theme for this part of Quincv 
Center. 

I^Raia also spoke of the 



need for quality medical care operated under private 
at Quincy City Hospital. contract and needs increased 

The public facility is public scrutiny, he »aid. 



ATTENTION! 



Confused Policy Holders 

Left high and dry 

by your insurance company? 

CALL 



FAIELLA 

INSURANCE AGENCY 

L«l Ut H«ip You Sav«( 
148 Washington St., Quincy 

For All Your Insurance Needs' 

471-1111 



CAU HDR A PROMPT APPONTMBNT TODAY • INSURANCE ACaPTED* 61 7/471 0234 



With CENTURY 21,® your future 
could be as good as gold. 




A career vMth the Number I team in 
real estate has a lot to offer someone 
just starting out. Freedom. Financial 
rewards. And the CENTURY 21 
CareerTrak* Program which is the 
most comprehensive training 
program in real estate 



Join US for our CENTURY 21® 
Career Stssion. Scotimi is limiteil, 
so coll now. 



TIME: 7-9 pm 
DATE: Wed., July 22nd 
PLACE: 367 Washington St. 
Braintree 

Admission Free. 



Qfikw ADAM HOBART REAUTY, INC. 

it^_jn2l. 367 Washington street 



Braintree 



848-4740 



m 



mi9 




QUINCY CENTER SIDEWALK SALE 

LIVE 

ON 
Q.C.T.V. - CHANNEL 03 
JULY 1 6TH • JULY 1 8TH 

There will be prizes and giveaways from the 
Q.C.T.V. van. Look for highlights of this year's 
Q.C.T.V. productions and interviews with visitors to 

the sidewalk sale. 

TUNE IN TO CHANNEL 03 

or 
stop by our booth In front of The Bank of Boston 

don't forget ... 

Channel 03 is the place to be for 

Live coverage of the 
Miss Quincy Bay Beauty Pageant 




81 School Street. Quincy. MA 02169 (617) 471-9609 



Page 2* Qaincy Sun Thuruiay, July I*. I9t7 




HELP WANTED 



$ QUALITY JOBS $ 

FOR 

$ QUALITY TEMPS $ 

Earn $5-$15 Per Hour 
Flexible Hours. Local Assignments 
S«cr«tarta(/W.P.. Ctortcal, Accounting, 
Ught Induttrtal, Data Entry 

QUALITY TEIMPS, INC. 

Division of Quality PartonntI 



SM-0500 ^w"»-"' ..-^. w, ..^ 328-6400 

"^^^^ DI»l.lon of Quality Paru>nntl Q^,„^y 

FuN A P. Tim* Parmanant Also Availabia 

1 ?ase 



Wanted 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 

BOOKKEEPER 
Call 471-3100 -335-1747 

For Appointment 



LEGAL NOTICE 



CITY OFQUINCY 
IN COUNCIL 



ORDER NO 
ORDERED 



170 



April 6. 1987 



Be It ordained by ihc Ciiy Council of the City of Quincy that the 
Revised Ordinances of the City of Quincy of 1976. as amended, be 
further as follows: 

In Chapter 24 City of Quincy Zoning Ordinances. Section 32 Zoning 
Districts. Add the following: 

"Thai land presently zoned Business "C" on Assessor's Plan 
No 3189, Plots 17, 23, 27. 28. 29 and 30. this land n on the 
northerly side of Newport Terrace and the westerly side of 
Newpon Avenue be re/oned to Res "B " 

Passed to be Ordained June 29, 1987 

ATTESI John M Gillis 

Clerk of ( ouncil 

Approved July 8. 1987 

Francis X. McCauley 

Mayor 

A True Copy-Attest. Thomas R Burke, Ass't City Clerk 

7 16 87 



INSTRUCTION 



fS 



HELP KNOCK OUT 
BIRTH DEFECTS 



Rescrvdlions 
Agents 
Ticket Agent 
Ground Service 
Reprf-sontalive 



Start locally full time/part time 
Tram on live airline computers 
Home study and resident 
training Financial aid 
available Job placement 
assistance National Hdqtrs 

Lighthouse Pi FL 
A.C.T. TRAVEL SCHOOL 




Join ihe 



ttr^ March of Dimes 




LEGAL NOTICE 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Aiiiencaii 
Red CnjKh 



Hi 



loj^cthcT. 
we Ciui 



COMMONWEAITH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 
AND FAMILY 
PROBATE COURT 
NORFOLK, ss 

79FI095EI 

To all persons interested in 
the estate of JOHN R 
ARMSTRONG late of 
QUINCY in said County, 
deceased 

A petition has been presented 
lo said C ourt for license to sell 
at private sale - public auction - 
certain real estate of said 
deceased which is situated in 
Quincv. in the ( ounty ol 
NORFOLK, in accordance 
with the terms set out in said 
pciiiKin 

If >(iu desire to object Ihercl" 
>ou Of \()ur attorncs should lilc 
a written appearance in said 
( Durl at Dedhafii. bflurt- kti 
u'clotk in the lorcriooii on iIk 
twcnls-lhird day ol Scpicmhii 
I'^X"'. the return da\ ol ilii-- 
uialion 

Wiiiicss Kubiit M I Old 
I squire. I irst Jud^e ol said 
( ourt. this twenty-second das 
ol Juni- I9K7 

tHOMASPAIKK K HI (.HIS 
■^ I'' 87 KecMlcr 



EVERYBODrS IHIARKETPIACE 



HELP WANTED 



NURSES 



Dug to the opening of our new unit, the 
Bostonian Nursing Care Center has 
Charge Nurse positions available 7-3. 3-1 1 and 
11-7 shifts. Full and part-time with excellent 
wage and benefits, paid Master Medical 
and Life Insurance. 

We are a 1 09 bed facility in the Neponset area 
of Dorchester, convenient to Expressway and 
public transportation. 



7. 16 



Call lUlrs. McQuald 
265-2350 



HUMAN SERVICES 



A dynamic agency is currently seeking. 



WORK SUPERVISORS 



Be responsible for the training and supervision 
of handicapped adults in janitorial and indus- 
trial areas. Excellent benefits and $14,000 •»■ 
salary. 
For these and other opportunities please call: 



Nancy 
328-0300 



7/16 



EXPERIENCED 

PASTE UP ARTIST 

Full or Part Time 
Call 471-3100 for appt. 



■'W 



1372 Hancock St., Quincy 
471-3100 



BARTENDER 



Mutt be experienced 

to woiit rotating 

schedule Friday, 

Saturday, Sunday. 

Starting Salary 
$5.00/per hour. 



LOU'S 
RESTAURANT 

Marshfield 
837-0818 



Ask for Charlie 



7/16 



FEDERAL, STATE * 
CIVIL SERVICE JOBS 

$16,707 to $59 148/yeaf Now 
Hiring CALL JOB LINE 1 518- 
459-361 1 ext F4464 for into 24HR 

7/16 

FOR SALE 



GOVERNMENT HOMES 

Irom $1 (U Repair) Delinquent 
tax prrjperty Repossessions 
Call 805-687-6000 E XI GH 3019 

9 17 



FOR SALE 

Wet suil & accessories $70 

Free/t-r chest oak veneer $75 

Call 479 6434 after 6 00 

GOVERNMENT HOMES 

For $100 (U Repair) BUY 
LilRECT' Repos and Tax 
Delinquent Properties Get ir>e 
FACTS TODAY' Call (refundat>le) 
1 518^459-3546 Ext H4464 24 
MRS 7/16 



SET OWN P/T HOURS 

Show toys & gifts at m home 

parties Free $300 working kit 

House of Lloyd 335-8024 or 697- 

9269 

7/?3 



OFFICE ASSISTANT 

Mature, organized individual with 
a pleasant telephone manr>er 
Light office work (filing, typing, 
phones) Please call 773-1767/ 

7/16 

REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 



HELP WANTED 



HOUSE FOR SALE 

Braintree, prime location 3 
bedroom Colonial Cape with 
garage. ^'^ baths, country 
kitchen, excellent condition 
Owner anxious to sell $159,900 
843-0806 

7/16 



MISCELLANEOUS 



PATENT SUIT 

Patent 4.481.674 suit against 
govt Make upto3miilion dollars 
That s $6000 to each dollar paid 
996-1637 $500 cost Wayne 
Silva 97 Park St New Bedford, 
MA 02740 '"6 



MOVING SALE 

7/18 & 19. 10-3 

50 Vane St N Quincy 

China/furniture/gas dryer/odds 

& ends/pu/zles/book- teweiry/ 

toys 

7'16 






IF YO J CAN DRINK. 
THAT S YOUR BUSINESS 

IF YOU CAN T WE RE 
WILUNG TO MAKE IT OURS 

CALL 847-3«41 ANYTIME 



SALES PERSON 

South Shore Buick is looking for 2 more Sales 

Representatives, to round out our Sales Force This is a 

career opportunity lo work for "A BEST IN CLASS 

DEALERSHIP 

Fringe benefits include Health & Accident. Life Insurance 

plus Retirement Plan 

If you are willing to work hard and follow directions. 

contact Jack Doyle for a confidential interview at 

770-3300 
SOUTH SHORE BUICK 

50 Adams SUmI, Quincy, MA 

7 16 



LOT PERSON 

Entry level position eilsts for person with some 
mechanical ability. Position involves moving ol 
AutomotMlee, upkeep of New and Used car lot and various 
olh«r duties. Must be neat appearing and have valid drhrers 
license and must be over 18. 

Contact Glen Peterson. 

770-3300 
SOUTH SHORE BUICK 

50 Adams Street, Quincy. MA 



7 16 



ATTENTION! 

Full Time & Part Time 

TELEPHONE OPERATORS to take catalog orders 
for European Compare Choose your own hours 
start Aug 10 Ideal tor students homemakers 
teachers, actors and actresses and anyone looking 
for full or pan lime schedule Will tram Must have 
pleasant speaking voice and en)oy workirM with put> 
lie Good woikir>g conditions and salary Convenient 
to Red Line. So Station area Flexible hours availa- 
ble between 8 30am to 8 30pm. Mon -Fn . 9-5 Sat 
Call Maureen 426 5216 

€92€I^^L.O 

7 lo 



RETAIL ADVERTISING 
SALES PERSON 

Part Time 



Loar 



1372 Hancock St., Quincy 
471-3100 



HELP US, 

HELP KIDS ! 



COMPASS . a private non 
profit agency serving 
adolescents is presently 
seeking fosier parents We 
provide comprehensive 
services to clients and loster 
parents including 24 hr 
support and weekly rem 
burse prints 

For rrxxe mlormalion please 
call: 

524-2333 

WE NEED YOUR 

HELP!!! 627 



RN or LPN 

Charge Nurse lor 3 lo 11 ihilt each 
Friday and aliernale weekends 
Encellenl salary Cali471 4046 Friel 
Nursing Home WoliaHon MA 

7 16 



DRIVER-CLASS II 
WAREHOUSE HELP 

For national building products 
company Will till ordPrs lor pick up 
by f:uslf)mpr» A deliver in New 
Fnqland area assisl <" general 
*ij'eh')u»e Heavy loitdirig and 
.inlf>ading rH^.^trcmenls Mij'.t bf 
'es()()n»it>lp i hard *oriiinq able I 
Inllrjw insfr(i( iMjns with a minirT'iirTi 
ot %uperviMon fjCMUerit driving 
'ecord •ic«(l«nl company banetlli 
Equal Opportunity Employer 
961 3720 

7/16 



RESIDENTIAL 
COUNSELOR 



VIN FEN CORP It Making full or part 
lima human Mrvice prolettionaif to 
work in a ratidantial tatting with a 
mantal haalth population Petition 
involvat skill leaching cate 
coordination tome individual and 
group countaling and iraatmant 
planning weekly in tarvica and 
training advtncamant opportunitiat 
3 waaka paM vacaNon. HailMa 
tchadullng. aicallant banaflla 
pa c taga, aalary alanine at 15K. 



CALL 

JENNI SANTILLO 

Mon-Fri 331-5506 

7/16 



EX. HOUSEKEEPER 

3 days a week Hours 7 to 3 
Excellent salary Fnel 
Nursing Home 58 Beacti St 
Wollaston 471-4046 

7 16 



HIRING! 

f P(l(,-ral governriieni phs your 
arcH and overseas Many 
imrTiediate openings without 
waiting list or test $15-$6e0O0 
Call refundable (602) 838 8885 
Fxt 2379 7 ^3 



ThHraday, July U, 1M7 Quincy Sun Page 27 




EVERYBOOrS MARKETPIACB 



SERVICES 



SERVICES 



ELECTRICAL & APPLIANCES 



CLYDE POOL SERVICE Inc. 

Vinyl Liner Replacement 

General Masonry 

Coping, Decks, Walkways, Patios 

Opening/Closing 

Sales Service & Repair 

337-4949 328-7290 



/ >/ 






STEVE'S CLEANING CO. 

GENERAL CLEANING 
COMMERCIAL FLOOR CARE 

FREE ESTIMATES - 770-9799 



24 Hour Answering Machine 



ae 



C 



GARAGE DOOR 
STAUATION I REPAIRS 
ELECTRIC OPENERS 

frt IftMIMtH 

691-2304 9 3 



AT YOUR SERVICE 

We II do 

Small construction, patio and 
yardwork. clean attics cellars 
and garages, painting driving 
Ask for Martin at iM-MM. 

7 16 

Auto Truck Marine 
Supply Co. 

138 Washington Street 

Ouincy. MA 02169 

Penn/oil Motor Oils 

Blue Streak Ignition Parts 



7-16 



Shop Locally 
Savt Gas A Monay 



PERSONALS 



M.iit holy aposllo Si Jude faithiui 
ip'ka'il and Itiond ol Jesus the Church 
h.nuirs and invokes you imn^prsaHy as 
Vx- pat'on ot hopeless i Hses o' thmgs 
nnos* desp.itte^ o* P'ay lor me la^is..' 
hp'pless a'>d iilni' Make uso I tmplo'f 
,011 lo b'ing ./sbie am speetly help 
*^p'e help is a'^uisi despa^ed ol 
CoTie lo my asS'Slance i' this qreal 
need that i rrirt, n-ceivc the consolatmn 
and help ol hea»pn m aM my 
necessities tribulations and 
su'ienngs partit.ciia"y ihcfe Tiake 
y.)in leqicsll an1 that I ni,u p'aisr 
Got «i|h you a'ld all the Plf< I lorcvfr I 
promise O blessed SI Judi" tobPOvP' 
min:l«ul ol this qrpa' tavor *o alAays 
hf)iif)r yoii as w, sp'-Lial aM! powflu' 
pat'-)ri and to graieluliy eni ciKajc 

d*'VOlion lo you Anipn 

BR 

7 16 



NANCY'S NOOK 

New baby boutique, christening 
and baby equipment, etc New 
and gently uaed children s and 
women s apparel Quality 
consignments accepted. 2SA 
Beale St . Woilaston. 773-9293. 



D.R. Smalley 
Carpentry 

Quality work in all fazes of: 

Building 

Remodeling 

Roofing & 

Siding 

Custom Oecics 

Fraa Est. Anything 

Don with 

479-7436 Wood 

7-16 



WANTED 



WE WANT YOUR RUBBISH 

Trees bushes. |unk etc Weir-cnt 
It all Well clean it all. the cellar 
the garage the attic the yard 
Call for a quick free estimate 
337-8552 8 2: 



FOR RENT 



kFiA ER TO THE HOLY SPIRIT O 

Holy Spirit You »yh i enhghlons me 
*ho illuminatps all things S(^ I may 
attain my goal You who gives mr the 
divine gift ol forgiving and 'Tgettinq 
the evil doniMomp and who isevpr with 
me at all moments o' rriy nfr I wish 
during this sho't diaiixjiie witn Yon to 
thank You lor everything and lo 
contirm onre ag.iin my wisti to never 
b*' separated irom you even an^ in 
spitp ol all material dislr.n t.ons I 
desire lo be wil'i you in eterr-al gloiy 
Thank You tor Your merry low.i dfs me 
ami all who are dear lu me Must be 
sail three days in sucr.ossion al'ei the 
throe days lavor or grace will be 
atl.iinert even il :< appi;i". ''■ He ol 
rti'ticiilt nature Then puhlished with 
instructions as soor. as possitile wil'i 
/our initials G B 

7'16 



Thank You 

St. Jude 

My Prayer was Answered 

CMS 
7/16 



Thank You 
St. Anthony 



M H 

M6 



Cottages 
For Rent 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore. House- 
keeping cottages. 
Studio and 3 room 
available. Weekly 
rentals M85 - »250. 
Private beach. Tennis 
a\;ailable. Call 328- 
1300, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

T F 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Quincy K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

f-or information please call 

328-5967 

TF 

HALL FOR RENT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380. 

American Legion. 1116 Sea St 

479-6149 

TF 



HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings Showers. 

Meetings. Banquets 

Elks Home, 440 E Squantum St 

Ouincy 

472-2223 

TF 



ANCIENT MARINER 




Carpet A Upholstery Cleaning 






471-8026 • 282-5060 






Horn* ConmwtcKl Mvin* 




AulO 


•CARPETS • 






J18 00 Per Room $25 00 Per Room With Scotch Guard | 


•UPHOLSTERY • 






All Prices Below Include 3M Scotch Guard 






Sofa 


ns 




Chair 


S20 
$30 
$55 
$45 
$45 




Loveseat 


Sofa A Loveseet 


Sola A Chair 


Loveseat I Chair 


Ottoman 


$10 
$75 


ft.6 


Sofs Loveseat I Chair 



A &T VACUUM 

• $1.4 95 Overhaul Special 

on any vacuum 

• QOECK XL VACUUM 

(as arlvHrtisel by WBZ sDa<<; 
Ma/nard on sale Nr-jw ■•?49 / 

Almost fii^t Eife'.i'oiux ', 
Startiri-j at '299' 



We now have a Large Selection 

of Video Movies 

99C Memlj«rship Fee 

$2 per Movie 



27 Beale St . Wotlaston 
479-5066 



TF 



^t^ Inc. ^^/ 



472-6604 

FREE ESTIMATES 
QUALITY WORK 
REASONABLE RATES 
ALL STAGES OF CARPENTRY 



5? 






7/16 



PRIVATE CHARTERS 

Cruise Sightsee, Whalewaich 

USCG Lie 

Capt R F McDermott 

Reasonable rates day/night 

•43-M01 Eve. 

10/15 

ROBERT L. ELLIS 

Decks, Porches, Windows 

and Remodeling 

Free Estimates 

Licensed 331-9977 

9 17 



BAY STATE 
Home Services 

e Interior and Exterior Painting 

e Wallpapering 
Insured Free Estimates 



878-4567 



7/16 



HOUSE 
CLEANING 

Can Pal 479-0214 
$10 an hour 



7,' 16 



GLASS A SCREEN REPAIR 

Wood & Porch Screens 

WOLLASTON GLASS CO. 

9 Woilaston Ave., Woilaston 

Reasonable Rates 

Overnight Repair 

472-6207 9 10 

LAWNS MOWED 

Hecjges Trimmed 

Reasonable Rates 

Call for Free Estimate 

479-1165 

7 23 



SERVICES 



BATHROOMS 

REMODELED 

also 

MINOR REPAIRS 

Ceramic Tile 

or 

Formica Enclosures 

One Price 

Reasonable Rates 

CALL 472-1310 

Lie ■12*7 Since 1960 

Free Estimates 



BOWES CUSTOM 
DECK & FENCE 

Free Estimates 
Call 698-2304 



JOE'S FLOORS 

Sanded & Refinished 
Best Quality and Prices 
«=REE ESTIMATES 
254-7539 9 17 



TREE WORK 

Pruning, removal, brush 
chipping Free estimates MiKe 
Sullivan. 472-3595 

9 24 



Your South Short 

Heedquarttrt 

For 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St So Ouincy 

472-1710 




TF 




EXPERT 



lAMf nnn 

t KWUHO 

GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



SERVICES 



Larry's 
Home Repair 

e Carpenters 
e Painters 
e Decorators 
General Contractor 
20 Years Experience 
Licensed O Insured 
Interior-Exterior Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 

All HoiT>e Repairs 
Small or Large 



32S-S735 



S5f-7471 

TF 



B& W 
RENOVATIONS 

Painting Inteno' Exterior 

Remodeling 

335-2452 472-7276 

9 3 



Special Classified Ad Bonus 




CV»an/ie/ 



and Sun Cable Classified Ads 



MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancocl( St., Quincy, MA 02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 




RATES 



QUINCY SUN 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $4 50 for one insertion, up to 20 words. IOC each additional word. 

D With your Sun ad you can also run 20 times per day for 3 days on 
Channel 8-Sun Cable T.V. for only Si per day 



INDEX 



D Services 

a For Sale 

a Autos 

D Boats 

D For Rent 

O Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

a Pets, Livestock 

C Lost and Found 

a Real Estate For Sale 

D Real Estate Wanted 

D Miscellaneous 

D Work Wanted 

a Antiques 

D Coins & Stamps 

D Rest Homes 

D Instruction 

D Day Care 

D Personal 

D Electrical & Appliances 

Cable Ads will be 
abbreviated if neccesary. 



D S4.20 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions, of the same 
ad, IOC each additional word 

D With your Sun ad. you can also run 20 times per day for 4 days on 
Channel 8-Sun Cable TV for only $1 per day 

QUINCY SUN & — 

SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 
8 WEEKS 



QUINCY SUN 
3 WEEKS 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $4.00 per insertion, up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions of same ad 
IOC each additional word. Channel 8 Cable for 5 days at Si 00 per 
day 



QUINCY SUN 

13 WEEKS or more 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $3 85 per insertion, up to 20 words for 13 or more insertions of the 

same ad, IOC each additional word 
D With your Sun ad. you can also run 20 times a day for 7 days on 

Channel 8-Sun Cable T V for only Si per day 



SUN CABLE 
T.V. ONLY 



D Run ycur ad on Channel 8-Sun Cable TV. alone 20 times per day 
for 3 days at S2 per day. 



D Enclosed is $ 

in The Quincy Sun and 



COPY: 



.for the following ad to run _ 
days on Channel 8. 



.weeks 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACr RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION 
DEADLINE TUESDAY. 1000 AM PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD 



ra|c It Q«hir> S«n Thunaay. July I*. 1917 



Hospital Board To Meet 

There will be a meeting of Board of Managers Tuesday, 
the Quincy City Hospital July 21 at 7:30 p.m in the Dennis F. Ryan Board Room. 



EVERYONE'S AT HUB VIDEO 
CASHING IN ON THE CHIPS 

Now you can get a $1^9 bag 
of WESE potato chips for only 




Ground Broken For 
New QJC Building 



Quincy Junior College 
groundbreaking ceremonies 
were held Monday behind the 
present college IcKation on 
Savillc Ave.. Quincy Center 

The occasion was to 
dedicate a ncM building being 
buill without public lunds 
especially for Quincy Junior 
Collcgc-lhe only locally 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here t a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



sponsored public community 
college in Massachusetts. 

QJC president Dr O 
Clayton Johnson said: 

"It is a remarkable feat for a 
municipal public college that 
does not receive public funds 
to be engaged in building a 
new educational-administra- 
tive facility. Fhis action is the 
result ol the human resiliency 
ol the faculty and students, 
the institutional commitment 
to continue providing 
collegiate services to this 
region, and of the community 
leadership and support 
received It cmphasi/es our 
concern foi the lutuie. our 
intention to stand last .ind a 
major attempt to expand our 
services 

"We express our sincere 



appreciation to the City of 
Quincy School Committee, 
the City of Quincy Council, 
the Mayor, our legislative 
delegation and. in particular, 
the people who have and 
continue to support us, Jhe 
faculty and students of the 
college reward that trust by 
providing excellent educa- 
tional preparation and 
graduating outstanding 
students. In essence we are a 
people's college and we 
proudly serve people I torn 
over sixty cities and towns ol 
the C ommonwcalth. 

"Our special thanks is 
fxtended to the developer- 
RiLCiardi C ompanv -the 
support provided has been 
most gracu)us I hank \ou 
verv. ver\ much " 



Lease YOUR Car, 
Save YiDUR Business 

You can save a bundle for your business when 

you lease. And now you can lease through someone you know. 

Your bank. Call 47 1-3500 and ask about 

MAC Auto Leasing. It's an affiliate of Quincy Savings. 



Quincy Savings Bank 




Member FDIC DlFM 



Awhollyownedsubsidiaryof Excel Bancorp 



Political AdvertiseTient 



Polilical Advp'iisemeni 



t';'^'.' Hi A(ive't'S**'Tic' 



r 



Joe LaRaia wants to change the face 
of the Quincy Center Retail District 

He has the PLAN, the VISION and the COMMITMENT 






"'^</A//' 







r^' 



Return Joe LaRaia - Mayor 



Jam** F Eiidy. Chairman 
LaHala lor Mayor CommHIaa 




fkQW^ 




^7^'^ V^'5 7 on inn 



LRIN GROGAN, 18, of Quincy. third runner-up, walks 
down the runway for the swimsuit competition in the Miss 
Quincy Bay Pageant. 

iQuincy Sun photo by Chorlei Haff) 




MISS QUINCY BAY Renec Vardaro, 21, of Brockton It 
escorted by Pat Pasquale, commodore of the town River 
Yacht Club in the swimsuit competition. 

(Photo by PhotoQuickf 



LORi COLLELA, 19, of Mansfield, was first runner-up in the 
Miss Quincy Bay Pageant. 

Story, other photos Page 14 (PhotoQuUk of Quincyf 




VOL. If No. 43 




Thursday, July 23, lf87 



In Wake Of Bulger-Flynn Feud 



United Front Fights Hub Incinerator 




THREE-ALARM FIRE Sunday at the Odd Fellows Hall on Newport Ave., Wollaston, caused 
an estimated S150,000 damage, story on Page 3 

(Quincy Sun photo by Tom Gorman) 

100,000 Square Feet 

Of South Quincy Land 

Marked For Open Space 



Ward 4 Councillor James 
Sheets reports that 100.000 
square feet of land in South 
Quincy has been dedicated to 
open space and will be cleaned 
up later this fall. 

The land between Liberty 
St., Penn and Columbia Sts. 
has become open space 
through efforts of the 
community, the city 
councillor and the l.appan 
family, he said. 



The Lappan family 
purchased the property from 
the Peter Rusciuto estate and 
will build a warehouse on the 
land abutting Liberty St. near 
the intersection of Liberty St. 
and Brook Rd. according to 
Sheets. 

As part of the agreement in 
ailo>\ing (he building, the 
greater majority of the land 
will be open space and cannot 
be built on in the future, he 



said. 

Four informal meetings 
were held by Councillor 
Sheets, and numerous public 
hearings were held before 
various city boards. 

"The residents overwhelm- 
ingly supported the agree- 
ment." said Councillor 
Sheets. 

He also said the land 
dedicated to open space has 

ll ont'd on Ha/ir 28) 



By NANCY McLAL'GHLIN 

State and local 
officials unified their 
efforts Tuesday to 
"strongly oppose" 
solving Boston's trash 
problems by siting an 
incinerator on Quincy's 
Moon Island or at the 
closed General Dynamics 
Quincy Shipyard. 

It was also unanimously 
agreed by the group to oppose 
construction of any type of 
incinerator by any group 
which purchases the yard, 
according to Mayor Francis 
McCauley, in whose office the 
meeting was held. 

Discussion centered on 
Senate President William M. 
Bulger's derailing of Boston's 
plans to construct a trash-to- 
energy incinerator in South 
Bay. 

Bulger said that he would 
reveal "sometime soon" his 
own "irresistible choice" for 
location of the 1.500 ton-a- 
day plant. 

Though Bulger refused to 
elaborate on his choice, which 
he said would be in a "less 
populous location," specula- 



Quiney Bay 
High Tides 



tion focused on several sites, 
including Moon Island and 
the closed Quincy shipyard. 

"We have no knowledge 
that Bulger was indicating 
sites in Quincy," said 
McCauley, "but because 
rumors were reported in the 
press, we felt we had to take a 
strong position. 

"Any such attempts will be 
strongly opposed and 
resisted by the city of Quincy 
officials and citizens," 
McCauley said. 

The mayor said he was 
reactivating the Moon Island 
task force established last year 
after taking the island by 
eminent domain from Boston. 
City Solicitor Joseph (Jay) 
MacRitchie is chairman. 

He also said that, on the 
recommendation of Rep. 
Robert Cerasoli. the General 
Dynamics Site Task Force 
will be established to monitor 



the ongoing possible sale of 
the shipyard. 

Cerasoli and Ward 2 
Councillor Theodore 

DeCristofaro will be among 
the members, McCauley said. 

"We're all concerned that 
whatever goes there (at the 
shipyard) that it is 
environmentally sound and 
complementary to the 
neighborhood in Quincy 
Point," the mayor said. 

McCauley said he planned 
to write to Bulger and Boston 
Mayor Raymond Flynn 
opposing the siting of any 
incinerator for Boston's trash 
in the city of Quincy. 

The mayor noted that 
Bulger said he would not 
make his suggestion known 
until September. 

He also said that the 
ultimate decision will be up to 

(Cont'd on Page 28) 



Finn Undergoes 

Surgery At 

Mass. General 



July 23 
24 
25 
26 

27 
28 
29 



A.M. 

:0:42 
11:25 

12:08 

12:46 

1:25 

2:04 



P.M. 

10:43 

11:27 

12:06 

12:44 

1:22 

1:58 

2:35 



Police Chief Francis Finn 
was in the intensive care unit 
Tuesday, at Massachusetts 
General Hospital, Boston, 
following surgery Monday to 
clear his carotid arteries. 

According to Mayor 
Francis McCauley, the 
operation was successful. 

"We wish him a speedy 
recovery," said McCauley, 
who noted that Pohce Capt. 
Paul Nestor will serve as 
acting chief. 

Finn is expected to be out 
fo. at least six weeks. 

He underwent bypass heart 
surgery four years ago. 




FRANCIS FINN 



P«|e 2 Quincy Sun Thur»d«y. July 2V IM7 



Low Interest 
Mortgages Available 



Rep. Michael MorrisscN 
announces the Massachusclts 
Housing finance Agenc\ 
(MHFA) is making available, 
once again to qualified 
homebuyers, approximately 
$23.5 million in low-interest 
mortgages 

it is expected that about 
.^00 households are to bcnelil 
from the 27-year lixed rate S 2 
per cent mortgage. accordin>; 
to Morrissey 

To qualify for the low- 
intercsl loans, residents must 
fall into one of the following 
categories: lower-income 
households, minoritv 
households, qualified Vietnam 
era veterans, and physicall> 
handicapped borrowers. lo 
be considered under lower- 
income households the 



annual adjusted houM-luiM 
income must be under S2h.()(M) 
for one person. $.'1,000 I'" 
two people and $.V(MK) loi 
each additional dependent to 
be Ining in the house 

As ol .lul\ S. ItJS^ 
participating lenders are 
accepting applications which 
must be completed betore 
.Ian S. 1<)88 In order to 
appU. residents must have 
already signed a purchase and 
sales agreement or an 
accepted oiler to purchase 
agreement Some of the 
participating lenders m the 
area are the Bank ot New 
Fngland, Boston; MIC 
Mortgage C ompany, IVdham. 
and Northern Mortgage 
Companv. Norwell 

There is a limit on the cost 



ol .1 house in i)rdei to qualit\ 
tor the loans for example, 
there is a limit ol $i:4.()(K) lor 
existing s 1 n g I e - 1 a m 1 1 s 
structure or condominium 
unit. $17().(KM) tor a tour- 
tamily structure in the Boston 
area 

Rep Morrissey said, 
'These low-interest mortgages 
are a great opportunity for 
man> people who would 
normally be unable to 
purchase their first home. I 
encourage anvone who 
qualities to take ad\antage of 
the \ e r $ 2 .' million 
available." 

,\n\one interested in 
tinding out more information 
can contact the MHf- A Ottice 
of Single-Family F'rograms 
on 5() Milk St . Boston. MA 
02109 or at (M7) 451-2766. 



Library To Receive 

$40,000 Matching Grant 

From Historical Committee 



The Thomas Crane Public According to libiar> 

Librarv has been selected tora dir<-'c-tor Warren Watson, the 

matching allocation of grant will go towards repair ol 

$40.00() from the Massachu- Nvmdows intheold Richardson 

setts Historical Commission's building, as well as some 

Fiscal Year 1988 Massachu- pointing, 

setts Preservation Pro|ects Watson said estimated cost 

Pund "f 'he project is S2(M).0(M). 



CHRISTMAS IN JULY 



Variety of 

Xmas 

\ decorations 

goose 

planters of 

various 

sizes 

T-Shirts 

Mugs 

Etc. 




Personalized 

Xmas 

Stockings 

Ornaments 

Pot Pourri 

"Quincy" 

Tote Bags 

"Mass" 

Souvenir 

Items 



Ihe S4().()00 grant will be 
added to SKMI.IMK) alreads in 
the librar\ budget, he s.iul 

though not sure when 
work on the proiect would 
begin. Watson said that it 
must be completed h\ lune. 
1988. 

The library is on the 
National Historic Register 
and was designed b\ Henrv 
Jobson Richardson, foremost 
architect ol his era 

It was commissioned m 
1880 b\ Albert Crane in 
memory ot his lather 



From Personal Gifts to Household Items 
Mon Fn 6% Haiicock Street 
Sat Wollaston, MA 

102:30 472-7886 

Sally Enckson Betty Ellis 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



Ifyou^ve got the needy 
We We got the money. 

In fact, Quincy Junior College offers the 
most financial aid dollars per student of any 
community college in Massachusetts. Con- 
sider these facts: 

• Every Quincy Junior College student 
demonstrating need this year was offered a 
financial aid award. 

• 75% of our student body received some 
type of financial assistance. 

• Over half of QJC full time students paid no 
tuition money out of their own pockets. 

• Many part time students taking as little as 
one course received financial aid. 

You can attend college, too. Call our Financial 
Aid Office at 786-8775 and let us put you on the 
path to a more successful future. 

Your convenient community college. 

Financial Aid & Child Care A vailable 





Quincy Junior College 

"^4 (">xidin«ion Sirrrt. (Jjun( v. Md'.sa< hijs»-its <)2\f)'i 




KIRK ( HIKK (irl Valfnti direct* operalionN ■! a lhre*-«larm fire al Odd Krilows Mali on 
smokr-shruuded Newport Ave.. NNoliaslon. 

l(Juini> Sun fthoht /m Turn l.nrninii 



At Odd Fellows Hall 



$150,000 Blaze 
Under Investigation 



Otticials aic lM\t.■^ll^alln^; 
the eaiisL- ot a thtcc-alai tii tire 
Sunda\ allcinonn uhuli 
causcil an cstitnatcd Sl^O.OOd 
damage to ihc Odd Icllovss 
Mall at M.V T and ^21 
NcwpDtl A\c , Wollasion 

I he building also houses 
(irccniaw's ollice hiiniluie on 
the street le\el 

I he lire started in the thud 
lloor attic area, aceordin^; to 
I ire Chief Carl \alenii I here 
were no reported iniunes. he 
said 

\alenti said that the lire 
was diltieult lo contain to the 
low and a halt-siorv wood 
(rame siruttiire hetause ol the 
close proximit\ ol apartment 
buildings on either side 



lenants ol both buildings 
were evacuateil while the lite 
was being louglit, aicotding 
lo \ alenti 

■■\\e hail to make sniiu- 
toiceable entries to niakc sure 
e\ei\onc was oui," saul 
\ alenli 

\V.itcr tiittams h\ the tiic 
tkparlment on either siilc ol 
the Odd lellows Hall helped 
keep the lire Ironi spreading. 
he said 

lenants were allowed lo 
return to the apartment 
buildings attei the all out wav 
sounded, accoiding to 
V'alenti 

"Ihe lite was prett\ well 
advanced when the liie 
department aiti\eil." said 



\ alenti. who e\pl,iin;i: 
there vs. is no otu 
building so tluie u.i. 
in discover V ol the h,,i/ 

I he top Hoot ol ■! 
I elUtws Hall w.iv p, 
gutted, according in \ ,i 
He s.iid the huiUlmg mv;' 
will determine it thi h,r 
str iiclurallv sound 

i he lifsi alarm i.ir; 
4 Sh p m . se».orhl ,i: ^ '• ■ : 
and third at <i ?4 ; \ 
s.iiil I he all ou! u '. 
p ni 

\ alenli rioii 
was the scene 
lour vears ac 
started b\ voungvic 
with lirecrai k 
I outlh ot iulv 



$9,9 K) In Plumbing Permits 



A total ot 141 plumbing 
permits were issued during 
June, and permit lees 
amounted to $^.^40 . 
according to lames A I rwm. 
.Ir . Plumbing and das 
Inspector 

(here were 2 IX inspections 
made, he said 



\ total ol 12 gas litting 
permits were issued, and 
permit lees totaled S^'JS. 
i rwm said 

I here were |7| inspections 
made 

last month, during Ma\. 
there were I \l> plumbing 
permits issued, and per mil 



fees amounted to S4 '■)~-i 
A total ol 24 I iiispci • ' - 

were made 

According to I rwin itun 

were M gas tilting pen; s 

issued, and permit l-i's 

totaled SM2 

I here were I ^H gas IiM tu' 

inspections m.ide. he s.ml 



Beach Swim Schedule 



Thursda), Jul> 2.V high Heginner I H 12^0. Ikginner 
lide-1042, beach hours K H A- 1 I. fkginner II H- II V). 
a m -I p.m , Bcgmner I A-12, Advanced Heginner-y. 



"I wish 

rd known that 

before " 

We hear people we serve say this often. 

That's why we f.-xtend an open invitation to 
anyone to consult with us in advance. 



Keohane 

FUNERAL HOME, INC. 

785 arxl 333 HANCOCK STREET 

QUINCY 

773-355 1 

'PEOPLE HELPING PEOPLE" 



Inlermcdiale-K ^0, Sw 
K, Bjjsic Rescue \ ^^ 
Salety-9 30-11 

Krida), July 24. Iiifd Uik-^ 
1 1 2.S. beach hours 'i ,i m 2 
P m . He g inner I \ ' 
fk-gmncr I B- 1 30, Meginni! II 
A-12; fk-gmncr II HI 2 '<i 
Advanced Beginrut I" 
lnlcrmcdialc-9:30. Swiinnui 
y; Advanced I ilesavmi- 
10 30-12 

Mond-..y, July 27, high int^' 
l;22, beach hours 1 1 a ni 4 
p.m , Bcgmner I A 3. Beginrui 
I B 3:30. Beginner II A ■■ 
Beginner H B 2:30; Advaiu^>l 
Beginner II, Inlermedi.iii 
11:30; Swimmer 12. Advanced 
life-saving 12:30-2 

Tuesday. July 28. high n.lc 
1:58; heath hours II ^Oa m 
4:30 p m ; Beginner I A ^ 'n 
Beginner I B 4; Beginnci H \ 
2:30, Beginner II M ' 
Advanced Beginner I I '" 
Intermediate 12, Swirnimi 
12 30. Basic Rescue A W"" 
Salelv I 2 JO 

Wednesday. July 2V. 1 1) '' 
tide 2 IS, beach hours |?no,iii 
*> p m , Beginner I A ' 
Ikginnei I B4 30, licgiinHi 1 1 
A 3. Ikginnei II H < "' 
Advanced Begiinur I-' 
Inter mediate 12 M). Swimhu" 
I. Advanced I ilesaving I '" 
3 



Thur«day. July 23. 1917 Quincy Sun Pag* J 




' «. ^ • ^ _ ^ ^fc ■^ ^ _ 



( RI:ATIN(. a MASTKKPIKC KisDenisc DesLauvimwhu paints thf face of J.T.Mickle) III 
at thr popular Hand and Painlini; Booth sponsored b> the Quincy Rotary Club. 

Good Fun, Buys, Weather 




HINDREDS OK SHOPPERS turned out uniu Haiicutk ^^reet v^Juch became a pedestrian 
mall decorated with booths displaying merchandise and colorful pennants fluttering overhead. 

lQuini-\ Sun phutot by Charlei Flaftf) 



Sidewalk Bazaar Gets^Very Successful' Rating 



By ROBKRT BOSWORTH 

li was another banner \far 
for the Dountown Quincy 
Sideualk Ba/aar 

An abundance of bargains, 
pleasant weather and plenty 
ol eager shoppers combined 
to make the 17th annual 
ba/aar a successful one. 

I he three-da\ e\cnt 
during which Hancock St. 
becomes a pedestrian mall lor 
three days is sponsored b\ the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association 

Hancock St between 
School and (iranite Sts was 
closed to \ehicular tralfic. 
People ol all ages walked up 
and down Hancock St 
enjoying the ba/aar's man\ 
attractions. 

\ random sample ol 
\arious people and businesses 
who participated in the 
annual e\ent agreed it was 
"\er\ successlul" and helped 
boost downtown Quincy"s 
summer business season. 
Sample comments. 
Donald Moreau. manager 
ol Woolworth's and chairman 
ol this year's ba/aar: 

"We topped last year which 
had been the best year ever. 
Business wise it was \cry 
got)d Ihe nice days on 
Ihursday and Friday really 
helped us. Ihe ba/aar was 
very successlul and I am 
pleased." 

Robert Colman Sr . ol 



C'olman's Sporting (ioods: 
"Business was very good. We 
had a good crowd, good 
weather and everything 
turned out very well. The 
ba/aar days were very 
successful, very orderly and 
there were no problems." 

Jean Leonard, manager of 
Ryder's of Quincy: "Business 
was very good. We sold about 
everything we put outside 
I he turnout on Thursday and 
Kriday was very good Many 
were here the first thing 
Thursday morning it was 
very successful and it was a lot 
of fun " 

Mark Bert man ol Roger's 
Jewelry "We were busv this 
year, more than last year 
Ihursdav and I ridav were 
very busv and the traffic was 
excellent. Volume was up 
from the last couple of years 
and I am very pleased with the 
ba/aar's results." 

Kenneth Fallon Jr., 
executive director of the 
Quincy Center Business and 
F'rofessional Association: 
"Ihe ba/aar ran very well 
Ihere have been little or no 
complaints on the mechanics 
of the ba/aar Quincy Cable 
Ch. .^and Sun C'h. K. WJDA. 
Wl'MB in addition to the 
other media added a great 
deal to It Ihe Ronald 
McDonald Show was popular 
as were the Caricature's 
Unlimited and Hand and 
Face F'ainting sponsored bv 



Well Child Clinic Aug. 5 



I he Well-Child Clinic held 
by the Quincy Health 
Department at the J.F-.K. 
Health Center. 1 120 Hancock 
St. will be Wednesday. Aug. 5 
from 10 a.m. to 1 1 a.m. 



Call 77.VI3«0 e.xt. 2.^8 for 
further information. 

Shop Locally 
Save Gas & Money 




SMITH 
CORONIV 




As low as 



Eleclra XT 
Automatic Correction 



$12995 



"We service 
what we sell" 



QUINCY 

Typewriter Service 

5 Maple St., Quincy Sq. 472-3656 



the Rotary Club of Quincy. 
Fhc Yankee Jack and Marie 
performance also drew a big 
crowd." 



Irwin Slatnick of Cum- 
mings: "The ba/aar went very 
well. It was very successful 
because the weather was with 



us 



there was plenty of 
merchandise at the right price 
and the customers were 
satisfied. We had a high 



turnout and the traffic was 
very heavy. People were 
pleased and I think the bazaar 
was excellent." 



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NAME 



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Neponset Circle Office: Doicliestei 825 9090 
Quincy Office Quinry 479 9660 



ADDRESS 



CITY 



TELEPHONE 



STATE 



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Pagr 4 Quinc> Sun Thursday, July 2^ 14X7 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Quincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

1372 Hancock St . Ouincy Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth, Jr . Publisher and Editor 

2M per copy, $11 00 per year by mail in Quincy 
$12 00 per year by mail outside Ouincy $15 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston Mass 



Postmaster Send address change to 
The Quincy Sun. 1372 Hancock St Ouincy Mass 02169 

The Ouincy Sun assumes no financial responsilxlity for •'oTTLJ"'' 
lypograpfiical errors in advertisements t5ul will reprint thai lfmA,*fn 

pan of an advertisement in which the typographical error 
occurs 



Clean Water 
Day Saturday 



"Save The Harbor Save 
The Bay" and the "Clean 
Water Action Project" have 
set aside Saturday. July 25 as 
Massachusetts' first annual 
"Clean Water Day " 

Mayor Francis McCauley 
has proclaimed the day to be 
"Clean Water Day" in 
Quincy. 

Among the many activities 
scheduled for the day will be 
MDC Metroparks activities 
at the Wollaston Beach 
Reservation in Quincy. 
Participants will learn about 
Boston Harbor and the 
problem of pollution in the 
harbor Those interested 
should meet across from the 
Wollaston Beach bath house 
on Quincy Shore Drive at 1 1 
a.m 



Other activities include live 
music and speeches at 
Nantasket Beach in Hull from 
10:30 to 1 1:30 a.m.. and a 
barbequc at the beach at 5:30 
p.m. 

In addition, volunteers 
from all over eastern 
Massachusetts will have 
petitions that ask Congress 
and the Environmental 
Protection Agency for full 
funding of the Clean Water 
Act and stricter enforcement 
of key environmental laws 
which protect the waters and 
reduce the use of toxics. Each 
\olunteer will also carry a 
"clean-up bucket" to collect 
donations to further the work 
of "Save The Harbor Save 
The Bay" and the "Clean 
Water Action Project." 



'What's 
New? 



Tl^on^as 
Crar^e fa 
Publics 
Library 




Following 1$ a list of new adult and children's 
books now available at the Thomas Crane Public 
Library. 

Fiction: Carnival of Spies; a novel, by Robert Moss. 
Villard Books, 1987. Dead Faces Laughing, by David 
Delman. Doubieday & Co., Inc., 1987. Dreams Of The 
Kalahare, by Carolyn Slaughter. Charles Scribner's 
Sons. 1987. Embassy, by Leslie Waller. McGraw-Hill, 
1987. A Hollywood Education; tales of movie dreams 
and easy money, by David Freeman. G.P. Putnam's 
Sons, 1987. Woe To Live One, by Daniel Woodrell 
Henry Holt & Co., 1987. 

Non-Fiction: Complete Guide To Sports Injuries, by 
H. Winer Griffith, M.D. Body Press, 1987. •617.1027 
G87. Cooking With Bon Appetit: Cookies. Knapp 
Press, 1987. •641.8657 COO. Cooking With Bon 
Appetit: Gifts From The Kitchen. Knapp Press, 1987. 
•641.5 GIF. Higher Learning, by Derek Bok. Harvard 
University Press, 1986. ^378.73 BOK. Not Quite 
Paradise; Making Marriage Work, by Bonnie Maslin, 
Ph.D. & Yehuda Nir. M.D. Doubieday & Co., 1987. 
•306.81 B37. The Second Oldest Profession; Spies and 
Spying in the Twentieth Century, by Phillip Knightley 
WW. Norton & Co., 1987. ^327. 12 K74. 

Children's Books: Airplanes, by Byron Barton 
Crowell, 1986. •; E629.1 B28. Cleopatra And The 
Egyptians, by Andrew Langley. Watts, 1986. •J932.01 
LAN. Up And Up, by Shirley Hughes. Lothrop. 1986 
JE Fiction. What's The Matter With Htrbic Jones, by 
Suzy Kline, Putnam, 1986. J Fiction. Where's Julius?, 
by John Burningham. Crown. 1986. JE Fiction. 

•Dewey Decimal (location) number. 

Compiled by Cathcnne Duffek and Jane Granstrom 




- (£/ Km« ' MiM«B Sr><na>«. 






'Rule number 26 : 'Never adjust your girdle while the 
vehicle is in motion.' " 




Sunbeams 

By HcMuy Bosworth 



Coming: One High School? 



It's something that a lot of us just don't want to think 
about. 

Especially those of us who enjoy the tradational 
Quincy High School-North Quincy High School sports 
rivalry topped off by the I hanksgiving Day football 
game. 

But the day may not be too far down the road when 
Ouincy will have to face the fact that it has become (or is 
about to become) a one high school cil\ 

As a Quincy High School graduate that might be 
considered treason over on Coddmgton St. 

And it won't win many friends in North Quincy. 

What do you mean a combined Quincy-North 
Quincy High School! No way! Never! 

But we're moving in that direction. And seem to be 
picking up speed. 

Richard Koch. Sr.. executive 
secretary of the Quincy Park- 
Recreation Board noticed the 
evidence over the July 4th holiday. 

Koch issues the permits for use of 
the city parks and fields for various 
activities - including July 4th field 
days and other special events. 

Fewer permits were issued this year than in years 
past because there were fewer ward and neighborhood 
activities. 

And. because there are fewer youngsters to go to 
them. 

"We had the fewest requests for permits that I can 
remember" he says. 

He says Quincy is shifting from a cit> of juniors to a 
city of seniors. 

He notes that just 15 years ago there were an 
estimated 20,000 public and parachoial school students 
in Quincy and about IO.(X)0 senior citi/cns 

Now. he says. It's the other way around. About lO.(KK) 
(maybe less) public and private school students and 
20.{KM) senior citi/ens. 

He notes 13 elementary schools ha\c been closed 
although one (Wollaston) will re-open in the fall 

At the secondary level, there were only 720 graduates 




in the three high schools this year 339 North QiiirK\ 
259 Quincy and 122 Quincy Vocational lechna.il 

In 1971 there were 1 132: Quincy 493, North Qiiin,\ 
479 and Quincy Vo-Iech 160. 

I he Class ol 1987 had 412 fewer graduates than ihr 
Class of 1971 

In fact, the 1971 QHS class had onl\ |()S k.^^., 
graduates than the combined Quinc> and North classes 
this sear 

It would seem il the enrollment ligures contiiuji i,, 
drop, that Quincy one ol these days will ha\c to lace ilic 
fact that few seem to want to face a one high scht)oU ii\ 
It mas not be long before declining enrolimcnis vmII 
make it unfeasible to pas the cost ot opcraimt; .hk) 
maintaining two separate high school laciliias 

Of course that would do awa> with the iradiiioiui! 
Thanksgiving Das lootball risalry but ii mijihi >!.. 
wonders lor all the learns in both girls and boss spurts 
by combining the school athletes 

Unless there is an unexpected desclopmcni hkr .i 
baby biH)m. the one-high school concept mas noi be taf 
around the corner 

Most ol us would like to keep it the uas it is Rut tinu 
- and changes - march on. 

D 
FORMIR MAYOR Walter Hannon has a tani.uis 
neighbor at his Kenncbunkpori. Me summer fmrm- 
George Bush 

Well. Bush's place is ahoui ifu 
length of a football field or tun .lu.i . 
but Hannon sees him orue in a wtni: 
1 roni observation points. H.inrioii 
n(»tes that lateK when Bush has heni 
in town and in a \eliiele. ,in 
ambulance is not lar ht[; :,,' 
Apparentis it's there should .iinif,;' . 
of an emergencs nature happen 
Also, if Bush IS plasing golf, he and tin s ;, 
SMih him dress prcllv much alike and are .r .' , , T 
si/e. 

So, It would be d'llicult for the wrori^ sunRnne i.. 
easils pick out which one is Bush 




Bl SH 



Readers Forum 



Commends Police Depl. 
For Protecting Women 



Leave Tax Cap Alonc^ 



fditor. I he Quincy Sun: 

Congratulations arc in 
order to the Quincy Police lor 
their commitment to the 
enforcement of the Domestic 
Abuse Prevention Act of 
I97H. 

I was pleased to read the 
editorial in the Boston dlobe 
on .July 9, entitled "Protecting 
Battered Women" which 
praised the Quincy Police 
Hcpartment's "exemplary 
program." 

Women in Quincy should 
be relieved to learn that they 
are protected by police 
officers who take the issue of 
domestic violence seriously. 
Further, the establishment in 
1979 of IK)VH. a shelter for 



battered VM)men. s^as an 
example ol citi/en activists 
and public agencies working 
together to soKe a menacing 
social problem I he presence 
o( I)()\ I in our communits 
demonstrates the continued 
commitment of people 
throughout the South Shore 
to respond to this issue 

We should all be proud of 
our community, our Quincs 
Police Department and the 
Norfolk ( Ounts I amils 
Service I nit for creating a 
model for other communities 
to follow when dealing with 
domestic violence 

Patricia M loland 
('ouncill()r-al-l.arge 



Seeks Host Families 
For French Students 



I ditor. I he Quincv Sun 

I he South Shore ( haniber 
of ( ommetce believesih.it the 
provisions ol the lecenllv 
enacted tav cap should be left 
alone 

As voted bv the people ol 
the ( ommonwealth il stale 
revenues exceed the growth in 
Massachusetts wages and 
salaries than those levenues 
are returned to the people on a 
proportional basis 

I he governor's proposal ol 
redistributing the revenue in 
a weighted fashion toward 
those in the lov^-ineome 
brackets is admirable in its 
intent However we see this 
one-time refund to be ol 
minimal assistance and does 
not address the true needs ol 
those in low-income brackets 
What also concerns us is the 
manner in which the 
administration is attempting 
to circumvent the will of the 



people 

I his tax c.ip vv.is ,i; : 
h V t lie voters 
( ommoiUKe.ilth on!\ 
Il the goveinoi u ^' 
ch.ingcs the disi t if^ . 
piovisioM ol the i.i;' ■•■ 
hasn't he .iskeil ! 
opinions ot the ve: 
voters' V\c ask the let'i- ■• 
to defeat this propos.il il:.; 
eltect savs "I don't e.iie ' ^ 
vou voted, we kiio^v v^ I : 
best lor vou " We .'^^ 
people ot the lominoiivu.i M: 
who voted lor the tav i.ip '" 
let the administration kn.-« 
that thes disapprove "I ''■'' 
attempt to change 'h; 
provisions of the lav '" 
without their input Mtii ■>" ^' 
IS our mones 

Kevin .1 ( I'sw' - 

(lovernmenl Ml.n'- 

Man.o'i'' 

South Shore ( h.inihci 

ol ( omiiKi'i- 



Editor, I he Quincs sun 

Seventeen-year-old Alain 
C'almet is arriving in Quincy 
on July II from I ranee What 
he may find is that no 
American family wants to 
share its home with him 

lor the past two months, I. 
a coordinator lor the 
American Institute for 
foreign Study, have tried to 
find host families in Quincy 
and nearby communities lor 
Alain and 1.^ other I rench 
students At this late date II 
students still remain without 
families to host them during 
Iheir month stay 

During their stay the 
students, ages fV 19, will take 
various sight-secmg trips m 



the area I hey will come with 
spending money and 
insurance 

Host families are eligible 
for scholarships ranging 
between SKM) and $4(K) |(»r 
each student they host 
families that are unable to 
host a student (or the entire 
month arc still encouraged to 
apply 

for more information, call 
Katherine at f)23-77X9 or 
Normuat 21V241I land 17 
year-old Alain and II other 
students are eagerly awaiting 
some response 

Katherine Ihornpson 
X Whitman St 
SornervilJe 



Thanks Fish Store 
For Help In Fire 

fdiior. I he Quincy Sun: including the breaking dovui 

We would like to publicly of our aquarium Pisces v^,.s 

thank Pisces Iropical fish the only one willing to I'l^' 

More for saving our valuable care of these fish gratis 

'"^;'"^" ''"^^ (.eorgeand Man l<^.^. 

As you know the fire formerfs of hi S'-' ^' 
necessitated out relotaiion. 



Stage Names 



Cyd Chiiris.si's rral nami. is Tula Kiiiklca Hay < hiu^h"^ 
rtal nam«' is Kay (bar I. s Kohms«.n (hers r.al nam-' i" 
Uimlyn Sarkisiiui |>al.sy ('Iin<-'s real nain»- was Virginia 
PattiTM.n H«-risl.-y ('lau«l.-tu. ( oIImtIs n-al namr is I-'lv 
('hauchoin. 



Thunday. July 2J. I9S7 Quincy Sun Pi|c 5 



Marianne Peak Successor 

Wilhelmina Harris To Retire 

As Adams National 
Historic Site Superintendent 



I he National I'ark ScrMcc 
(\I*S) has chosen Marianne 
Polls Peak to succeed 
Wilhelriiina Sellars Harris as 
stipennlendent ot the Adams 
National Historic Site in 
yiiincN 

AiHiouncciiienl was niade 
h\ Herbert S ( ables. Jr.. 
director ol the NPS North 
Atlantic Rej;iori 

At '^l. Mrs Hams is the 
longest serving! siipeririien- 
dent and the oldest m the 
National J'ark Ser\ice She 
headed Adams NHS for M 
years. I he (irst woman to 
work as an NPS superinten- 
dent, she has led a model 
career for the modern 
working mother Awarded 
the highest honors trom the 
iX'partment of the Interior. 
Harris has had numerous 
articles and works published 
on the Adams (amil\ 

J'cak served under Harris's 
leadership lor 26 years 
Beginning her career as the 
superintendent's secrelar\. 
she became deputs superin- 
tendent in 1482 Peak 
assumed managerial respon- 
sibilit\ in the lields of 
administration, interpreta- 
tion. preser\ation. curatorial 
management, maintenance, 
resource protection, opera- 
tions and \isitor services She 
now super\ ises a stall ot some 
20 eniplo\ees and administers 
an annual budget of S5()(),(HW) 

"Marianne Peak brings a 
wealth ol ma nage na I 
evpcrtise to the Adams 
superinteiidencN ." Cables 
said "I know that she will add 
a Iresh approach to the |ob 



while carrying on the 
traditions o( her predecessor." 
he said. 

Peak serves as a member o( 
the Quincy rourism Commit- 
tee. Historic Sign C t)mmitiee. 
Quincy Historical Society. 
Hingham Historical Society. 
Ba\ Slate Historical 1 eague. 
Abigail Adams Historical 
Sociei\. and Massachusetts 
Historical Societv. She is also 
on the hoard ol Directors ol 
(Quincy .lunior College and 
Adjunct leaching Staff for 
the college in the Department 
of Social Sciences. 

Ihis is the opportunity of a 
lifetime-to ha\c earned the 
privilege to succeed Mrs. 
Harris, who is highly 
respected in the field of 
Adams history and who has 
carried on Adams tradition." 
Pead said. As her protege. I 
ha\e benefited from her 
knowlege and link to Adams 
history 

"It is truly a privilege to be 
charged with the management 
of one of the nation's most 
important historic sites I plan 
to carry out my responsibility 
of imparting Adams history 
while fulfilling the mission of 
the Park Service, that is. to 
loster CIVIC pride, educational, 
cultural, and historical 
enrichment and most 
importantlv to preserve this 
area lor future generations so 
that they too might enjov it." 

I he Adams National 
Historic Site consists of the 
two Adams Birthplaces on 
franklin St.. the Old house 
(occupied bv four generations 
of Adamses trom I78S to 




WILHELMINA HARRIS has been a long-time familiar and 
popular figure at the Adams National Historic Site. 



1927) and Stone Library on 
Adams St. The Captain Beale 
Estate and the United First 
Parish Congregational 
Church are also within the 
park. 

Ihe Adams family donated 
their homes to the American 
public, and they are 
administered by the IS 
Department of the interior. 
National Park Service. The 
familv takes an active interest 
in the park, returning historic 
artifacts to the collection, 
attending functions and 
visiting throughout the year. 

Charles Francis Adams 
speaking as President of the 
Adams Memorial Society 
expressed the "delight of the 
Adams familv on the 



appointment of Marianne 
Peak as Superintendent of the 
Old House. .After years of able 
and devoted service under 
Mrs. Harris, she has earned 
the respect and confidence of 
the Adamses." 

Peak holds a bachelor's 
degree in Fine Arts from 
Emmanuel College. Boston, 
and a master's in Psychologv 
from Eastern Na/arene 
College. The daughter of 
Mary Keblis Potts of East 
Weymouth and T. Allen Potts 
of North Wev mouth, she 
resides in Hingham with her 
husband Phihp G. Peak. Jr. 
Vice President. Commercial 
Banking and Investment. 
Guaranty First Trust Co.. and 
their daughter .Alexandra. 10 
years of age. 



School Conimitlee Meeting Agenda 



Ihe agenda for the Quincv 
.School committee meeting 
".cheduled lor Wednesday, 
lulv 22 at 7 30 p m in the 
.^chool committee Room at 
C^uincv High School; 

1. Appioval ol Minutes - 
Executive Session minutes for 
.June }; Regular and 
Executive Session minutes for 
June 17. 

2. Superintendent's Report 
- Dr Robert Ricci will be 
present 

3. Reports of Special 
committees - Negotiations - 
All contracts - status report by 
subcommittees. 

4. Hearings: 

A. Cirievance: A member of 
Quincy .lunior College. 

5. C)ld Business 

A C heerleading; Mr. 

Mariano will be present 
B Ht>race Mann proposals 
C . QJC Petition; Counselor 

of Developmental Education. 

WoUaslon Bt^acli 
Festival 

the MDC Metroparks will 
sponsor the "Wollaston 
Beach Kids Festival" on 
Sundav. Aug 2 from I I am 
to } p m 

Ihe festival will feature 
clowns, kites and sandcastles 
as well as games and races 

All activities will take place 
across from the bathhouse on 
Quincy Shore Dr 



I his item was tabled at the 
meeting on June 1 7 

I). Wollaston School: Mr. 
Berna//ani will be present. 

E. High School Handbook: 
I his item was tabled at the 
last meeting 

6. New Business 

A. I extbooks. approval of: 
list dated June 22. 

B Lincoln Hancock 
loddler Playground has 
requested a "No Trespassing" 
sign. ITiis item is on the 
agenda at the request of Mr. 
Durkin. 

C. Myles Standish School: 
Ihe School Committee at its 
meeting May 20 reaffirmed a 



decision to turn over tne 
Mvles Standish School to the 
citv effective Sept. I. 

D. Rental Fee for QPS 
buses 

E. Voting delegate: 
Consistent with the bylaws of 
the MASC, it is necessary to 
name a voting delegate and an 
alternate voting delegate to 
the annual business meeting 
Nov. 6. 

F. Schedule of S.C. 
Meetings. 

G. Retirements. 
H. Resignations. 

1. Leaves of absence 

K. Appointment.^. 

7. Additional Business 



8. Communications 

9. Executive Session 

A. Items to be considered in 
Executive Session: 

1. Contract of employment 
for Dr. Ricci. 

2. Assistant Superintenden- 

cy 

.V Cjrievance 

4. Negotiations 

a. Reports from all labor 
groups. 

b. School Committee 
membership on subcommit- 
tees. 

5. Litigation 

6. Establishment of a 
hearing date for discipline 
hearing 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Hert't a chance to earn 
eitra money by building a 
Quincy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Tei»phone: 471-3100 




riw 



vj 




m 



B'J fJ 




^. the Bradford Building 
stood at the corner of Maple 
>i and Chestnut Sts. in Quinc) 
Square. 



. . . \<)u were not just a 
Pollc> Number and retained 
>our own identilv, when 
personal service was alwavs 
l>i\en ... ft still is al 



BURGIN PLAINER INS 

1357 HANCOCK STREET 
QUINCY 472-3000 



Quincys 
Yesterdays 

He Wants Only 
Men As 

School Principals 



July 22-28, 

1929 
58 Years .\go 



Houghs Neck residents apparently lost out in the bid 
to have Miss Elizabeth Garrity. a teacher in the Quincy 
school system for 42 years, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
named principal of the newly 
enlarged Atherton Hough 
School. 

The Quincv School 
Committee refused to 
reconsider its appointment of 
H. Forrest Wilson to the post ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
and Committeeman Col. ^^^^^^^^^^^^ 
Warren E. Sweetser proposed a resolution that only 
men be named schoolmasters. 

There were two other women principals of Quincy 
schools. Miss Margaret Sweeney of Gridiey Bryant 
School and Miss Lucy Hennigar of Willard School. 

CRIME RATE DOWN 

Police Chief Ernest H. Bishop, speaking over Radio 
WNAC in Squantum, proudly announced that Quincy 
has less vice and liquor traffic than any city of its size in 
the country. 

"We have had very few serious crimes in the last few 
years and it is a saying among the crooks that you had 
better keep away from Quincy." said Bishop. 

"We claim that Quincy is freer of vice and liquor 
trafficking than any city of our size in the country and 
this claim is endorsed by federal officials." 
MEN WITH TAILS? 

Everyone was talking about the reports of men with 
tails brought back from the PhiUipine Islands bv Lt. 
William F. Malnati of 60 Bedford St., Quincy, who 
spent 13V: months with the I .S. Geodetic Survey in 
Luzon. 

Malnati said he saw men with tails si.x to eight inches 
long but he denied it was evidence that man descended 
from monkeys. 

He received support from Chalmer F. Rose of 837 
Sea St.. Houghs Neck, a former Marine, who said he 
saw pictures of the men with tails while serving with the 
Marines in the Philippines in 1926. 

QIINCY-ISMS 

Arthur Blake of East mllton jumped 1.800 feet in a 
parachute. 900 feet in free fall, as the highlight of the 
Sunday program at Dennison Airpoart ... .A new five- 
room house at 79 Pierce Ave., with sun parlor, steam 
heat, shower bath and garage was renting at $50 a 
month from W.T. Donovan's office in the New Granite 
Trust Building . . . The Rev. Max Bergathon of 
Brooklyn. N.Y.. opened a series of revival meetings in 
the Norwegian Gospel Tent on Scammel St.. Quincy 
Center . . .James(Two Gun) Baker of the Quincy Police 
was recovering from injuries suffered in a motorcycle 
accident . . . King Fong. an American and Chinese 
Restaurant at 1422 Hancock St., offered regular 
dinners at 40 cents and 50 cents and Sunday specials for 
60 cents and a dollar . . . Hoyte Macaulay. Quincy 
contractor, narrow ly escaped injuyr when the brakes on 
his truck slipped and the vehicle went over a 30-foot 
drop into Merrymount Quarry, which was used by the 
city as a dump . . . Theophilus Kingof theGraniteTrust 
Co. was the first customer as Howard D. Johnson, the 
Wollaston ice cream maker, opened his Soda Shop and 
Tea Room in the Granite Trust Building . . . Harry 
Keohler was re-elected president of the Rock Island 
Cove Improvement Association . . . Gary Cooper and 
Lupe Velez ("She sings! Gary sings!") were starring in 
"Wolf Song" at the Alhambra Theater . . . Monarch 
Fred O. Wadsworth led 200 members to the Taleb 
Grotto outing in Onset . . . Arthur (Chick) Fcwier, 16. 
of 63 Edgemere Rd.. Quincy. with 10 hours airtime and 
three solo flights, was on the verge of getting his pilot's 
license at Dennison Airport . . . Willys-Knight sedans, 
with wire wheels induced, were on sale for $L 145. FOB 
loledo. at Hancixk Square Motor Co.. 31-37 Adams 
St. . . Martin Battis was elected chancellor commander 
of the Merrymount Lodge of the Knights of Pythias . . . 
Abel Stevens drilled 618 feet into the ground at the 
Granite City Ice Co. plant but failed to hit water ... It 
was reported to be the deepest hole ever drilled in 
Quincy . .. First National Stores had salt, I '/: pounds for 
five cents; mayonnaise. 2 1 cents for an eight ounce jar; a 
large package of Ivory Flakes. 21 cents; and Kellog's 
Corn Flakes, four packages for 29 cents . . . Quincy 
Attorney Frank D. Coffman was elected treasurer of 
the Weymouth Sportsmen's Club . . . Ladies Oxfords 
were $2.95 at Levander's Shoe Store. 21 Granite St.. 
where you got "Double Legal Stamps Tuesday Only." 



Page « Qnincy Sun Thureday, Jul^ 23. I9f 7 




Marie's Kitchen 



B> MAKIK J. I) ()l IMPIO 



Chicken Cooked Indoors 

A Nice Change Of Pace 

Maybe some of you are tired of eating 2 Ibsps margerine or butter 



hot dogs, hamburgers and whatever else 
you cooked out so far this summer and 
long for something different 

And even though you may ha\e 
cooked chicken outside also, this recipe 
for chicken could be nice change of pace 
Served with rotini or rigatoni, mastaciolli 
(or if you don't want to be bothered with 
tomato sauce, it also goes great with rice. 

1 usually remove the skin from most of 
the chicken cooked in this manner, but 
that is a matter of choice By the way; I 
recently had lunch at Finians and the 
hostess told me that she enjoys my 
chicken recipes the most because of her 
restricted diet. So this one's for vou! 

EASY GOIRMET CHICKEN 

2 large chicken breasts; split 
(preferabl) boneless) 

bay leaf 

about ■/: dozen large fresh mushrooms, 

cut in halves, 
fresh parsley 

1 small cut up onion 

2 Tbsps oil 



About half a jar of whole pimento peppers 

(cut in large pieces) 
10 black ohves cut in half 
I jar of artichoke hearts (small) 
'/] cup white cooking wine 

In heated oil and butter, add the 
onions, bay leaf and parsley ("ook (or a 
few minutes until blended Add the 
chicken and saute until browned on both 
sides Add the wine and cover and cook 
for about 15 more minutes. Add the 
pimento, olives and artichoke hearts and 
mushrooms and simmer for ani>ther l.*> 
minutes or so. and then cook unco\cred 
for the last few minutes until chicken is 
done Serve with a favorite pasta, rice, 
potato or anything your heart desires. 

Marie D'Olimpio is the author of 
"Simply Italian-And Then Some," a 
collection of her own recipes. ( opies of 
the book are available at That's Italian, 
Franklin .St., South Quincy; Previte's 
Market, Sumner St., Quincy Point and 
Samoset Pharmacy, .Samoset Ave., 
Merrymount. 



'Safe Babysitting* Course Al QCH 



Quinc> City Hospital, in 
cooperation for the 4-H Club 
will offer a new session of its 
"Safe Babysitting" f*rogram, 
beginning Sept. 16 

Ihe course, designed for 
boys and girls ages 1 1 and 
older, will prepare the 
youngsters to become 

responsible babysitters. 

Instruction will be in such 



areas as home satels, inlant 
and child care, growth and 
development, entertainment, 
first aid. nutrition, and the 
basic responsibilities of a 
babysitter 

Attendance is required at 
all SIX sessions in order lor the 
student to quality tor a 
certificate at completion ol 
the course 



A nominal lee is charged 
tor the course, and enrollment 
IS limited to ensure adequate 
instruction lor all ol the 
students 

F'arental permission slips 
and registration forms are 
available b\ calling Nancy 
frame in the Pediatric 
Department at the hospital 
(773-61(M) cxt y\\^) 



SOUTH SHORE TILE 



^/!^\ 



% 



DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 



338 Washington St. 



QUINCY 471-3210 



HOURS: 7 to 5 Mon., Tue«., Fri. Wed. & Thur$. til 8 pm 





f-''4J% 





>wr ^1^^^ 



yi I\( \ IK \HI( SI PKKMSOK rrlifffs are prrsrnled nilh uHiirds for wurs of s»fMu 
From left are Imfric Suprr^isor Prfsidrnl Josfphine Kirman. Safrly Offiirr lon> P.iUr.i 
retiree ( armella Napoleone. with W >ears of scrMce; rrliree Mae I) \n|>rlo. 2\ >fars Mauir 
Francis Mc( ault> and retiree Kila I'reHitl. 21 years. 

Natasha Anaslasi Reroives 
Arhievemenl Award 



Nalash.i Anaslasi ol 
Quincy. .i sc n i o i .it 
Archbishop Williams High 
School m Hraiiilrcc. has been 
named a I nilcd Stales 
A c h I e \ e m e n t A c .i d c m \ 
national award wmiu-i in 
I cadership Service 

Ihe criteria for selection 
are a student's academic 
perlormance. inlciesi and 
aptitude, leadership qualiliCN 
and lesponsi bility . and 
recommendation from a 




NATASHA ANASl Asl 



le.icfiei <u diiccliM 

Miss An.isl.iM uill ,i('p ,! 
in the I 111 I c J s : ,! ' 
Al h I e \ e nun i \ v .i >h 
Ollicial N eaih.iok piih .■ 
nalionalK 

She IS the daughlci ol \1 
and Mis Ailhiir Xn.tsi.i^ 
4< Highlirid Kd Quiru , II 
gianilpaicnls .m M' 
Mis Anil HI \nas!.is. 
Quinc\. ami Mi .iu^\ M' 
Stephen I in^:ts n' I 
\Ke\ mouth 



Job Workshop For Women Al QJ( 



A free workshop on "How ( Dllegc, ( oilijington Huild- 

to Make the Most Irom Home ing. Room V)4 
to Work-BuildingC Onlidence 

i he workshop is loi women 

anil (letting Started will be v^ho are thinking •>! going to 

heltf Monday. Aug V al Id ^,„i, .,„,j ^.,„, ,,, biHomc 

a m at Quincv Junior scll-supporling 



Id regislei. oi ! 
inlonnalion aboui .> 
job cinmseling st i ■. 
Diane C anino. H.i 
( e n I e I s t o i I ) 
Uoituinakcrs. S t(. 
I V> 



15 Residents On NDA Honor Roll 



Sister Anne Monica 
Ruane. principal ol Notre 
Dame Academy, fiingham. 
reports 15 Quincy residents 
on the honor roll for Ihe 
fourth term marking period 

Fhcy arc: 

Seniors: Second Honors - 
Allison I weed\ 



Juniors: First Honors 
Marybelh Powers 

.Sophomores: i irsi Honors 
Rebecca ( hiccino and Jeanne 
Nelson 

Second honors kar\n 
Brownell. Kerry ( Onnor and 
Kathleen I ewei 

Freshmen: Principal's I isi 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
H«rt's ■ chanc* lo ••rn 
extra money by building a 
Oulncy Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 471-3100 



I a u r a H c n ne ssr . ' 

Jennifer I al'oinlc 

I list Honois k ■ 
I escinskas .i ml M 

McDonnell 

Second Honors kdi;: 
( On nol ly . I o 1 1 M u tu li 

I orbush. lata Melliiu .nul 
Mi/abeth Renda 



Ji'nnifrr .MrClaiilrv On |)<>uir.s Lis I 



SPACE SAVER FIRST! 

IW-forv xou re-do your closets visit Space Sdver Shelving. 



.1 e n n I f e r M c ( a ii I e \ . 
(laughter of Ma\oi and Mrs 
I ram IS Mc( aule\ ol Houghs 
Nctk, h.is been named to the 
(lean's iisi ((ir ihf spring 



sc NIC si e I a I A im I ' . .i 
I niNcrsily. Washingion I ) < 
A second seinesu r st mi " 
she will hi. gr.idii.iii 'I 
laniiatN. I''HX. wiili .i <l r 
in |()ui n.ilisin 



7 Residents On 




Clairson 



CLOSET 

MAID* 



LJ Complete design and 
installation services 
available. 



Q AssisUnce for the do-it-yourselfer. 

HI An opportunity to see new and innovative 
storage products in our show room. 

Into space since 1983. Space Saver Shelving can provide 
the assistance and expertise you need. We've solved storage 
problems in the home, the office, and industry. Using Closet 
Maid s vinyl coated steel wire shelving, in combination with 
our other products, we can solve your storage problems 

r/ ' ^o"^^? ^^"^^^ SHELVING, INC. 1.800-556.0202 

X Quincy Square ^ - 

1^ 1363 Hancock Street, Quincy. f 



Nrwhiiry Deairs List 

Seven (Quincy rcsideriis are 
on Ihe Ncwbur\ ( ollcgc 
Dean's list for iIr- I<>K7 spring 
semester 

''ii'ficia J ( allale. 
( ulinarv Arts. Jo.inn I' 
/(lankowski, I. IS 111 on 
Merchandising. Kosemary \ 



Kiiitii. ( ompiiui Si II '!■■ 
Richard I M.ihiiu.n. 
Paralegal Snidics, Kubn' I 
Olson. ( iiliri.ii\ All 
I immons. M cd i.i 
nology. and D.ivid 
Management 



lr> h 
Uhil. 



1^! 



328 3402 



MA 02169 



Commerce Green 

24 Rfxkland Street, Hanf>ver. MA 023'W 
826 974 1 



Jeremiah Square 

Rte 6A, Orleans, MA 026S3 
240 04% 



•mtmrnmi^mimmmimmm' 



i 
* 
i 



f^'^t^^T 






VISIT US AT OUtNEW QUINCY STORE! 



"It's Simply Italian -- 
And Then Some" 

And They're All Simply Delicious 
A book featuring the recipes of 

Marie J. D'OlimpIo 

On Sale In Quincy At 






That's Italian, Franklin St. 
Previte's Market, Sumner St. 

And Al 

Samoset Pharmacy 
Samoset Ave., Merrymount 
Price: $5.95 



Thursday, July 2J. 1917 Quincy Sun Page 7 




PAl I.A I. MISKIMS andJAMES I. 



^1? 
BOTTARY, JR. 

I Miller StUiUol 



Paula Miskinis Engaged 
To James L. Bottary, Jr. 



Mr and Mrs John IV 
M iskinis of Randolph 
announce the enj;at;cmcnl ol 
their daughter. Paula 1 
Miskinis to. lames 1 . Bottars. 
.Ir . son ol Mr .lames Bottar\ 
and Mrs Carol Hottar\ ot 

(^UUKA 

Miss Miskinis attended 
Kanijolph High School and 
the I iuversit\ o| Massachu- 



setts at Amherst. She is 
currentK employed by the 
I irsi Inion Home Tquity 
Corporation. 

Mr Bottars is a graduate ot 
QuincN High School and 
Northeast Institute. He is the 
owner ol (iuaranteed 
Appliance Repair. Inc. 

A .luly 2.*< wedding is being 
planned. 



Sally Tobin Elected President 
Happy Recreation, Photo Club 



SaiU lobin ol QuincN was 
elected lor the I 2 1 h 
consecutive term as president 
ot the Happ\ Recreation and 
I'hotograptu Club ol Quinc\ 
at their annual nieeiing held at 
the Hawthorne (Ountrs 
Club. Dartmouth 

Othei otticeis elected were 

losepli Weuci. \ice piesidenl. 

MaiN Donnellen. lieasurei. 



Iran ( Dllenburg. secretars; 
Marguerite Spinne\. corres- 
pontlence secretar\ 

Oliver latro was elected 
director to serve (or three 
\ears 

Alter the luncheon and 
business meeting, entertain- 
ment was provided bv the 
Hawthorne Countrv Club 
I no. 



Jeanne Marie Hopkins 
Trinity Graduate 



leaiine M.inc 
dciu^hter ot Mr 



Hopkins, 
and Mrs 



.1 102 
recent 



Births 



Jul) 5 

Mr and Mrs Michael 
Avitahile (Susannah Seamaiis). 
f<2 Buck lev St , Quincv. a 
daughter. 

Mr and Mrs Kenneth 
I each (Maine Angel. 1 1.*^ 
West Scjuantum St . North 
(Quincv. a son 

Jul> 7 

Mr anil Mrs Mark 
Duprev (Denise Beliveau). 'JO 



C harles \S Hopkins 
I'lermont St is a 
graduate ol Irinitv C Ollegc. 
Hartlord. Conn She received 
a bachelor ol science in 
computers coordinated with 
biologv 



Social 





MRS. BRVAN GH.MARTIN 

Lorraine Kearns Wed 
To Bryan Gilmartin 



Lorraine Kearns. daughter 
ol Mr. and Mrs. John Kearns 
ol Braintree was recentlv 
married to Bryan (iilmartin. 
son ol Mr. and Mrs. I homas 
(iilmartin ol Quincv. in 
Sacred Heart Church. North 
Quincv 

Matron ot honor was 
Deborah Power, sister ol the 
bride. Bridesmaids were 
Karen Kearns. Julie Kearns. 
Debra I'usateri and Anne 
Hruvnell 

I he groom had his lather. 
I homas J. (iilmartin. as his 
best man I'shers were Daniel 



Gilmartin. Jack Kearns. 
l.arrv McCirath. Paul Peinllo 
and Robert Power. 

Michelle Pusateri and 
Michael Pusateri served as 
llowcr girl and ring bearer. 

Ihe bride is emploved at 
the Harvard Medical School. 
Ihe groom is the owner ol 
Brvan (iilmartin Carpentrv 
and Painting and isempkned 
by the MB I A 

Alter a weddmg trip to St 
Thomas and Disney World, 
they are making their home in 
.Abinglon. 



CITYSIDE 

Limousine Service 

269-6848 

fully equipped Lincoln stretches 

for ANY OCCASION 

A budget to fit your needs! 



M 



For Mora Info C«l th« 

Talking Phonabook 

972-«000 

arxj Than Praas Thia Coda^ 






B r oail w a v 
daughter 



Quincv. a 



INJURED? 

Over ?.5 years 
experience 
in trial of personal 
injury cases 

Free Consultation 

Call toi Appointment 

Attorney 

Richard W. Barry 

339 Hancock SI. 
Quincv 328-6900 



^ .'Tm4cA (f "e/a:^:, 




110' 



.-I'" 



Senior 

Citizens 

Dnci'uni 



mr 



IF YOU CAN DRINK, 
THAT'S YOUR BUSINESS. 

IF YOU CANT WERE 
WHJJNG TO MAKE IT OURS 

CALL 847-3841 ANYTIME 




FRANCIS J. CAPORALE and ROBIN L. NASON 

Robin Nason Engaged 
To Francis Caporale 



Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. 
Nason of Holbrook announce 
the engagement of their 
daughter, Robin I. Nason. to 
Francis J Caporale, son of 
Mr, and Mrs, Frank J. 
Caporale of Quincv 

Miss Nason is a graduate of 
Holbrook High School. 



Mr Caporale is a graduate 
of Quincv Vocational High 
.School and the Franklin 
institute of Boston. He is 
emploved as a service 
manager for Blue Hill 
Business Svstems in Canton. 
.An August wedding is 
planned. 



Mr., Mrs. John Lewis 
Parents Of Daughter 



Mr. and Mrs. John Lewis 
of Quincv are parents of a 
daughter, Melissa Maura, 
born June 11 at Brigham and 
Women's Hospital. Boston. 
Melissa is their first child 

Marie Leonard 
On Dean's List 

Marie Leonard, of Quincv. 
a court and conference 
reporting major, has earned 
Dean's List honors at 
Massachusetts Ba> Commu- 
niiv College in Welleslcv Hills 
tor the spring semester _ 



Mrs Lewis is the former 
Philomena Hastings 

Grandparents are Mr. and 
Mrs 1 homas J Hastings and 
Mr. and Mrs. Chesle\ L. 
Lewis, all of Quincv 

Darline Derbes 
Bay Slate Graduate 

Darl\ne I'krbes of Quincv 
has graduated from Ba\ State 
Junior College with an 
associates degree in 
accounting. Darline plans to 
continue her education in 
accountini: 



FABULOUS CARIBBEAN CRUISES 

Save up to 9 wUU per person 
Cruise the Western Caribbean 
Oct. 17-24 MS NiewAmsterdam 
visit: Cozumei 

Ocho Rios 
Georgetown 
LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE 
Exclusively at 






misLDig 



Prestige Travel, Inc. 

1155 Hancock Street 
Oulncy, MA 

CALL: 786-1801 

each agency independently owned and operated 






^ 



Closed Mondays 

Open Tuesday Ihfu Saturday 

10AM -b30PM 



2S Grpfowood A«i- 



/r. 



WolUUon 



773-S266 



y/\A 



if Nail Tipping 

& Overlay ^55 

it Sculptured ^ ^ 

Nails 'rio 

.^Pedicures • 1 *) 




for her. 


..Monday 


Spec- 


ial 


Wash. Cut * Blow Drv 


if 


14 


Loii^ hair si 


i^htly higher 



for him. .Tues. & Thurs Special 

Blow Cut. includes 

shamptx) 



m 



^ (Miii(>»(ia> l*rrm S|MM'ial«<: 

Lhiiperni "^35 comp. Goldw ell Foam Perm .... ''51 comp. 

Complete Slightly higher for longer hair 
Facial WaxintJ Available l'<'l.. ui.- and N.nl >■ nlpinui 

All Specials Pfitomu'd IK One Ol KusseH's Staff 



^t 



t or 



H.irui'ik \ I tifsliuit ^L I 



< MopU- *^i 



lOfii ' 



r*|t I OHbicy Sun Tlmre^a;. July 23, 1*17 



Quincy Police Log Hot Spots 



July 10: 
Break, 12:01 am, Connolly I casing. 165 Hancixk St. 
Under investigation at this time 
Arrests, 2:49 am. Sea St K-3 Sgt 1 Kelly reports a car 
traveling on Sea St with one party hanging onto the 
hood and another Nehicle chasing them C-2 Off. 
Bertoni & M Kelly. 0-2 Off Houling to assist Two 
Ramlolph men were arrested for h assault and battery 
with a dangerous weapi>n. 2) malicious damage to 
personal property to wit an automobile V Ouinc\ man 
was arrested for i)ass;»ult and batterN \Mth a dangerous 
weapon, an automobile. 2) operating a motor xchicie to 
endanger 

Family Irouble arrest. 4 M am. Washington St Caller 
reports husband jUst came home drunk and is 
threatening her D-l Oil J Murph\ A O'Brien 
dispatched A 25 >car old Ouinc\ man was arrested tor 2 
counts of assault and baticr\ on a police otTicer and 
violation of a restraining order Both otTnTers were 
treated for iniuncs recei\ed and reliCNcd ot dut\ 
Break, ^ .W am. 1 & I Pet Grooming. 12 Beale St \ 
quantit\ o\ mones and checks were taken 
Break, S 43 am. laffrail Rd . low numbers Nquantits 
of moneN and a microwave oven were taken 

Jul> 11: 
Break, 2 OS am. Sea St . 5(H1 bUvk Fntrance was gained 
by forcing a front door \othing known missing 
Robber>. 5 25 pm. Gulf Ga> Station. 4-0 Sea St I nder 
inNcstigation at ihiN lime 

July 12: 
Break. 12 .V^ pm. .Sea St I2(X) block Fntrance gained 
through a Mde door I'nknown what was taken. 
Break, I .V*^ am. Pond St .SIB. A stereo system valued 
in excess oi SKXH) wa> taken 

Break. 4 .^6 am. Franklin St 2tX) bkvk Metro Police. 
I ower Basin, report ihes have twoQuincy souths under 
arrest lor B & I and Farcen\ of a M \ When Metro 
called \ehiclc owner on Franklin St she was unaware of 
the house ba^ak or the theft oi the \ehiclc 
Break. 10 5*) am. Hancixk Flower Shop. AOO Hanccvk 



St. A quantitv of money and blank checks was taken. 
Arrest. 2:08 pm. Utica & Palmer Sts. 0-8 Off. McKim 
requests the wagon at the above location. A 33 year old 
Ouinc\ woman and a 37 year old Quincy man were 
arrested for I ) Possession of a class "A" substance with 
intent to distribute. 2) Possession of a hypodermic 
needle 

Break. II 51 pm. Cleverly Ct Caller reports that a 
$3(HX) oriental rug. a S30(X) African Seal Jacket and 
a hdixibag were taken I nder investigation. 

Juh I.^': 
Break, S «»J am. \mego School. 10 Merrymount Rd 
Kiunm taken was an Oki Computer and a #193 
computer printer 

Break, I! 01 pm. Powers Clam Shop. 789 Quincy Shore 
Otae V quantitN of mone\ was reported taken. 

Jul> 14: 
M N Break, t> }0 am. Summit Ave.. #93 and «I82. 
1 hree \ehicle> were broken into overnight. 
M > Break. I 0' pm. 62 Hobart St A 77 Ford was 
entered and a camera taken, camera was then smashed 

Jul> 15: 
Break, "28 am. Marina Bay Taxi, a quantity of money 
was taken 

M/V Break, 7:41 pm, Parkingway Garage Caller 
reports that an 86 Ford was broken into and items were 
taken 

July 16: 
Break, 9:01 pm. James McManus Co 246 Arlington St 
Caller rcpons that the office was ransacked I'nder 
investigation 

Break, 5:06 pm. Sea St 400 block A Panasonic VCR 
and a quantity of jewelry were taken. 

Services for week: 911 Calls-368; Wagon Runs-59. 
Vehicles Towed-50. 

If you have any information about any of the above 
crimes, or any crime, please call the Quincy Police 
Detective Bureau at 479-1212 ext 371. You will not be 
required to identify \ourself 



#S8SS?5?: 



SSS^SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS? 




1 



SOUTH SHORE 
EVENING MEDICAL CARE 

21 School Street, Quincy Center 

> Reasonable Fees • Walk In 

No Appointment 
Necessary 

• Adolescent and 
Adult Medicine 



Insurance Accepted 
• Qualified Physicians 



• wC--f$. r roc r'esSw'e screening. Friday evenings. 
• H«jrt diis««« risk screening and cholesterol $10** 

Kcr.M'f-P'^aa^ 6 pm - 9 p<n, SatwrtJjy. 9 am - 4 pm 

T«*: "T-2«CC 
A M«ac* A4scci4l«9 0^ Q\jincY Inc. Affyi«t« 



I 

t 

I 



Building Your 
Protection 



\tRLW% kR.'. 


"■'•_ ' : 'i 


T - .l' '"( ' 


'. /' 


'W'H I 


' % * 1 - 


'*',*' .;'* : 


."(-'■ 


■A- .'■: 


•■v.il t 


Tv >«■•.- ' • ■ 


1 ■ " 1 


i"t ' : ' 


• .il- 


:■('♦- 



4 Residents 

On Don Bosco 

Honor Roll 

four Quincs rcMilcnts, 
siudcnlN at Don Bosco 
fcchnical High School in 
Bt>Nton. have been named to 
the honor roll lor the tourth 
quarter ol the school \car 

Ihc> arc 

NicholaN Dcmctriou ol V' 
furnace Ave and David D 
tiardincr of 45 (irossman St , 
both sophomores, and both 
receding first Honors 

Michael J Leonard oi 2h 
Blake St . a sophomore 
receiving second honors, and 
Ireshman Brian J Hcgart\ ol 
U5 WiUon Ave . receiving 
sevrond honors 

Michael Rirca 

On EmertKjn 

Dean'«i List 

M.cftae; Ricca. of \29 
V*.i.tc-- Ase . South QuirKv. 
*Ai r*M-. ztrrjcd to the dean's 
••; -.»:<■ 'sn f X the 19*" ipnng 
w-TTinrr- »• E.rxnon College 

~ : yi - M:rai on the dean'i 
i!ir I K"uinr s:*i.r rrujnta.nat 
k:*!:; I • ':*'. pfcit point 
i"".:-r^ i.n: •r.-jv.-.-z z,: pzde 

t.ivji •; t TtitTJ *»r- z< the 




B) ROBKRT H ANNA 
Crime Prevention Officer 
Quinc> Police Department 



Business Security 

Part 1 

Mow would Nou like to hclpahurglar break mtovoui 
place ol business and steal everything of \aluc'' 

Sounds cra/\' Don't be too sure Qullcafcv^ business 
owners do just that though they don't reali/c thc\"rc 

doing It 

If you're not doing everything you can to make it hard 
for a burglar to get in if you're not making ii likcU 
he'll get caught if he does get in or it you're makinj; 
your business too tempting a target, you might as v^cil 
be the thicfs accomplice 

Arc you a potential accomplice'' Here's one v^av lo 
find out Stop b\ your business at night, when ii\ 
closed I ook at it with a burglar's eyes Case the joint 

Start across the street Are there shadows to hide vou 
as vou try to get in'' Would boxes stacked near the 
building provide cover' Is a delivery truck or comparu 
car parked near the side so you could use it as cover or as 
a ladder to get in a windov* or onto a root 

Is there merchandise in the display window, v^hcrc 
you could smash, grab and run'' Can you see into the lar 
corners of the display room, or could you work at vour 
leisure, unseen by passersby' 

Now take a walk around the building Dots the 
sidewalk grille lead ti> a basement loading entrance ' U 
there evidence o\ a burglar alarm - a door or windnu 
sticker or some visible wiring"' Are hinges on the outside 
of the door, so you could remove them and lift the door 
out'' What kind of a linrk is on ihe door' Is there a glass 
panel >ou could break to reach inside and unliKk the 
door"' Check the door - is it even locked' (It's much 
easier to walk in than to break in ) 

How about the basement or ground floor windov^s 
could vou gam access through them' Could you puii a 
van into the back alley to can away loot'' How about a 
skylight or large vents as a way to get in - or adjomini; 
buildings'' 

You could find out all these things without goinj: inti' 
your business probably without making anvone 
suspicious If you came back during business houj^ \ou 
could do further checking on your locks and burglar 
alarm, see where the money is kept, find out when 
there's a lot o\ mt>ncv on hand arxl where valuable 
merchandise is displayed 

There are some things a would-be burglar looks jiu 
And thcN are things that vou, as a business owner, lusi 
be aware oi too unless you want to be hisaccomplite 

Security is an impi>rtani part of buslne^^ 
management just as impt>rtant as inventory contra 
and pricing, because it directlv affects sour balance 
sheet A good security system may seem costly, but ii^ 
cheaper in the long run than risking being wiped out b\ 
a skilled burglar and that can happen to a small 
business 

How much time and money vou spend on scciirit\ 
will depend on a lot of variables whether you're in an 
area with a high crime rate, whether your merchandise 
IS especially appealing tor its resale value, thelavouiand 
si/c of \our shop, and other things But regardless ot 
how "safe" you think you are. you must spend some 
time and mone\ on it; >ou can't afford to ignore n 

Next week "How to put burglars out of business " 

I would like to thank all of the people that stopped hv 
the Crime Prevention btn^th at the Quincv Sidc-N^alk 
Ba/aar It was a pleasure meeting and talking with vou 

Brien Maginnis Receives Degree 

Bnen k Maginnis. son ol from \\cstcrn Marviand 

Mr and Mrs N^illiam College. Wcstminstei. 

Maginnis of Quincv reccntlv Marvland 
received a bachelor's degree 



' ;U I.;" rf.ulVjI'f.* illt^ril', 
' <. ~u' I :i lie 1-' '1. •!i»f»r' iiK'. 
• ' I I"" ; 1 in: \,til r :>! .ti'.'.'K.n 




Thunday, July 23, Ift7 Quincy Sim f ■!« f 





When is 
taking a diance better 
tlian a suie thing? 



When you spin our 
"Wheel of Fortune" 
at the Grand Opening 
of our newest office 
at 731 Hancocic Street, 
Woliaston, from 
July 18 through August 1. 
(You could get up to a 
20% interest rate on 
your term certificate.) 

The Hibernia Savings Bank has always given its customers great 
rates on Term Certificates. But this time, we're leaving nothing to 
chance. From July 18-August 1, to celebrate the opening of our new 
Wollaston Office, we're giving our customers a chance to get more 
than just a great rate, they'll get a shot at an unbelievable one. 



One Year Term Certificates: 



From a minimum 
rale of 



To a maximum 
rate of 




20 



% 



($1000 J10(i.{KK)D»-posili 

Kven,one who opens a one year term certificate has a 
chance to earn interest up to 20% simply by taking a 
turn at our "WTieel of Fortune!" Simply open your 
account and spin the wheel whatever rate comes up 
will l)e the rate of your certificate. 





iSI.OOO- $100,000 Deposit 1 

We haven't forgotten those of you who prefer 
a longer term either The rock bottom 
rate on a two year term certificate will be 8 '/«%. 
However your rate could go as high as 20% 
if the right bingo ball falls for you. 



Pdrkmi; 




Another sure bet when you do your banking at 
our new Wollaston Office is that there will be 
plenty of free parking. (Xer 100 off street parking 
spaces are available at our new facility. 




PLUS: 

FreelKp 

Drawing! 

Every account 
you open at 
our new Wollaston Office 
through August 15 gives you 
a chance to win a one week 
vacation for two in Bermuda 
(includes airfare and 
accommodations) 



Member FDIC'DIFM 

All rdtrsdrfsimplfinlf rest 

All de(xisils must hf wv, funds in hank No transfers allowed 

.Subslantia! penally k>i eariv \»ilt)drai»al 



The 
Hibernia 
Savings 

BanI 

Now in Wollaston. 



731 Hancock Street. Wollaston 02170 479 BANK 

Other offices at 

263 Washington Street, Boston 02108 227 9031 

51 Commercial Street. Braintree 02184 848 5560 



Page 19 Quinry Sun Thursday, July 23, 1917 

Eileen O'Leary, 84, 
Aelive In Church Groups 



A funeral Mass for Eileen 
(Murphy) O'l cary. 84. of 
Quincy. who uas active in 
several church groups, was 
celebrated Tuesday in St. 
John's Church in Quincy 
Center, 

Mrs. 0"l.eary died .hily 18 
at Otis Hospital in Cambridge 
alter a long illness 

Born in Cork City. Ireland, 
she came to the I'nited States 
in ]9}b She li\cd in 
Dorchester before moving to 
QuincN 17 years ago 

She was a member of the St 
Matthew's Sodalit\ in 
Dorchester. Our l.ad\ of the 
Miraculous Medal Chapter of 
the Catholic [daughters of 
•America and the Children of 



Mary in Ireland. 

Wife of the late Daniel .1. 
O'I.eary. she is survned by 
two sons. Fdmund W. 
O'l eary of 0>'in*-'y ^^*^ Kevin 
P O'l ear\ ol Pcabody. two 
daughters. Marueen I". 
Kasper of Avon and Sister 
lileen O'l eary. OS. I., of 
Albany. N.>'.; two brothers. 
William Murph\ of Ireland 
and Pcarse Murphy ol 
Waltham; a sister. Winnilrcd 
IX'smond of Ireland, and 
eight grandchildren 

Burial was in New Calvary 
Cemetery in Boston. 

1 uneral arrangements were 
b> the Wickens and Troupe 
Funeral Home. 26 Adams St.. 
Quincy. 




A THOUGHT FOR THE WEEK 



-iCS.^r/, 



->-,0, 



re 



Scott Deware 



Wt all know p«opl« who alwaya 

'drtam of what thay will do 

TOMORROW and hanca loaa ail thair 

Important TODAYS! Bacauaa 

"dlttanca lends anchantmant", ntany 

think tha tutura holds tha answer to 

their problems; yet they fall to raallie 

that meeting today'a rasponslbllltlea and opporlunltlea 

with zest and dedication Is the first rung on the ladder 

that leads to heights to which they aaplre. Wa need 

always to remind ourselves that as Important as the past 

and the future may be, the most Important time for us to 

deal with Is the present TODAY . . . right now many of 

us are passing through crises which will aHect our whole 

future. Isn't It true that If wa win triumphs today. 

especially over aelflshneas, envy and greed, we may be 

preparing ouraehres tor a future of Immeasurable 

significance? Isn't It true that If we take care of the 

present the hiture should take care of Itaelf? 

We suggest you look for • and read - our thought next 
week In which we will comment on the beauty of lime well 
spent. You will find It Interesting. Look for It. Read It . . . 

Deware Funeral Home 

576 Hancock St., Quincy, MA 02170 

I Tel: 472-1137 

^ Member of the "New England Funeral Trust" 
t and your Suburban Boston Pre-Need 

i funeral specialist 

) Serving All Religious Faiths 

S Servces Rendered To Any Distance 



Planning ahead can offer 
peace of mind... 



li I- iinU human In put things off 
But (>r't>«T planning fur Ihf r»rnl 
iif i,nt''> dralh tan spare a famil\ 
ma -« iraumalK drcisions and 
li ancial hurdrns B> pre 
arranj!inj lh« drsirrv and wishfs nt 
i.nrs funrral. hurial and fxprnsfs 
tan bf spcufird lo rliminalf 
ii>iifusiiin. diffrrt^cfN of cipmion 
and difritull drosmns i,n Ihr pari 
if fainih mrmhfrs In fasr this 
hiirdrii. mi- arr making aMilablr 
III Miu t Kt I a b<Miklrt »ilh all 
nrirNs»r> information aiM) torr.is 
to assist and (uidr «ou Wh> not 
»isil us or wrilf for »our VHfJ 
IVf-arrangcmrnt Booklrl 



Booktrl co»frs 
Ihr rollowini; subjerfs: 

• h uneral and Interment Preferences 

• Mtiil Statistics and Data 

• Sur\i\(»rs Information. Social Securit), Insurance. 
Bank \ct(»unts. Keal Kslale, Automobile, Safet> 
Deposit Box. Savings Bonds. Slocks and Bonds, 
Ketiremeni Accounts and \ eterans Benents. 

• Pre- Arrangement Information 

• I hree duplicate copies of a h uneral and Interment 
Pre- XrrangemenI Agreement. 

Please send me mv cop> of "\1\ Specific Requests" 




N«mr 



Addmt 



CHv 



Si«i» 



< f)l KIIS\ Ol 



Zip < ude 



1 



Sweeney Funeral Service 

77.V272H 

" I h<' JuM/ih S|((<7/<\ liturrnl Hinm\ 
74 Kim St. Quinc> Dennis S. SHeencv 



Obituaries 



Lawrence Quinn, 96 



Otto Lampinen, 80 



A funeral service lor Otto 
I ampincn. SO. of Quinc\. a 
mill workci for Bethlehem 
Steel and a painter lor 
(ieneral Ihnamics at the lore 
River S h 1 p N a r d . was 
conducted .luly 16 b> the Rev. 
Kci|o Aho. minister ol West 
Quincy Congregational 
Church, at the Matthew A 
Hannel Kuneral Home. 
Copeland St.. Quincv 

Mr. I. ampincn died July X 
at his home. 

Born in Ma\nard, he 
attended school in I inland 
before returning to the I'nited 



States. 

He also attended school in 
the I nited States 

Mr. l.ampinen served in the 
I I n n i s h A r m \ d u ring 
peacetime and was a I S 
Arms veteran ot \N orld VNai 

II 

Husband ot the late Bertha 
Ruuttila I ampincn. he is 
survived bv a stepson, I ert) 
Ruuttila ol SpringlieKI. 111.; a 
sister-in-law. katn I eppalai>l 
Wev mouth, several nephews 
in l-inland and seveial cousins 
in the I'nited States 

Burial was in Pine Hill 
Ccmeterv 



Linda Perullo, 37 



A funeral Mass for I inda 
Perullo. .^7. ot Quincy. 
tormerly of Randolph, was 
celebrated Monday in St. 
Mary's Church in Randolph 

Miss Perullo died .luly 17 at 
home after a long illness. 

She is survived by three 
brothers, l.co A. Perullo ol 
Peterboro. N H; I ouis P 
Perullo of Milton; and John 
J. Perullo of Abington; two 
sisters. Dorothv A Donlanof 



lalmoiilh and Ann Cronin ot 
Quincv, and I"" nieces and 
nephews, and Ramesh 
Saver She was the daughter 
ot the late I ouis I and 
Dorothv R (Smith! Perullo, 
and sister ot the late I rancis 
\ Perullo 

Burial was in St Marv\ 
Cemetery, Randolph 

luneral arrangements were 
bv the Cartw right luneral 
Home in Randolph 




Bolea-Buonfiglio 

Funeral Home 

Michael A. Bolea 
^ Director 

"~"'^^ _ ^.jg Franklin St. 
Quincy, Ma. 

472-5319 




I H 



aneock 



John Kicciuti & Sons Inc. 

Vltit our complete 

factory display at 

366 Centre St., So. Oulncy 

From Quincy Center, take Burgin 
Pkwy to Quincy Adam* Station, at 
light, turn right on Center St., 3rd 
building on right (tMJilding after 
car wash) 



Bronzt ar>d Granite Cleaning Eatlmate* on Rtquett 

Open Mon thru Sat by AppQinlm..nl on Sunrlay. 




A luneral Mass l»)r 
lawrence Quinn. ^(^. ol 
Quincv. who retired .^2 years 
ago alter M) years as u 
machinist lor Boston (iear 
Works, was celebrated 
Wednesday in St Joseph's 
Church. Quincy Point 

Ml Quinn died Julv IK at 
Otis Hospital in ( ambndge 

Born and educated in 
Ireland, he lived in 
Dorchesiei lor 4.S years, 
moving to Quincy .^0 years 
ago 

He was a toimei member ol 
ihe Social Irish-American 
Club in Dorchester and the 
Irish Boston Music C tub 

He IS survived bv his wite, 
llcli-n I (Mc(;iiire) Quinn; 



two daughters, Maiv I 
Hause ol Newburv. N H ..iiul 
Patricia H Chaissonol North 
Weymouth; two broiluis. 
Anthony Quinn ot Oiu.nui 
Canada, and I ouis C Qmnn 
ol New N'oik. a sister, S.iliv I 
Hynesol New N Ork.and iij;hi 
grandchildicn 

Burial was m Moiim 
Wollaston C emeteiv 

Arrangements were b\ itu 
Sweenev Biuiheis Home im 
Kunerals. I IndepciuJiiin 
Ave , Quincv 

Memonal donations ^.m hi 
made to the Si loscpli\ 
Chutch Building I uiul. ssn 
Washington St , Quiika M \ 
U2\M 



Marion LeBlaiie 



A luneral Mass li>r Marion 
(MacPhecl I cBlanc. a Quincv 
resident loi man\ vears. was 
celebrated I uesdav at Sacred 
Heart Church 

Mis I cBlanc died Julv T 
at C arnev Hospital in 
Dorchester attci a briel 
illness 

A native ol ( anada. she 
had lived in Quincv 45 vears 

She IS survived bv her 
husband, Joseph I I cHlanc, 
who IS retired from the 
Quincv I ire Department, two 



daughters. Anne M (^um'i 
lani ot Quincv arul M I ik(.!i 
I rainor ol Hakerslicld. ( ,iht 
and several graiuldaughit r ^ 

Burial was m Hhu II 
( emelerv. Brainircc 

I uneral ariarigcmciiiv u 
by the Keoh.inc I uii ; 
Home, ■'KS Hancovk s 
VV ollaston 

Memorial dniniioii^ ■: 
be mailc to the Sacred II-, r' 
C hurch Memorial I und •>■ 
Hancock St . Quiik \ M \ 
02171 



Mildred Butt, 91 



A funeral lor Mildred 
linv" Walberg (Rowe) Bull, 




^^^^^^^^^^^N^^^^^^^ 



lAMERICAN 
CANCER 
SOCIETY^ 



f 



yi. ol Wollasion, v^.i^ ; ■ 
Julv P at the Deware I iitu .i 
Home, 5''f> Hancotk ^' 
Quincv 

Mis Butt ilied 1 ueNtl.i . 
Quincy Citv Hospiiai 

She was a native o'. s: 
Jt)hn's. S evk t ou nil I.I r >\ 
Canada, beloie niiuniL' ' 
Wull.isiun "*(! vears agn 

Mrs Bull was a membi: 
Wollaston ( on^Mtg.i: •' 
(hurch 

Wile ot the latv K.r.'; 
Ambrose Bun. she is -^:: 
by twi) children. Raip) 
and I IMS Butt holh ol (.) 
and several niei. i - 
nephews 

Burial w.is in I'lm 
( emeleiv. West Quiiu\ 



M 



Aini-i II .111 
Kfd Cross 



+ 



l()<:etlHT, 

\>c can 

chanjit' things. 



uiEEnc^ 3Funeral ^eruicc 

DKNNIS S. SWKKNKV, Director 
The"J()SKPH SWKKNKV KINKRAK HOMKS" 

(OMIM.KTK "HOMKI IKK" 
MMOSIMIKRK 






^li>( Ol'l I AND 

\^ Ol i\( V 



'h 



Ol K OM \ lUO I ()( MIONS 

'" M I II iMi I) V.II I) ^^^, ,,| ,,, ^f 

II Ml' M HOMI IN (^1 |\( -, 



HEARING AID 
"KNOW HOW" 

KNOW: Ht- accepts Mp o 

anfl all insu'anijp cafnp's i 
payfTi«»nt in lull 

KNOW; Mpgivps 30 day '■•■• 
trials to insu'p you' satis'a- ' 
vvith no charge 'o' fittings 
molds 

KNOW; A salesman ^ i ■ 
knocH on youf doo' uninvilf : ; < 
you and where <vouid r^e t'*- ' 
follow up service 

KNOW: There is unhmitf'd 

follow up service tor the iiii' ' 
your hearing aid 
KNOW; He speciah/es m M»-,r 
ing aids only 

IF YOU KNOW ALL THESE 
FACTS YOU MUST KNOW Wf 
ARE TALKING ABOUT 

BOB & KEN KARAS 

CERTIFIED HEARING AiU 
SPECIALISTS 

QUINCY 

tETTER HEARING AID 

DISPENSERS 




BOB KARAS KEN KARAS 



Now located acroM 

from Woolworth* 

and Remlck's at 

1536 Hancock SI 

lormvrly loc»l»d •• 
124t Hancocli SI 

Mon-Frl 9 to 5 
Sal 9 10 12 

CAll NOW F OR *f'f^"i'- '■'''•' 

47f-5333 773-0900 

wt MAKt HDPWII VISl! 
AND ACCEPT Ml UICAII' 



Thurvla). Jul) 2J. 1917 Quinc) Sun Pa|« II 



Cheney To Seek 

Re-election To Ward 1 

City Council Seat 



Councillor Michael I. 
Cheney announces that he 
\m\\ seek rc-eleclion lo the 
\Nard One ( ity ( ouncil seal 
"I am pleased to announce 
that I will be a candidate for 
re-election to the Ward One 
City Council seat this 
November." said Cheney "I 
have enjoyed working with 
the people of Ward I on a 
number ol projects that have 
served lo improve the quality 
o( life for the residents of our 
neighborhoods." 

Discussing his accompiish- 
menis. Councillor Cheney 
noted that the closing of the 
Palmer Pub was the most 
difficult "It was clearly 
mandated by the people that 
the Palmer Pub must be 
closed It took nearly two 
years to accomplish not onlv 
the closing ol the pub. but 
encouraging a better use of 
the property Foday. it is 
evident that all of our efforts 
have been worthwhile People 
in the vicinilv of the Palmer 
Pub enjoy peaceful nights Iree 
from harassment " 

councillor Cheney also 
noted that there has been less 
vandalism in the area sinrc the 
closing ol the I'almer Pub. 

In regard lo Public Winks 
projects. C h e n e V s a ul . 
"Short Iv alter 1 was elected 
Wau) I Cilv ( ouncillor. I 
tc.ili/ed the hniilcil hinds thai 
wvu' allocated lo rcsiirlacc 
our iilv sIiccIn I bimighl ihiN 
p I obic ni 111 the St .1 1 c 
Department ol Public VSOik^ 
where I louiul SI H million in 
( hapicr ^) slicci leMiriacm^; 
lunds I bmiij.'hl ihiN lo ihc 
altenlion ol ihc ( ommissmin-i 
ol Public Works lod.iv. 
m.inv ol ihc sliccts m ihe ciiv 
III 1.^11 1 nc \ h .1 \ c hcc n 
icsurttucil Willi this moiuv 
( ouiKillor C lu-iu'v tiolcd lh.it 
the cil\ h.iil not n|ici)I .m\ 
( h.iptii '*() inniKV inttupiHM 
M\ vcais 

One otlui si. lie piiij;i.iiii 
Ih.tl ( oiiruilioi (he lie V s.iiil 
he has etieoiii .ij.'eil .uui 
iilili/ed in Iheeilv is ih.il ol the 
( oasial /one M.inageiiieni 
(ir.int Projii.im. which oilers 
eo.isi.il cilies and towns jiltv 
pel cent ni.ilehmj; liiiuis Idi 
par k a ml piihlie aci ess 
piiigi.ims Ne.iilv SI million 
111 improvenienls will be m.ide 
in Mon^'hs Seek iilili/iiif; this 
progi.im ( oinuilloi ( hetiev 
noted thai the newest p.iik in 
Houghs Neek will be biiill 




MICHAEL CHENEY 

without the utilization of city 
tax dollars "I hope to ulili/e 
the same program for 
improvements in Adams 
Shore. Germantown and 
Merrymount in the future." 
stated Councillor Cheney. 

"One of the most pressing 
issues that is still before us 
today is that of cleaning up 
Quincy Bay and Boston 
Harbor. This is a challenging 
time for the residents of the 
City of Quincy We can finally 
see the light at the end of the 
tunnel Within 10 years, we 
will see a significant 
improvement in the water 
quality of Quincy Bay. I look 
forward to taking my family 
to the beach where thev can 
enjov swimming in salt water 
free from fear that they will 
become ill from swimming in 
polluted water" Councillor 
C henev noted. hi>wever. thai 
the light IS not over Ihe 
recent annoiincemeni bv the 
M .1 s s a c h u s e I t s Water 
Resources Authorilv to 
expand the Hows ol sewer.ige 
to Nui Island b\ W) million 
^.illoris .1 d.iy would eie.ile a 
serious public he.ilth issue, he 
said He vi>weil lo stop .in\ 
extension ol the Soul hern 
Sewer District anil lo 
encoui.igc the use o! saleliile 
tre.iiment t.ici lilies lor 
eoinmunilies who wish lo 
exp.ind their sewer capacity 

"1 have cnjoved representing 
Ihe people ol Waid I on the 
Qiiincv C itv Council and I 
wish to be re-elecled so th.ii I 
m.iv complete the projects 
that .ire presenllv under wav 
.mil eoiUiniie to work h.ird on 
improving the quaiilv ol lile 
loi the resiilerils ol the Citv ol 
Quincv," he said 

Councillor (henev noted 
that he has sei veil .is eh.iirman 
ol Ihe Quincv Cilv Council 
Public Salety C ommiltee. 
Public I ra nsporta I ion 



Sicpheii Doraii Awarded 
AFL/CIO Scholarship 



Stephen Dor. in. son ol Mi 
(ieorgc Doianol Quincv. w. is 
lecerillv aw.iided the I ilw.iiil 
Kcnnedv Scholarship, one ol 
over 2(K) AM ( iO I .iboi 



Stephen is a gr.uliiale ol 
Quincv High School and will 
be entering Northeastern 
linivcisity in the lall He will 
be majoring in cleclrical 



Scholaiships awarded at the engineering 

241 h annu.il sehol.irship ^wN^s^s/^^^i^s^^^s^^^^»^^v^ 

dinner held at the .11 

Kcnnedv I ihi.iiv in Doiches- 

tet 



Shop Locally 




PoiiihI ^^V 
'Adoptahlos'ji^, 

( «»nUcl OfTicer Phyllis Kcrlmrhi or Briue DiBella. 77.<-62«»7 

Offici- hours: daily H:M) ii.m.-4:.MI p.m. 

Kxriiidini; Sundays 

I .is.i Apsi), male. 4 \e.irs. bull, "Chainp" .uliilts 

onlv 

I abiiiix, lem.ilc. I vc.ii. .ill black, blue coll.ii. 

hiouii h.iiulaiia 

Scotch IciiKi, male, all black. ^ wars, illness 
I ;ib-mi\. lemalc, 9 iiuMillis. light blown. Iloiula 

Kabies tag 



Committee and the Environ- 
mental Control Committee 
He also served on the council 
president's Zoning Task 
Force Committee which was 
instrumental in recommending 
a number of measures to 
reduce densitv and control 
development in the City of 
Quincy. Many of these 
recommendations were 
adopted by the City Council 
for the protection of 
neighborhoods. 



Cardinal Law Donates 

$3000 To Sea St. 
Apartment Fire Victims 



Cardinal Bernard I aw has 
contributed S.VfKK) to bring to 
S5.()(M) the total raised so far 
lor victims of a fire last month 
at a 151 Sea St apartment 
house according to hr. James 
C urtin. pastor of Our I adv oi 
(iood Counsel Church. 
Merrymount. 

Ihe moeny will help 
provide housing needs, 
household items. clothingand 
other items for the more than 



40 tamilies left homeless bv 
the fire 

•A meeting of the former 
tenants, half of which have 
relocated, will be held tonight 

Robert Kenney 
Fitchburg Graduate 

Robert Kennev of Quincv 
has graduated from Fitchburg 
State College with a BSEDin 
industrial arts 



(Thursdav ) at 8 p m in the 
Ciood Counsel Church hall 

Donations to the 151 Sea 
St Relief Fund mav be sent to 
the church. 22'' Sea St. or c o 
Quincv Savings Bank. 1200 
Hancock St. Quincv. MA. 
02169. c o James Chiccino. 

Shop Locally 




^. 



15 BEALE S7KEET,QU1NCY MASS. 02170 



^D AY- OPEN SUNDAY' 




Does any hospital offer 
* the most modem 
§ medical technology with 

a warm, personal touch? 



One does— QCH! 



At Quincy City Hospital we recognize the impor- 
tant role ol advanced medical technology and sophis- 
ticated equipment in Ihe successful treatment of our 
patients Thats why you II find our hospital equipped 
with the finest medical instrumentation and systems 
available today 

Just as important, you'll find doctors, nuises and 
a support staff here who truly care about youi health 
and well-being With our long-standing reputation 
for the provision of warm and attentive nursing care 
and our highly trained medic.il staff, proficient in 
every major medical and surgical specialty, you can 
be assured of receiving the finest health care avail- 
able today at QCH 

Currently. Quincy City Hospital is adding bi.tnd 
new facilities and refurbishing existing ones to tiet 
t(M serv(^ the future health cau^ ne(Hls ol you .tnd 
your family 



For moro information cnll the Conimunilv Rplaltons 
Department loday at 773-6100. ext 4016 



Nearly 200 different 
through the hospital's 

• AmlitiuiUvv Clio 
Oulp.llit'nl 

• ni.ionostu" Sorvnos 

• Ciisis Lliiit 

• EriUMiirniA Oop.irMvnl 

• Inlciisivo CiVO 

• Mi'lluMl StVVICOS 

• SmouMi Si'iviros 

• H(\';pii,iKi'\ Thi>r,ip\ 
Piilmoii.uv Mt'diiini' 

• Plivsir.ii Tinv.ipv 



programs and services are offered 
major departments listed below. 



• SiV ,ii Si'ivut's 
Ci^xiliniiitio C.VO 

• SjH''(Vli TMor.H^ 

• SlHOHMl n.lV C.Vt' 

CiyniViilOOV 

• Ph.iini.ii-v 

• SlHTllS Mciln'ilH' 

• Ciniiiiuiniiv Pn\)i,ims 

• PU->ot1 P.imK ,)iii1 



• v'.l'vl^li' Ro^l.lti'Mt.lla'-^ 

• P.istiv.i: Cue 

• Oi-i-iir\itii''n.il Thiv.uA 

• Oithopodti- Ui'M 

• OiH-oliHlV Unit 

• N»\iUilV*\lvuM,ii Unit 

• Pl.UVll'S FlIUlMt'O' 

• Ht'.tll'i Pioinotion 
Prooi.inis 

• PiVli.UiiS 




I 111 \. W 



^ '^ I 111 MW 

1.7 J Quincy City Hospital 

1^ 11 I \Vhil\vcllStivcl.(hiiiuy. M\02H;*M(il7i77;i (il(M) 



HCA 



Th»N»aH»M:i 



Paf« 12 Quinc> Sun Thunday. July 2.1, 1917 



Vacation Bible School 
At Faith Lutheran 



"Serve Ihc lord" is the 
theme of \acation Bible 
school at faith I iitheran 
Church in Roberts St . 
Quincy 

Any South Shore child 
three- \ears- old through 
completed fourth grade is 
in\ited to attend from Aug 3 
through Aug "^ C lasses wili 
meet daily from 9 am to 
noon in the church at 201 
(iranite St . Quincv Classes 



arc free and class si/e is 
limited 

Students will participate in 
Bible stories, art activities, 
music, service projects and 
worship all centered on live 
themes: Jesus the Savior- 
Servant; Blessed with (iilts; 
I'artncrs in the Ciospel; 
Serving Others; and telebrate 
New I ife 

"Serve the 1 ord" is a 
unique and i ni p o r I a n i 



learning opportunitv for 
children It aims to provide a 
learning-centered and tun- 
lilled occasion for all who 
participate 

Registration lor vacation 
Bible school is now in 
progress Vou can register or 
obtain additional inlormalion 
by calling the church office ^ 
am - noon everydav except 
Wednesdav. I he telephone 
number is 4''2-l247 



^Overcoming Fear' 
Squantum Church Topic 



"Overcoming Fear" was the 
sermon preached Sundav at 
First Church of Squantum bv 
church pastor Rev Hr dene 
I angcvin 

Hvmns sung during the 
service included "VVhen 
Morning (iilds the Skies." 
"(iod Is VI V Strong 
Salvation." and "(iive to the 



Winds 1 hv I- ears " Pianist 
.1 a n e t Williamson and 
organist Marv Ruth Scott 
accompanied the congrega- 
tion 

For the offertorv anthem. 
Tom Williamson sang "Rest 
in the I ord" (rom Mendels- 
sohn's oratorio, "Flijah " 

Stewart Scott and lore 



Wallin were the ushers May 
Lewis and (irace Holmes 
hosted the Fellowship Hi>ui 
after the service 

The sermon this Sundav 
will be entitled. "Overcoming 
Stress " During the summer, 
the Sundav worship services 
all begin at 9 30 am Visitors 
are alwavs welcome 



What Harvest Is Expected?' 
Sermon Topic At Bethany 



During the summer at 
Bethanv Congregational 
Church. Coddington and 
Spear Sts . Quincy Center, 
there will be one worship 
service at 10 am in the 
sanctuary 

The Rev J William 
Arnold, senior minister, will 
preach the sermon Sunday. 
Julv 26. entitled. "What 
Harvest Is Expected'" Peter 
F Krasinski will be the lay 
scripture reader 



Bethany's baritone soloist. 
F'aul David Johnson, will sing 
two selections: "Sing Me a 
Song of Sharon's Rose" by 
Shea and "It Is No Secret" by 
Hamblen 

The church school is closed 
for the summer However, 
nursery care for babies and 
toddlers is provided. 

I he service will be 
broadcast "live" direct I rom 

Bethany's sanctuarv at 10 



am over radio station 
WJDA. 1300 kc. 

A fellowship hour will be 
held in the Allen Parlor at 1 1 
am following the worship 
service. Individuals and 
families from the community 
are invited to attend and share 
in both the worship and 
fellowship 

For more information 
about Bethany's ministries 
and programs, contact the 
church office at 47y-73(K) 



Blood Pressure Screenings 
At Quincy Hospital 



Quinc> ( it> Hospital will 
conduct a free blood pressure 
screening for the public 
Fuesdav. .Aug 4 in the 
Ambulatory Care Department 
from 1:30 to 3 p.m. 



I he screenings, performed ^^''■'^ "' relerral to a physician, 

bv nursing staff, will enable ^'" ^ advised to do so 

individuals to keep track of ' h<-' screenings, which will 

their blood pressure, and be ^^^^ P'^^<-' "" '^"•" ^"^'*' a"'' 

aware of dangerous elevations '^""^^ Fuesdav of each month. 

in the pressure Persons m are free of charge 



CPR Course In August 

Ihc fee IS S20 
prepayment is required 



Fhe South Shore American 7 to 10 pm each evening at 
Red Cross will offer a C PR the Red C ross Office. 1245 
course Aug 4, 11 and IK from Hancwk St , Ouincv. 



and 



65 Washington Street Quincy, MA 02169 

., 479-6512/479-4932 

.'.'.* ".*',. Sunday School 9 30 a n 

Starting July 1 - Sept 1 

: :'■ Morning Worship 10 00 a ni 

Evening Service 6 00pm 

Wed Evenings 7 00 p m 

Bible Study & Prayer Service 

Nursery provided at all services 
Rev Sid A Veenstra Pastor. Teacher 
A.M. God Can Um YOU 
L^ P »« GUEST SPEAKER - REV. RON LARSON 

QP Affiliated with Baptist General Con'^irence 

^^^ Northern Baptist Conference 



CENTRAL 

BAPTIST 

CHURCH 



Early registration is 
encouraged since classes till 
quickly 

For details, call the Red 
C ross at 471-5440 



THE QUINCY POINT 
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

anr) Washington ""jt Qumc/ 

SUNDAY SllVICiS. 9 A JL 

Re^ ' red AiAOod L /or, 

Re; Cdroi E Atrt'jor] L/ori 

7/3 6424 'CrHMCar»;pro/i'1»?r), 

Call The Daii/ Bibi'- i7-/ 44'i4 



"God so loved the world 

that He gave His only Son . . . 

Now . . . 
What can YOU do? 

Do vou think you can meet God in the C itholic Church? 
Have you ever thought about becomi g a Catholic? 

For a non-pressured informdl locjk at the Camolic Church, try 
"Conversations in the Catholic Faith", sponsored by' 
St. John the Baptist Parish connmunity. 

For further information, call St. John's Adult Center 

Tel. #770-1586 

Church of St. John the Baptist, 44 School St., Quincy 77,3 1021 




220TH BIRTHDAY of John yuinc> Adam\.sJ\lhprrsidfnlof the I niled Slitrs. Masobsrrvrd 
with « wrrathf layiriK ceremon> in Ihf cr>pl at I nilrd KirsI Parish ( hurrh. Quinc) Sq. the 
wreath was sent from President Ronald j<ea|>an. Krom left, are IS. Na>> Signalman. First 
(lass. Dennis Mc( arthy; (apt. Michael Holt; Sen. Paul Harold. V1a>or hranris Mc( aulr>. 
Walter Urigley. Mrs. Doroth) Wrijle) and Richard Post 

((Juttn\ >ijri i>hi>lit h> ( hiirlix I Inn^ < 

28 Mayor's Commission 
Members To Be Sworn In 



Mayor Francis Mc( aiilc\ 
announces that 2K members 
ol the Mayor's Commission 
on the Status ol Women uill 
be sworn in Monday, Auj; }. 
at 7 pm at a ceremony in the 
mayor's office. 

the ceremony will be 
officiated by John M (iillis, 
city clerk Members ol the 
commission will sijin the 
Official Register alter being 
sworn in 

Fhe commission was 
established m 1974 and has 
been active in the city. Its 
purpose is to address the 
needs of women. parlicularK 
to encourage women to 
participate m activities in the 
citv. 



Fach \ear. the c«)mmission 
sponsors seminars on such 
topics as women's health, 
consumer protection, sell- 
delense, women in real estate, 
tinancial opportunities and 
investments, a ml stress 
management 

(he annual e\enl "Women 
to W t)men's W eek" has been a 
success lor a number ol years, 
according to Mc( auley 

Fhe 20 members to be 
reappointed to Ihecommissmn 
are Frudy Fiuckley. Kathleen 
Fiutlcr. chairperson. Mary 
Fkth C iirran. co-chairperson, 
( arol DeMeritl. Marian 
F il/gerald. secretary. FFarriet 
(loUlman, Melissa \ 
(loldsiein. ludith Kiellander. 



Irene M I arrinpton. Ic.in 
I eslie, Kathleen Mc( orniuk 
Marylou Meighan. iVobf.id 
OrrTian, |)oroih\ Poulrn 
acting c o r r e s p o n d i ii ^ 
secretary. l)o n n .i M 
Keardon. F'hsllis Kudniik 
Shirley Schull/, ( ouikiIIhi 
I'atricia loland. KathiMi 
\enelo, Arloa Webber 

i he eight members in he 
newly apptunlcd are Dcium 
( onnelly, Stephanie ( oom 
I aura l)i I ullio. Maig.in.-i 
Murphy. Janice OldlicUi. 
Fieverly Shores, Belh Aim 
Sirenge, Paula Willi.nns 

I he appointments .,n 
elleciive until June Mk |w>> 
Mayor Mc( aule\ noted 



Family Support Service 
For Mental Health Patients 



the South Shore Menial 
FFealth (enter and the 
Quincy -based branch of the 
( enter recently launched a 
Family Support Servnt- 
(FSS) program designed to 
provide respite services to 
families of chronic menial 
health patients 

fhe program will have lour 
types of service, the first of 
which allows one or two 
Llients to live and inlegralc 
with a host family lor up lo 
three weeks 

Second, an i n - h o me 
specialist can he scheduled to 
visit the ( liinl at home for 



scvci.il hours lo .iliow ihe 
family some time awav 

I hi I d , the program 
provides outreach anil 
support for Ihe families A 
lamilv advocate will be hiicd 
to help families with problem 
solving and to serve as liaison 
between families and the 
provider svsiem 

I I ri a 1 1 y , families ni a v 
participate in kcliires .md 



Workshops designed to In Ip r- 
are. IS ol coping, probkit; 
solving and dealing- v.:"- 
evervdav issues 

Flosi families would hhim 
.« njoiul.irv slipind t"' 

accommod.iling clieiils I m 
more infoimalion i.il! itu 
South Shoie Ment.il Hc.ilui 
C enter or the Quiricv h.isn! 
branch of the center din \iK 



Sl('plH»n Rorlir Appoiiit(Ml 
Krsiclrntial Appraiser 



Slephen I KckIi 



ol 




J 



Churc h of 

Saint John the 

Bapti<>t 

44 School SI Ouincy Ma«i 



PASTOR 

Rev WIMUm R McCarthy 

ASSOCIATES 

Rev Daniel M Graham 

Rev Edward G Carroll 

Rev Theodore Forlier 

Quincy Hotpllal Chaplain 

In residence 

Rev Mr Charles Sullivan 

Deacon 



MASS SCHEDULE 

ALL MASSES IN THE UPPER CHURCH 

'>.ilijrr),i/ /J 00 A / 00 (jrti 
Sijf.fjH/ / fXJ 8 1', 'i "10 anO 1 1 00 H'<< \>M) .inrl ', lO pm 
Dail/ M;)',',<.-, Monrl.-f^ ttinj ( tkI;,^ HOO-itn ;ir,f) ', Jfj ,,fn 




Crjnfi.-ssiorr. 
Sat 3-3 A'j PM 




ifi ''^tiapifl 
MS -8 1', PM 



n-i 



Quiiicv li.is been .ippoiiilid 
sl.ilt residcrili.il .ippi.iisii jiu 
lianker's Appr.tis.il ( (uiip.iiiv 
Inc , of I eMiigtori 

Roche is responsible loi 
completion o| resulenli.il icil 
est, lie .ippi.iisals, .iiid lu 
provides iise.ircti .issisI.uk c 
on the niiilli unit residriiii.il 
rii.ii kel I Ol c omiiir n i.il 
appraisers 

Koche |oiiied H.inkiis 
Appi.iis.il ( iiiiip.mv III M'K^ 



Wollaston Churcti 
of the rNazarene 






T m r I Bi 




i ' r ^ IJm 




j7 E Elm Awe . Wollaston 




— Services 

Sunday 1100am tbOOpn) 
Wrdrtaibay / 00 p m 




Yiiiii I iiniiiiiitiily (hull >> 



Thursday, July 23, I9t7 Quincy Sun Page 13 



201 On NQHS 
Honor Roll 



Norlh Quincy High School 
hsis 201 students on the 
fourth quarter honor roll 

They are: 

c;radk9 

Di^lincliun: Anihonv .1 
■XrukTimnis. Aandra M Bcillif. 
Icnnifct N Hcllaniih, Hi-aihcr I 
( ady, ArtMi I' I ancllos. 
(hriMinc { arrojl. Alhert (i.V 
C han, Nclsim C hin. 1 ai K Choi. 
Wilham V C hii. I aura M 
Dawson. .Iiilie k f ii/f!ciald- 
Swan. Mallhcvs R (m-sc, Hrian 
I (ik-nnon. Ink K (lusialson. 
I aura Hughes. Jodi R .loncs. 
Slacic Kane. > un^' C Kao. 
I vanjiflos K>ranis. I ai \ .1 I cc. 
Wilham 1 cc. ( hristinc VI 
Ma/rimas. .lames M Mc( arlh\. 
( hrisiophcr M Mtdraih. 
Hcalhir .1 Mcl'hce. I ivsial I 
Viollcll. loanne V1oriarl>. Kar>n 
I Moshcr. Mci > N>!. Stephen . I 
Nkkerson. Vlark I' Vitsthke. 
Daniel M I'lke Mattheu I 
Price. Sherrin I yuinliliani. 
Jonathan ( Kork. Jason I 
Rowland, lenniler Sullivan. 
\Silliam I* barren. Barbara M 
White. I'eier .1 WiMis. Susan M 
Williams. Andreas ( Wohlrah. 
Wilham M Ni-e. N un 1 Vu 

Hi|th Honors: Sandra M 
SnicN, .lames 1 HKih. David H 
( awihoine. C raij! I (hernov, 
Scoll ( Cod\. Sara I I rancis 
Dana I (iuillov. Krisii-n 1 uosi-s. 
I aree/a Na/ir 

Honors: Ink R |)e«oer. 
Kerr> N DesRoche. Sjioctram 
N Dieu. ! inila .1 I llis kinihcrK 



A (ialvm, .lohn V Hcaney, Erica 
.1 Norgaard. IKie Papantoniou, 
Micheic M Sardo. Heather 
Stuart. Kerry A lolson. ( ynthia 
M Varnadorc. James A 
Waltermire. Yeung Yeung 
GRADK 10 

Distinction: Kaihenne 1 
Aliberti. Robyn I Bailey, f rin K 
Bonnevier. Vicki I Borek. 
Vielanie J Borromeo. Lynda M 
Butler. Kipp W C alduell. Sui H 
(hoi. Diane M Clougherls. Julie 
DetvMler. Michael .1 Dupill. 
Anna Ian. deorge S (lavros. 
.lacqueline \ Harrington. Renee 
I aforest. Tina I cc. Cara M 
VIcNally. Michael Megias. 
laneile M Nielson. C aitlyn M 
O'Brien. Andrew W Ogihie. 
Brett OHare. Karin M Reister. 
Da\id K Siott. Sharon M Stark. 
Carol I Sleeves. Rachel \ 
Sturgis. (hung M WOng 

High Honors: Jane C 
Amendoiare. \alerie I Brown, 
Adam J C ocio. Pamela J 
t'ourage. leresa M Diorio. 
Kristin Fiacco. Kerry (iaKin. 
Robin \ (iuiilin. Caroline A. 
lones. Quitn I e. 1 vnn VI 
Vlahonev. llaine VI O'Sullivan. 
Kaara A Peterson 

Honors: Kellianne Brooks. 
C hrisiopher VI Bulger, (ircgory 
S Callahan. Vancy P C asev . 
Karen C ashman, l.inda B 
CDoke. John J f it/gerald. 
Melissa A Haherty. Kara R 
Fletcher. Knsten M Ciolden. 
Sharon R Cioodwin. Susan 
(luarentc. Dawn M Halpin. 



Kevin Kellv Receives 

m 

Christa MoAuIiffe Grant 



C iirry COIIegc senior ke\in 
I' kelK of Quincy was 
a w .1 r d e d the Christa 
VIcAulille leacher lncenli\e 
(irant lor the I4S6-S7 
academic year by t h c 
Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. 

I he grant program was 
established by the Common- 
wealth in honor ol the New 
Hampshire teacher who 
perished in the C hallengei 
tragedy. 

Kelly, an education major, 
had to attain a ciiiTiulati\e 

Mirhaol MrMahon 
A.F. Serjeant 

Michael C McMahon. son 
of Robert W, McMahon. 1 I 
Bethel I err.. Quincy. has been 
promoted in the VS. Air 
t orce to the rank of stall 
sergeant 

McMahon is an operations 
resources management 
specialist in Japan, with the 
^I6th lactical Airlilt (iroup 

He IS a 1980 graduate ol 
Quincy High School 

DwayiH' ^ ilcoxiMi 

!N.H. (lolh'^o 

(fra<liial(> 

Dwayne \S . Wiicovcn ol 
Quincy recent K ("aduaicil 
from New Hainpshiie C oilcgc 

with a bachcloi ol science 
degree in accoiiiiimg. 



grade point average ol .VO or 
better in his first two years at 
the college in order to qualify 
lor the highly-valued grant. 
He IS the first student at Curry 
to receive the McAuliffe 
award. 

Fhe requirements for the 
grant provide that the 
applicant must be preparing 
to teach on a full-time basis in 
a public school in the 
Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts and must be willing 
to teach full-time for at least 
one year in such a public 
school following graduation. 



Robert Howard. Sandon Jee. 
Jennifer 1 Killilea. Kara M 
l.cntmi. Krisien M I vdon. 
Maura 1 McCarthy, Barbara 
Murphv. Debra J Panaro. 
Iheodoroa Pappas. Rcnec M 
Rohichaud. Su/anne I- Rochon. 
Vlahacl S K Seto. Sharon 
Stroup. Kathleen A Watt. 
Ml/a bet h I Zadig 

GRADK II 

Distinction: Derek J Borek. 
f av D.I Borromeo. tdmond J 
Brosnan. Alfred B Cawthorne. 
Amv I Davis. Shannon Doyle. 
Vancy Flukes. David Forrester. 
Yuen M f ung. Kristen Gearin. 
Vlaura Ciraham. Kathrvn R 
Ciralton. Jrcasa Ciray. Augustine 
Jac. Nathan R James. Iimothy 
M Jones. Elaine M Joseph. 
Christina Kalant/is. Diane Ice. 
Peter I cc. Jill Marlowe. Merry E. 
Mcl.aren. Ann VI McNally. 
Patrick J Murphy. Paul (i 
(VHara. Karen M O'Sullivan. 
Stephen Patch. Christine Price. 
Paula J Quigg. I isa I.. 
Rodriguez. Vieiissa M Rvan. 
Vlichael A Shields. Frederick I. 
Stevenson. Angela \ene/ia. 
Christine Vene/ia. Bradley J 
Waltermire. Brenda A Warren. 
1 cona M Watkins. Jolanta Zvch 

High Honors: Andre J 
Abou/eid. I isa VI Bell. Patricia 
A Feenev. Fddie I lu. Brian P 
Mahonev. Douglas I Vlasters. 
Paul C Nitschkc. Karrie A 
Pistormo. Michael F Walsh. 

Honors: Carrie Campbell. 
Katherme B Dutfv. Christine M 
Cirimm. Rebecca A. Histen. 
Fannie W F l.o. Eugene K 
VIcCarthv. Paul J Vieehan. 
Frances W Vlilne. James VI 
Monaghan. Brian Viosher. John 
F VI u lien. lara A O'Brien. 
Kristen Phipps. John Quill. 
Sandra S Sprague. Harry P 
lowle. Stacev VI Welch. Ralph 
J Willard. Wilham W.l Wong 



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We're Glad You Asked! 




CAN FUNERAL DECISIONS 
BE MADE WISELY UNDER STRESS? 

Not always wish is why we recommend planning your own 
funeral 

Cdughl up in grief and stress, some pK'ople may be emotionally 
unable to cope with making funeral arrangements effectively 
They may be tempted to proceed with more > ostly 
arrangemenls than they should It should be noted that the 
psychological value of the funeral has no relationship to its 
I osts 

Planning .uch arrangements may eliminate the possibility ol 
sui b over sp«'nding F^lannmg lan Ih' accomplished in advance 
of need, in an almosjihere uncharged with the emotionally 
disttessmg cinumslances ol bereavemi'iil For details of 
planning funerals, call us or slop l>y tor literature 

Your ijiu'stions and cnminents on this and othei subji-i ts are 
welcome in private or publu ly through this column 



a<^^^ 



WiCKENS & TROUPE FUNERAL HOME 

26 Ad.jtns Street. Quituy 472 S888 





THIRTY ORDERS dealinf> with loning changes were recently signed b) Mayor Francis 
McCauley, seated, center. To his left, is Councillor Thomas Nutley. who chaired the Zoning 
Task Force which proposed many of the orders. At right, council president Stephen McGrath, 
who created the task force. Standing, from left, are Councillor Patricia Toland, a task force 
member; and Citizens Advocating Proper Planning (C.APP) members Lillian Austin, Norman 
Boulilier, Planning Director Richard Meade. Arthur Chandler, Alice Boutilier, Maureen 
Mazrimas, Ken Hawes, Judy Kolson, Peter Kolson, Maryann Lencki and John Keenan. 

l(Juinr\ Sun photo h\ Tom (worman) 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Quincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 




Delivered by 
Celebrity Look-Alikes, Bag 
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Stu4f«d Anlmais 
A Greeting Cards 

Com* Slop By Our Stor* 

674 Hancock St., Wollaston 773-0690 



Disc Jockeys Available 
For All Occasions 



Georgina G. Camillo, D.M.D. 

is pleased to announce 

that she has joined the offices of 

Donald C. MacLeod, D.M.D. 

52 Greenleaf Street 

Quincy, Massachusetts 02169 

Phone: (617)773-6300 

Evening and Saturday 

Hours Available 



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Weymouth Ma. 

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An Authortzed PIIOTO GRAPIUX 



331-7162 



Paffc 14 Quincy Sun Tliureday, July 23, 19S7 




Renee Vardaro: 



RENEE VARDARO, 21, of Brockton, is i pretty picture after beinc crowned Miss Quincy Bay 
of 1987 at the annual pageant held at Quincy Center Plaza. 




nVE FINALISTS in the Mitt Quincy Bay Pageant were, from left, Lori Colleia, 19, of 
Mantfietd; Annette Godin, 23, Rockland; Erin Grogan, IS, Woiiaston; Renee Vardaro, 21, 
Brockton, later crowned the winner; and Lauren Pearson, 17, South Weymouth. 

H/iiincy Sun /iholn* h\ (hnrlf* Flatm) 

I HOW CREATIVE ARE YOU? I 



1. Do you have a favorite song'? 

2. Do you have a photo album full 
of great pictures'?* 

3 Do you have a VCR';* 

4 Can your favorite songs and pictures 
be made into a meaningful music video'? n 

If you answered yes to all of these questions, 
you are very creative'! 

Now, bring your favorite photos and your favorite 
music to Quincy' s finest transfer center 



yes 


no 


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D 


D 


D 


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PHOTOQUICK OF QUINCY I 



1433 Hancock St. 
Quincy Center 

Together we can make beautiful 
music videos" 



Miss Quincy Bay 

Made Her 
Dream Come True 



By KRISTINK STRKNGK 

Rcncc R Vardaro. 21. 
St rived lor her dream and 
made It come true iridav 
night when she was crowned 
Miss Qumcy Bay of 1987 

"I feel fantastic," she says 
"I was kind ol nervous, 
however. My commodore. 
I'at Pasquale made me led 
more comfortable " 

ihc pageant, which is the 
highlight of the annual 
Quincy Center Sidewalk 
Ba/aar. drew an audience ol 
over I0()() to Quincy Center 
F'ia/a 

It was co-sponsored by the 
Quincy Center Business and 
Professional Association and 
the Quincy Bay Race Week 
Association 

Renee. daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Phil Vardaro ol 
Brockton, was crowned by 
last year's winner. Michelle 
loth ot Weymouth 

the runners-up were I on 
I C ollcia, 19. ol Mansfield. 
Annette (iodin. 23. ol 
Rockland, inn I Cirogan. 
18. of Quincy and I auren A 
Pearson. 17. of Weymouth 

.Sherry I Paduia. 19. ol 
Weymouth was named Miss 
Pht)togenic by William 
I it/gerald and (ilen C aterer 
of Photo Quik. Quincy. the 
oltkial pageant photographers 

As Miss Quincy Bay. Renee 
will rcign over Quincy Bay 
Race Week. July 29 to Aug 2 
and also attend various yacht 
club (unctions 

She will receive a $I.(KH) 
scholarship to Quincy Junior 
College and the largest share 
ol the over $2.5(K) in pri/es 
which will be divided among 
the lour runncrs-up 

Renee. ol Brcnkton was 
encouraged to enter the 
pageant by co-worker, Phyllis 
Dreyer ol Quincy who gave 
Renee an application. 

"My mother, sister. Phillis 
and Aunt Rose have also been 
very supportive, sticking with 
me through thick and thin " 

I he five-foot green-eyed 
brunette is no stranger to 
beauty pageants She has 
entered the Miss America 
Preliminary Pageant twice, 
winning third runner-up and 



has been in the Miss USA. 
Preliminary Pageant in which 
she did not place 

"I found the other pageants 
to be helplul in my stage 
presence and my ability to 
answer questions along with 
my eight years ol modeling 
experience." 

Renee plans to enter the 
Miss Massachusetts Pageant 
in Nt>vember 

Ihe 2f> contestants were 
judged in swimsuits. evening 
gowns and lor poise 

For the swimsuit competi- 
tion Renee wore a black one- 
piece bathing suit with white 
and gold trim During the 
evening gown competition, 
she wore a red drop-shoulder 
gown 

Alter the competition was 
narrowed to live finalists a 
question was asked in which 
the girls were ludged on their 
response 

i he question: What was the 
m»)st important trail or 
message that you ha\e learned 




SHKRRY PADUA, 19, of 
Weymouth, wa» selected 
"Miss Photogenic" at the 
Miss Quincy Biy Pafeant. 

HJuincy Sun phnio 
h\ Char If* Ha fig I 



from your parents that you 
will carry with you 
throughout your life' 

Renee's response " I hf 
most important thing I've 
learned from my parents is lo 
be honest, be mysell and lo 
always strive for my dreains " 

Alter Ihc pageant Rcnif 
and her family and Iriends 
attended a reception at the 
Metropolitan Yacht ( luh. 
Braintree 

Pi esent ly . Renee is 
employed at the Mcdu.il 
inlormation Bureau. West 
wo»)d as an Inlorex operator 
She also works part-tiriic at 
l^lemmina Mt)deling Show 
as a miHleling instructor 

Renee is enrolled in the 
Massasoit College liberal arts 
transfer program and plans td 
attend Quincy Junior ( oikjic 
with the scholarshiji she won 

She also plans to pursue a 
career in television broadcast 
ing as an anchorwoman 

"Ihe pageant was a ^ircat 
experience ft)r me because ol 
the exposure, support mu\ sfit 
confidence one gams whin 
entering or winning a 
p.igeant." she saiil 

In May. Renee has plans to 
marr> Bernard C ummings. ni 
Brockton, a militarv pulkt 
ollicer in the Marine ( orps 

I he other contest a ntv 
were 

Natasha I Anaslasi. \h. ni 
Quincy. I)t>nna M Berg. Isi 
ol Quinc\, I isa M (arrnl.?- 
ol Hingham. Michelle I 
Columbus. 16. of Quukn 
Kcllie Anne Davidson. T o\ 
Wc\ mouth. C orinne M 
Fleming. P. of Weymouth 
Donna J (ilsnn. IS. nl 
Quincy; Amy J (irogan. !'< 
ol Braintree; Deanne D Kww. 
18. of Weymouth, l*amela \ 
Murph\, 21. of Quincs. 
Aileen A. Peterson. 21. nl 
Quincy; fraccy A. Pierce. ]t\ 

I Quincy; I i s a M 
Richardson. 20. of Weymouth. 
Rachelle C Romberg. 22 ol 
C^iincy. Carolyn Rocheile. 2n 

01 Quincy; loni M Solimini 
18. of Weymouth, leresa M 
Viglas. 17. of Weymouth. 
Hope A Weldon. 16; <'l 
Weymouth. J e n n 1 1 e r A 
Wright. 19. of Braintree 



when it comes 
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keep good 

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We represent many fine insurance 
connpanies. Ancj we select the company 
we think can best suit your insurance 
needs — whether it's coverage for your 
car, your home or your business. 

For insurance with an independent 
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Thuriday. July 23. I9t7 Quincy Sun Page 15 




PEGGY SCHAUB SEVERSUN of Virtinia, Miss Quincy 
Bay of 1967. a special tue%t at (his year's pageanl {ol another 
chance to walli down the runway. 



Friday Deadline For 
Baby Contest Entries 



MICHELLE TOTH, Miss Quincy B*y of 1986, was with 
emcee Bernie Reisbcrg. 

(Quincy Sun Photos by Charles Flagg) 



FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY of Quincy Bay Race Weeli was 
marlied by a calte presented during the Miss Quincy Bay 
Pageant. 



Koch Club Family Picnic Contest Results 



JM I'roduclions and 
Quincy Communitv Summer 
I heat re will hold a Bah> 
I'hoti) contest to support 
their upcoming pcrlormance 
oi the contemporary musical. 
"Bahy." to be performed m 
August. 

Pht)tos uill be ludged in 
three categories: Newborn-6 
months, 7 months- 1 year, and 
13 months - 2 years, with first 
pri/es being awarded in each 
category. 

The entry fee per non- 
returnable photo is $5 vMth all 
proceeds to benefit the 
Quincy Community Summer 
Theatre. 



Winners will be chosen at a 
benefit party being held on 
.luls .^1 Irom Kto I l:3()p.m at 
the Function lent at Marina 
Bay. where the public may 
pay $1 to Note for their 
ia»orite entry .All entrants 
will receive complimentary 
tickets to this e\ent. 

lo enter the contest, send 
photo along with the child's 
name, age, address and phone 
number to JM f*roductiorv>, 
128 Elmwood Ave . Wollas- 
ton. MA, 02170. 

Deadline for entries is July 
24. All photos must be 
accompanied by the $5 entry 
fee. 



The Koch Club held its 40th 
annual family picnic recently 
at Pageant f ield. Merrymount 
Park, with several hundred 
participating in the day's 
festivities including races and 
games for the children and 
adults in attendance. 

Ice cream and tonic was 
distributed to the youthful 
participants during the 
afternoon program while 
pri/es were awarded to the 
contest winners of the various 
events: 

Races: 



Boys under 5 years - I, 
Peter Koch; 2. Gordon 
Martin; boys 5-6 years - I, 
Jeffrey Glynn; 2. Matt 
Melchin; boys 7-8 years - 1. 
David Keddy; 2, Anthony 
Bragdon; boys 9-10 years - I. 
Jeff Keddy; 2. David Brown; 
boys 10-12 years - I, Keith 
lanofsky; 2. Kevin Robinson. 

Ciirls under 5 years - I, Erin 
Bragdon; 2. Sfiayla Contrino; 
girls 5-6 years - I. Kristen 
Bowes; 2, Sarah Kane; girls 7- 
8 years - I, Nicole Hanson; 2. 
Marylynne Kane; girls 9-10 



years - I. Jennifer Robinson; 
2, Josie Sawin; girls 10-12 
years - I. Jennifer Antonazzi; 
2, Kellie Sartre. 

Home Run Hitting: 

Boys 5-6 years - Justin 

Hickox; 7-8 years - Anthony 

Bragdon; 9-10 years - Ke\in 

Robinson; I I-I2 vears - Brian 



Campbell. 

Girls - 7-8 years - Nicole 
Hanson; 9-10 years - Josie 
Sawin; 11-12 years - Kellie 
Sartre. 

Winning the adult egg 
throwing contest after a three- 
way tie was Linda Latem and 
Scott Needham. 



EYEGLASSES 

• Designer Styles 
1-3 HOUR SERVICE 
Lab on Premises 



Michael McCormack 
Stationed In Philippines 



Airman 1st Class Michael 
J. McOomack. son of Janice 
McCromack of 129 Lincoln 
A\e., Quincy. has arrived for 
duty with the 1723rd Combat 
Control Squadron, the 



Philippines. 

McCromack, a combat 
control specialist, is a 1985 
graduate of North Quincy 
High School. 




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Page H Qulncy Sun Thunda). July 2.1, 1917 




Special Features 



CiRUHRY 



By Wairon S.iKlcr 




Clare Annswells 



Starscope V 



Swamp Urals 



IM BR IWG/Nur THIS 

SC^QULX TO /MV 
LADV LOVE/ 



By Warren SaltliT 



LOOK ,COTT0H. 



• ** < vjk.V<^it^ ^ 




...AH TH\m HISSVS r«v/w' 

ro DISGUISE HISSELF AS 
A ROSEBUSH f 



HCfT MOUHCU OF 
SENTIMENr^urv' 
IN HIS ENTiHE BOOY.' 




I 



NAPOLEON 



By Foster Moore 



KlOW THAT WE'PE PCWN AT 
TH' BEACW AND 1 WAVE MV 
MCVIE CAMERA— LET'S SEE 
SOME ACTION/ 



'f ^.IJ^^- 





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TWITCH 



By How Rands 




WEEK OF: July 23 

BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK 

You take charoo and excel in & leadership role whether in 
vited or not V<)u're a popular role model thanks to your will 
inyness to work hard without losing your good humor Educa 
tional opportunities are highlighted over the next three to six 
months The first half of 1988 may include unique travel 
opportunities. 

AQUARIUS - January 21 - February 19 

Unique opportunity may present itself for making key profes 
sional contact If traveling, plan for detours and distractions 
Recent financial planning should start paying off now 

PISCES - February 20 - March 20 

Some cancellations and postponements miiy leave you with 
free time, likely during or after the weekend The timing couldn't 
be better because your creative spirit is soaring 

ARIES - March 21 • April 20 

Ciood week for artistic projects, including home decorating and 
trips to galleries Some communications tie ups may mean that 
niessaqes aren't getting through to you f amily reconciliation 
IS spotlighted 

TAURUS - April 21 - May 22 

Your noble efforts pay off feuding friends are back together 
again, thanks to vour concern Health and (itness plans require 
a sensible attituile Hobby proves especially rewarding 

GEMINI - May 23 June 21 

Don't hesitate to speak up about injustices you've observed ■ 
)ust Ik* prepared for possible cross examination Straightforward 
tasks may bi' unexpectedly complicated i inanciai news 
brightener may arrive after Monday 

CANCER - June 22 • July 22 

If traveling near f)r far. be sure you're eciuipped with the latest 
information Timing works to your advantage as you find 
yourself in the right places at ttie liveliest moments 

LEO - July 23 - August 22 

friendship related difficulty may be s.itisfactfirilv resolved by 
Wednesday Week finds you enjoying a few luxuries or indulg- 
ing in precious free time Kelative may be surprisingly 
mysterious 

VIRGO - August 23 • September 22 

The week finds yf)u meeting people from assorted walks of life 
and learning from their experiences Kelationshin between 
relatives shows signs of dramatic improvement, {.V)\\ t force the 
matter 

LIBRA - September 23 - October 22 

With a little more patience, you can reali/c your creative polen 
lial Joint endeavors require some further planning Relation 
ships thrive un i\n intellectual level [jiuialion is highlighted 

SCORPIO - October 23 ■ November 21 

Good week for completing miscellaneous tasks and con- 
templating your next long term project Family obligations 
become less pressing Weekend finds you enjoying a change 
as well as a rest 

SAGITTARIUS - November 22 - December 22 

Sagittanus, the eternal student, excels in a teaching role through 
this period A sagging relationship comes back to life in full 
force Don't neglect mechanical prcjblcms 

CAPRICORN - December 23 • January 20 

A long term goal is within reach, thanks largely to the extra 
effort you've recently made You may be asked to mediate a 
family discussion. Travel and education blend well 

BORN THIS WEEK 

July 2'Mi.\. writer Carl Wilson; 24th, actress Ruth \\\xu.\. 25th. 
singer Rae Brett, 2()th. singer Mick Jagger, 27th, producer 
Norman Lear. 2Hth, actress Sally Struthers. 29th. actor Robert 
H o r t <; n 



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Thurtday. Jul) 2J. I9g7 Quinc) Sun Page 17 



Legion Baseball 

Morrisette Finishes 
With 14-4 Record 



By TOM SI I.I.IVAN 

I he Morrisctic I cgion 
baseball team completetj its 
regular season Monclav night 
vMih a 3-1 victors o\er 
Molbrook. Iinishingmtha 14- 
4 recortl and ciinthing a /one 
^ pla\oll berth 

()nl\ Morrisette. the onl\ 
leain to complete its srason, 
.mil Milton ( I }-2) are asMited 
III plaNoll sp«»ts Biaintree 
and Mass I r ii e k o ( 
\Ve> mouth have the inside 
track on the other two berths 
there are several makeup 
games to be p laved 

I he plavoMsare due to start 
Saturdav v\ith the lirst place 
team meeting the lt)urth place 
club and the second and third 
place teams plaving in the hest 
ot three scries The vvinncrs 
will meet in a best ol three 
series to determine the /one 
representative in the state 
loiirnament 

Kav (attaneo. Morrisetle"s 
head coach U)r 17 vear> and 
ihe team's manager this vear. 
earned his 25()th victorv last 
week Ra> turned the head 
coaching |ob over to Dave 
I'eidios. one ol his tornier 
piavers. but (atlaneo's duties 
haven'l changed much 



Dan (Kerbs gt>t his scctmd 
si.iit and went lour innings 
.tgainsi Holbrook Mondav 
nighl. allovMiig lour hits, 
sinking out iv^o and walking 
ihiec iim Brillo pitched one 



perfect inning and I arrv 
laglieri picked up the win. 
K<'i'ig the last two innings to 
improve his record to K-l 

Morrisette scored a run in 
the hrst inning when Steve 
Minichiello and Dan Biagini 
singled and Minichiello 
scored on Rob McDonald's 
sacrifice tlv Holbrook tied in 
the third ami it staved that 
was until the si\th when 
Morrisette scored twice 

Minichiello reached on an 
error and went to third on 
Hiagini's single to right 
Biagini stole second and 
Minichiello scored the 
winning run on a wild pitch 
Biagini scored on Mike 
Mullanev's single 

Biagini had two hits and 
Minichiello. Mullanev and 
Briilo one each 

BilK McDougal made two 
line running catches in center 
held and I ddie J lav in ran 
down a ball at thelence in lelt 
held 



In Its previous game 
Morrisette got bv Qumcv.4-3, 
in extra innings I'ltchers 
\Kavne ( hanibers ot Morri- 
sette and Rob Miggins ol 
Quincv were tough in the 
clutch Migginsgave up 10 hits 
but struck out II and walked 
onlv two C hambers gave up 
onlv three hits in .*i I .^innings 
but was wild, giving up eight 
walks He struck out eight He 
gave wav to Overhv. who 



picked up his second win 

Morrisette scored in the 
third when flavin singled, 
stole second, took third on a 
wild pitch and scored on 
Mullanev's single 

yuincy tied in the lourth 
when Bill Mulkern singled. 
Mike loland sacrificed and 
when the bunt was misplaved. 
both runners were sate and 
Mulkern scored on a wild 
pitch 

Morrisette went up. 3-1. in 
the fourth when Rob 
McDonald singled. Ricciuti 
singled. McDougal walked 
loading the bases and F lav in 
doubled scoring McDonald 
and Ricciuti 

QuincN tied it in the sixth 
when Nick Dragone walked 
for the third time and Peter 
I utts hit a 4(K)-foot homer over 
the centertield fence at Adams 
field 

Quincv had a chance to win 
It in the seventh but 
McDougal made a great 
throw to nip Mulkern at the 
plate as McDonald blocked 
the plate well 

Ron fletcher walked in the 
eighth and Quincv. anticipa- 
ting a bunt, sent the intield in 
tin the pitch But there was no 
bunt and Quincv had f letcher 
picked oft b\ 2()leet. fletcher 
saw second base was not 
covered and toi>k t>ff Ihe 
throw went into lett field and 
f'letcher continued on to 



third Ricciuti lofted a flv 
which hit the right field foul 
line and f letcher scored the 
winning run 

It marked C atlaneo's 25()th 
Morrisette victorv and he was 
given the game ball signed bv 
all the plavers and coaches 

Ricciuti went .^-for-4. 
Minichiello and flavin had 
two hits each and Mullanev. 
McDonald and Biagini one 
apiece 

In Its previous game 
Morrisette defeated Canton. 
6-0. as faglieri turned in a 
pitching masterpiece, giving 
up three singles for the onlv 
Canton base runners He 
struck out I 1 and did not walk 
a batter No runner reached 
second and the outfield didn't 
have a putout. 

In the second Kletcher 
doubled in Ricciuti. who had 
singled. Morrisette added 
three in the fifth when 
McDougal was hit bv a pitch. 
Mullanev singled and stole 
second and both scored on 
Minichiello's triple. Minichiello 
scored on Biagini's ground 
out. 

Morrisette added two in the 
seventh when McDougal 
walked. Mullanev reached on 
an error. Biagini singled and 
Jim Ross walked with the 
bases loaded 

Vlinichiello. Ricciuti and 
Biagini had two hits each and 
Mullanev and Fletcher one 
apiece. 



Babe Ruth League 

HN Wins A.L. Championship 



Houghs Neck won the fiabc 
Kuth league's American 
I e a g u e c h a m p i o n s h i p . 
Iinishing with a \b-(i reiotti 

flob Austin pitched a no 
hitler as Houghs Neck 
walloped Barrv's IKIi. I. *>-?>. 
scoring eight runs m the 
liHirlh innini: 



Rob kisiel and .Austin had 
a double and single each. 
Steve Mclnnis three doubles. 
IVler I espasio and .l«)hn 
Roik two singles each, (had 
McMahon a double and I'eter 
Mel oughlin, Sal Manganaro 
and Billv ( ampbell a single 
apiece 



Houghs Neck rolled over 
Brvan i'osi. 12-1. with 
Mel oughlin pitching siv-hit 
ball. 



single 

\or Brvan I'ost Mark 
Ivelleher had a triple and 
single. I*at McDonough a 



Austin had a home run and double and single and Scan 
triple, kisiel a home run, Mulkern a single. 



Campbell two singles. 
Mclnnis a double and 1.^- 
vear-oUl H.iiell HulkiiN .i 



Mclnnis pitched fivc-hii 
ball .IS Houghs Neck ptilished 
.>lt the I ire Dcpi . I.'- 1 




Ql IN( V RKSIDKNT Michael Perkins finished lliird in 
llie male 40 and over division Mith a time of 20:46 in the 
New Kngland Baptist Hospital's third annual Spring Run 
for hun race. .\ppro\imatel> 150 other runners 
participated in the race which raised SI. 000 for Missiim 
Possible, an urgani/atittn which sponsors vouth programs 
in Mission Hill. 



Sun Sports 

County Women's 
Classic At Presidents 
Golf Course 



I he annua I Norfolk 
(\)univ Women's Classic will 
K- held at the Presidents (loll 
Course I ridav. Aug 2S 

Deadline for entries will be 
Aug 2ti at .S p rii. 

I ritrv lee is ^20 which 
includes lourn.iment fee and 
pri/es. Checks should be 
made pavabic to NiMlolk 



Couniv Women's Classic aiul 
mail c d to t o u r n a m e n i 
direcli>r Arthur Cicconi. 
Prcsident> Coif Club. }y 
West Sijuantum Street. Ninth 
Quincv 02 r I 

I nt ranis are asked to call 
the pro shi>p at .'2S-.U44 on 
Aug 2' to veritv >i.iiinig 
times 



Frank (.urios Graduates 
From A.F. (loiirsr 



Ail rn.iri tst ( lass I i.mk .1 
( ar Ills, son of \ rank I and 
M.iiv A Carlos of 77 
I'hinoiilh St . (^^iiiiicv, has 
K'ailiiated liom ttie IS \ir 
I orce let enmne nK».li.inn. 



couise at ( fuimile 
Base. 111. 



All loicc 



He I', a I^S'> graduate of 
Quincv Voc.ilional technical 
High School 



Locker Room 
Base Ball Cards 

Bought - Traded - Sold 

Weymouth Market Place 

Shaw's Plaza Rte 53 
Open Sat. 9-5 
Sun. 9-5 

843-4476 - 479-210? 



if 
II 
II 

I 

I 
I 

I 

II 

II 
II 
II 

II 



VRU: Big Mac 

when you bu\ 
one o\ the same 

VAlin ONIY AT 

• OUINCY 

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Paier IS Quinry Sun Thunday, July 23. 1987 



Koch Broad Meadows 
Awards Night July 28 



The Broad Meadows 
District of the Koch dub 
Boy's Baseball and Girrs 
Soitball leagues will hold the 
26th annual Parents and 
Awards Night luesdav. ,lul\ 
2K. at 6;30 p.m. at the Broad 
Meadows Middle School 
Held. 50 Calvin Rd 

Rain date is Ihursday. Jul> 

30 

Uminated certificates will 
be presented to each boy and 
girl who participated in the 
after supper recreation 
program and those with 100 
percent attendance will be 
receiving a special recognition 

Anthony T. l>lmonico, 
founder and director of the 
Broad Meadows Unit of the 
Koch Club, will direct the 



Awards Program assisted by 
Mrs (Jerry Hclmonico and 
the coaches and umpires of 
the leagues 

The Broad Meadows 
I")istrict closes out the 37th 
year of the Koch Club's 
popular neighborhood 
recreation program The 
North Quincy, Montclair and 
West Quincy Districts had 
completed their activity in the 
final week of June. 

I n add It ion to the 
recreation activity, the Broad 
Meadows District since 1964 
has funded a $ 1 00 scholarship 
award to a boy and girl 
graduate of Quincy High 
School with a total of $4800 
presented by Broad Meadows 
of the $13,000 presented by 



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the Koch Club since 1959. 

I he Koch Club, in 1973. on 
(he 25th anniversary of the 
organization established a 
permanent scholarship fund 
to be activated in 1998 on the 
50th anniversary of the 
organization I he 25lh 
anniversary events brought 
$3,000 for the project and the 
North Quincy and Broad 
Meadows Districts donated 
$1,000 each. The $5,000 
original grant has increased 
the total to its present amount 
of $19,000 in the past 14 years 
from gifts and interest. 

On the 30th anniversary of 
the Koch Club, a permanent 
Christmas charity fund was 
established with a $5,000 
grant. The amount has 
increased to $11,000 in the 
past nine years and will be 
activated in 1998. 

The Broad Meadows 
District commemorated its 
25th anniversary in the spring 
with Delmonico. director, 
recognized for his efforts in 
founding and directing the 
numerous activities for 
thousands of youngsters. 

On May 14. 1988 the Koch 
Club will celebrate its 40th 
anniversary as a community 
service organization 




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Ward 2 Field Day 
Winners Announced 



One hundred .ind sixty- 
scNcn young people won and 
placed in the races and special 
events during the Ward 2 
CiMc Association annual 
I ourlh of July Field Day. 

Hot dogs, ice cream and 
cold drinks were served to all 
who attended "Sparkles" the 
clown and helper made up the 
youngsters' faces adding \o 
the lesti\e event 

Irophics, second and third 
place ribbons, dolls and 
pinwheels were awarded to 
the winners and runners-up 

Ihe winners: 

Decorated bicycles: 
Danielle Oliverio. Luann 
Martin. Nicolette Martinson. 

Dolls: Kara McSweeney. 
Angela Martinson, .lennifer 
Doyle. 

Horribles costume contest: 
1st place. Katlyn Bagen; 2nd 
place Richard Bagen; 3rd 
place. Sarabeth Bagen; 4th 
place, Michael Mc! aughlin 

Decorated doll carriage: 
Kelly Smith 

Fifty yard dash: ages 5-6, 
girls 1st, I.eanne Martin; 2nd, 
Jamie McCarthy, 3rd Kelly 
Smith 

Boys: 1st Jason Page. 2nd 
Mark Mclnnis, 3rd Joshua 
Dwyer 

Seven-8 girls: 1st Angela 
Martinson. 2nd Jana Bagen. 
3rci Danielle Rt»bcrtson 

Ages 7->< boys: 1st Jell 
I finer, 2nd Michael Marlin. 
3rd KcNin Regan 

■\j;cs y-iO ^irls: 1st 



I lizabeth Crowle>. 2nd 
Samantha I a lleur. 3rd 
Kristen Adams 

Ages 9-10 boss I si Mark 
Regan, 2nd Cireg Santoro. 3rd 
Mat McSweene\. 

Ages 11-12 girls: 1st Kara 
Bagen. 2nd Katie McCarthy, 
3rd Christine Marrone 

Ages 11-12 boys: 1st Ally 
Sleiman, 2nd John 
Digiacomo, 3rd Jason 
Sullivan 

Ages 13-14 girls: 1st Lisa 
Mcdrath 

Ages 13-14 boys: 1st Chris 
Digiacomo, 2nd Matt 
Sullivan 

Sack race, girls 5-6: 1st 
I.eanne Martin, 2nd Danielle 
Oliverio, 3rd .lohnice 
(iraham 

Ages 5-6 boys: 1st Joshua 
Dwyer, 2nd Mark Mclnnis, 
3rd Richard Bonvie 

(iirls 7-K: 1st Barbara 
Scolaro, 2nd Danielle 
Robertson. 3rd Angela 
Martinson 

Boys 7-8: 1st Kevin Regan, 
2nd Michael Martin. 3rd Jefl 
Feiner 

(iirls 9-10: 1st Flizabeth 
Crowley, 2nd Samantha 
l.aFleur. 3rd Beth Mcdralh 

Boys 9-10: Mark Regan, 

Boys 9- 10 I St Mark Regan. 
2nd lommy Mclnnis, 3id 
Matt McSweencN 

(iirls 11-12 IM kalic 
M(.('arlh\, 2nil ( hrisiinc 
Marrone. 3rd K.ira H,i>;eii 

B()\s ii-i: isi \\\\ 

Slfim.in. 2 ml lohn 



3id la son 
Lisa 



■,l 



Digiacomo, 
SulliNan 

(iirls 13-14 
Mc(irath 

Boss 13-14 Isi ( hris 
Digiacomo, 2nd I o m 
( (uirlney, 3rd Malt Sullivan. 

Three-leRged race: (iirls 7- 
8 1st Jana Bagen- Nicole 
Martinson. 2nd Barbara 
Scolaro-.Angela Martinson. 
3rd Danielle Robertson- 
Melissa Mclaughlin. 

Boys 7-8: 1st Jeff Sullivan- 
Mike Martin. 2nd Mark 
Doyle-Steven McMan. 3rd 
Jeff Feiner-Mike Adams 

(iirls 9-10 1st leah 
Robertson-Susan Deskins. 
2nd Elizabeth Crowlcy- 
Pauline Doyle. 3rd Samantha 
Lalleur-Angela Martinson 

Boys 9-10: 1st (ireg 
Santoro-Matt McSweeney, 
2nd Mark Regan-Keith 
Martinson, 3rd I t)dd 
Sullivan-Jacob Harle 

(iirls I 1-12: Isi Christine 
Marrone-Kalie McCarthy. 
2nd Kara Bagen-Shannoii 
McAdam, 3rd Cind\ ( edronc 
-Michelle (iowdy 

Boys 11-12: Isi John 
Digiacomo- AIK Sleiman. 2nd 
Ihomas M c (i r at h. lames 
Swimni 

(iirls 13-14: 1st Melissa 
Marrone-lisa Mc(irath 

Boys 13-14: Isi Inm 
( (Uirlney-.AIK Sleiman, 2ntl 
Matt Sullivan - ( h ri s 
I )i^'i.n.i)nu> 

dills 15-N' Isi Icanrullc 
/iipkiitska-l'alli I It /^ii. I III 



Whiffle Ball Tourney Winners 



ey 



I lu- QiiiiKA Kecrcalioii \ll- 
( \\\ Whitllcball Ituirnaiiiciil 
v^as i.()tKliitlc(i as 12 teams 
ihrdughoul the cilv ninipcteil 
in the third annual (icorge 
Hrcll lournamcnt tukl ai 
Kusscll I'ark 

In the Midget Divisiim. 
lore River loiij.'hl Us wa\ out 
ot the losers' bracket todeteat 
I aUrecque Park, 6- 1, lor the 
cilv championship Lor the 
winners Mark Regan hail a 
strong oHcnsive tournament 
with ten homcruns while 
Dave (lunthei and John 
Michael Lop r lore had 
outstanding delensive eltorts 

In the Junior Division, 
Russell Park remained 



undelealed as ii heal 
I aMrecque Park. 1-0. lor Ihe 
eit\ title Ihe vMiiniii>; le.irn 
eonsisted ol lamie Arnsiein, 
Brian ( a m p b e 1 1 . D .i ri 
( an.ivan, .mil ( hris Dellulo 
In the Senior brarkrl. 
Leniio Slieel Plav^'rouiui .liso 
reniameil uruleiealetl in 
niaintaining its title as eilv 
ctiamps as it tonqiiered 
Bishop PlavgroiiiHt. 11-2 I m 
ilic winners. Pat O'Donoghue 
and Shawn I vneh each h.iil 
three homenins ^hile Dan 
Me I e.in .iddeil ! o I he 

balarKed stiirin^ .illjik with 
two homer iins 
In the (iirls Division. Ihe 

riiiilgel gills from ( hapel 



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DRUNK DRIVING? 

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and potential legal consequences 

one hour consultation *50.00 

TRIAL LAWYER ROBERT K. KELLY 

Call 479-8133 for appt. 



. orisisi I nj; ot (h 1 1st 1 lie 
Sulliv.in. .lenn.i Nolan. Iiilie 
\nri Dorsev. Keheeea S.ili. 
and I .iiireri Walsh were Ihe 
eilv eh. imps arul Ihe lunior 
(nils trotii l.ison I'.iik 
(.onsisting ol Siis.in Sweenev, 
I.I m le Ca r 1 n I , ( he r v 1 
M. I r shall, I am en Par ker 
were Ihe eilv eh. impious in 
iheir division 

In e.ieh il i\ ision. ihe 
winners were a w a i iled 
Irophies thai were supplied hv 
t h e (,^ u I lu V R e c r e .1 1 1 o ri 
Depart merii 

Ihe t oil r na men I was 
org.ini/ed anil siipeiviseil hv 
i.iime Pa/ .i lul \1 .i i v 
Holler.in, sports and spen.il 
eveni eoordinalois lor ihe 
summer plavgroiind program 



Save Gas 
and Money ... 
Shop Locally. 



BORED? 

Start A Quincy Sun 
Delivery Route. 

You'll Be Part Of 
The Business World. 

Call 471-3100 
or Apply in Person 

1372 Hancock Street, Quincy Squore 471-3100 



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Thursday, July 23, IW7 Qulncy Sun Page !♦ 



Quincy Legion Hopes Triple A All-Star In 
Slim For Playoff Berth Medway Tournament 



I he Oui"cy legion 
baseball team completes the 
regular season tonight 
( I hursday) agamst Randolph 
at S:3()at Adams Field uiihits 
best record in years assured 
and still holding slim hopes 
lor a playoff berth. 

All teams with the 
exception of Morriselte. have 
games to make up and onl\ 
Morrisette (14-4) and Milton 
(l>2l ha\c clinched playoff 
spots 

Quincy (9-8). which has lost 
several one-run decisions, 
dropped a 6-5 heartbreaker to 
Milton Mondav night, having 
the tying run on third base 
with no outs in the last inning 
hut unable to score. 

Quincv scored in the first 
on an error, a walk and Steve 
Happas" single Milton lied in 
the bottom half on a home 
run Quincv scored three runs 
in the tourth but Milton came 
hack with five in the bottom 
halt. 

Quincv scored its last run in 
the filth Happas was the 
losing pitcher and was relived 
hv Rob Miggins in the tourth 
Happas had three singles and 
was struck in the lace bv a 
j;round ball but slaved m the 
game Bill Mulkern. Higgins 
and Jim Kearns had singles 

Sundav Quincv edged 
Mass Fruck ol Wevmouth. ^- 
6, in a makeup of a previous 
tic 

Jim Dennis pitched (^ 2 } 
innings, and was relieved bv 
Hill Rt>che. whv) picked up the 
win Quincv scored U)ur runs 
in the litth lor a 4-0 lead, but 
\Scv mouth came back to tie it 
in the si\th 

Quincv won it vsith three 
litis in the top of the seventh 



when Dennis. Mulkern, Mike 
ioland. Peter I ufts and 
Kearns singled and Roche 
walked. Weymouth came 
back with two in the bottom 
half but Roche retired the 
linal batter on a fly to right 
field with the tying run on 
base. 

Dennis had three singles. 
Kearns two and Happas. Kyle 
Robertson. Nick [)ragone. 
Mulkern. Ioland and lufts 
one each Roche walked three 
times and scored two runs 
Kearns made two outstanding 
catches in the outlield 

In Its previous game Quincv 
lost a 4-3 squeaker to 
Morrisette in extra innings 
Miggins pitched fine ball, 
striking out eight and walking 
two lults had a two-run 
homer over the tence at the 
4(K)-foot mark at Adams Field 
to tie the score in the sixth 

lied alter seven innings. 
Morrisette scored the winning 
run in the eighth on a walk to 
Ron fletcher. a two-base 
error and a single that hit the 
right lield toul line by Chris 
Ricciuii Quincv had a chance 
to win It in the seventh but Bill 
McDougal threw out 
Mulkern at the plate from 
center held on a single bv 
Higgins. 

f arlier Quincv lost to 
Braintree. H-4. with the score 
}-} going into the top of the 
seventh Pitcher Joe laylor. 
who was tiring, was taken out 
tor a pinch hitter in the sixth 
and he gave wav to Happas. 
who gave up a triple, a double 
and two walks lor five runs 

Quincv came back with a 

run in the bottom half but it 

was lar too little and too late 

Quincy scored in the first 



when Dennis reached on a 
fielders choice and Robertson 
tripled. Braintree tied it on 
two singles and an error and 
went ahead on two singles and 
a double in the fifth. Quinc> 
tied It in the bottom of the 
fifth on a walk to Happas. a 
single by Dennis and a double 
by Mulkern F he other 
Quincv run in the seventh 
came when Roche doubled 
and Happas singled Sean 
(iately and Faylor had singles 
and Happas also had a 
double. 

Quincy had previously 
edged Braintree. 6-5. in a 
makeup game Dennis was the 
winning pitcher, going all the 
way and giving up eight hits, 
striking out five and walking 
only one. 

Quincy had seven hits but 
lelt 12 men on base, 
something that has plagued it 
all year long. 

Frailing. 5-4. in the last 
inning, Quincy scored twice 
with two outs. Fufts and 
Roche walked. [)ennis 
singled, scitring lufts and 
Roche scored the winning run 
on a wild pitch. 

Dennis had three singles. 
Robertson a double and 
single and Toland and 
Mulkern singles Roche 
walked three times and 
Higgins reached three times. 
The playoffs are scheduled 
to open Saturday. The top 
four teams in Zone 6 will 
compete with the first place 
team playing the fourth and 
the second meeting the third 
in the best of three series. The 
winners will meet in a best of 
three series to determine the 
/one's representative in the 
state tournament. 



Quincy's Triple A Baseball 
league all-stars are plavingin 
a tournament in Medway and 
broke even in two games 
recently. 

Ihe team will continue in 
the tournament for the next 
three weekends. 

Quincy edged Ashland. 4- .3. 
in seven innings as Mike 
Aupperlee pitched four-hit 
ball, struck out eight and 
walked only one 

Aupperlee and Chris 
.Mibrandi sparked Quincy. 
with Alibrandi driving in the 



winning run. 

Quincy was upset by 
Bellmgham. 11-8. Philip Bell 
had a three-run homer to 
bring Quincy to within one. 
8-7. but Bellingham clinched 
the win with a three-run 
homer of its own. 

Quincy had two runners on 
and two outs and the tying run 
at the plate in the last inning 
hut a great play bv 
Bellingham ended the game. 

Fn a Triple A regular season 
game the Yankees bombed 
the Tigers, 19-7. .Andrew 



Vermette was the winning 
pitcher and struck out seven. 

Iheresa Elwood had two 
singles for the Yankees. Justin 
Elwood two singles and a 
double. Sean Perry a triple 
and single, John Downey two 
singles. William Sit two 
singles and Jason Beauvais a 
double and single. For the 
Tigers Ken Duddy had a 
double and Brian Sullivan a 
double and single. John 
Downey played strong 
defense. 



12 Boats Compete 
In Lipton Regatta 



Carlton Ladies 
Champ At Ponkapoag 



N.intv ( aillon vkoii the 
iliih (.hampimi award at the 
I'nnkapoag (ioll ( ourse 
ladies' Innei Club Idi the 
loinih successive vear 

Runnerup was Steplianie 
Ki//a 

( arlton has ai.cunuil.iled 
inoic honors bv winning! Ihe 
annual competitum tm the 
(iibnev Cup with a net 6"" She 
made an impressive eagle on 
the lOth hole of course =2. a 
485-vard par 5 h»)le Ihe 
(iibnc\ Cup IS given in honor 
1)1 F'onkapoag's lirst goll 
piotessional 

A lewest putts nme-hole 
tiiurnament was held recentiv 
with Bert Sigilman and 
I lorence Kollman tying lor 
first place with 15 putts Sallv 
Barr and Rita Rogers lied 
with 16 putts and Marion 
Dale. Ruth /aleski. I aura 
1 ynch. Fielle Smith. I helman 
Fkrman and F leanot \erdun 
all tied with 17 



Ihe annual ladies" Inner 
( lub invitational tournament 
will be held next luesdav. 
julv 2h An awards luncheon 
will be held at the Blue Hill 
( iHintiv Club tollowinj; the 



tournament Stephanie Ri//a. 
Stella Carvelli. Charlotte 
Dickie and Ruth Zaieski are 
co-chairpersons. Ml iadv 
golfers from area clubs are 
invited to enter. 



The first Sir Thomas 
lipton Regatta, sponsored bv 
the Squantum Yacht Club last 
Saturdav and Sunday, was 
described as a "smashing 
success" by chairman Don 
McCJilvray. 

"We had 125 boats 
competing and everyone 
enjoyed it," he said "All said 
they would be back next 

year." The club hopes to make 
it an annual event, hopefullv 
one of the major regattas in 
the Northeast in future years. 
Fn the Class A Performance 
Handicap racing fleet. Ralph 
DiMattia in his Shamrock 
edged Jim Feeley in his Lady 
Love when Feeley. leading at 
the time, hooked onto a 
lobster pot. 

Bob "Mu//" Murray had 
two wins, a second and a third 
to win the Hustler Class pri/e. 
He had Kevin Flaherty as 
crew on each of his four races 
and his daughter. Frin. board 
and his daughter. Erin, 
aboard for the final race. 

Russell Robinson o\ 
Hingham Yacht Club won the 
1 10 class title with a win. two 
seconds and a sixth. 

Jack Willy ot Wessagusseti 
scored two wins in the 25-boat 
Laser fleet. 



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Doug MacGregor. Bill 
Clark and Jack Foley of 
Hingham Y C. added the 
Lipton Cup 210 Class title to 
their recent Dick Sullivan 



Regatta v,\n. 

Hingham's Finlay skipper 
Courtney Drohan won the \ 
10 title. Dan Flaherty was 
second and Kellv Ross third 



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COWANS' 



Sports 
Stumpers 



1. Naino th«' two curront major leaguers who have hit 
100 or more home nins with three diff»Tent baseball 
teams. 

2 What player did the Padres receive in return for 
tradinj; Ozzie Smith".' 

:\. Name all four fraiu hist^s m the Arena Football 
U'ague. 

4 How many ganu-s during the regular seaM>n are 
seheduled for eaeh team in the NB.A' 

'r For what team did Ttx;Ls Ranger pitcher, Chiirlie 
H*)ugh, play before moving to Arlington. Tex? 

t). Name the last quarterbaek to lead the Colts into 
post seiLson play 

7. Name the last he;ul roach to lead football Cardinals 
into [)ost season play 

8. Name the last manag<'r to be hired by former Oakland 
As owner, Charles ( ) Finley. 




Answers: 1 Reggie I.uksoii and i'arrcll Kvans. 2 (i;iry 
Templeton; ■\. I'lltsbiirgli, henver. Chicigo and Washing 
ton, 1 SJ, ") I)»Mlgers, t> Hcrt .lonc>,. 7 |)t>n Coryell, S Hilly 



Mart 111 



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Page 29 Quincy Sun Tbundi)^. July 2.1, tHl 



Donoghue Team 
Wins Broom Classic 



Free Tennis Clinic July 3 1 



Quincy's Paul Donoghue 
led his team to a 9-undcr-par 
M to capture the 4th annual 
Broom Classic golf tourna- 
ment at President's Golf 
Course. 

Donoghue captained his 
team in the Florida style 
tourney, using his long tee 
shots and accurate putting. 
Playing with Paul were 
George McCall. Dave 
Robinson and Qumcy High's 
girls volleyball coach Jim 
Rendle. 

The second place team of 
Don Smith. Rich Smith. 
Steve Buckley and Brian Jolly 
finished at K-under Iheir bid 



to force a playoff went astray 
when Don Smith lined out a 
birdie attempt on the 18th 
hole. In third place with a 7- 
under score of 63 was the team 
of (ied Phelan. PaulCadigan. 
Roger Homan and Fred 
Murry. 

Ihe highlight of the 
tournament was the format 
which required golfers to wear 
costumes to the first tee. Best 
Costume winner was Al 
Bortolotti. 

A total of 26 pn/cs were 
awarded b> Broom Classic 
lournament Director Brian 
Buckley. A total of 36 players 
participated 



Recreation Director Barry 
Welch, announces that the 
Quincy Recreation Depart- 
ment will be host for a special 
free one day tennis clinic 
Icaturing instructors from the 
New England lawn Icnnis 
Association (NEI.I A) 

The clinic will be held on 
Friday, July 31. at the 
Montclair Park tennis courts 
on Holbrook Rd.. North 
Quincy from 10 a.m. to noon 

Betsy Ihurmond, a 
professional instructor with 
the NEl.FA, will be the head 
instructor and will bring other 
teaching professionals to 



assist in this special program. 
Members of the Quincy 
Recreation Department 
playground staff and tennis 
instructors Janice Sullivan 
and Mark Tcnney will also 
assist. 

Ihe program is open to 
boys and girls age 6-16 years 
and participants can bring 
their own racquets or they 
will be provided. All 
participants should wear 
sneakers. Registration will be 
conducted on the day of the 
event at the tennis courts. 

Ihe Nl I lA instructors 
will be teaching from the new 



United States lennis 
Association's lennis in the 
Parks curriculum. Ihis 
curriculum is designed to 
bring a solid base of skill 
development that is effective 
and rewarding and geared 
specifically to recreation 
department programs. 

Welch stated that. "Ihe 
tennis in the parks curriculum 
IS new to the eastern United 
States We at the Quincy 
Recreation Department are 
fortunate to participate in this 
pilot program Betsy 
Thurmond and her staff has 
given instructor's clinics to all 
recreation leaders and it was 



very well received. We have 
placed a new emphasis on 
tennis this year because of the 
great carry over value the 
sport has. Skills learned at an 
early age can provide for a 
lifetime of enjoyment 
Additionally it is an 
excellent sport that docs not 
require large numbers ol team 
members to practice or play. I 
encourage youngsters from 
beginner to advanced to 
attend and participate in the 
clinic on July 31." 

Additional information can 
be obtained by calling the 
Quincv Recreation Depart- 
ment at 773-1380. ext 204. 



Paul Flaherty Promoted 
To Project Leader 



Hotshot Competition July 27 



Paul Flaherty, of Houghs 
Neck, was recently promoted 
to the position of project 
leader in the programming 
department at Practice 
Management Systems. Inc. of 
Necdham. 

Flaherty joined the five- 
year old company o\er two 



vears ago as a programmer 
As a project leader, he will be 
responsible for the develop- 
ment of SYSIFM III. a 
software program for the 
management of medical and 
dental offices He will also be 
in charge ol updates and 
enhancements to the 
program. 



The Quincy Recreation 
Department playground 
program will host the annual 
Pepsi NBA Hotshot Compe- 
tition at citv playgrounds Julv 
27. 

Recreation Director Barry 
J. Welch said the competition, 
which IS being made possible 
through the sponsorship of 
the Pepsi Cola Bottling 
Company of Milton in 



conjunction with the Quincy 
Recreation Department, will 
be held for District I 
Playgrounds at the fenno St 
Playground; District II 
Playgrounds at I.aBrccque; 
District III Playgrounds at 
O'Rourke Playground and 
District IV Playgrounds at 
Flynn Playground on Flm St. 
All competitions will begin 
at 10 am 



See what everyone dse 



&:.:...3»*< 



ist£dldi^ab 



Add Cinemax* to pay TV 
and . . . watch out ! For dynamic 
entertainment full of surprises. 
From heavyweight cinema 
snuishes, classics and just- 
discovered sleepers. To brash 
comedy. Unspeakably outra- 
geous late-night entertainment. 
And offbeat Cinemax program- 
ming, like Max Headroom. 
It's a 24-hour bargain. That 
expands your choices. And lets 
you see things your neighbors 
only wish they could. 




firrERnuNMflirr TomiMX 



Quincy Cablesystems 
Call 471-9143 



enema. ie-«« ft »»«.l^ «■ -'«-'^ «"*fl W L-blt ' ^ .no ...Hclea.l,.^rT^n^t..,>],„g..,.K!pn,.rtt r,,KlerCf, e.m/Ho»^Bo, Ott,c^ Im. ■Rtg,M,,tdl..Otm.„> plHorM. Bo> Otkf W 



Open to boys and girls ages 
9-10. the Pepsi NBA Hotshot 
competition tests youngsters' 
speed, dribbling, shooting 
and rebounding abilities 
I here are six age categories 
(or competition: Boys 9-12. 
l.VLS. 1(^1 8; girls 9- 1 2. 13-15, 
and 1 6- IK 

Ihe winner in each of the 
SIX categories of the district 
competition will advance to 
compete against other kual 
winners for the Quincy 
Recreation Department 
championship One winner 
trom each ol the si\ categories 
will advance to an area 
playoff to be held in Boston. 
Ihe six winners ol that 
round will pla> oil during 



halftime of a Celtics game and 
the winner will receive an 
expense paid trip to the 
National Championships to 
represent New England in 
competition against the 
winners of the 22 other NBA 
cities At that time the winners 
in each of the six categories 
will be crowned National 
Champion lor his or her 
respective group 

Additional information for 
the Pepsi NBA Hotshot 
program will be available at 
supervised playgrounds from 
K 30 a m to 1 .M) p m 
Monday through f riday. or 
contact the Quincv Recreation 
Department at 773-l.^KO. ext 
204. 



18 Qualify For 

Hershey Slate 

Championships 



Recreation Director Barry 
Welch announces that IK 
Quincy participants qualified 
for the state championship in 
the Hershey National Track 
and Field Youth Program. 

The Quincy competition 
winners had their times and 
distances compared to the 
winners of 4 1 other 
community meets with the top 
eight selected to take part in 
the state finals. 

Ihe winners of the 
Massachusetts championship 
are compared to winners from 
meets held in the six other 
Northeast states and the top 
qualifiers receive an all 
expense paid trip to the 
National Championship at 
Hershey. Pa. in August. 

Ihe qualitiers from the 
Quincy competition and their 
events are; 

Jessie Ceurvels, 440 yard 



dash and 440 yard rclav; 
Solomcn Demeke. 440 yard 
relav; Haley Houlc. 440 yard 
relay and softball throw; 
Brian Klier. mile; Christopher 
Klier. 220 yard dash and 440 
yard relay. Rachel Marshall, 
440 yard relay. Kerry 
Mc(iahan. 440 yard relay; 
lindsev McCiovcrn. 440 yard 
relay and KKO yard run; 
(iuersley Milord. KHO yard 
run; Catherine Mulcahy 440 
yard relay; Regina Murphy, 
440 yard relay; Kathryn 
O'Shea. 440 yard relay; 
Jennifer Pratt. 440 yard run 
and 440 yard relay; lerrence 
Roche. 440 yard relay; Susan 
Sweeney. 440 yard relay; 
Robert Verney. 440 yard 
relay. 50 yard dash and 
Softball throw; Amanda 
Young. 440 yard relay and 
standing long jump; and 
Mane Hater. 440 yard relay. 



Jeff Bovarnirk 2nd Lieutenant 



Cadet Jeff A. Bovarnick. 
son of Brenda C. I.opilato and 
stepson of Thomas I.opilato 
of 112 Brook St., Quincy, has 
been commissioned as a 
second lieutenant under the 
Army's Early Commissioning 
Program. 

The program allows a cadet 
who has completed all the 



military science requirements 
to become a member of either 
an Army National (iuard or 
reserve unit. Ihis allows the 
new officer to continue 
working toward a bachelor's 
degree. 

Bovarnick is a student at 
the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst. 



RETAIL 
ADVERTISING 

SALES PERSON 



1372 Hancock St., Quincy 471-3100 



TiMnday. Jmlj 13, Ift7 Qiiteqr Sm Pifc 21 




i;j 



14 
IT) 

17 

IK. 

Jl 

24. 



49 



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POI.K K ( HIKK KrancK Finn rrccntl) pinned a «tatf polict 
badgr on his son, Dennis P. Finn, 26. during gradualion 
ceremonies at the State Police Academ), Kraminsham. At 
rijht, is another of Finn's sons, Kevin Finn, 29, a police officer 
in Oakland Park. Fla. 



King Crossword 



ACROSS 

1 Large farm 
(West r.s ) 
f) Taxicahs 
10. City (Neb) 
1 1 Take as 
one's own 
Artirinal 
inland 
waterway 
Citatlel 
Cry. as 
a (at 
(iuitlo's 
highest note 
Aniri( lal 
liRht 

Too muth 
Verbal 
2h Audience 
lf> Tnle 
28 Manage 
carefiilly 
F^ectrified 
particle 
A part 
of the 
telephone 
Kamshatkie 
hous<' 
W Mischievous 
persr)ns 



39 Humble 

40 Newt 

42. Accumulate 
45 Assistants 

President of 

Argentina 

Watered 

silk 

Trust 
52. Come in 
DOWN 



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8 

9 

12 

Ifi. 
18 

19 



Fat)ulous 
bird 

Wine cup 

Girls 
nickname 

Lake be- 
tween NY 
and Vt 

Robust 

Feline 

F\iss 

An arb<)r 

Int antation 

Shelf in 
a trunk 

Sorrow 

A tennis 
stroke 

Constella- 
tion 



20. Male 
adult 

22 Carting 

vehicle 

23 Scholarship 
27. Fate 

29. Border 
30 Juice of 
a plant 
31. Elevated 
trains 
American 
humorist 
Strike with 
the hand 
(Jreek poet 
Conscious 
Renown 
The sum 
Upward 
curving of 
a ship's 
planking 
Close up 
(Dial.) 
47. Before 
48 Varying 
weight 
(Ind.) 



33 



35. vS 



36 
37 
41 
43 
44 



46 



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2 


3 


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^^^ 



NEWCARRIERS 
WANTED 
Here's a chance to 
earn extra money by 
building a Ouincy 
Sun home delivery 
route. 

Telephone: 
471-3100 



lNl^HAhl3ldl 



DBB DEB 



QH|N|U[ 

TSinBPi 



eaBE?i:DB bisc^b 



V"l 






M 



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OlMjvN 



i 



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Bates Ave. Bridge To Be Repaired 



Rep. Michael W Morrissey 
announces the Massachusetts 
Department of Public Works 
has awarded a contract for 
improvements and rehabilita- 
tion of the bridge carrying 
Bates Ave. over the Southeast 
Expressway. 

The contract calls for the 



replacement ot the driving 
surface with concrete decks 
and new sidewalks. The 
structural steel will also be 
blast cleaned and painted. 

In conjunction with the 
overpass work, there will be 
improvements to the 
abutments. Approximately 



380 feet of Bates Ave. will be 
reconstructed, including 
sidewalks and guardrails. 

"This project reflects the 
continued interest the 
Department of Public Works 
has shown in the Quincy area. 
It is not difficult to see the 
wear and tear in the area, but 1 



am pleased that the 
Department of Public Works 
has responded to our frequent 
requests," said Rep. 
Morrissey. 

The project is expected to 
begin in early August and be 
completed by Oct. 31. 



Ihe Ihomas Crane Public 
Library in Quincy Sq. will 
conduct a storytelling concert 
featuring Sumner McClain 
Tuesday, July 28 at 7 p.m 

McClain will tell stories 
that "celebrate the human 
spirit" His program in 
Quincy will feature Afro- 



Sumner McClain Featured 
At Storytelling Concert 



American tales, but may also 
include original stories and 
tales from around the world. 

McClain is known 
throughout the greater 
Boston area not only as a 
superb storyteller but also as 
an actor, director and 



educator. He has appeared 
at the Boston Globe Book 
Festival, at the Children's 
Museum and has been 
featured on "Evening 
Magazine" and "Senior 
Circuit." 

McClain's storytelling 



concert is the second ot four 
to be held at the librar> This 
summer 

Lee Min Mo will perform 
on Aug 1 1 and George 
Capaccio Aug. 25. 

All concerts are offered to 
children age five and older 
and to adults. 



-* z 



IS YOUR CAR WRECKED, 
STOLEN, OR JUST PLAIN ZJKSD? 

WITH THIS COUPON YOU CAN SAVE MO OFF ANY 

ONE WEEK RENTAL OR SAVE ^5 OFF ANY SHORT TERM 

RENTAL OF A NEW, CLEAN, AIR-CONDITIONED. 5 OR 6 
PASSENGER MID-SIZE OR COMPACT CAR BEFORE LABOR DAY. 

ECONO CAR RENTAL OF QUINCY, INC. 

459 Souttwm Artery A70 ^AOO Across From 

At QuiTKy Minute ■# f 5f "*# V^O Quincy Police 

GUARANTEED RESERVATIONS ""^''"' 

NEW CONTRACTS ONLY — ONE COUPON (f 
PER CUSTOMER 



o 



Good News For Everyone Born Before 1921. 




IF YOITRE A 
SENIOR CITIZEN 
AND YOU'RE 
WILLING TO 
SPEND FIVE 
MINUTES 
READING Tins, 
WE'LL GIVE 
YOU TODAY'S 
CABLE FOR A 
MONTH, FREE. 

Until now you probably thought that cable wasn't for you. 
That it was just an extra expense. If you 11 be good enough to 
spare us your time, we've got some facts that may well 
change your mmd. T ARI P IQMT 

There's always somethmg nfcTMiiriDC' -TA/ 

good on today s cable JUST MORE TV. 

You'll ahvays firxl programs to entertain you, inform you arid 
keep you in touch, just when you're in the mood. Cable's 
even got programming especially for seniors. You don't have 
to watch more, you just enjoy it more. 

BASIC. 

THE HEART OF 

THE CABLE 

DIFFERENCE. 

People often think that cable 
must be expensive. But the 

fact IS that the essence of cable. Basic Cable, is really a bar- 
gain You get great reception on the cfiannels you're 
getting now, plus 33 fascinating new channels. Here's just 
a taste of what they offer: 

Senior Spotlight with local personalities and senior issues 

Senior Nutntjon and Senior Exerase 

The Discovery Channel with the worid of nature and science 

Senior Smarts and the Senior Dating Game 

Classics from the goMen days of T\' and Hoil>'woud 

Lifetime with tips on finance and hfe extension 

C-Span with coverage from Congress 

News. 24 hours a day, workl. financial and kx:al 

Country and Classical music. The Home Shoppvig Network 

Economics of one and two person househokls 

National Geographic Expkirer Series every week 

Plus The VM?ather Channel and 

documentaries not seen on ordvury TV 



T 



PEOPLE ARE 

If Basic is the heart of cable, ^ PART OF 

Senior Service is the souL Our --^^ pirTI TDC 
people go out of their way * ***^ r 1\^ 1 UIvEL. 

to provide thou^tful, courteous and prompt servKe to 
everyone. But especially to senior citizens. Just listen to 
wtiat some of our senior subscribers have to say about us: 

"Semgr Smarts has done a gnat deal to add to the 
enjoyment (^senior citizens and helps to keep them young, 
active, and tmportanl." 

S(cve Mjn 

"Let me thank you for your good service and especially for 
providing such good TV as MoOier Angelica " 



1 



Mary A KUonr> 



? 





SEE FOR 



"/'m pleased beyond words. . . I find your 
working crew pobte, efficient and 
you keep your word!" 

Phyta Accbo 

"It ts really a 
pleasure to 
deal with 
honorable 
people. 
Thank you 
very much." 

)nr Bid Esther Ross 



We codd tell you 

but there's no substitute YOURSELF, FREE. 

for first hand experience. That's why we're making this 
special offer to senior atizens only. Well install cable and 
give you a month's Basic Cable service, all for free. You can 
sit back and see what Basic Cable's got for you, without 
spending a cent. 

A GUARANTEE, vu.^, , , , 

I\(J1 A UIMMILK. into anything. Wfe're giving 
you a month's free servKe to help you make up your mmd. 
If. at the end of it, you're not completely satisfied, we guar- 
antee well remove your cable and that wili be that. So. what 
have you got to k)se.' 
If you'd hke to give cable a 
try. please give us a call at 
One month 

after installation, you 11 see 
why some of our happiest 
subscribers are seniors. 
Because youH be happy too 




(all DAMEL BOYLE, 7702395 



Page 22 Qulncy Sun Thursday, Juh 2J, 1917 



Arts/Entertainment 



Quincy Historical Society Plans 
Framingham, Sudbury Trip 



The Quinc> Historical 
Society will sponsor a trip 
Tucsda\. Aug II to 
F ramingham and Sudbury. 

The tour will include 
(iarden-in-the-W oods in 
Framingham. the botanical 
garden ol the New Fngland 
Wild Mower Societx Its three 
miles of trails and l.5(K) 
species of flowers, plants and 
shrubs ha\c made the gardens 
nationalK recogni/ed as a 
center for native plant 
education, research, and 
conservation 

The group will visit nearb\ 
I^antorth Museum for a 



guided tour ol its collection 
which includes a noteworthy 
display o( lithographs of 
plants and Powers 

1 uncheon at I ongfellow's 
Wayside Inn in South 
Sudbur\ will provide a choice 
ot entrees. On the grounds of 
the famous inn. members of 
the group will have the 
opporlunitv to \isit the Red 
School House of "Mary and 
her I ittle I amb" fame Built 
in I79S. the school was moved 
in 1926 bv Hcnrv Ford to its 
present location where it was 
reslored Also on the inn's 
grounds the Wavside Cirist 



Mill, a reprtnluction of an 
18th century mill built for 
Henry Ford in 1929. grinds 
flour and corn meal toda\ 
Flour and meal produced in 
the mill IS used in the inn's 
kitchen and is sold in the (iift 
Shop as well 

Ilie bus will leave the 
Historical Societv promptK 
at K:4.S am and return at 
approximately 5 pm I he 
cost, which includes lunch, is 
$.^5 lor members and SM for 
non-members. Make reserva- 
tions by calling the Historical 
Society office at 77.VI 144 by 
Monday, Aug .V 




iA 



/teco 



A 



Luncheon Specials 
11:30 - 3:00 p.m. 

Chicken Parmigiana 

spaghetti M.SO 

Seafood Newburg •4.95 

Baby Broiled Haddock •4.95 

London Broil Au Jus ^4.95 

Broiled Beef Liver 

onions & bacon *4.50 

Gift Certificates 
Available 



Dinner Specials 
3:00- 11:00 p.m. 



Queen Prime Rib 
Chicken Parmigiana 
Broiled Boston Schrod 
Beef Burgundy 

rice pilaf 
Eggplant Parmigiana 
Veal Cacciatore 
Chicken Marsella 

Served w, fresh garden salad or 
soup, potato, veg. or pasta 




Live entertainment in our lounge 
Thurs - Sal - Bob Benoit, Sun - Frank Dunn 

75 Franklin St., Quincy 
472-1115 




like royalty 

dance like 

crazy, all for 

common 

cents. 



Next time you 30 out for a special e/eriing, 

don't let It end iri dessert. 

Instead, kick up /our heels at the 

f<<ew Gazelle, where daricmg m the lounge 

puts the finishing touch to a meal fit for 

royalty yet commonly affordable. 

So get in step with our band, Wednesday 

through Saturday, starting at 8:30 And 

end your everiing on a much higher note 



r 



WS(?( 




a Barrett restdufdoi 

One Monarch Drive, 7th Floor 
State Street South, Qumcy 

Call for reservations 3281600 






Ql INC Y RK.SIDCNTS. Julir Hahfrly. \»\tnt Kfri and Beth Wei«ler recently participated in 
the fifth annual Frontiers in .Science and Mathematics summer program at Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute. Here they watch a demonstration by Peter ( hristopher, associate 
professor of mathematics at WPI, uf a spectrometer, a de>ice that divides light into its 
component frequencies and displays them as a pattern of alternating light and dark lines. 

Quincy Summer Theatre 
Group Fundraiser Al Marina Bay 



.1 M Productions anil 
QuincN CDmmunity Summer 
theatre will hold a part\ at 
the lunction tent at Manna 
Ha> lrida\. .iul\ }\ Irom H 
p ni until midnight. 

iickets are S.*>. with all 
proceeds to henelil the 
group's summer production 
ot the conlemporars musical- 
corned > "Bahy " 

I he amateui theater group 



was founded in ]^H4 b\ lohn 
McDonald of Quinc\. and 
produces an annual summer 
musical teatunng local 
residents and laleiit I hi\ \ear 
marks the louilh prt>ductiiin. 
supported, in p.irt, h\ a grant 
from the Quincs Arts 
Council 

I he pari\ will leature a D.I 
and a hah\ photo cunlesi. as 
well as a chance to hu\ rallle 



tickets lor a gilt certilicale at 
one ol Quincy's finest 
restaurants. I he (\>mmon 
Market 

"Hahv" will he performed 
Aug 14, IS and 21. 22 at 
North Quincs High School 
Iickets are %t>. and will he 
a\ailahle at the door, or h\ 
calling 71^-}^y Iickets lot 
the parly ma\ he puicha\ed ai 
the door 



^Birvrle Rodeo' At Ward 2 Center 



Ihe Ward 2 Commuriii\ ( ourse" Wednesday. luK 29. 
(enter is sponsoring a al 10 .V) a in 
"Micvcle Rodeo & Salel\ Ihe course will he 



(IjisterSUB 

Homemade Italian Cuisine 

Chicken Parmigiana 

Chicken Campagna 

Lasagna 

Beef Stroganoff 

Salad & rolls with butter 
included with dinner 

64 Billings Rd., N. Quincy 328-9764 

Mon -Sat tO-10 



ct>nducted h\ la\ I leUI. 
counl\ extension agent in 4-11 
C luh work, coopcialive 
extension. I riiseiMlv nl 
M.issachusetls 

Ihe \oung people should 
hring their hic\cles to the 
lore K I \ er ( lu hhoiise 
parking lol, Nevada Ril , 
QuiiK\ Point I he \oungsieis 
should he ahle to handle their 
hikes ihiough a marked s.ilelv 
tiuirse I vpeiienced hike 
riders as well .is beginners are 
welcome 

At Ihe conclusion ot the 
course a certilicale will be 
awarded to those w ho qualify 
(Ihe course takes about I'; 
hours) 

lor further inlormalion 
contact director IMnllis Hagen 
at the Ward 2 ( ommunii\ 
(enter at 77.V2I.V^ dailv. 



Grill 2 



Restaurant 

For Business Luncheons 

end 

Elegant Dining 

Best Food on the South Shore 

Tablecloth and Candlelight Dining 



Now Enjoy LUNCH on Weekdays And BBQ on Weekends and Holidays 
at the South Shores only OPEN AIR POOLSIDE RESTAURANT 

Background Music - Tasty Tropical Drinks 
Also: Don't Miss Our BOILED LOBSTER Specials 



FRI & SAT.: PRIME RIB X-LARGE »9" 

ALL DINNER ENTREES From »8'» to M3" . '""^'^'^^ 

iiui/^iir .... .^. ^ «» iw •« Salad & Potato 

LUNCH From *3'* - Plus Daily Blackboard Specials 

At The Quincy Bay Inn 

29 Hancock St.. Oulncy 
Call for rMarvatk>n« 328-1500 

AvaiiabJe For FurKtons Located Next to Ttw Neponset River BrWge 
Free ParVfng - Non-Snr>oklr)g Section Avariabte ^^°*^ Smtur-iay Lufx* 
_. CkMM Sunct«y « KJoon 




Thunday. Jul) 23. 1917 Quincy Sun Page 23 



Quincy Cable TV 



The UkiI proKram srhrduir for 
Quinr> ( •blM>%lfms ( h. 3 and 
(h. 9 from Wrdnrsda>,Jul) 22 to 
hrida). Jul) 31. 

Ch. 3 

Wrdnr^da). Jul) 22: 

7 pm Summcrlcsl - live - Yankee 

lack c«)unlr\ and western from 

the Rulh (lorilDn Amphilhcalte 

ThurMla), Jul) 23: 

6 ^7 pm Rh>nics ol ihc limcN 

■■ pm JiK" Mutii's B«h1\ Works 

" Ml pm Quincv Magazine 

>< pm C ahlelalk 

h M) pm I* M ( onnecliDn 

') pm loh Search - l'eupi>- In 

IVople 

hrida). Jul> 24: 
; 'i" pm KliNmc'" 1)1 ilu- limc^ 
< pm Senior Sniari\ i K) 
' XI pm I ibr.uv H(u>k Nmik iKi 
4 pm Daves & (mliaih 

Sunda). Jul) 2b: 

I he { arpenlCfN I inon 

J M) pm ^tui Are ihe I ijihl ot ihe 

Uoild 

" pm Siimmeilesl • Kene A Maii.i 

KaiKouii iKl 

Monda). Jul) 27: 
(i ^"' pm Klumes ot ihe limes 
' pm Keadinj: |)is(.i>\ei\ 
' M\ pm Sircninj; Konm 
s pm Senior Sniails ( K i 
K M) pm Joe Mucci'n HoiK Works 

Tur\da). Jul) 28: 
*' *i' pm Kh\mes ol ihe I imes 
" pm I ihiaiN Book Nook 

M) pm I iKal I oiiis 
s pm lalk ahoul the Vlnul 
VSrdnrMla). Jul) 2»: 
" pm Summerlesi 1 ive 

Heiilajie la// Hatu) Itom ihe 
Kiilh (lOiiloM Amphiiheaiie 

Ihursda). Jul) 30: 
(> ""^ pm Kh\nu-N ol the limes 
' pm Joe- MiKcrs Bodv Woiks 
' Ml pm Mad ahoiil the Movies - 



Hiian IVI'alma 
K pm (ahlelalk 
S M) pm Make a lovlul Noise 
Krida), Jul) 31; 

2 *>■' pm Rhvmes ot the limes 

3 pm Senior Smarts (Kl 

3 30 pm I ibrarv Hook Nook 

4 pm Davev & dolialh 



Ch. 9 



Wfdnfsda), Jul) 22: 

7 pm Siimmertesi ■ lue N ankee 
lack counliv and v*esteMi hand 

I I om Ihe K ui h do r don 
Xmphilheatre 

Ihursda). Jul) 23: 
'' pm loe MiKcis Kodv Works 

'0 pm (JiHTKv Md^a/ine 
h pm ( ahlelalk 
H 30 pm I' M ( onneciion 
V pm loh Se.irch - I'eople lo 
people 

Frida). Jul) 24: 

III M) ani i.ilk ahiuii the \1iiul 
iKi 

2 ^~ pm Rhvmes ol the limes 
' pm Senior Smarts 
' Ml pm I ihiatv Hook Nook 
4 pm I)avev &. (loh.ith 

Sunda). Jul) 26: 

4 pm I hi ( .iipK'nter's I nioii 

4 M> pm Noil Are the I ij:hi ot ihe 

World 

' pm Summeilesi Rene ii Mane 

Rancoiiri (Ri 

Monda). Jul) 27: 

pm Re.iilinj; I )isio\er\ 

M) pm Sireeninj: Room 
H pm Senior Sniaits ( R ) 
^ Ml pm loe Mucii's Hodv Works 
lursda). Jul) 2K: 

pm I onihonne I ik.us 

Ml pm I iKal I ocus 
^ pm lalk about the Miml 

Wrdnrsda). Jul) 29: 

"■ pm Summer test - live - Herilajie 



Jason Radzevich 
Choir School Graduale 



lason M Rad/cvich.sonol 
\1 1 a ml Mis Ralph 
Kad/c\ich ol IK SturtcvatV. 
K i) . u 1 ti c \ . r c c c n 1 1 \ 
^•ladualcd Irom the Bi)sU>n 
\rchdioccsan Chiut Schoiil 

•Nrnonj! his acctnnplish- 
nicnts arc several reci>rdcr 
and piano recitals as v^cll as 
.ippcaranccs VMlh Ihc Boston 
Opcia C Ornpanv under the 
direction ol Sarah (aldwell. 
and the Boston Svmphonv 
Orchestra in Boston and in 
ianjilewood 

Rad/evich vmII enter the 
tieshnian class at \a\erian 
Hrothers High School in 



West\M>od in the tall 



WOLLAS^TON 
THEATER 



14BEALEST 



A 



773-46QP 



Wed & Thurs July 22 & 23 

"HARRY « THE 

HENDERSONS" (PG) 

Big Foot Is Lovable 

Eve 5 7 00 Only 



Stans Fri July 24 

Arnold Schwarzneggef 

-PREDATOR" (R) 

A Commondo in S America 

Fri & Sat 7 00 4 9 15 

Sun-Thurs 7 00 Only 

Mon & Tues Dollar Night 



ADM >2 SO 20 a OVER •2.00 



RESTAURANT 



A Good 
Ploct To Eat 

33 Independence A»f Quincy 479 51 13 REASONABLE PRICES 



4 Different Dinners Will Be 
Posted on Blackboard Daily. 

Call us for the specials 



DINNER SERVED SUN. TO THURS. Til 9:45 P.M. 

FRI. & SAT. Til 10:45 P.M. 

lUNCHEON SPECIALS SERVED DAILY 



^f^ 



IPurliu'js 



HOMEMADE 
ICE CREAM CAKES & PIES 

FOR ANY DAY • EVERY OCCASION 

'There's No Taste 
Like Homemade" 

68A Billings Rd. 
N. Quincy, MA 

472-8558 



la// Hand Irom the Ruth (lordon 
Amphitheatre 

Thursda). Jul) 30: 
7 pm .l(H- Mucci's Biidv Works 
7:30 pm Mad about the Movies - 
Brian IX-Palma 
X pm (ahlelalk 
K ,V) pm Make a .lovful Noise- 

Frida). Jul) 31: 
10.^0 pm lalk ahoui the Mind 
2 V pm Rhsmes o\ the limes 
.^ pm Senior Smarts (R) 
^ '0 pm I ibrarv Book Nook 
4 pm Davev & (ioliath 



Quiricy Sun 
Ch.8 



Quinr). rrf>ional. national 
and HorlJ nrws around thr 
clock srven davs a week. 
Plus 
Sprriil \jdfti News Reports 
and hralurrs. 

Monda) s. «« '(i I' M ■" Ml I' M 
Tuesda)>. Id A M "^ Mi P M . 

- M) P M 

\\ednrsda)s. lu \ M . 5 ^0 

P M . ^ ^11 P M 

Ihursdaw. in \ M ^ 'd P M 

^ »() P M 

Krida)s. 10 AM. "> 'd P M . 

" Vi P M 

Saturdays. Id .\ M 



Top Ten 

Video 

Rentals 



1 "Little Shop Of Hor 
rors" starring Rick Mora- 
nis and Ellen Greene 
(Warner Hros.) No. 3 

2 The Color Purple" 
starring Oprah Winfrey 
and Whoopi Goldberg 
(Warner Bros.) No .'> 

'■\. The Morning After" 
st;uTing Jane Fonda and 
Jeff Bridges (l>orimar) 
No 4 

4. The Mostjiiito ('<»iLst" 
starring Harrison Ford 
(Wiirner Bros.) No 2 

f) "Mannali & Her Sis 
ters" starring Woody 
Allen, Mia Farrow, 
Michael Caine (HBO 
Cannon) No. I 

ti. "No Mercy" .st;irring 
Richard Gere and Kim 
Basinger (KCAColiiinhia) 
New Kiitry 

7 "Tlie Color Of Money" 




slarnng Paul Newman and 
Tom Cruise (l*;iraniounl) 
No 7 

K "Crimes Of The lleiirt" 
starring Diane Kealon, 
Jessica Lange and Sissy 
Spacek (l/«)riin;ir) N«). S 

it "Hearhreak Uidge" 
starring Clint Eastwood 
(Wjirner Bros ) No !» 

10 "CnM«Mlile Diuulee" 
slarring Paul llogan 
(r;irain«»inil) New Knlry 



NKW KKI.EASKS 

Allan yualcrmain and the 

lost City i>f g»>ld 

Something Wild 

Meat halls 

Wisdom 

R«>ck 'n Roll Nightmare 



S|MHiM>cr<l l>« 

"\iiur IIoII>wimhI ( oiiiN'rIion" 

-^^VIDEOEXPRESSSS 



VIDEO VOVES 




Miss Quincy Bay 
Pageant On Sun Ch. 8 



The Miss Quincy Bay Videotaped b\ Ch f> 

Beauty Pageant will be shown cameramen BobGohland Pat 

Ihursday at 7 pm and Mulkern. this year's pageant 

Saturday at 10 am on Sun featured 25 South Shore 

Ch. 8. contestants and climaxed 



with the crowning of Rence 
Vardaro as Miss Quincv Ba\ 
1987. 

Master of ceremonies is 
Bernie Reisberg. 



Waiters Race To Benefit Leukemia Society 



Greater Boston's first and bartenders to compete in 

annual Waiters Race to a four-man team obstacle 

benefit the leukemia Societ\ course race 
will be held at Marina Bav. Competitors will dodge a 

Squantum Aug 2 from 2 to 5 course of cones, milk crates 

p rn and tires while balancing a 

The area's finest restaurants tray of open bottles of beer 

will send waiters, waitresses and wine. T1ie> will obtain 



sponsorship from friends and 
associates and all proceeds 
will benefit the Leukemia 
Society's research program 

Admission will be free to 
spectators 

For more information call 
482-2289 



471-1959 



4I<>IIAN( IX H SI N(i milNI 1 UA(l.'l/l 



''Impresslvel Clint Eastwood's 
performance Is one of his 
richest, funny and laid-back. 
His direction Is especially 
successful." 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES, Vincent Canby 

''Pure entertalnmentl 
Eastwood's best performance 
since 'Dirty Harry' — tough, 
funny, credible, even tender. 
The movie is fun 1" 

— USA T(X)AY, Mike ClarV 

"Nobody does it with greater 
conviction, energy and 
unpatronizing affection for 
the grand old forms than 
Eastwood. His toughness is 
all the tougher." 



— TIME, Richard Schickel 



>i 









/ ^J 



Ol.MTIMfWOOII 

HiAfneMyyc RNMie 



;\.V;\l' 






pni oouw Tin i m T 









k^.i. 'ir ••• •"■s 



AMERICAN CABLESYSTEMS 

CHANNEL 23 

Call To Order 
328-9090 

or 
471-9143 

Each Request TV Movie 

Is only ^3.95 added 

to your Cable bill 




Pmft 24 Quincy Sun Hiunday, July 23, iW 



Business/Real Estate 




THK HIBERM A SAVINGS BAN KrecentI) held Hbbon cutting ceremonies •tllsnewofnce at 
731 Hancock St., Wolbston. From left, are Dennis Myers. Hibernia Savlnfs Bank vice 
president: Mayor Francis McCauley, and Marybeth Shea, bank manafer. 

(Quincy Sun phnio bv Tom (,orman) 




RICHARD KRVE. (left) and George Riley (rifht). who represent the Independent Insurance 
Agents of Braintree and Quincy present a $1,000 check to Braintree Fire Department ( aptain, 
John Grand> to purchase 22 lightweight portable search lights, one of which the captain holds. 
The association has made other donations toward Tire prevention and police safety and provides 
scholarships for students at Quincy and Braintree High Schools. 



VOLVO'S SOLD OUT but 

CABLESYSTEMS' GOT THE TICKET! 
AND SO CAN YOU . . . 

DON'T MISS LIVE EXCLUSIVE COVERAGE OF 
THE VOLVO TENNIS CLASSIC ON 



can I 

AUGUST 6th — 9th 

Plus, mail in the coupon below to your cablesystem and 
you're eligible to win tickets to see Becker, I.endl and many 
more match up in Straiton, \ T. 

LIVE DRAWING! CHANNEL 3 
JULY 30th. WATCH!! 



o 



Name . 
Address 



AMFKICAN ( ABI.ESYSTEMS 

81 Sclioul Street 
Quincy, MA 02169 




BUCK MOTOR DIVISIONS annual prestigious "Best In (lass" ser>ice award for 1987 was 
won by South Shore Buick, 50 Adams St., Quincy. Here Bruce (iemmil (rifht) Buick Motor 
Division's New Enfland Zone Manager, presents the award to South Shore Buick co-owners 
Bob ( ostello (left) and Bob Kitzicrald. 

(Qutnry Sun fthnio h\ (harlr* h'lagft) 

South Shore Buick 

Wins Highest 

Customer Service Award 



'Offer avjiUhlv to tab/r buhinritHrs with current miuunis only. 



South Shore Buick of 
Quincy recently won Buick 
Motor I)i\ision"s highest 
customer service award for 
1987 

Ilie annual "Best In Class" 
award recogni/es the Buick 
dealership with the highest 
record in customer ser\ice. 
repair and courteousness. 
according to oflicials 

South Shore Buick was 
chosen Irom among 120 
dealers throughout New 
Fngland. ()nl\ 5H dealers ol 
2.yH5 nationwide ha\e 
lecencd the award since 
Buick hegan presenting it in 
1^77. 

LEGAL NOTICES 



( OMMONWI Al IH 

Ol MASSAC ursii IS 

nil IKIAl ( Ol K I 
I HI CROBAII AM) 
I AMI! V ( OIRI 
1)1 PAR I Ml N I 
NORIOl K DIVISION 
Docket No K4l'IK4<il I 
NOTK K OK 
HDKIARVS A(C()l NT 
I o the M a s s a t h u s c 1 1 s 
Atlorncv (icncral's Olficc and 
to all persons mliTi-sicd in the 
estate of IRANCIS .1 
(iAI I KiAN.lalcofQI INC Y, 
m said C'ounlN, deceased 

You are hereby notified 
pursuant to Mass R C is I' 
Rule 72 that the I irsi and linal 
account of Res DAMI I M 
CiRAHAM and Wll I Rl I) A 
NOI AN. I xecutors (the 
fiduciary) of said estate has - 
have been presented to said 
C Ourl for allowance 

If >ou desire to preserve your 
right to file an objection to said 
account(s). you or your 
attornes must file a written 
appearance in said Court at 
Dedham on or before the 
twenty-sixth day ol August, 
1987. the return day of this 
citation You may upon written 
request by registered or certified 
mail to the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney (or the fiduciary, 
obtain without tost a copy of 
said account(s) If you desire to 
object to any item of said 
accountfs), you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aforesaid, file 
wiihm thirty days alter said 
return day or within such other 
time as the C ourt upon motion 
may order a written statement 
of each such item together with 
the grounds (or each objcctum 
thereto, a copy to be served 
upon the liduciarv pursuant to 
Mass R C IV I' Rule 5 

Witness, Robert M Kord, 
I. squire, lirst Justice of said 
C ourt, this fifteenth day ol July. 
1987 
THOMAS PATMK K HCCHIS 
Rcgitter 
7/2J/87 



"We're \ery excited about 
winning because e\er\one 
worked hard all year," said 
South Shore Buick co-owners 
Bob C'ostello and Bob 
I it/(ierald " I he award gives 
us a (eeling ol accomplishment 
because it lets customers 
know that we really care 
about their problems " 

South Shore Buick excelled 
m more than l.*i() categories in 
sales and service to earn the 
award, according to Buick 
Motors. 

"Best In C lass'" is a 
standards-based performance 



improvement system that - 
unlike other auto industry 
awards - measures customer 
satislaction in both the sales 
and service departments 

"Because it's so unique, the 
award has become one ol the 
most prestigious designations 
in the industry." said (Ostello, 
who along with Bob 
lit/Cieraid purchased South 
Shore Buick in I'ih} 

I ocatcd at Ml Adams St m 
C^iuncv. South Shore Buick 
has been serving the South 
Shore cominunity tor more 
than KO vears 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWI M I M Ol M \SS \C Ml SI I IS 
cot Vn Ol NORIOl K 

PROPOSM 

Scaled bids will be received ai the oKice o( the Norfolk C ountv 
( ommissioDcrs. Adminisiraiion building. M4 High Street. Dedham. 
Massachusetts lor WOI I AS I ON RK R I A I ION M fACIIIlY 

I Kl I'l \( IS{. (M M(>S W| DMSDAy M {,1 SI i: l'»K''ia I (K. r M 

lo be considered, bids must be received by I (K) P M on Wednesdav 
Al Ci I2ih on the above datc(s) at which time and place Ihev will he 
publicly opened and read Bids must be ma sealed envelope and on the 
outside be clearly marked with the date and description of bid 

Details of contract requirements and specifications shall be obtained 
al the Commissioner's Office (Purchasing) in the Administration 
Building, second floor, between ihc hours ol 8 .^0 A M and4 (K) P M 

I he Norfolk County C ommissioners reserve the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or lo accept any bid or poriion thereof deemed 
by them to be in the best mieresi of the County 

Bidders are on notice that the ( ommissioners neither individually nor 
colleciivcly are to be conlaclcd. nor will they discuss any bids prior to 
the scheduled opening Prior complaints about the bids should be 
presented to the Purchasing Agent 

James J ( ollms, C hairman 

Cieorgc B McDonald 

David ( Ahearn 

NORIOl K (OUNIY COMMISSIONIRS 

7 2y K7 



COMMONWhAI IH OK MASSAC HUSIIIS 
COIJNIY OK NOR KOI It 

PROPOSAL 

Scaled bids will be received al the office of the Norfolk County 
( ommissioners. Administration building. M4 High Street. Dedham, 
Massachusetts lor WOI I AS ION RKC Rl AIIONAI KAC II II Y 

I MISCKI I ANKODS KQl-'IPMI NI I KASF, 
WFDNI SDAY, AUCil'SI 5, I9K7 (a I (K) P M 

lo be considered, bids must be received bv I (K) P M on Wednesday 
Al/'Ci *>lh on the above dale(s) at which lime and place thev will be 
publicly opened and read Bids must be m a sealed envelope and on the 
outside be clearly marked with the date and description of bid 

Details of contract requirements and specifications shall be obtained 
at the Commissioner's Office (Purchasing) m the Administration 
Building, second floor, between the hours of 8 .10 AM and 4 (K) P M 

I he Norfolk County C timmissioners reserve the right to accept or 
reject any or all bids, or to accept any bid or portion thereof deemed 
by them lo be in the best interest of the C ounly 

Bidders are on notice that the C ommissioners neither individually nor 
collcciivelv are lo be contacted, nor will ihey discuss any bids prior lo 
the scheduled opening Prior complaints about the bids should be 
presented lo the Purchasing Agent 

James J Collins. Chairman 

Cieorgc B McDonald 

David C Ahearn 

NORKOI K (ODNTV C OMMISSIONKRS 

7;23/K7 



Tkunday, July 23, 1917 Quincy Sun Page 25 



New Duties For 
Mary W iedermaiin 
At liiirlev Insiirance 



LEGAL NOTICES 



HELP WANTED 



I he Hiirlcv I iiMiLicuc 
\j;ctu\. wilh hIIicln hi 
(,) 11 1 n c > .1 n d B r a I n 1 1 c c 
,1 II n»> u tu I's thai M .i t \ 
\\icdcrmann has added a 

sales dirm'iision to her lok as 
mana).'cr o\ ihe Miami rcc 
ollicf She has been \silh the 
agenev lor l(( \ears. siaitiiij; 
as a (u si Diner Ser \ u e 



LEGAL NOTICES 



( OMMONWI M IM 

or MASSAC HISFF IS 

IMi IKIM (OIKI 

I HI PROHMF AM) 

I AMII V ( OIRI 

NorlolK Division 

IkKkcl No K7nK22M 

I slate of I It MAN H 

\Mn I l(K K Idleot yriNC N 

m Ihc tounu ol NORIOI K 

NOTICi: 

A pelilion has been prcscnicd 
in Ihc abo\c-eapiioncd mailer 
pia\ing Ihal the last \mII ol said 
ilcecdcnl be proved and allowed 
..nd Ihal Bl K I ON ( 
WHI I l(K K ol WISIBORO 
inthc( ounlvol W()R{ isn R 
hi' app»)inlcd executor named in 
ihe vMJI without surcts on the 
bond 

II sou desire to objeel to the 
.illowanee ol said petition. \ou 
Ol \our attornev should lilc a 
written appearance in said 
( ouri at l>edham on or belore 
10 IK) in the lorenoon on August 
:r>, \')H'' 

In addition \ou should file a 
written statement ol objections 
It) the petition, gisinj! the 
spetidc grounds ihcrclore, 
vMthin lhifl> (^01 davs alter the 
return da\ (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to Ihc petitioner. ma\ 
allow) in accordance wiih 
I'robaie Rule 16 

\Kitness. Robert VI lord. 
I squire. I irst Justice ol said 
(ourt at Dedham. the 
ihitiecnth dav ol JuK. one 
thousand nine hundred and 
lights seven 

IMDNUS PMHK K HI (.MhS 
Kr^'^lrr (>f Probtlf 



( OMVIONWJ Al 111 

Ol M \SS\( MISI I IS 

III! I KIM ( Ol Kl 

IMi I'ROHMI AND 

I Will N { Ol Rl 

Niwlcik DiMMon 

D.Kkci N,. h"n"'6'l I 

I si.iic ol I ARKN 

\M()NI I I I lateol Ql IN( N 

111 the ( ount\ ol NORI Ol k 

NOIK K 

■\ petition has bix-n presented 
III the above-captioned matter 
prasingthat the last willol said 
decedent be proved and alloweil 
and Ihal I ORI I I A M 
DIBONA of Wevmoulh in the 
( ounlv of NORI Ol K Mn\ 
Rl NA A SI I ARNS ol 
Wl VMOt IH in Ihe County ol 
NORIOI K and MARII A 
MRM)| IV ol Wl VMOIMH 
in the ( ountv ol NORIOI K 
and (HRISIINI A 

MONIANI ol MM ION in the 
( ouniv ol NORIOI K and 
I ARRV .1 AN lONM I I ol 
BOS I ON in Ihe ( ounly ol 
SLIIOIK be appointed 
execulors named in Ihe will 
without surely on the Kind 

II you desire to objeet to the 
allowance of said pelilion. you 
or your allorney should lile a 
written appearance in said 
Courl at Dedham on or helore 
10 (X) in Ihe lorenoon on August 
19. I9K7 

In addition you should lile a 
wnllen slalemcnl ol obieclions 
to Ihc pclilton. giving the 
speeilie groinuls thcrelore. 
wilhin thirty ( '(I) days alter the 
return ilav (orsucholhei lime as 
Ihe ( oiiil. on mtilion with 
notice lo Ihe petitioner, mav 
allow) in accordance with 
I'robaie Rule If- 

Wiiness, Robiil M lord. 
I squire. I list Justice ol s.iid 
( ourl al IKdharn. Ihe ninth day 
ol lulv. one thousand nine 
hundrcjl ami eighlv seven 

MIOMAS PAIKU K HI <.M»S 
RrKKirr of Vwb»tt 
7/2.^/87 



RcprcNcniative in Personal 
I incs She plans to enroll in 
Ihe Chartered Properly and 
( a s u a 1 1 \ I ' n d e r u I 1 1 e r 
program, leadinu to the 
( P( I designation 



LEGAL NOTICES 



(OMVIONWI Al IH 

Ol MASSAC HISH IS 

I HI IRIAI COURT 

1HI I'ROBAII AND 

I AMII V C Ol Rl 

Dl I'AKIMI Nl 

NORFOI k DIVISION 

Docket No K4PI.19HI 

NOTK K OK 

HDCdARYS AfCOlNT 

lol lORI NC I I MIDAand 

lo all persons interested in the 

estate ol MORINCT I 

Ml DA ol QIINCV. in said 

Ciiunlv. a person under 

conservatorship 

Vou are herchv notified 
pursuant lo Mass R Civ P 
Rule 72 that the Ihird 
accounUsi ol JAMFS F 
Rl VNOI DS.JR, Conservator 
(the liduciarv I ol the propcrlv ol 
said I I ORI NCI I MHDA 
has - have been presented lo said 
C ourl for allowance 

If vou desire to preserve vour 
right to lilc an objection lo said 
aecounUs). you or your 
attorney must file a written 
appearance in said Court al 
Dedham on or before the 
lwentv-si\th day of August. 
1987. the return day of this 
citation Vou mav upon written 
request by registered orcertilicd 
mail to the fiduciary, or to the 
attorney lor the fiduciary, 
obtain without cost a copy ol 
said account!'.) II \ou desire to 
object to any item ol said 
account(s). you must, in 
addition to filing a written 
appearance as aloresaid. lile 
within thirty days alter said 
return day t)r within such other 
time as the Court upon motion 
mav ordei a written stalement 
ol each such item together with 
the grounds lor each objection 
thereto, a copy lo be served 
upon Ihe liduciarv pursuant to 
Mass R C i\ P Rule 5 

\\itness. Robi-rt M I lud. 
Fsquire. I irsi Justice ol said 
Court, this lourieenlh day ol 
JuK. I9K"' 
THOMAS PA IKK k HI (.HKS 
Rr|>Klrr 
7 2} K'' 

COMMONWI Al IH 

Ol MASSAC msi I IS 

IHI IRIAI COIRI 
nil I'ROBAII AND 
I AMII V C Ol Rl 
Norliijk Division 

Docket No K7|'|MII I 
I state ol JOHN I BISSII I 
late ol (^riNC V in the C ounlv 
ol NORIOI k 

NOIK K 

TO THi; MASSAC HI SKITS 

ATTORNKV (JKNKRAI S 

OKKK K 

A pi-tition has been presented 
in the ahove-caplioned matter 
praving that the last will ol said 
decedent bi- proved and allowed 
and that C HARI IS N ROSS 
of QUINC V in the County ol 
NORIOI kandRIC HARDA 
MASSON.Jr.olRANDOl PH 
in the County ol NORIOI k be 
appointed evecutors named in 
Ihe will without surely on the 
bond 

II you desire to obiect lo !he 
allowance ol siiid petition, you 
or your attorney should lile a 
written appearance in said 
C ourl at Dedham on or before 
H)W in the lorenoon on August 
S. 19K7 

In addition vou should file a 
written statement ol obieclions 
to the petition, giving Ihc 
specilic giountis therelore. 
within thirtv ( ^O) days alter the 
return dav (oisucholher lime as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to Ihe piiiiioner. may 
.,||„N*) in accordance with 
Probate Rule I'' 

Witness. Kohtrl M lord. 
I squiie. Inst lustice ol siiid 
C ouM at IKdharn. the Iwenly- 
loiirlh dav ol June, one 
Ihoiisand nine hundred and 
cij'hiv seven 
1HOMA.S PAIHK k HI <JUS 
Rrcislrr of Pn>balr 
7 2V«7 



COMMONWI Al IH 

OF MASSAC HI SI I IS 

FHF IRIAI COIRI 

THI PROBAII AND 

FAMILY COIRI 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No. 87PI8.15FI 
Fstale of CA7HERINF M 
RIZZI laic ol Ol'INCY in the 
Coumv of NORFOI K 
NOTICK 
A petition has been presented 
in the above-caplioned mailer 
piaying that the last will and 
codicil ol said decedent be 
proved and allowed and that 
ROY F Rl/Zlof Ql INC Yol 
NORFOI k be appointed 
executor named in the will 
without surely on the bond 

If you desire lo object lo the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
C ourl al Dedham on or belore 
IO;(X)in Ihe forenoon on August 
26. 1987 

In addition you should file a 
written statement of objections 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefore, 
within thirty {M)) days alter the 
return day (or such other time as 
the C\)uri. on motion with 
notice to the f>ctitioner. may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Witness. Robert M. Ford. 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham. the fifteenth 
day of JuK. one thousand nine 
hundred and eights seven 

THOMAS PATRK k HI C.HFS 
Register of Probitr 
7 2} 87 

COMMONWEAI IH 
OF MASSAC HI SF I IS 
PROBAIF COIRI 
NORFOI k. SS 

K6P22(t.VAI 

10 all persons interested in 
the estate ol JOHN J Gl YNN 
late olQlINC V in said County, 
deceased in testate 

A petition has been presented 
lo said Court lor license to sell - 
private sale - certain real estate 
of said deceased, situated in 
C^l INC V in the county ol 
NORIOI k - and that the 
petitioner mas become the 
purchaser ol said real estate, m 
accordance with the oiler set 
out m said petition 

11 you desire to object thereto 
st>u tu sour attornes should file 
a written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham belore ten 
o'cUxk in the lorenoon on 
August 26. 198"". the return 
day ol this citation 

Witness. Robert M Ford. 
Fsquire. First Judge ol said 
Court, this tenth das ol July. 
1987 
THOMAS PATKK k HI (iHFS 
RcKister 
7 2}. M). 8 6 87 

COMMONWFAI IH 

OF MASSAC Ml SF I IS 

I HI IRIAI COIRI 

THF PROBAIF AND 

FAMII V COIKI 

Norlolk Disision 

Docket No K^PPVFI 

Fstale ol Cil ADYS V 

McDONAl DIaleofgilNCY 

in the Counts ol NORFOI k 

NOTK K 

A petition has bcx'n presented 
in the abtne-eaptioned matter 
praying that the last will ol said 
decedent be prosed and allowed 
and that MARCiARFI I. 
DACFY ol BOS ION in the 
County ol SUIFOIk be 
appointed executrix named in 
the will without surely on the 
b»>nd 

If you desire to «ih|cvl lo the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your allorncs should lilc a 
wnllen appearance in said 
C ourl al IXdham on or belore 
lO.lM) in the lorenoon on August 
12. 1987 

In addition you should file a 
written stalement ol objections 
to the petition, gising the 
specilic grounds therelore, 
within thirty {M)) days alter the 
return day (or such other lime as 
Ihe Court. «)ii motion with 
notice to the pelitionei. may 
allow) in accordance with 
IVobale Rule 16 

Wilness. R»)bcii M I t>id. 
Fsqiiiie. I'lrsi .liisiice ol s^iid 
Courl al Dedham. the si-cond 
day ol July, one thousand nine 
hiinilred and eights si-ven 
THOMAS PA TMK k HI (^HKS 
Rr|>islrr of Prtibalr 
7 21 87 



COMMONWFAI I H 

OF MASSAC HISFTTS 
PROBAFE AND FAMILY 
PROBATE COLRF 
NORFOLK. SS 

Docket No 871)0925 Dl 
KARENA DREW Plaintiff vs. 
SUMMONS BY PUBLICA 
TION MICHAEL E RCXiNEY 
Defendant 

To the above-named 
Defendant: 

A Complaint has been 
presented to this Court bv the 
Plaintiff. KAREN A DREW. 
seeking to dissolve the bonds of 
matrimony 

You arc required to serve 
upon DONALD J 
BERTRAND. Esquire plaintiffs 
attorney, whose address is 600 
Pleasant Street. Waiertown. 
MA vour answer on or before 
October 7. 1987 If you fail todo 
so. the Court will proceed to the 
hearing and adjucation of this 
action You are also required to 
file a copy of your answer in the 
office of the Register of this 
Court al Dedham 

Witness, Robert M Ford. 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham 

July I. 1987. 

THOMAS PATRICK HI GHFS 
Rrtist'r of Probate Court 
7 23. 30, 8 6 87 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETFS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No 87P1805CI 

NOTICK OK 
CONSKRVATORSHIP 

To LAWRENCE Ql^INN ol 
QITNCY in said County and all 
persons interested in the estate 
of LAWRFNCF QUINN and 
to the Massachusetts Depart- 
ment of Mental Health, a 
petition has been presented in 
the above-captioned matter 
praving that PAFRICIA 
CHAISSON ol WEYMOUIH 
in Ihe counts of NORFOLK be 
appointed consersator with 
surety on the bond 

If you desire lo object to the 
allowance of said pennon, sou 
or your attorney must lile a 
written appearance in said 
Court at Dedham on or belore 
ten o'clock in the forenoon on 
August 26. 198"'. 

Witness. Robert M Ford. 
Esquire. First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham this 
thirteenih das of July, in the 
year of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and eighty seven 
THOMAS PATKK K HI C;HFS 
Rrgislcr of Probate 
7 23 87 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSEFIS 

FHF IRIAI COURI 

THF PROBAIF AND 

FAMII Y COURT 

Norlolk Division 

D(Kkel No 87PI8(X)F1 
Estate of VERA P CiAY late of 
QUINCY m the Countv of 
NORFOLk 

NOTICK 

A petition has been presented 
in the ab<ive-capiu>ned matter 
praying that the last willol said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and Ihal RICHARD I CiAY of 
RCX'KLAND in the Countv of 
PIYMOUJH be appointed 
administrator with the will 
annexed without surety on Ihe 
bond. 

If you desire to objcvl lo the 
allowance of s;iid petition, y«>u 
4)r your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court al IVdham i>n or before 
l():(K) in the loreiunm on August 
19. 1987 

In addition you should tile a 
written sialcmcnt 4)1 objections 
lo the petition, giving Ihe 
specific giounds therelore. 
within thirty {M)) days atler the 
return day (or such other time as 
Ihc Court, on motion with 
notice to the fX'tilioncr. mav 
allow) III accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Wilness. Robiil M Ford. 
Fsqiiirc. Fust .Justice ol s,iul 
Court al Dedham. the ninth ilav 
ol Match, one lhous.iiid nine 
hundred and eighty seven. 
THOMAS PAIKKk HI (;IHS 
Re|>i^lcr of Prttbate 
7 23 K7 



$ QUALITY JOBS $ 

FOR 

$ QUALITY TEMPS $ 

Earn $5-$15 Per Hour 

Flexible Hours. Local Assignments 

S«crttar1ai/W.P., Clerical. Accounting, 

Light Industrial, Data Entry 

5ga.0500 QUALITY TEMPS. INC. 32,.e4oo 

Brockton' °*''^*^" °* ^^''''^ Ptrwnnd Q^,„^y 

Full A P. Tim* Permanent Alto Available 

I 2a 88 



RETAIL ADVERTISING 
SALES PERSON 

Part Time 



LOST 



1372 Hancock St., Quincy 
471-3100 



LEGAL NOTICES 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAL COURT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No H-'Pr23EI 
Estate of M ARV E CREEIX)N 
late of QUINCY in the Countv 
of NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and allowed 
and that EUGENE W 
CREEIX)N of QUINCY in the 
County of NORFOLK he 
appointed executor named in 
the will without surety on the 
bond 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance of said petition, you 
or your attornev should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at I^dham on or belore 
10:{X) in the lorenoon on August 
12. 1987. 

In addition vou should file a 
written statement of objections 
lo the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therelore. 
within thirty (.30) days alter the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) in accordance with 
Probate Rule 16 

Witness, Robert M. Ford, 
Esquire, First Justice of said 
Court at Dedham. the second 
day of July, one thousand nine 
hundred and eighty seven 
THOMAS PATRICK HI (JHFS 
Resistrr of Probate 
7 23 87 



COMMONWEALTH 

OF MASSACHUSETTS 

THE TRIAI COL RT 

THE PROBATE AND 

FAMILY COURT 

Norfolk Division 

Docket No 8^P09-'2EI 
Estate of MICHAEL C. 
MITCHERONEY late of 
SHARON in the Countv of 
NORFOLK 

NOTICE 

A petition has been presented 
in the above-captioned matter 
praying that the last will of said 
decedent be proved and 
allowed and that JOANNE C 
ANDRES of MANSFIELD in 
the County of BRISTOl be 
appointed e\ecutri\ named in 
the will without surety on the 
bond 

If you desire to object to the 
allowance oi said petition, you 
or your attorney should file a 
written appearance in said 
Court at IX'dham on or belore 
10:1)0 in the lorenoon on 
September 2. 198' 

In addition vou should file a 
written statement o\ objectu'ns 
to the petition, giving the 
specific grounds therefi)re. 
within thirty (.U)) davs alter the 
return day (or such other time as 
the Court, on motion with 
notice to the petitioner, may 
allow) m accordance with 
Probate Rule \t> 

Witness. Robert M Ford. 
Fsquire. First Justice ol said 
Courl at Dedham. the 
seventeenth day of June m the 
year of our I ord one thousand 
nine hundrc-d and eighty seven. 
THOMAS PATRIC K HI C.HKS 
Rrf isl«r uf Probate 
7 23 87 



INVIIATION FOR BIDS 

CITY OF QUINCY. MASSACHUSFLTS 

PURCHASINCi DFPARIMFNI 
\M)5 HANCOCK SI . QUINCY, MA 02169 

Invites sealed bids proposals lor furnishing and delivering lo the 
City of Quincy; 

POIICF DFPI 
RFBID School Zone Speed - 
Control Signals August 5. 1987 at 10:00 A.M. 

PARK DFPI 

RFBID C^ne 1988 3 4- Ion - 
4x4 Iruck August .S. 1987 at 10 M) A.M. 

SC HOOl DFPI 

Custodial Supplies - Cicneral August .S. 198' at 1 1 (H) A.M. 

Plumbing Supplies August S. 1987 at \\ M) A.M. 

IVlailed specifications are on lilc at the olTice ol the I'urchasing 
Agent. QuiiKV City Hall. 1.^05 Hanc»)ck Street. Quiiicv. MA 02lb9 

Bids must slate exceptions, il am. the delivciv d.iic .iiid am 
allow.ibic discounts 

I iini bid pi ices will be given first considcr.ilion .mil will K- received 
al Ihe ollicc ol the Puichasiiig Agent until the time and date staled 
above, al which time and dale thcv will be publicK opened .\ni\ read 

Bids must K- 111 a sealed envelope Ihc oulsulc ol the sealed 
envcU)pc- is to bicleaily maiked. "BID I NC I OSI D" with lime dale 
ol bid call 

I he light IS lescived lo rciecl am oi all bids or l») accept anv part ol 
.1 hul Ol Ihc one dcvmed best loi Ihe C ilv 



I laiicis \ McC aulev. Mavtu 
RoKii I IViivii. Jr . Purchasing Agent 



7 23 87 



Pi|c 2* Quincy Sun Thunday. July 23. IM7 




1 


SfS^^^ 




HELP WANTED 



%<^ 



. parents . 
j^«^ • Others "^/^ 



We Have The Job For Youl 



Our facilities employ full-time, part-time, permanent 
and summer personnel m the following positions 

• Nursing Assistants (7-3. 3-11.11-7, 7«m-7pm. 7pin-7«m) 

Help us provide personal care to our residents 
Some flexible hours available 

• Dietary Assistants (6 30-3, mso-s. 4-s) 

Help us serve meals to our residents 

• Housekeepers & Porters (7-3:3o. •-4:30, s-9) 

Help us keep our facilities clean 

• Laundry Assistants (7-3:3o, s-a) 

Help us wash and dry linens, towels, etc 

• Bedmakers/Ward Aides (momin»/»»»n»i»g hoort) 

Help us with non-patient care tasks 



• Excellent Wages 

• Choice of 3 Health Plans 

• Dental & Disability Ins 

• $500 

Tuition Reimbursement 



• Paid Vacation 

• Paid Holidays 

• Up to 10 paid sick, 
personal & earned days 



ON SITE CHILD CARE (Wvymouth/BralntrM) Quality 
programs for your chHd to aga 7. Child Cara companaatlon 
program (DuitMiry). CaN ParMMmal Offica for appolntmant 



Waymoutit 

Colonial 

Nursing 

artd Rahat>llltatlon Cantar 

12s Broad St. 

337-3121 

T But Line 22S/22SA 



Bralntraa 

John Scott House 

Nursing 

and RahaMlltatlon Cantar 

233 MIddIa St. 

843-1860 

T Bu* Line 236 



HUMAN SERVICES 



WORK SUPERVISORS 



Be responsible for the training and supervision 
of handicapped adults in janitonal and indus- 
trial areas. Excellent benefits and $14,000 ■•- 
salary. 
For these and other opportunities please call: 



Nancy 
328-0300 



7/23 



RN/LPN 



Full-Tlme 

Would you prefer every weekend off? If so. come 
join our team and become a charge nurse 8 PM- 
11 PM on our 25 bed level II unit Mon.-Fri. 
Our salaries are competitive and we have an 
excellent benefit package. 
Please call for interview. Mrs. Cremin. 

HYDE PARK C0NVELE8CENT HOME 

113Cantral Ava. 
Hyda Parti, MA 02136 

364-1135 



EVERYBODY'S MARKETPIACE 



FOR SALE 



GOVERNMENT HOMES 

from $1 (U Repair) Delinquent 
ta« property Repossessions 
Can 805-687-6000 Ext GH-3019 



9 1 J 



Save Gat and Monay 
Shop Locally 



HELP WANTED 



GENERAL OFFICE 

QUINCY INSURANCE and 

REAL ESTATE AGENCY 

Full Time 

T,'Oing and ottice procedures 
necessary Insurance know- 
ledge and experience helpful 
Will tram or re-tram for re-entry 

Benefits Included 
Contact Mrs LeRoy at 

Flavin & Flavin 
479-1000 

ft 6 



HELP WANTED 



SET OWN P/T HOURS 

Show toys & gifts at in home 
parties Free $300 working kit 
House of Lloyd 335-8024 or 697- 
9269 

7/23 

HIRING! 

Federal government )Obs your 
area and overseas Many 
immediate openings without 
waiting list or test Sl5-$6e000 
Call refundable (602) 838-8685 
Ext 2379 7 23 



iililllM 



Registered Nurses 

Starting your nursing career? 

Reentering nursing? 

Welcome to QCH! 

Are you in "pursuit of the untrlvial " in a nursing position? 

• Childrens day care 

• Choice of health insurance plans 

• Dental insurance 

• Un^fornn allowance 

• Tuition reimbursement 

• CEU tXDnus 

• Restricted smoking environment 

Let s talk atx>ut our full-time, part-time and per diem openings 
that match your interest and expertise in med/surg and spe- 
cialty areas: ICU, PCU, L&D. ER, OR, Pedi. Neurot)ehavioral 
(recovery, crisis and elder care). 

For more information call 773-6100 ext. 2085 
or send your resume to Marie Zinkevich, RN EdM 

.ji J Quincy City Hospital 

1^^ 1 14 Whitwel! Street, Quincy. MA 02 169 



wmmm 



Telemaiketers 

Turn Your Phone Skills 
Into Cash! 

Use iou' exceflerrt phone manner to promote coos«fv»- 
tion services on behalf of kxai utilities OMC Energy 
has immediate openings for partt'me telemarketers m 
Its busy Bramiree ofdce No product sales mvotved 

We of er excellent starting rates flexible hours arx) are 
located convenient to public Iransporlation Students 
encouraged to apply Don't wait— contact Karen 
McCool a( (617) Mt-97M. EEO M/f ; /?3 




SALES PERSON 

South Shore Buick is looking for 2 more Sales 

Representatives, to round out our Sales Force This is a 

career opportunity to work for "A BEST IN CLASS 

DEALERSHIP" 

Fringe benefits include Health & Accident, Life Insurance 

plus Retirement Plan 

If you are willing to work hard and follow directions, 

contact Jack Doyle for a confidential interview at 

770-3300 
SOUTH SHORE BUICK 

so Adams Street, Quincy, MA 

7/23 



GLAZIERS 

Experienced fabricators and 
installers wanted. Top pay, 
excellent benefits and full 
medical coverage. 

Call 284-2255 



7/?3 



UPJOHN HEALTHCARE SERVICES 

HIRING 

HOMEMAKERS. HOME HEALTH AIDES 

INTERVIEWS 

Wed., Aug. 12th, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

The Job Training Center 

Div. of Employment Security 

1 Bllllngt Rd., 3rd Floor, Quincy 

For Information Call 848-4785 

E.O.E. 7/30 



LOT PERSON 



Entry level position exists lor person with some 
mechanical ability. Position Involves moving ol 
Automot>lles, upkeep of New and Used car lot and various 
other duties. Must be neat appearing and have valid drivers 
license and must be over 18. 

Contact Glen Peterson. 

770-3300 

SOUTH SHORE BUICK 



50 Adams Street, Quincy, MA 



T/n 



Wanted 

ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE 
BOOKKEEPER 
Call 471-3100-335-1747 

For Appointment 



SALES AND CASHIERS 

CHANNEL HOME CENTERS. INC.. 
the nation's largest independently 
owned home center chain, is a great 
place to build a career. Right now. we 
have openings for qualified men and 
women who have upbeat personalities. 
We will train highly motivated, 
intelligent individuals with the drive to 
succeed. 

We offer attractive salaries and 
comprehensive benefits package for 
full time employees. Our part timers 
receive paid vacation and holidays. All 
of these positions offer the opportunity 
for advancement. 

APPLY IN PERSON 

CHANNEL 

HOME CENTERS, INC. 

550 Adams Street 
Quincy, Massachusetts 
Equal Opportunity Employer M/F/H 7/23 



WORK, INC, a progressive action oriented 
rehabilitation agency serving MR adults is 
currently seeking staff for the following 
positions: 

• WORK SUPERVISOR 

Be responsible for the training & supervision of 
handicapped adults in its CREWS (supported 
employment) dept , strong industrial 
background required Drivers license needed. 
Salary $14,000 plus 

• COMMUNITY TRAINING SPECIALIST 

Teach academic skills to disabled adults in day 
hab program Salary $14,000 plus 

• CASE MANAGER 

Requires BA or higher in Human Services, 
experience/training in work with handicapped 
adults Behavior management skills a plus. 
Salary $17,000 plus 

Excellent benefits and training offered for these 
and other opportunities Call Nancy at 328-0300 



Thursday, July 2J. 1917 Quincy Sun Pagr 27 




EVERYBODY'S MARKETPIACE 



SERVICES 



ClYDE POOL SERVICE Inc. 

Vinyl Liner Replacement 

General Masonry 

Coping, Decks, Wall(ways, Patios 

Opening/Closing 

Sales Service & Repair 

337-4949 328-7290 



NEW ENGLAND 
FLOOR SANDERS 

Hardwood Floor Specialist 

Installed - Sanded - Seals - Stained - Refinished 

Expert - Quality Service 

Low Price - Free Estimates 

770-3987 



t 



GARAGE DOOR 
STAUATION & REPAIRS 
ELECTRIC OPENERS 

FrM f flMiatH 

698-2304 9 1 



NANCY'S NOOK 

Nm> baby bouMqua. chrtatanina 
and baby aqulpmant. ale. Naw 
and eantly uaad cNMran's and 
woman's apparal. OuaMiy 
conalflnmanta accapiad. 25A 
Baala St., WoNaalon, 773-9293. 



MASTERCARD/VISAI 

Regardless ol credit history 
Also new credit card No one 
refused' For into call 1-315 733- 
6062 EXT M722 

86 



CUSTOM MATTRESSES 

to tit any Anliqup Bed Af\y 
si/p firmness Specialists sir.cc 
SS Advice tionic visits Siesta 
Sleep Shop 4 79^5119 Slevf 

AW 



PERSONALS 



May the Sacred Heart ol Jesus be 
adored, glorided. loved and 
preserved throughout the world 
now and forever Sacred Heart ol 
Jesus pray for us. St Jude the 
worker of miracles, pray for us Sl 
Jude the helper of the hopeless, 
pray for us Say this prayer 9 
limes a day for 9 days and by the 
8th day your prayer will bo 
answered This prayer has never 
t>een known to fail Publication 
promised IMay prayer has been 
answered 

PM 

7/?3 

Thank You St Jude 
For petitions granted. 

L DM 
7/?3 

Thank You 
St. Anthony 

MH 

7/30 



HELP KNOCK OUT 
BIRTH DEFECTS 



KILLION 
PAINTING 
COMPANY 

INTERIOR-EXTERIOR 
GUTTERS A REPAIRS 
GENERAL CARPENTRY 
Gutter Ciean-Oul A OHIng 



RESIDENTIAL 
COMMERCIAL 



SEAN 



472-3988 



7 ?3 



INSTRUCTION 



TRAIN FOR AIRLINE 
TRAVEL CAREERII 



• TRAVEL AGENT 
- TICKET AGENT 
STATION AGENT 
RESERVATIONIST 



Stan locally full lime pari time 
Tram on live airline computers 
Home study and resident 
I ( a I n I M g Financial ait) 
.ivailable Job pi a( omen I 
assistance National ttdgirs 
Lighthouse Ft f I 

ACT TRAVEL SCHOOL 



1 800 327-7728 



[Accrcdlled member N h S C 



TF 



FOR RENT 




loiii Ihi' 



^ March of Dinnes 



Cottages 
For Rent 

Scusset Beach area, 
Sagamore, House- 
keeping cottages. 
Studio and 3 room 
available Weekly 
rentals MBS - »250. 
Private beach. Tennis 
a\;ailable. Call 328- 
1300, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

T F 



HALL FOR RENT 

North Ouincy K of C Building 

5 Mollis Avenue 

For information please call 

32S-S967 

TF 

HALL FOrt RfNT 

(completely remodeled) 

Houghs Neck Post No 380. 

American Legion. 1 1 16 Sea Sl 

479-6149 

TF 

HALL FOR HIRE 

Weddings. Showers. 

Meetings. Banquets 

Flks Home 440 f Squantum St 

Ouincy 

472-2223 

TF 



SERVICES 



STEVE'S CLEANING CO. 

GENERAL CLEANING 
COMMERCIAL FLOOR CARE 

FREE ESTIMATES - 770-9799 

Dally/Weekly/BIWeekly/Monthly 

Insured 24 Hour Answering Service 

ft6 



ELECTRICAL & APPLIANCES 



CONTRACT 
CARPENTRY 

Complete 

Remodeling Service 

Stalrwayt A Finish \Mork 

• Specialty 

Archltecta references 

available 

24 hr. answering mactilne 

436-7178 



QuatHy Work 



Fr»« EillmalM 



PRIVATE CHARTERS 

C'uise Sightsee Whalewalch 

U S C G Lie 

Capt R F McDermott 

Reasonable rates day night 

843-B601 Eve 

!0 li 



ROBERT L. ELLIS 

Decks, Porches, Windows 

and Remodeling 

Free Estimates 

Licensed 331-9977 

9 17 



WE WANT YOUR RUBBISH 

Trees bushes |unK etc Wewant 
It all Well dean it all. the cellar, 
the garage the attic the yard 
Call (or a quick tree estimate 
337-8552 ■ 8 ?r 



K & A 
CONSTRUCTION 

Call and ask about 
excellent salary and 
benefits for a 580 Back Hoe 
Operator and a 855 Case 
Dozer Operator Some 
labor and travel required 

Call Jay 

1-285-9377 

After 6 

7 23 



'Setter 



Realty Management 

has rental listings 

Boston. Quincy A other 

South Shore locations 

(617)843-5242 

(800) 445-4427 



23 



GLASS & SCREEN REPAIR 

Wood & Porch Screens 

WOLLASTON GLASS CO 

9 Wollaston Ave . Wollaston 

Reasonable Rates 

Overnight Repair 

472-6207 9J0 

LAWNS MOWED 

Hedges Trimmed 

Reasonable Rates 

Call for Free Estimate 

479-1165 

' 23 



' A &T VACUUM 

• $1.4.95 Overhaul Special 

on any vacuum 

• ORECK XL VACUUM 

(as advertised by WBZ sDave 
Maynard on sale Now '249" ) 

Almost New Eiectroiux s 
Starting at »299* 



We now have a Large Selection 

of Video Movies 

99< Membership Fee 

$2 per Movie 



27 Beale St , Wollaston 
479-5066 



TF 



SERVICES 



BATHROOMS 

REMODELED 

also 

MINOR REPAIRS 

Ceramic Tile 

or 

Formica Enclosures 

One Price 

Reasonable Rates 

CALL 472-1310 

Free Estimates 



BOWES CUSTOM 
DECK & FENCE 

Free Estimates 
Call 698-2304 



JOE'S FLOORS 

Sanded & Refinished 
Best Quality and Prices 
PREE ESTIMATES 
254-7539 9 , 



TREE WORK 

Pruning removal brush 
chipping Free estimates Mike 
Sullivan. 472-3595 

9 .'J 



Your South Shora 
Haadquarlars 
For • 



Appliance 
Service 

ON ALL 
MAJOR 
APPLIANCES 



HANCOCK TIRE 

& APPLIANCE 

115 Franklin St . So Oumcy 

472-1710 

TF 





EXPERT 

LAMP REPAIR^ 
^t REWIRING t 



GRANITE 
LOCK CO. 

755 SOUTHERN ARTERY 
QUINCY TF 



SERVICES 



Larry's 
Home Repair 

• Carpenters 
• Painters 
• Decorators 
General Contractor 
2<^ Years Experience 
Licensed • Insured 
Intenor-Extenor Painting 
Scroll Ceiling 

All Home Repairs 
Small or Large 



4 



328-6735 



•SS-7471 

TF 



B & W 
RENOVATIONS 

Painting Interior, Exterior 

Remodeling 

335-2452 472-7276 

9 3 



Special Classified Ad Bonus 






CV^an/ie/ 



and Sun Cable Classified Ads 



MAIL TO: THE QUINCY SUN, 1372 Hancock St., Quincy, MA02169 
PAYABLE IN ADVANCE. Payment must accompany order. 




RATES 



QUINCY SUN 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $4 50 for one insertion, up to 20 words, IOC each additional word 

D With your Sun ad you can also run 20 times per day for 3 days on 
Channel 8-Sun Cable TV. for only $1 per day 



QUINCY SUN 
3 WEEKS 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $4 20 per insertion up to 20 words for 3-7 insertions, of the same 
ad. IOC each additional word 

D With your Sun ad, you can also run 20 times per day for 4 days on 
Channel 8-Sun Cable TV for only $1 per day 



INDEX 



a Services 

D For Sale 

D Autos 

a Boats 

a For Rent 

D Wanted 

D Help Wanted 

D Pels, Livestock 

D Lost and Found 

D Real Estate For Sale 

a Real Estate Wanted 

a Miscellaneous 

D Woiii Wanted 

D Antiques 

D Coins A Stamps 

D Rest Homes 

D Instruction 

U Day Care 

D Personal 

D Electrical & Appliances 

Cable Ads will be 
abbreviated if neccesary. 



QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 
8 WEEKS 



D $4 00 per insertion, up to 20 words for 8-12 insertions of same ad 
10C each additional word Channel 8 Cable for 5 days at $ 1 .00 per 
day 



QUINCY SUN 

13 WEEKS or more 

QUINCY SUN & 
SUN CABLE 
T.V. COMBO 



D $3 85 per insertion, up to 20 words fot 13 or more insertions of the 

same ad, IOC each additional word 
D With your Sun ad. you can also run 20 times a day for 7 days on 

Channel 8-Sun Cable T V for only $1 per day 



SUN CABLE 
T.V. ONLY 



D Run your ad on Channel 8-Sun Cable TV alone 20 times per day 
for 3 days at $2 per day. 



D Enclosed is $ 

in The Quincy Sun and 



.for the following ad to run _ 
days on Channel 8. 



.weeks 



COPY: 



NO REFUND WILL BE MADE AT THIS CONTRACT RATE IN THE EVENT OF CANCELLATION 
DEADLINE TUESDAY tOOO A M PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR PHONE NUMBER IN AD 



Page 21 Quincjf Sun Thunday, July U, 1917 




United Quincy Front 
To Fight Hub Incinerator 



TWIN BEARS were brousht lo a Tedd) Bears Picnic at the 
Montclair School by Kevin Walsh, left, and Brian Doyle from 
the Parker School District. 

((Juincy Sun photo hy Tom (,ormanl 

Political Advertisement Political Advertisement 



((imi'tl from Pagv li 

Mayor Flynn. 

Sen. Paul Harold said thai 
he met with Bulger Tuesday to 
ask him if Quincy is included 
in his recommendation of an 
incinerator site. 

"He wouldn't confirm or 
deny it." said Harold. "He 
stressed that his alternative 
was merely a suggestion 
which the Mayor of Boston 
could accept or reject. 

"He seemed to downplay 
his whole role 

"I told him there would be 
unified opposition to any 
incinerator plan in Quincy." 

Harold said that Bulger is 
"playing his cards close to the 
vest." 



"The only thing to do is 
oppose what we perceive to be 
a threat to the city, assume the 
worst and act accordingly," he 
said. 

Other comments by those 
who attended the hour long 
meeting are: 

Ron Zooleck. executive 
director. South Shore 
Chamber of Commerce: "The 
people at this meeting made a 
definitive statement that we're 
not going to be used as the 
dumping ground for Boston's 
trash, and uill fight that 
wholeheartedly at e\cry step " 

City Councillor Ihcodorc 
DeCristofaro: "We're all in 
accord, uc'rc all on top ol this 
thing, and I think that's the 



Political AdvefliSpmeiM 



"Every citizen of Quincy 

deserves the opportunity to obtain 

decent and affordable housing" 

— Joseph LaRala — 










Joe LaRaia has been voting for you for 20 years 
You can return the favor 

VOTE TO ELECT JOE LaRAIA 

THE DEMOCRAT 

MAYOR OF 
THE CITY OF QUINCY 

^amea f Eddy. Campaign Chairman 



only way wc can stop it. by 
staying together and working 
together." 

City Council president 
Stephen McCirath: "Any type 
of a plan to utili/e the 
shipyard will have to be 
approved by the Quincy City 
Council (which re/oncd the 
property Planned Unit 
Development) Needless to 
say. we will not be approving 
any kind of incinerator." 

City Councillor Thomas 
Nut ley: "We want to wail for a 
while to see what Buker is 
going to dt>. but we're going to 
cmphasi/e one thing - we do 
not want an incinerator in 
Quincy and we will not ha\e 
an incinerator in Quincy " 

Rep Robert Cerasoli: "I'll 
go out to the community lo 
get signatures on a petition 
opposing any type of 
industrial use at the shipyard, 
and try to implore people to 
have a mixed use concept at 
the shipyard, such as low rise 



ollice development, condo- 
minium development, hotel 
and commercial development, 
as opposed to any kind of 
industrial development " 

Public Works Commr. 
Paul Anderson: "I'm 
anticipating that the Mass. 
Water Resources Authority in 
the next week to 10 days will 
be announcing their 
candidate option sites for 
sludge disposal for the new 
Deer Island secondary plant 
as well as interim sludge 
disposal up until the new 
secondary plant is on line I've 
been concerned that the 
authority has indicated an 
intere. • in the shipyard I'm 
very concerned " 

Also attending the meeting 
were Rep Michael Morrissey. 
City Solicitor Joseph (.lay) 
MacRitchie. Kevin CostclU). 
South Shore Chamber ol 

Commerce. Rep Ihomas 
Brownell and his aide. I arry 
Chretien. 



100,000 Square Feet 
For Open Space 



lionl'tl from l'ai(r 1 1 

been the target for industrial 
use by many developers, 
including plans for a salvage 
yard and truck terminal Now 
this will never happen, 
according lo Sheets. 

The "92 Club" which is on 
the property will be preserved, 
refinished on the outside, and 



the club will be allowed to use 
their location, indefinitely 
and at no cost lo the club, 
added Sheets. 

( ouncillor Sheets said the 
plan will be finali/ed as soon 
as the Conservation 
Commission gives its 
approval 



Beaches Swimmable 



Water quality samples 
taken July 14, showed the 
city's 15 beaches lo be 
swimmable. according to the 

Quincy Health Department. 
The health department 
considers beach water 



Avalon Beach 
Mound Beach 
Broad y Beach 
Germantown Fire Station 
Rhoda Beach 
Edgewatcr Drive 
Parkhurst Street 
Post Island Road 
Chickatawbut Road 
Wolla&ton-Rice Road 
Wollaston-Sachem Street 
Wollaston-Channing Street 
Wollaston-Milton Street 
Nickerson Beach 
Orchard Beach 



samples of fecal colilorm 
counts of less than 200 
swimmable 

Counts of over 200 are 
unacceptable and unhealthy 
for swimming, according to 
the health department 

The results are: 

TOTAL FECAI. 

(OUI-ORMCOI.IFORM 



25 

110 

5 

20 
40 
35 

20 
10 
60 
80 
160 
90 
50 
15 



5 



5 

5 

5 









25 

45 

60 

50 



5 



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148 Washington St.. Quincy 

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69T?0 VW Aorixn^ 



Quincy Bay Ra 

50th Anniversary 
Special Section Pages 19-24 






vol . 19 No. 44 



ThurMlay. Jul) 30. 1987 




25$ 



>^^:^^^%^^>v^%^^%%^-^^^^^-^^^\-^^^^^\^^-%-^^^^^^^-^:^^^^^^^-^^^-^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




? 



RKADY KOk THK 50lh annual Quincy Bay Rare Wrrk, arr, from kfl Mirhrllr Tuth. 
19, Mitn Quincy Bay of I9M, Kcnee Vardaru, 21. Ihi« yrarS reiKnin^ que«n and Trkia 



Tanner. 21. Mk« Quinry Bay of I9II5. Race wcfk oprnrd Wrdnrwlay and confl 
thr«>ufh Sunday. 

(<,>iiiM«-« Nun I'hflo h\ i'harh* Flnfn) 



'/iis^x&^%x\\%\\\\\\\\\^u%\\.%^^^%sjSL^^ 



Paitr 2 Quinc) Sun Thur.da>. Jul> >0. 1417 




Shipyard Considered 
As Sewage Sludge Site 



TEN NEW FIREFIGHTERS were recenti) sworn in b) ( H) Clerk John Glllis during 
ceremonies in the Council Chambers at ( il) Hall. From left, are Robert S. Servaes, Edward W. 
Fenb), Peter J. Lindblom. Gerald J. McCourt. Robert A. (iilbod). Fire ( hief C arl Valenti, 
Gillis, Mayor Francis McCaulej. Paul A. Leonard. Stephen Walsh, Daniel T. DeC oste. Paul R. 
Griffith, and C,ut\ A. Smith. 

((Jiiinf\ Sun /»/i(»lu h\ < harirs I'lafinl 



The \acant. IKOacrc 
(Jcncral I)\nanms shipvard 
in QuincN in among mIcn m 
nine eommunitieN being 
considered tor the long-term 
disposal ol Boston area 
sewage sludge b\ the 
Massachusetts Water 
Resources Author its 

Melanie Ihomas said 
luesday the closed sard is 
being considered both as a 
transfer station and lor sludge 
composting and burning 

Mayor Irancis McC"aule\ 
said he will analyze the list ol 
sites and will be diiing "a lot ol 
work" looking at alternati\e 
sites. 



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Rte 6 A. Orleanb, MA 02633 
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take to fmd the 
right doctor? 

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Doctor Directory, 



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The QCH Doctor Directory can help you 
find your own personal physician. 

Eyerytxxly deserves a p)ersonal physician 
— a doctor you and your family know and 
trust for the l^est longterm medical care. 
The Doctor Directory can help you find one 

The Doctor Directory is a free physician 
referral service sponsored by Quincy City 
Hospital. When 
you call us, 
we'll help you 
choose phy- 
sicians who 
meet your 
needs best— 
a doctor in 




your neighborhood who specializes in the 
care you're looking for 

We give you a choice of more than 300 phy- 
sicians on the South Shore, in every major 
medical and surgical specialty, from family 
practitioners to vascular surgeons And we 
can even make an appointment for you 
over the phone, if you need one 

The Doctor 
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free Theres no 
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you never need 
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Call 786-0005 



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I he ma\(U said he wants to 
sec thf disposal site located 
outsule ol QiiitH\ 

Ahout the list ol sites under 
consideiation, MeCauiev said 
•Tm sine there smII be one or 
moie that would he better 
(than the shipsard) " 

Other sites being considered 
aie Waipole. Sttuighton. 
Ik-dl«)rd. Ashland. Maiden. 
I \nn, NK limingion. Deer 
Island and Spectacle Island in 
Boston Harbor 

Ihiee locations in Waipole 
are on the list ol options-two 
lor landlills and a third for 
incineratiiMi 

I he stale aulhoril\ now 
dumps ''(H).()(M) jiallons ol 
sludjie daiiv mlo Boston 
Harbor It is uiuki a tederal 
murl order li> Imd a more 



environmentalK s.iu- ijisp,, 
method 

I he authoril\ plans to • 
over sludge dispos.il t,, 
private compan\ liom Nw' 
IW.S and then siarl iis ,,>ai; 
long-term disposal pro^i.tn 

I he authoritv pKiniuil ■ 
announce the specilu 
options yesierdas (Wvitin 
da\ ) loi both h>ng-teim ,i ; 
inlcrim disposal \Kalp,iic 
town ollicials releaseil ilu 
ol commu nit les uinl. ; 
consideration lor ihi lotii: 
term disposal pn'^i.,- 
Mt»nday night 

After the authorii\ v;.r' 
presented the options \n ;• 
board, it will coniit 
stud>ing llu-m in detail 

Ihe board will pioh.' 
select one or mote m'.iv 
mid-l^^H. said 1 honias 



Finn Reriiperaling 

At Home* After 
Successful Surgery 



Police ( hid I tancis \ 
Jinn IS recuperating at home 
alter undergoing successlul 
surger> .luh 20 to clear 
passages in his carotid 
arteries 

I inn, M. w.is leleased Iroiii 
Massachusetts ( i e n e r a I 
Hospital in Boston liiU 2}. 



three da\s alter the sinj;i'. 
He IS expected to be oi/t ,i' 
least live weeks 

Captain Paul I' Nevi ■ 
scrxing as acting chiel ■ 
I inn's absence 

1 inn underwent miadti.; 
h\ p.iss heart sur gcr \ 
December \^S2 



DeCristofaro Opposes 
Clean Harbor Facility 



Ward 2 C ouncilU'r led 
DeC tistohuo has inloimed 
the Braintree C'i\ it Association 
ol his opposition to the 
granting ol a permanent 
license to operate the C lean 
Harbor 1 acilit> 

DeC ristolaro said in a letter 
to the association 

"Ihe storing and transpor- 
tation ol hazardous waste is 
entiieK obieclionable in an 



area thai is adjacent iii i 
resiliences and in an .iri.i • 
IS ahead) irnpac(e»l b\ , 
industrial lirms 

■ 1 he health and s.ikii ■ 
people should be the nii;;:*^ 
one concern Wc in the U.i .: 
I wo area o( (^uinc>. whu h i 
ad)acent to Braintree, sh.in 
\our concerns and h(»pe thi^ 
license will not be- granted 



Conditions Improve 
At Parking Areas 



conditions at the Kinnev 
Systems operated parking 
areas in C^uinc\ have 
improved, according to 
Mayor francis X McC auley 

McC'aulcy. who met 
recently with Bruce Young, 
regional supervisor for 
Kinney systems, said "things 
have improved and we will 
continue to monitor (the city- 
owned parking areas) very 



closely " 

McC auley said the nurnhci 
ol complaints have decreasnt 
and most ol the gralhti has 
been cleaned up 

"I hey (Kinney Sv stems i 
have been working very hard 
to improve this situation" 
McC'aulcy said 

Ihe mayor said complami^ 
still arise from unmanrmi 
booths, however. 





Quincy 

Pound 
Adoptables'^^"^ 



lab-mix. female. I year, all black, blue collar, 
brown bandana. 

Lab-mix. female. 9 months, light brown. Honda 
rabies tag. 

Collic-mix, small female, black and brown, ^ 
years. Sweet. 

Chow-mix. female, black/ brown. 3 years. 

Collie/Shepherd; Husky-mix. male, tan with 
black on face, red collar. 4 years. 

Retriever, black, male, brown leather collar. I 
year 

Collie, female, while and cream. 4 years. 

White shepherd, large, female. 2 years. 2 llc<« 
collars. 

Spaniel, male, black and white, black collar. 1'/.^ 
years. 

( onlacl Officer Phyllis Berlucchi at 77,V62'>7. 

Office iMiurs: daily 8:.V) •.m.-4:.^0 p.m. 

Kkcludini Sundays 



Thurvia), July M, I9fl7 Qulncy Sun Page J 



McCauley Calls On GD 

To Give Workers 
Tair Shot' At Buyout 



By ROBKRT BOSWORTH 

Mayor Francis McCauley 
said lucsday he hopes 
(icncral Dynamics, who has 
hired a real estate consulting 
firm to put togcthcra back-up 
plan to sell the vacant fore 
River Shipyard, will continue 
to give tiK- former shipyard 
workers buyout group a "fair 
shot" at buying the yard 

"I hope (ieneral Dynamics 
will gi\e every consideration 
to the employee bu\out bid." 
McCaulcv said 

last week, (ieneral 
Dynamics hired Security 
Pacific Adsisory Services o( 
New York lo draw up new 
marketing plans fur the 
vacant ISO-acre facility. 

McCaulev said he was 
contacted b> Jim Miller, 
executive vice president at 
General Dynamics, and told 
that the consultant was hired 
because present bidders, 
including former shipyard 
workers, arc having difficulty 
putting a financial package 
together. 

The other potential buyers 
arc Sid Grossman, former 
President of Grossman's Inc. 



and the (jenesis Group of 
Houston. 

"General Dynamics can't 
settle with any of these groups 
so they hired a consulting firm 
to look at a plan to possibly 
market the yard into smaller 
parcels and smaller purchases." 
McCauley said. 

McCauley added that GD 
is willing to continue to talk to 
the three shipyard bidders. 

Sen F'aul D. Harold (D- 
C^incy) said he is disappointed 
by the hiring of the consulting 
firm. 

Pointing oii» that the 
Hingham shipyard was sold 
piece by piece. Harold said "It 
was sold piecemeal, and as a 
result it is not being used at its 
highest and best use and 
hasn't been an attractive 
development for years. 

"The cut-up could 
minimi/e returns to the city, 
limit the number of jobs, and 
actually result in a conflicting 
use that in the total would not 
be acceptable to the 
community. 

Chris Shields, a spokesman 
for GD. said the company 
hired the New York based 



firm as a "supplementary 
service" to its ongoing 
negotiations with the present 
bidders who seek to buy the 
yard in its entirety. 

McCauley said if the yard is 
purchased by multiple 
groups, a recent re/oning of 
the shipyard from industrial 
to Planned Unit Development 
(PUD) insures the city from 
any unfavorable business or 
activity. 

"The shipyard land was 
re/oned to protect it from any 
adverse operations. Quincy 
has control over the long term 
use of the yard." McCauley 
said. 

McCauley added that any 
group that purchases the 
shipyard would need to 
acquire a special permit in 
order to do anything with the 
yard. The mayor said a permit 
would not be issued until a 
proposal is approved by the 
planning board and the city 
council and public hearings 
are conducted. 

McCauley also said he 
hopes the future of the 
shipyard, closed since last 
summer, will be resolved as 
soon as possible. 



3 Fire Dept. Promotions 



Mayor Francis McCauley 
announces three promotions 

within the Quincy hire 
Department. 

It. David C Usher of 42 
South Shore Dr.. Holbrook, 
will be promoted to captain. 
It Usher has been in the 
department since I9ft5. 

Clinton y. Iierney II of 5 



Willow St.. Quincy and 
Joseph S. Vcrlicco of 37 
Homer Rd., Quincy. will be 
promoted to lieutenants. Fire 
Fighters Tierney and Vcrlicco 
were both appointed to the 
Quincy Fire Department on 
May 2. 1970. 

The swearing-in of the 
officers will be Monday, Aug. 



3 at 10:30 a.m. in the mayor's 
office, third floor at City Hall. 

The promotions are due to 
the retirements of Capt. 
Theodore Kresslcr and Lt. 
Patrick J. McAutey. 

The effective date of these 
promotions will be Saturday. 
Aug. 8. 



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THE QUALITY CONSIGNMENT SHOP 



66 BILLINGS RD. N. QUINCY 328-1179 

,-»^. . The Slash is Back! 

nr Encore's 

Sensational, Sizzling, Summer 



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is now In progress 

Tickets marked with a red slash 

are fifty percent off 

our already ridiculously low 

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STORE HOURS 

TUES. THRU SAT. 

10:00 - 5:00 



CONSIGNMENT HOURS 
WED. AND SAT. 
10:00 - 2:00 a 




GOING OVER somt blue prints are members of a town planning department from Enfland 
who recently visited Quincy and Quincy planning department ofTicials. From left to right are 
Terry Brunt, general manager of Neighborhood Planning Service, Mayor Francis McCauley, 
Richard Groves, I'niveraity of Birmingham, Richard Meade, Quincy Planning Director, 
Michael Gibson, Town Planning Department head and Chris Wadhams, director of Shape 
Housing Association. 

tOuincy- Sun phoio by Charle» Flaggi 

Sheets Wants Stronger 
Law On Abandoned Cars 



Ward 4 Councillor James 
Sheets says he will ask the 
City Council to strengthen the 
law providing for handling 
abandoned motor vehicles. 

Abandoned cars are 
becoming a much greater 
problem in the city and the 
enforcement officer does not 
have the power and authority 
to deal with the growing 
problem, according to Sheets. 

He said the enforcement 



officer docs well with what 
law he has to work with, but 
circumstances have changed 
and the law must change. 

More and more vacant lots 
arc becoming dumping 
grounds for old cars, he said. 
Tltere are fewer and fewer 
salvage yards to take these 
cars, and when a salvage yard 
takes a car the owner is no 
longer paid anything for the 
car, and in return must pay to 



have the car towed to thejunk 
yard. Sheets said. 

"Heavy penalties must be 
levied against anyone who 
abandons a car in this city." 
Councillor Sheets said. 

He indicated he will work 
with the Police Department to 
draft an ordinance, as well as 
examine other policies in 
other cities and towns where 
al>andoned cars have been a 
problem. 



BUYERS 



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NOT ALL DAYBEDS ARE 
CREATED EQUAL! 



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• 33" DAYBEDS FOR THE 
BEST SEATING COMFORT - 

YOUR FEET WILL TOUCH THE FLOOR. 

• 39" DAYBEDS FOR THE 
BEST SLEEPING COMFORT. 

NOW SALE PRICED WITH SEALY MATTRESSES. 



• RANDOLFN 

Rte. 139atRt«.24 
0pp. Radio Sh«* 



• DEDNAM 

n»1nHrM».11 



Siesia 1987 



• QUINCY 

aosctxMist 



• HANOVER 

193 Columbia Rd. 

OiiMi.a3«Mi.1» 



N«>ttol 



^sTeep 



SHOPS 



' 1J»'. • ■•' ')l.'i.v' 



•.<u 



'LI. \ 



r»tt 4 Quinry Sun Thundiy, Jul> M. 19t7 



03r 



USPS 453-060 

Published weekly on Thursday by 

The Ouincy Sun Publishing Co . Inc 

137i Hancock SI , Quincy, Mass 02169 

Henry W Bosworth. Jr Publisher and Editor 

2S€ per copy. $11 00 per year by mail in Ouincy 
$12 00 per year by mail outside Oumcy $15 00 out of state 

Telephone 471-3100 471-3101 471-3102 
Second class postage paid at Boston. Mass 



Postmaster Send address change to 
The Ouincy Sun 1372 Hancock St Ouincy Mass 02169 

The Ouincy Sun attumat no tinancial respontitxlity lor 
typographical arron m adverliMmenl* but will reprint that 
part of an advartiaenient in which the typographical error 
occur* 



•A»»i' 



Water Meters 

To Test 
Quincy Bay 



The City of Quincy Sewer 
and Water Department has 
purchased three water testing 
meters that will be used to 
frequently examine Qumcy 
Bay's temperature, salinity 
and oxygen levels, according 
to Leo Kelly, chairman of the 
Citi/ens Advisory Committee 
for the EPA Study of Quincy 
Bay 

Kelly said the Boston 
Harbor Monitoring Program, 
who are under the auspices of 
the Massachusetts Audubon 
Society, will use the 
equipment to frequently test 
Quincy Bay. The equipment, 
purchased for $2,400. is a 
temperature and salinity 
meter, an oxygen dissolve 
meter and a secchi disc. 

Kelly stressed the import- 
ance of the meters since 
frequent and regular testing 
will provide more accurate 
readings. 

"This is a very necessary 
program because it's ongoing 
and allows continued testing," 
Kelly said. 

Kelly thanked Mayor 
Francis X. McCauley for his 
"quick response" on the 
matter. Kelly approached 



McCauley for the equipment 
funding after the Boston 
Harbor Monitoring Program 
appeared before a recent 
meeting of the Citizen's 
Advisory Committee. 

The first test was performed 
Tuesday at Squantum Yacht 
Club, said Kelly. Testing 
could be conducted as 
frequently as once a day, he 
added. 

Kelly said the Boston 
Harbor Monitoring Program 
will use the data collected and 
present it to the EPA as a 
history of the bay Kelly also 
said testing Mould help 
determine the effects of the 
Deer Island treatment plant 
once it opens 

Kelly said this area of 
testing ties in with his 
committee's examination of 
lead and metal contents of the 
bay and their effects on 
marine life. 

Presently, the Boston 
Harbor Monitoring Program 
tests and analyzes water near 
Quincy Bay, including 
Dorchester Bay. 

Kelly said he hopes the 
program will expand further 
into other communities. 




Foilowing is a list of new adult and children's 
b(H>ks which are now available at the Thomas Crane 
Public Library: 

Fiction: Don't Die On Me, Billie Jean, by Stanton 
Forbes, Doubleday & Co., 1987. Gabriel's Lament, by 
Paul Bailey, Viking, 1987. Gatsby's Vineyard, by A.E. 
Maxwell Doubleday, 1987. Under Contract, by Li/a 
Cody. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1987. Under The Lake, 
by Stuart Woods, Simon & Schuster, 1987. 

Non-Fiction: Behind The Front Page, by David S. 
Broder. Simon and Schuster, 1987. ♦071.3 BRO. CBS 
Murders, by Richard Hammer. Wm. Morrow & Co., 
1987. •364.1523 HAM. Fast Forward: Hollywood, the 
Japanese & the onslaught of the VCR, by James 
Lardener. W.W. Norton. 1987. •338.4 LAR. The 
Search For Extraterrestrial Intelligence: listening for 
life in the cosmos, by Thomas R. McDonough. John 
Wiley & Sons. 1987, •574.999 MI4. Star Crossed; a 
story of Robert Walker & Jennifer Jones, by Beverly 
Linct. G.FP. Putnam's Sons, 1987. •791.43 L64. The 
Ultimate Evil: an investigation into America's most 
dangerous Satanic Cult, by Maury Terry. Doubleday, 
1987. •364.1523 lER. Understanding Cancer, by John 
Uzio, M.D. Harper* Row, 1987. •616.994 LAS. 

Children's Books: Best Friends, by Steven Kellogg. 
Dial, 1986. JE Fiction Come A Stranger, by Cynthia 
Voight. Atheneum, 1986. J Fiction. Favorite Fairy 
Tales Told Around The World, by Virginia Haviland. 
Little, 1985 •J 398.21 HAV. World Of Squirrels, by 
Jennifer Coldrey. Gareth Stevens, Inc., 1986. •JE 
599 32 COL. 

•Dewey Decimal (location) number. 

Compiled by Catherine R. Duffck and Jane 
Gransirom. 




Sunbeams 

By Henry Bosworth 



Wilhelmina: A Landmark 




There are really two landmarks at \}5 Adams St.. 

Quincv. 

One is the Adams National Historic Site -- the Adams 
Mansion - which served as the summer White House to 
Presidents John Adams and John Quincy Adams and 
was home to four generations of the illustrious Adams 

family. . 

The other is Wilhelmina Sellers Harris whose 

association with the house and the 

Adams family goes back 67 years and 

includes 37 years as superintendent 

of the historic site. 

She first went to the Old House - 
as it was affectionately known by the _ 
family - in 1920 to become Brooks ^n hki.mINA 
Adams' private secretary. The last 
member of the family to live there, he died in 1927. 

After his death, she left, marned Colonel Frank 
Harris and became the mother of three sons. 

After the house became a National Historic Site m 
1946, she returned and became its superintendent, the 
first woman ever to become a superintendent for the 
National Park Service. 

Now 91, she will soon be leaving the house she has 
loved all these years. She is retiring 

A reception and open house for her and her 
successor, Mananne Peak of Hingham. who has been 
deputy superintendent since 1982, will be held I uesday. 
Aug. 4 from 5 to 7 p.m. 

Wilhelmina hasgivenlovingcaretotheold house and 
has kept it in a "lived in appearance." 

As you walk through the beautiful rooms you get the 
feeling that John and Abigail are out fora walk and will 
be right back. 

You find yourself waiting for them to return 

Those who really know her. will always feel that way 
about Wilhelmina. 



IN HIS ANNOUNCEMENT that he will seek re- 
election as Ward I City Councillor. Michael Cheney left 
the door open for a possible run lor 
the state representative seat I humas 
Brownell is vacating to accept a 
Plymouth District Court judgeship 
But close obscivers don't think 
Cheney will make that run if a special 
election is called for January or 
February. It would be too close to 
this year's Quincy municipal election. If no special 
election is called, he might give consideration to 
running in next year's regular state election 
But he may pass it up then. 
Observers think he and former 
Ward I Councillor Leo Kelly who 
has already said he will run for 
the Brownell scat, would get into a 
bloody and costly battle if both ran 
They wouia split up that important ^^^*^ l^i 
Houghs Neck vote that usually Slicks HBL ^ i^ 
together. That would help another KKI.I.Y 

candidate from another area -- say Wollaston -- walk off 
with the prize. 




EN FY 




LAUGH TIME 




V^^^ 

"r'^''^ 




h^JY:: 




/^"^JLeA^ .. 



"I think thii is going to be one of the more inlerest- 
ing nighU around here." 



D 

MIC HAM CONDON officially kicks oil hi 
campaign lor City Councillor at-largc \nu\^h 
(Ihursday) at a fundraiser at 
Amelia's. Marina Bay. Squantum 
Irom 6 to 9 p m I ickcts arc $10 and 
may be obtained at the door or by 
calling 770-3566 or 741-8544 

Condon, incidentally, has been out 
kniKking on doors and doing the 
sign patrol on Neponsci Bridge 




D 



YOU 



CONDON 

. candidate lor 




MIGHT SAY that Tim Cahil 

Cit> Councillor at-largc. has addiij .i 
touch of art to political campaigning 
His sister-in-law, artist (iuiliana 
Franccsca. is holding an art shou 
and reception tonight (Ihursda\i 
from 7 to 10.30 pm at lim\ 
Wevmouth Handshakes Cak 
( .\llll I Stetson Place. Rie IK. South 

Weymouth 

(iuiliana. a Quincs resident, will be selling some oi 
her paintings with a portion of each sale goin^; to 
Cahill's campaign fund Plus the proceeds from ralllini; 
ofl one ()( the paintings 

D 
ENIRAN( F OF I om McDonald into the Wan) * 
City Council field will liven up an alr eady IivcIn ra.c 

McDonald, former state 
commander of the Veterans of 
foreign Wars is a QuincN native and 
lives on Vershirc St North Quintv 
He has been active in the Bryan VF W 
Post of which he IS a past commander 
and in worthy causes such as the 
Muscular Dystrophy Association McDDNM I) 

He makes the fourth contender lor the scat hi t:^ 
vacated hy John I ydon who is retiring ! he other ihtcc 
Larry Chretien, aide to Rep I homas Brov^rull 
Howard MacKay who made an impressive nin i^vo 
years ago and William Reardon 

McDonald. MacKas and Reardon are all praciuiii^ 
Montclair neighbors. 



eady livcl> rai.c 




D 

WF WISH Phil Dine good luck and success i^ he 
leaves the Patriot I cdgcr to join the 
St Louis Post-Dispatch 

Although we haven't always 
agreed with one an«)ther we have 
found Phil to be a good compctntir 
and a good news digger. 

Fverytime they call a I uesday I 
p.m. press conference at City Hall, 
we'll think of you. Phil. 



Q 



DIM 



Harbor Monitoring 
Program Expanded 



I he Ho si on Ha rhor 
Moniloiing Program expand 
t<l to Quinev Ba> I uesday 
with a ceremony al the 
Squantum Yacht ( luh on 

u I n e \ S li o r e Drive. 
Wollasion 

Started lasl (Ktoher in 
Dorthesler Hay. the Hoslon 
Harhor Monitoring Program 
IS an ellorl to bolster the cause 
lor the Hoslon Harhor clean- 
up filling an important 
inlormalion gap, the 
Monitoring Program is 
designed to 

• collect data about the 
condition ol Hoslon Harbor, 

• involve volunteers in a 
lormal scientific pr<tgram and 
improve their understanding 

01 the slate of the harbor. 

• present data and regular 
status reports and cm the stale 
"( ihe harbor to the public and 
•<> key agencies, including to 
• he I nvironmental I'rolection 
Agency who is presently 
c«»nducting a Quincy Hay 
marine life study 



Participaling m '''^ 
ceremony were Dr (m.ml \ 
Herlrand, president ol ihc 
Massachusetts Aialnhon 
Society, and Mavor I m^^;^ 

Mc( aulev 

Directed by Mass.uhuHii^ 
Audubon StKielv siuniis! 
I homas Hruby. voluni<nv 
Irom Quincy Icsieif llu ^^•''" 
lor turbidity and diss< ^^'' 
oxygen from the dock 

Ihc Hoslon H.nh.r 
Monitoring Prt)gra(n i^ •' 
collaborative effort coming n 'I 
by Massachusetts Aii.inhon 
Society, the I iieiuls ol il'^ 
Hoslon Haibor hl."'"'- 
Massachusclls liay ^^""'^ 
Studies ( onsortiuni. "^'^ 
I ngland Aquarium, N'>"'' 
eastern Dniversily. Save the 
Harbof/SavelheHav.ii'i.lilH 
Hoslon Harbor AssocmH^ 
I he program aims to irKfe.isi 
public awareness ol »i."f"" 
issues, improve scienn'i' 
understanding, and a«lv'>-^ 
harhor decision makers 



Thur(d«>. July 3«. I9t7 Quinc) Sun Pagf 5 



Awards Presented 



Children's Garden Park Opens ^"'"Cy's 



At Lincoln Hancock School 



A crowd of 200 adults and 
children gathered recently on 
the grounds of the Lincoln- 
Hancock Community School 
for the opening ceremonies of 
the Children's (iarden Park, a 
new playground geared for 
children from pre-school to 
eight years of age. 

Participating in the ribbon 
cutting and awards ceremony 
were Mayor Francis 
McCauley, Councillor 
Patricia Toland. Lincoln- 
Hancock Community School 
Assistant Principal Dorothy 
(ireene. and South West 
Community Relations 
Committee Co-Chairperson. 
Diana Kinch. Their speeches 
stressed the importance of 
community involvement and 
cooperation 

A number of awards were 
presented by the mayor at the 
grand opening. 

Sculptor Edward Monti 
received a plaque from the 
South West Community 
Relations C ommittec for his 
donation of a granite turtle to 
the playground. He also 
received a citation Irom the 
children of Qumcy for his 
work 

lot-l ot Committee 
members received certificates 
of appreciation for their work 
over the past year. 

Committee members are: 
Donna Ackerman. Frncst 
Aristidc. Jcnnv Baker. Dcbra 
Beach. Ciwendolyn Caldwell. 
Diana Kinch. Margaret 
Orlando, Cindy Silveira. 
Neighborhood Services 
Coordinalrtt for Quincy 
Neighborhood Housing 
Services, Albert V-aughn. Jan 
Tucker. Julie Cantclli. and 
Arthur I ucker. 

I he playground is complete 




RIBBON (I TUNG ( KRKMONIKS were held recently for the Children's Garden Park at the 
Lincoln Hancock Communit) School. From left, are Dorothy (ireene. vice principal; Mayor 
FrancK \1c( auley. ( ouncillor Patricia Toland and Diana Kinch. 

i(^)iiiiii\ >iiii fihiitti In ( harlf% h'lagul 



with tunnels, swings, 
playhouse, suspended 
bridges, wooden vehicle, and 
bright colored steering 
wheels it is the result of a 
year-long cooperative effort 
between the city of Quincy, 
including the City Council. 
Planning Department. Parks 
and Recreation Department. 
Police Department. School 
Committee and the South 
West Community Relations 
Committee and the Lincoln- 
Hancock Commumly School 

School principal, Dennis 
Carini was instrumental in 
involving the Lincoln- 
Hancock Parent Icachers 
Organization and Mothers 



Club. 

The project was funded by a 
community development 
block grant and given support 
by Ward 4 Councillor James 
Sheets. 

Richard Koch, executive 
director of the Park. Forestry 
and Cemetery Departments, 
volunteered an installation 
crew headed by Paul 
Zambruno. Flowers for the 
park were donated bv 
Almquist Flowerland and 
planted bv Lincoln-Hancock 
fifth grade teacher St.'ve 
Cantelli 

Ihc name of the playground. 
"I he Children's Garden 
Park," was chosen bv the fot- 



Lot Committee from a 
number of entries. Each 
classroom submitted a 
prospective name to be 
considered. 

Along with vandalism 
prevention seminars conducted 
by Quincy Police Officer 
Robert Hanna for members 
of the South West Community 
Relations Committee. "Park 
Pride" seminars were held for 
the school's children by their 
teachers to encourage each 
child to take care of their new 
plav ground for the benefit of 
ail. 

Park Pride "Private Eye" 
buttons and identification 
cards were handed out to the 
children. 



Quincy Quarries Program Saturday 



Ihc Q u 1 lu \ Q u .1 rri c s 
Historic Sue will present a 
one diiv program entitled 

"I roMi Quarrv lo Ion" 
Salurdiiv. Aug I 

Ihc two pari program 
starts at Qiiincv Quarries 
Hisione Sue wiih a I ' < hour 
hike alonj: the Quariics 
Footpath \ IS ii I ng the 
hislorieal aiul archaeological 
Icalures ol the area. The lour 
(hen shifts to Cisile Island in 



lVIirha<*l Moriarly 

Rereives .Army 

Achic'vemenl 

Award 

Spec 4 Michael D 
MoriarlN. son of. lean DiBona 
t)f 57 Cummings Ave. and 
Michael M o r i a r t y of 
Merry m»)unl Rd., both ol 
Quincy. has been dec«>raled 
with the Army Achievement 
Medal in West (iermany. 

I he Achievement Medal is 
awarded lo soldiers lor 
meritorious service, ads ol 
courage, or other accomplish- 
menls. 

Moriarly is a missile crew 
member with Ihe 5Mlh Air 
Delense Arlillery. 

He IS a l')K4 graduate of 
Nt)rlh Quincy High School, 
Quincy. 



St)uth Boston U) e\aminc ihe 
Quincy Granite structure lt)rt 
Independence Parlicipanis 



nia> join in cither or boih 
sections of the tour. Bring a 
lunch and siiirdv shoes. Pre- 



regisiialion is required. C.ill 
S2S-')|46 or ^9S-IS02 lor 
liirther information. 



SOUTH SHORE TILE 



'^ 



A'^ 



\ 



y^ 



DISTRIBUTORS, INC. 



338 Washington 



QUINCY 471-3210 



HOURS: 7 to 5 Mon., Tues.. FrI. Wed. & Thurs. Ml 8 pm 



s^.? 




Will Be Closed Saturdays 
During July and August. 

Newscarriers may pay their bills 
Mondays through Fridays. 



43 Years .\go 



Yesterdays 

Youngsters 
Convince Mayor 

Of Need For 
New Playground 

Mayor Charles A. Ross announced plans to convert 
five acres of city-owned land off Sea and Palmer Sts. 
into a new playground 3 nd l^g^^^H^BBm 
baseball field. 

The Mayor's disclosure came Julv 29-Aug 4, 
after a meeting with four 
youngsters from Germantown 
and Adams Shore, who 
con\inced him of the 
difficulties arising out of' 
sharing their pasture ball field with a herd of cows. 

The bovs were Bill Bieakley. 14. of 5 Norfolk Ave ; 
William Wareham. 1 3. of 104 Palmer St.; Joe DeGuste. 
15. of 30 BroadvSt.;and Bill Leaman. 15. of 13 Chesley 
Rd. 

QIINCY-ISMS 

William G. McDermott. 53. of 609 Willard St.. West 
Quincy. a delegate of the Independent I'nion of Fore 
River Workers, died at his summer home in Nantasket 
... A storm of protest erupted when Ralph W . Lowd. 
director of the MDC. ordered the Nut Island pier in 
Houghs Neck closed to fishing on grounds it was unsafe 
... Pvt. Donald M. Murray. 19. of 11 Chester St.. 
WoUaston. won his wings as a paratrooper at Camp 
Forrest. Tenn ... The Quincy Theater featured "Andy 
Hardy's Blonde Trouble." starring Mickey Rooney. 
Lewis Stone and Bonita Granville ... School Committee 
man L. Paul Marini narrowly escaped injury when he 
was struck by lightning while digging clams on 
Kingston Beach. . . Seaman 1 c Edward .\ DiBona of 
226 Libert St.. South Quincy. was home on leave from 
England after making six crossings of the .Atlantic in 18 
months ... The Quincy XJranite Manufacturers 

Association's 65th annual picnic was delayed when 
thick fog forced their boat back to Boston and they had 
to travel to Nantasket Beach by car ... Quincy Market. 
18 Chestnut St.. had assorted cold cuts for 29 cents a 
pound and fresh baked rolls at 15 cents a dozen ... Mr. 
and Mrs. Andrew K. Nikula of 95 Town Hill St.. West 
Quincy. were notified that their son. Pvt. Edwin K. 
Nikula. was killed in action in France ... The 
Germantown Garden Club held a picnic at the home of 

Mrs. Robert Justis. 65 Shelton Rd.. and \oted not to 
have a flower show in the fall ... Dick Donovan tossed a 
two-hitter as Sacred Heart of North Quincy snapped 
Quincy Comets' 12 game unbeaten string with a 3-2 
victory in Park League action at Kincaide Park ... 
T, Sgt. Domenic A. Speran/o of 106 Liberty St.. South 
Quincy. was awarded an .Air Medal for meritorious 
action during the D-Day invasion of Normandy ... A 
full course Sunday turkey dinner went forSl .50 at The 
Rendezvous. 853 Hancixk St.. opposite Mcrr\mount 
Park ... General Chairman W alter Schmit/ said Qumcy 

went over the top in the Fifth War Loan Drive, 
exceeding its quota of $10,225,000 by more than 23 
percent ... S Sgt. .lohn F. MacLeod of 102 Upland Rd . 
Quincy. was safe after his B-17 fought off eight 
Messerschmitts and crash landed on the Normand> 
Beachhead while returning from a bombing mission 
over Germany ... Granite Chevrolet Co.. 290 
Washington St.. Quincy Point, was .so desperate for 

used cars that it advertised: "Right now transportation 
is very essential. If you have a car and you do not have 
any essential use for it at the present time, we will pay 
ceiling price for it" ... Cpl. Barbara Cushman of 270 

Beach St.. Wollaston reported tor duty with Ihe First 
Iroop Carrier (Glider) Command at Laurinburg Air 
Base. Maxton. N.C. ... The Peanut Store. 1442 
HanciKk St. ("Look for the Strung Peanut Display") 
had fresh roasted peanuts in shell at three pounds for 75 
cents and mixed nulsat 89 centsa pound ... Pfc.Iohn.A. 

Garland. 22, of28CarlsonSi.. Quincy. was hospitalized 
in Italy with wounds suffered in the Battle of Cassino 
1 he Quincy Red Cross issued V-mail certificates to all 
bloiuJ donors, who could then send them to a 
serviceman overseas to show they had donated ... I op 
or bottom round steak was going for 33 cents a pt»und. 
plus 15 red points, at hoy's Markets, 1 177 Hancivk St.. 
Quincy, and Franklin and Water Sts., South Quincy. 



N|e * TiiWcylfin 'tUuM.y. July M. m? 




MAUREEN McTORD 

Maureen McCord 
Engaged To Russell Osgood 



Mr. and Mrs. Webster 
McCord of Hull, formerly of 
Quincy. announce the 
engagement of their daughter 
M aureen McCord of 
Weymouth to Russell 
Osgood, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Lauren Osgood of Weymouth 

Miss McCord is a graduate 



of Quincy High School and is 
employed by Boston 
Financial Data Service. 

M r. Osgood is a graduate of 
Weymouth Vocational High 
School and is employed by 
Midas Muffler Shops. 

A September wedding is 
being planned 



Linda Flaherty Graduates 
From Newman Prep. 



Linda J Flaherty, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs. Joseph 
Flaherty. 41 Sheldon Rd.. 
Quincy. was recently awarded 
the high school diploma ol 
Newman Preparatory School 
in Boston 

Miss Flaherty, a member of 
the school's chcerleadmg 
squad, was presented her 
diploma by Congressman 
Joseph Moakley. a 
Newman Prep School 
alumnus and guest speaker at 
the school's 42nd commence- 
ment exercises 




LINDA J. FLAHERTY 



Mr., Mrs. Ronald Tremblay 
Parents Of Daughter 



Mr. and Mrs Ronald S. 
Tremblay of Lynn are parents 
of a daughter, Christine Lyon 
Tremblay. born July 18 at 
Atlantic Medical Center 

Grandparents are Mr and 



Mrs. John MacKinnon of 
Quincy and Mrs Sylvia 
Tremblay of Lynn. 

Great-grandparents are 
Susan E. Hughes of Quincy 
and Mr. and Mrs George 
Provcnchcr of Salem 



^ *^ouck (Jf "^la^ 




^Ifii^ie ^fxi^etla^ \ 




Senior 

Citizens 

Discnuni 




28 Gf*«fl>wood Ave 
WollMton 




Cloft«d Mondayt 

Open Tuesday thru Saturday 

10 AM - S 30 P M 

Op«n Thu't •••» III I }0 



773-5266 



VKA 

"•mm 




MARRIED 50U AKS" Mr. and Mrs. Rostrio Tenorr of 
Quino recenll> celebrated their 50th weddln|«nniverMr> 
with a Mass at St. Joseph's ( hurch, followed b> a 
reception at Knights of ( olumbus Hall. Holbrook. 

Mr., Mrs. Rosario Tenore 
Celebrate 50th Anniversary 



Mr. and Mrs. Rosano 
Tenore of Quincy recently 
celebrated their 50th 
wedding anniversary with 
a Mass at St. Joseph's 
Church. Quincy Point 

A reception, attended b> 
their children and 2{K) 
guests, followed at Knights 
of Columbus Hall, 
Holbrook. 

Ihe couple arrived at St 
Joseph's Church in a 
chauffeur-driven limousine 

The Re\ Robert 
f-cchtner celebrated ihc 
Mass in which the Icnores 
renewed their wedding 
vows and received a papal 
blessing. 

After the ccremon\. 
there was a balloon launch 



on the church steps 

Ihe lenores were 
married (Xt II. 19.^6 in 
St Francis of Assim 
Church, South Braintree 

Mrs lenorc is the 
ft)rmer .Anna Venuli ol 
South Braintree She is a 
retired emploscc ol Sigma 
Instruments, Braintree 

Mr lenore, lormerls ol 
QuincN and Holbrook, 
was a conslruclion worker 

Ihe> ha\e two children. 
Josephine Mc(iaughc\ ol 
flol brook and John 
lenore ol South We\- 
mouth. and 10 grandchil- 
dren 

Ihc lenores were also 
the parents of the lale 
Joseph lenore 



Linda Marinilli 
Receives Degree At MIT 

Linda ( Marinilli ol 
Hudson St , Quincy recent 1\ 
was graduated from the 
Massachusetts Institute of 
technology with a bachelor's 
degree in chemical engineering 

Miss Marinilli hopes to 
receive her master's degree in 
chemical eneineerinK practice 
in January of I9KK 

She has accepted a position 
in the Central Research 
Facilities of the General 
Foods Corporation in 
Tarrytown, N.Y. 

Miss Marinilli is the ^^^^ ^^ 
daughter of Mr and Mrs ^"^^ ^^» ^ j 
Ijno Marinilli LINDA C. MARINII II 




"I wish 

rd known that 

before" 

We hear people we serve say this often. 

That's why we extend an open invitation to 
anyone